Podcasts about christmastime

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    Best podcasts about christmastime

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    Latest podcast episodes about christmastime

    Courier Mail - News Feed
    Cost Of Living Will Reach Higher Than Expected Peak 29/07/2022

    Courier Mail - News Feed

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 3:46


    THE cost of living crunch impacting Australian households will hit a higher than expected peak at Christmastime, with the pain not expected to ease fully until mid-2024 Treasurer Jim Chalmers has revealed. A workforce shortage has gripped the Sunshine State on the back of the Omicron and influenza waves, forcing companies to go to desperate lengths to attract staff. A SENIOR education department bureaucrat who was suspended following a corruption probe which led to former Deputy Premier Jackie Trad quitting was paid more than $630,000 while stood aside. BILLIONS of dollars of housing projects in Queensland have been either stalled or mothballed as skyrocketing costs send the sector spiralling deeper into crisis. For updates and breaking news throughout the day, take out a subscription at couriermail.com.au.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Christmas Creeps
    Episode 133: Money Train

    Christmas Creeps

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 63:49


    Happy Christmas in July! On this episode, we're still knee deep in summer action season as we take a look at the Wesley Snipes/Woody Harrelson buddy cop flick Money Train! They're two cops who also happen to be brothers, or is it two brothers who also happen to be cops? Either way, it's Christmastime in the Big Apple and Charlie owes a large gambling debt to a local mobster. What's a transit cop in need of cash to do? Why rob the money train, of course! Questions/Comments? Email us at XmasCreeps@gmail.comTweet us @ChristmasCreepsVisit us on the web at ChristmasCreeps.com! Join us on our Discord channel! Intro: "The Loco-Motion" (Grand Funk) Outro: Happy Christmas, You Guys! (Simon Panrucker) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

    L is for Losers Preview
    Preview 07-22-2022

    L is for Losers Preview

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 38:18


    Welcome to a preview of L is for Losers where we dive in deep on all the latest in pop culture + reality tv. For full episodes of L is for Losers go to Patreon.com/LisforLosers. L is for Losers: Pause for Possums News (6:15): Welcome Mrs. Jennifer Affleck to the chat, everyone! We've also got Tristan hand-holding in Greece, Chelsea Handler and Jo Koy splitting, Kylie as a climate supervillain and lots more!  Real Housewives of Atlanta (53:00): The ladies take a trip Marlo's put together to the Blue Ridge Mountains. Kenya arrives late to make an entrance and immediately gets into it with Marlo! Real Housewives of Beverly Hills (1:14:50): It's Christmastime in Bev Hills and we're getting to see all the festivity, including Kathy's Xmas trees in every room! Also, a potato absolutely FILLED with caviar? Okay!  - Below Deck Med (1:47:05): After recovering from the stabilizers scare, the crew has a lovely time with the charter and we finally learn the juicy backstory on Natasha and Dave!  - Southern Charm (1:58:25): An outdoor tea party gets tense between Kathryn and Venita and we start to see the beginning of the end for Shep and Taylor.  xoxo, Marcy & Jess!

    Village Pres Sermons
    Embodied - Rev. Hallie Hottle

    Village Pres Sermons

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 20:08


    “The Word became flesh.” We usually read this passage at Christmastime, but it has a different meaning outside the context of incarnation. Rev. Hallie Hottle preaches about the holiness of living in physical bodies in a physical world. Our scripture reading is John 1:14-16.  Support the show

    Wilson County News
    Poth EDC considers Christmas on the Plaza, more

    Wilson County News

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 3:09


    Outside the temperatures sizzled, but inside Poth City Hall, visions of Christmastime filled the air. The Poth Economic Development Corp. met July 11 to discuss, among other things, the city's Christmas on the Plaza celebration. “I'd kind of like to revert to the 1990s,” said board member Marie Orth, outlining ideas for photos with Santa, vendors or a market days event, and a dance, perhaps. Board President Steven Wiatrek suggested inviting donations of food and toys for the Poth Food Pantry in conjunction with the event, tentatively discussed for Dec. 10. The matter was tabled, pending further discussion at the...Article Link

    Arms Room Radio
    ArmsRoomRadio 12.18.21 It's almost Christmas time!

    Arms Room Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 102:12


    Join the show this week as they sit one week out from Christmas. They discuss holiday travel for both work and leisure. They talk about a California Sheriff losing her job. A judge in Nevada has something to say about the State's new Ghost gun laws. The guys talk about the new British SAS firearm and of course, last minute Christmas gifts for that special someone.

    The Christ and Pop Culture Podcast Network
    Seeing and Believing 342 | RRR & Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

    The Christ and Pop Culture Podcast Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 70:59


    Kevin and Sarah take on a pair of buddy movies this week. First up: the Tollywood smash hit RRR, which features a friendship for the ages at the center of India's fight for independence. Then they discuss Shane Black's 2005 movie Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, a black comedy noir set at Christmastime in L.A. Along the way, Kevin and Sarah ask themselves: which one of the hosts is the straight man, and which one's the loose cannon? Follow us on Twitter @SeeBelievePOD Support the Seeing & Believing Patreon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Seeing and Believing with Wade Bearden & Kevin McLenithan
    Episode 342 | RRR & Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

    Seeing and Believing with Wade Bearden & Kevin McLenithan

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 70:59


    Kevin and Sarah take on a pair of buddy movies this week. First up: the Tollywood smash hit RRR, which features a friendship for the ages at the center of India's fight for independence. Then they discuss Shane Black's 2005 movie Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, a black comedy noir set at Christmastime in L.A. Along the way, Kevin and Sarah ask themselves: which one of the hosts is the straight man, and which one's the loose cannon? Follow us on Twitter @SeeBelievePOD Support the Seeing & Believing Patreon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    PT Profit Podcast
    Tik Tok Growth with Rachel Pedersen

    PT Profit Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 27:37


    This episode is packed with value! The "Queen of Social Media" joins us to talk all about TikTok, making content for multiple platforms, showing up authentically and creating a hook in your content that gets people to engage with you.We went over SO much and we actually have a fun additional resource for you. Rachel mentioned 10 Hooks for TikTok in the episode any you can get the resource right here!If you are struggling to create content or hesitant to get started on TikTok, this episode is for you.Don't forget to leave us a review on Apple Podcasts.About Today's Guest  Rachel Pedersen is a Social Media and Digital Marketing Strategist who partners with entrepreneurs to create disruptive, creative campaigns that generate exponential returns.Rachel overcame the statistical odds as a college dropout, alcoholic, and single mother in poverty and has dedicated herself to creating life-changing business growth that emulates the radical change in her personal life.Rachel helps business owners break through the ‘glass ceiling’ of opportunity. Her campaigns bring results that change the narrative, such as achieving 7134% growth for an organic skincare company, generating $3 million in one year for a fitness company, and reaching over 12 million people for a coach.Rachel’s passion for helping others change their life stories is apparent in the energy and wisdom she brings as the founder of Social Media United, the leading online education platform for social media managers. With more than 1100 students from 70+ countries worldwide, Pedersen’s platform supports and trains students - predominantly stay at home parents, single moms, and college dropouts - how to develop and leverage their skills to become successful social media managers.Rachel regularly impacts the world around her by raising support for 90+ single mothers and their children with food and gifts at Christmastime.Rachel also raised funds to bring water and light to those affected by Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and supports Operation Underground Railroad, a non-profit dedicated to rescuing children from sex slavery.Pedersen has landed global coverage in print and digital outlets, including the Today Show, Cosmopolitan, The Daily Mail, The Huffington Post, Funnel Magazine, and Content Marketing Institute.She is a proud wife and loving mother to three children.https://rachelpedersen.com/https://www.instagram.com/themrspedersen/https://www.facebook.com/the.mrs.pedersen/https://www.facebook.com/the.mrs.pedersen/Join the Facebook community!Are you a new fitness entrepreneur looking to attract clients? Maybe you're looking to dial in your messaging? Or perhaps you're experienced and looking to scale your business?Head on over to Facebook, and request access to my Online Marketing for Fitness Professionals group. Post an introduction about yourself, ask some questions, or let us celebrate your wins with you.BSimpsonFitnessLinks & Coaching Opportunities Beverley Simpson's PT Profit Formula & PT Profit Accelerator- PT Profit Formula is a 12-week step-by-step community coaching program utilizing a proven process to help you build an effective, repeatable system that consistently generates leads and customers inside your fitness business so that you can fill your client schedule and sell out your products.- If you're ready to take the next step, then PT Profit Accelerator is the program for you! Accelerator is 12-month coaching mastermind intensive designed for high performing health and wellness professionals who are ready to scale to multiple six figures without working harder. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit beverleysimpson.substack.com

    Good Mornings Podcast Edition
    Friday, July 8, 2022

    Good Mornings Podcast Edition

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 61:43


    If men are from Mars and women are from Venus, no wonder we don't speak the same language... How to make sense of the way the other half communicates with the author of ''Sex Talk'' (at 16:05) --- A milestone for canine enthusiasts as the American Kennel Club has officially added its 200th recognized breed of dog... Meet the Bracco Italiano (at 28:07) --- Happening This Weekend: The 7th annual 'Ride to Remember' will be touring much of the area to benefit the Wreaths Across America at Christmastime (at 34:12) --- Another collection of tasty, easy-to-make recipes from Kyra's Kitchen (at 51:16)

    Christmas Movies Actually
    Episode 63: Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (feat. Morgan Gire)

    Christmas Movies Actually

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 106:21


    Morgan Gire of The Friendship Dilemma joins Collin and Kerry to talk about her favorite film of all time, "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang." Could this movie have happened with Downey/Kilmer in the mid-'90s? Is there a reason Shane Black's movies often take place at Christmastime? How does some of the humor in the film hold up today? All this, plus the "We Just Say Book" segment and the Blu-ray Gift Exhange. Book: "A Trip To the Moon" (1902), "Goldfinger" (1964), "Top Gun" (1986) Blu-rays: "Boomerang" (Paramount), "Strawberry Mansion" (Music Box Films), "For Me and My Gal", "Ziegfeld Girl" and "The Clock" (Warner Archive)

    Twisted Listers
    Sins of Sin City: Las Vegas Murders Part 2

    Twisted Listers

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 75:44


    We're back, twisted listeners, and we're celebrating by taking a trip to Sin City to cover 10 of its most scandalous murders! Featuring a Christmastime surprise in a truck bed, more than one murder involving body builders, a wrongful conviction, and a very confusing love triangle. Some of these cases are salacious, gruesome, and others are downright Floridian - so buckle up for a wild ride through the more sinful happenings in recent Sin City history! When venturing to Vegas, stay safe and please stay off our lists!Check out our website! www.twistedlisterpod.comBrought to you by Podmoth Media Network podmoth.networkJoin us on Patreon: www.patreon.com/twistedlistersFollow us on Instagram: @twistedlisterspcastTiktok: @twistedlistersWant to start a podcast? Sign up HERE Cases Covered:1. Brookey Lee West2. Craig Titus, Kelly Ryan, and Melissa James3. The Las Vegas Hilton Burning4. Ted Binion5. Tzatzi Sanchez Sources:https://www.distractify.com/p/what-happened-to-ted-binionhttps://pvtimes.com/news/nbc-exhumes-ted-binion-case-on-dateline-episode-107896/https://www.sportscasting.com/former-pro-bodybuilder-craig-titus-brutally-murdered-his-personal-assistant-and-burned-her-body-with-his-wifes-help/https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/bodybuilders-kelly-ryan-and-craig-titus-taser-assistant-torch-bodyhttps://thecinemaholic.com/tzatzi-sanchez-murder-where-is-marcela-whaley-now/https://esajaelina.com/what-happened-to-tzatzi-sanchez-from-las-vegas-her-murder-story-and-connection-with-marcela-whaley/https://news3lv.com/news/local/40-years-later-remembering-the-las-vegas-hilton-firehttps://lasvegassun.com/news/2012/feb/10/fatal-hilton-fire-was-31-years-ago-today/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brookey_Lee_Westhttps://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/12/science/12file-fly.htmlThe Salty Nerd PodcastMaking Movies Fun By Making Fun Of Movies.Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

    Losing a Child: Always Andy's Mom
    Episode 145: Ella's Mom

    Losing a Child: Always Andy's Mom

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 58:12


    A few years ago now, Cassie's daughter, Ella, wrote a piece on the meaning of beauty. In the final sentence of the piece, Ella wrote, “The only thing that means anything at all is excruciating beauty if only you can find it.” For people who follow me on social media, they will recognize that I have grown to appreciate that phrase and even apply it to my life. Every guest certainly teaches me something about my own grief. Every once in a while, however, I have an interview that I feel impacts me in a way where I will be forever changed. Hearing Cassie repeat the words written by her daughter has done that for me. Cassie's 23 year old daughter, Ella, had an amazing spirit and personality. She was unique and loved by everyone around her. She was artistic and expressive, truly a beautiful soul. What began as a headache and suspected severe sinus infection around Christmastime in 2019 was found to instead be an exceedingly rare cancer that would take her life in a few short months. Only a month or two after the world started shutting down for COVID, Ella took her last breath and died.  Ella's death was in April 2020 in Paris, France which made it impossible for her to have a true celebration of life. During COVID, Cassie's American family were not allowed to enter France at all. Everything was put on hold. In some ways, the family's grief was even paused. Finally, two years after Ella's death, the family was able to celebrate her life in a way that could truly honor her. Her family and friends could finally gather together. Cassie called the experience ‘excruciatingly beautiful.' When we as bereaved parents think about our lives now after the deaths of our children, we are so many experiences that can be described as ‘excruciatingly beautiful.' Recently, Andy's life has been honored through two graduation ceremonies and a camp building dedication. When I would mention these events to friends, I would often get a big smile telling me how great it was that they were honoring Andy in that way. I can't argue with that. It certainly is amazing that different people are remembering Andy, but I actually had a hard time with the big smiles and others telling me how happy I must be feeling.  As amazing as these things are, and as amazing as Ella's celebration of life certainly was, it was not a happy experience; it was an ‘excruciatingly beautiful' one. I think that phrase helps people to understand just a little bit better.  Thank you, Ella, for the gift of that phrase. I know it will change others as it has changed me.

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    "PUT ON A STACK OF 45's"- MICHAEL PENN - "NO MYTH" - CHAPTER NINETY TWO - Dig This With The Splendid Bohemians - Featuring Bill Mesnik and Rich Buckland -The Boys Devote Each Episode To A Famed 45 RPM And Shine

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    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 36:26


    "PUT ON A STACK OF 45's"- MICHAEL PENN- "NO MYTH" - CHAPTER NINETY TWO - Dig This With The Splendid Bohemians - Featuring Bill Mesnik and Rich Buckland "THE PENN REVIVAL":https://americansongwriter.com/a-revival-michael-penn-album-interview/

    The Writers' Hangout
    PAGE Awards Judges Reveal How They Evaluate Your Script

    The Writers' Hangout

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 40:50 Very Popular


    Two PAGE Awards Judges, Victoria Lucas and Laurie Ashbourne, talk about how they evaluate your screenplays, whether you're just starting or have a script in the competition. You do not want to miss this inside talk.⭐️ Laurie Ashbourne began her film career in Disney animation, and over the past 20 years, she has worked as a story consultant, writer, and producer for Disney, Amazon, and many independent producers. She has over 30 features and short films to her credit, including her new family feature CHRISTMAS TIME, which is currently in post-production. As a PAGE judge, Laurie reviews scripts in several different genre categories, including Family Films, Comedies, Dramas, and Shorts.⭐️ Victoria Lucas is an independent producer who has developed scripts for projects starring Antonio Banderas, Scarlett Johansson, Wesley Snipes, and Hilary Swank. Among her favorite projects is the highly acclaimed coming-of-age film, The Island on Bird Street, awarded the Silver Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival. Victoria is also a Judge for the PAGE Awards contest, in a variety of genres including Drama and Historical Films

    Semi Pro
    Marky Mark Sweep: Daddy's Home 2 (I was an alternate for Season 3 Ice Road Truckers)

    Semi Pro

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 62:44


    Josh, Daniel and Dalton discuss how their lives changed forever after watching Daddy's Home 2. SYNOPSIS: Father and stepfather Dusty and Brad join forces to make Christmastime perfect for the children. Their newfound partnership soon gets put to the test when Dusty's old-school, macho dad and Brad's gentle father arrive to turn the holiday upside down. After a sudden change in plans, the four men decide to take the kids to a luxury resort for a fun-filled getaway that turns into a hilarious and chaotic adventure.

    Love and Lordship
    Names of God 18

    Love and Lordship

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 11:45


    “Lord, our Lord, how majestic is Your name in all the earth,You who have displayed Your splendor above the heavens!”  Psalm 8:1  Pele Yoetz – Wonderful Counselor (Isaiah 9:6)  I can't think of a better way regarding our focus on the Names of God, and Christ, than to look at those Names found in Isaiah 9:6, one of the most recognized passages in Isaiah, prevalent at CHRISTmastime due to the Messianic prophecy! Why? Here in this prophecy each Name for God The Father is given... Read More

    ReDIScover
    70. ReDIScovering London: Travel Tips & Tricks

    ReDIScover

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 54:53


    Welcome back to ReDIScover! We're bidding farewell to London Bridge month with a fun BONUS episode, where we're talking all things (you guessed it) London! Just in time for summer travel, we're highlighting all the must-dos and hidden gems of this historic-meets-modern city, and sharing all the tips to help you plan your trip and check every item off your bucket list! We're getting super-specific to help you have the most memorable experience: from the best app to find last-minute, affordable tickets to shows in the West End to the best way to elevate those more touristy destinations, this episode is your one-stop takeaway for all this London. We're getting experience-driven, appetite-driven, and touching on how to make every moment count. So come along as we give into the hype surrounding one of the greatest cities in the world. This episode will be sure to inspire your wanderlust for traveling again and help you rediscover yourself in a truly international metropolis. Enjoy!   And just a heads up -  After today's episode, we will be taking a ReDIScover summer vacation! Please enjoy catching up/listening to episode replays all summer long, but until then we will see you back here in the fall!   Other ReDIScover Travel Episodes: Episode 57 - ReDIScovering Italy: EPCOT vs. Reality Episode 58 - ReDIScovering Paris at Christmastime   Recommended London Experiences: TodayTix - To Book West End Shows and Enter the Lottery! Brigit's Bakery Afternoon Tea Bus Tour   And if you would like to connect with us... Jess: Instagram: @JessicaFaye508 TikTok: @theroadjesstraveled508 Blog: The Road Jess Traveled Youtube: Jessica Faye Kristen: Instagram: @positively.kristen

    The Daily Gardener
    May 31, 2022 Walt Whitman, Charles McIlvaine, Elizabeth Coatsworth, Virginia Woolf, The Pickled Pantry by Andrea Chesman, and Louisa Yeomans King

    The Daily Gardener

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 18:54


    Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1819 Birth of Walt Whitman, American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, Walt is remembered as the father of free verse. When Whitman was 54 years old, he suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed. He spent the next two years immersed in nature, and he believed that nature had helped to heal him. He wrote, How it all nourishes, lulls me, in the way most needed; the open air, the rye-fields, the apple orchards.   Walt also appreciated flowers. He wrote, A morning-glory at my window satisfies me more than the metaphysics of books.   In 1892, Walt wrote one of his most celebrated prose about Wild Flowers in a piece called Specimen Days. This has been and is yet a great season for wild flowers; oceans of them line the roads through the woods, border the edges of the water-runlets, grow all along the old fences, and are scatter'd in profusion over the fields.  An eight-petal'd blossom of gold-yellow clear and bright, with a brown tuft in the middle, nearly as large as a silver half-dollar, is very common; yesterday on a long drive I noticed it thickly lining the borders of the brooks everywhere.  Then there is a beautiful weed cover'd with blue flowers, (the blue of the old Chinese teacups treasur'd by our grand-aunts,) I am continually stopping to admire [it] - [it's] a little larger than a dime, and very plentiful.  White, however, is the prevailing color. The wild carrot I have spoken of; also the fragrant life-everlasting. But there are all hues and beauties, especially on the frequent tracts of half-open scrub-oak and dwarf-cedar hereabout - wild asters of all colors.  Notwithstanding the frost-touch the hardy little chaps maintain themselves in all their bloom.    1840 Birth of Charles McIlvaine, American author, and mycologist. Charles was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania. He served as a captain in the Pennsylvania Infantry. After the Civil War, he always went by "Captain." When he was 40, Charles moved to West Virginia, where he wrote articles for magazines like Century and Harpers. After the war, food was scarce, and Charles started hunting and eating mushrooms. Charles ate virtually every specimen he encountered and even dabbled in mushrooms said to be poisonous. If he suffered no ill effects, Charles deemed a specimen edible. Before Charles's work, the USDA issued a report in 1885 that claimed there were only twelve edible species of mushrooms in the United States.  Today Charles is best known for his 1896 book called 1,000 American Fungi. Charles was passionate about mycology, and he included his experiences with eating almost every species mentioned in his book. He wrote, I take no man's word for the qualities of a toadstool. I go for it myself. Charles claimed to have eaten over 1,000 mushrooms and toadstools, and he said he enjoyed the flavor of most of them.  His daring ingestion of so many species earned Charles the nickname Old Iron Guts. Charles lived to be 69 and defied the old saying,  There are old mushroom hunters and there are bold mushroom hunters, but there are no old bold mushroom hunters. Charles was indeed an old, bold mycologist. Charles's experimentation is all the more impressive given the challenging nature of mushroom identification. If you find plant identification challenging, mushroom identification is much more involved and often requires chemical reagents and microscopic evaluation. In our modern times, DNA sequencing can also definitively establish species. Thanks to his excellent writing skills, Charles wrote about mushrooms in a friendly and conversational manner. Here's what Charles wrote about the Oyster Mushroom: The camel is gratefully called the ship of the desert. The oyster mushroom is the shellfish of the forest. When the tender parts are dipped in egg, rolled in bread crumbs, and fried as an oyster, they're not excelled buy any vegetable and are worth of place on the daintiest menu.   Here's how Charles described the Vomiting Russella: Most are sweet and nutty to the taste. Some are as hot as the fiercest cayenne, but this they lose upon cooking. Their caps make the most palatable dishes when stewed, baked, roasted or escalloped.   Finally, here's a little-known poem that Charles wrote called Our Church Fight. I'm that nigh near disgusted with the fight in our old church, Where one halfs 'g'in the t'other, an' the Lord's left in the lurch, That I went an' told the parson if he'd jine me in a prayer, We'd slip out 'mong the daisies and' put one up from there.   Charles is remembered in the name of the journal of the North American Mycological Association (NAMA), McIlvainea ("Mick-ill-vay-nee-ah").   1893 Birth of Elizabeth Coatsworth, American writer of fiction and poetry for children and adults. In 1931, She won the Newbery Medal for her children's book, The Cat Who Went to Heaven. Elizabeth's poems invoke sentiment and thoughts of home. Her poem November begins, November comes  And November goes,  With the last red berries  And the first white snows.   Her poem Nosegay is about a small bunch of flowers. Nosegays were typically sweet-scented and worn at the waist or bodice. Violets, daffodils, roses and thorn were all in the garden before you were born. Daffodils, violets, red and white roses your grandchildren's children will hold to their noses.   1920 On this day, a 37-year-old Virginia Woolf gardened with her husband, Leonard, at the new home they had bought the previous year. The garden covered three-quarters of a hectare and came with mature apple, plum, cherry, and pear trees. Of the two, Leonard was more the gardener, but Virginia was happy to assist whenever she got the chance. In her diary on this day, she wrote, The first pure joy of the garden… weeding all day to finish the beds in a queer sort of enthusiasm which made me say this is happiness.  Gladioli standing in troops; the mock orange out.  We were out till nine at night, though the evening was cold.  Both stiff and scratched all over today, with chocolate earth in our nails.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation The Pickled Pantry by Andrea Chesman This book came out in 2012. It's an oldie, but goodie. And the subtitle is From Apples to Zucchini, 150 Recipes for Pickles, Relishes, Chutneys & More. Well, this is one of my favorite books. I use this every single summer. And I love what the publisher says here about Andrea's book. They write Blending your grandmother's pickling know-how with today's Internet resources, Andrea Chesman shows you how easy it is to fill your pantry with tasty homemade sauerkraut, Salt-Cured Dilly Beans, and Rosemary Onion Confit. Explaining classic techniques in simple language, guiding you to helpful websites, and making you laugh with humorous stories, Chesman provides inspiration and encouragement for both first-time picklers and dedicated home canners. With tips on pickling everything from apples to zucchini, you'll enjoy exploring the stunning variety of flavors that can fill a Mason jar.   And I can tell you from experience that when the pandemic hit, and we had that first year of everybody rushing to garden, Andrea's book was a go-to resource for so many people as they were dealing with their first garden harvest. Now I thought what I would do is walk you through the table of contents because that helps you understand Andrea's book's structure. This is really a book about pickling. There are other items and other recipes covered here, but this is primarily a pickle resource. So, what is covered here is: 1 All About Pickling page 10 2 Fermented Pickles page 34 3 Single Jar Pickles page 72 4 Big-Harvest Fresh-Pack Pickles page 122 5 Salsas, Relishes, Chutneys page 148 (This is one of my most dog-eared sections in this book.) 6 Refrigerator & Freezer Pickles page 202 7 Recipes for Enjoying Homemade Pickles page 236   I also wanted to share just a little bit about what Andrea wrote in the introduction to this book because you'll get a little glimpse of her marvelous sense of humor. She wrote this in the introduction. Naturally I wanted to pack all that freshly harvested goodness into jars to preserve it for the coming winter. I asked my grand- mother how she made her pickles. My grandmother was not a woman enthralled by the domestic arts, nor was she overly chatty. She told me to put cucumbers and dill in a crock, cover them with water, then add enough salt so "it's just before you gag.   Well, that sounds like my mom. That's exactly how my mom tells me about how to make our family recipes. So this one made me smile. Now the other story that I wanted to share with you is this fantastic idea that Andrea came up with for sharing your pickle bounty. If you're part of a garden club or a group of gardeners in your neighborhood, maybe you can pool your resources when it comes to canning time. I had the opportunity to collect pickle recipes and gather them together for a book. It began with a "pickle barter party." Because so many traditional recipes yielded seven or nine jars of pickles (a boiling-water-bath canner load), I thought it would be a great idea to swap jars of home-canned pickles the same way people swap cookies at Christmastime. My friends were all fellow back-to-the-landers, and preserving food by canning, pickling, and freezing was part of the lifestyle. Today's urban food swaps accomplish much the same thing.   Great idea. Isn't that? And such a fun thing to do this summer. You can do it outside. And not have to worry about catching COVID. And here's what Andrea says about pickle preferences - and this is so true - especially if you have kids. What I learned as I tasted my way through batch after batch of pickles is that preferences vary widely. For some people, no pickle is too sweet; others hate garlic. But inevitably, there is perfect pickle for every taste. It just requires collecting and inventing many, many recipes. Over the years, I've watched many trends and pickle making And in the 1970s, just like today, many people rediscovered, pickle making as they moved back to the land. And so what's old is new again. Well, I tell you what, you could do a lot worse than having Andrea Chessman be your guide for pickling. This is a hefty book. It is 304 pages of pickling everything - from cucumbers (so that you can make your dills, your half-sours, your bread-and-butters) to other vegetables (everything from carrots to rhubarb cabbage, to even pineapple.) The bottom line here is you can pickle it - and that's Andrea's favorite saying. Now, luckily Andrea's book is ubiquitous because this book has been around for a decade. You can get a copy of The Pickled Pantry by Andrea Chesman and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $8. And by the way, if you have a family reunion to go to, or you just want to have a little family picnic, this would be a lovely little hostess gift. It's so sweet and that cover is adorable.   Botanic Spark 1905 The Flower Garden Day by Day by Louisa Yeomans King MAY 31. Take a part of this month if possible, and visit the Arnold Arboretum, Boston, for lilacs, Asiatic cherries, crabs, and general beauty; and Highland Park, Rochester, N. Y., for the great lilac collection. The notebooks should go, too; and while it is difficult to leave one's own garden at SO interesting a time, a great enlarging of the gardening horizon is the result of such travels.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.  

    Salt & Burn This
    A Very Supernatural Christmas

    Salt & Burn This

    Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 79:18


    It's Christmastime for the Winchesters! But not even close for our heroines as they bask in an early summer, that's oddly similar to the one shown in this episode. In Michigan. In winter. Salt and Burn This is a "Supernatural" rewatch podcast, hosted by Sami and Valerie ("our heroines"). Each week they break down one episode of their favorite show "Supernatural," going scene by scene, blood splatter by blood splatter, pop culture reference by...well, you get the idea. And in each episode they find something that reminds them of their real lives, usually making fun of themselves and stopping short of a "bitch/jerk" moment. Subscribe if this sounds like your jam, and if you enjoy please leave us a review! Follow us on social! We are @saltandburnthis on Insta, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook. We'd love to see you there!

    HARKpodcast
    Episode 310: Christmas Wrapping Sandwich

    HARKpodcast

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 46:48


    Inspired by the upcoming World Goth Day, we find a dark jewel in "Things Fall Apart" by Cristina. And then we kinda wander away from World Goth Day, with Ian instead leading RJ down a seemingly circuitous but actually quite straightforward route to arrive at "Christmas Time in the Motor City" by Was (Not Was). This week's ranking music is "Christmas Wrapping" by The Waitresses!

    The Angry Vets fantasy football podcast
    It's almost Christmas time for every NFL fan. The NFL draft is finally here!

    The Angry Vets fantasy football podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 122:18


    We've already had an exciting offseason and it's shaping up to be an even more exciting NFL draft. If you've been a fan of the TAV family for a while you know how hype we all get to do this annual mock draft and to see how it all plays out in the real draft. We're one family, TAV nation and we really appreciate all of your support. We can say thank you enough and we love you all. Thanks again! To all my brothers and sisters in arms thank you so much for your sacrifices and I'm still striving on getting you all a voice in this country. You all have earned it

    Tis the Podcast
    It's Going To Be The Best Barton Christmas Ever! (Marvel's Hawkeye)

    Tis the Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 86:46


    Happy Monday, Christmas fanatics! We are BACK after a long two week hiatus! Welcome to our final episode of April 2022! Can you believe it's already May next week?! We can't! But we're not complaining! We're officially more than halfway until Halloween, which means Christmas is coming up fast! This week, the elves are joined by Gerry D. of "Totally Rad Christmas" to discuss the 2021, Disney+ Original: Marvel's "Hawkeye"! Journey to New York City at Christmastime with your hosts in this extraordinarily festive - and geeky - episode! Not only do they talk Clinton Barton's and Kate Bishop's chaotic Christmas, but they also discuss: the first trailer for "Thor: Love and Thunder", "Moon Knight", "The Secrets of Dumbledore", "Sonic the Hedgehog 2", "Uncharted", and much, much, much more!    This is one fun episode full of so much holiday cheer, you want to be sure not to miss it! It's the perfect way to jumpstart your week! As always, thanks for your love and support, y'all!

    WORST. COMIC. PODCAST. EVER!
    WCPEver Episode 408 - Countdown to Planet Comicon 2022

    WORST. COMIC. PODCAST. EVER!

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 53:27


    On this week's episode of the Worst. Comic. Podcast. EVER!: As this podcast goes live, we are just hours away from the start of Planet Comicon - a.k.a. the reuniting of Cullen, Jerry, and John in one building! We will be at the Hero Initiative table (#339) all weekend long. Except for 6:00 on Saturday, when we will be hosting the WCPE panel. Be there! Not to bury the real lead here, but guess what we will be raffling off to benefit the Hero Initiative? Just a copy of JLA Avengers!! Seriously!! Again, table #339, we will see you there.  We look at 52 #33, with Alfred Pennyworth directing a children's choir singing "Christmastime is Here." And what do you get a Batwoman for Hanukkah?  We have our Pick 3 selections, sponsored by our friends at Clint's Comics in Kansas City.  We would love to hear your comments on the show. Let us know what you've been reading or watching this week. Contact us on our website, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or email. We want to hear from you! As always, we are the Worst. Comic. Podcast. EVER! and we hope you enjoy the show. The Worst. Comic. Podcast. EVER! is proudly sponsored by Clint's Comics. Clint's is located at 3941 Main in Kansas City, Missouri, and is open Monday through Saturday. Whether it is new comics, trade paperbacks, action figures, statues, posters, or T-shirts, the friendly and knowledgeable staff can help you find whatever it is that you need. You should also know that Clint's Comics has the most extensive collection of back issues in the metro area. If you need to find a particular book to finish the run of a title, head on down to Clint's or check out their website at clintscomics.com. Tell them that the Worst. Comic. Podcast. EVER! sent you.

    Stories of Inspiring Joy
    Linda Jämsén

    Stories of Inspiring Joy

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 12:20


    Linda Jämsén is an American expat living in Finland. She recently self-published her first book, Odyssey of Love: A Memoir of Seeking and Finding, a romantic, travel, and music-filled adventure of her three years working and singing in Budapest. A classically-trained pianist, she is also a choral singer and has performed in Israel, the UK, Hungary, and Finland. She lives on an island in Helsinki with her husband. In today's episode Linda shares a heartfelt story called "The Joy of Giving”, of how the donation of her childhood violin to a Middle Eastern refugee musician in Finland created ripples of joy for all involved. After hearing "Joy to the World" during Christmastime, this memory came to the forefront, and it's a beautiful reminder of the joy of connecting with others, and that our contributions to others have the ability to make a difference. To connect with Linda and learn more visit her website www.lindajamsen.com and on Facebook @Odysseyoflovebook Instagram @lindajamsenauthor and Twitter @LJamsen Stories of Inspiring Joy is a production of Seek The Joy Media and created by Sydney Weiss. To learn more and submit your story, click here. *Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this episode are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of Stories of Inspiring Joy.

    Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness
    Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness - Ep 81

    Norm Nathan's Vault of Silliness

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 76:30


    Ahoy faithful listeners! We are holding at 95 subscribers on YT. Wouldn’t it be just so darn great to get to 100 by the 100th episode? If you haven’t already, please subscribe. Let’s get to 100 together! Today’s episode features Norm in caller free-form mode. Coming to us from April 6th, 1996 it is titled: ‘Yo-ho-ho and a Bottle of Fun.’ Tom Howie was the producer. We begin our journey with Norm and I talking everything from guest and scheduling issues to bumper stickers and job dedication. Norm’s Hungarian Gypsy Princess Grandmother (HGPG) offers up more sage advice that has me on the edge of my seat, only to fall right off the chair in disappointment. There was a guest problem as Carol Gardner, author of ‘Bumper Sticker Wisdom: America’s Pulpit Above the Tailpipe’ was attending a function that conflicted with our interview time but that doesn’t stop us from having a lively discussion about bumper stickers that Helene from Belmont join in on later. Marge from Indiana calls in to talk about pirate radio stations.Norm had mentioned that our guest the next night would be Andrew Yoder who wrote ‘Pirate Radio: The Saga of America’s Underground Illegal Broadcasters.’ It was also going to be Game Night on Sunday with Linda Romero and the game ‘Perspectives’ then John J. Moran with ‘Daring Passages: The Boardgame in a Bottle.’ Uncle Norm talks about being the interviewee when he was speaking to Jeff Kaufman of WFAD in Middlebury, VT where Norm and I were going to do our little Old Time Radio Show. This leads to a list of the upcoming event dates on the Old Time Radio Show World Tour. Peabody, Topsfield, Medford! If any of you had a chance to see us do this or just want to say hi, I’d love to hear from you. There’s a double date brewing for the Prom with Monica and her daughter Veronica from Nahant. We learn that one or both of Norms’ daughters were overwhelmed by Boston at Christmastime when their grandmother took them to see Santa at Jordan Marsh. Peter with a sweet call and Norm is just so grateful he’s sending him quite the gift. We are now graced with the presence of the lovely and talented Linda Chase. She’s accompanied by the lovely and talented Dick Paris. They promote some upcoming shows and talk to callers including: The one and only, Robert from Everett. This is another classic Norm and Robert call. The tape skips to an inquisitive caller asking about Linda’s looks and wishing she would cut an album. Moving to side B we continue with Linda as we hear from Carrie. She’s a high school student who, at the time, was ranked #2 in the State for drumming. Lawrence from PA tells us more than you’d ever want to know about Windber, PA. Mary from PA adds a very important detail Lawrence left out. Bernie asks about Guy Mainella and Norm lets him know what his own personal goals are. There’s another very sweet call. This time from Dottie. She sums up how, I believe, we all felt about Norm. Episode 81, ‘Yo-ho-ho and a Bottle of Fun’ set’s sail in 3, 2, annnd 1. Email: normnathanvos@gmail.com

    Disney Wedding Podcast
    #520 Jennifer & Raphael's American Adventure Rotunda Wedding

    Disney Wedding Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 25:57


    Today, Jennifer Port shares the story of her Christmastime ceremony at the Wedding Pavilion, Harmonious prereception at Italy Isola, and reception at American Adventure Rotunda—plus a welcome party at Yacht & Beach Club's Shipwreck Beach! You'll hear how they incorporated Raphael's career as a firefighter for Walt Disney World's Reedy Creek Fire Department, plus how Raphael was able to surprise Jennifer at the reception with a performance by her all-time favorite group, Voices of Liberty! Click here to see all the photos!      

    All Things SR
    Christmas Time in Selinsgrove

    All Things SR

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 75:00


    Christmas Time in Selinsgrove by All Things SR

    PUB SONGS for Celtic Geeks
    Funny Irish Stories

    PUB SONGS for Celtic Geeks

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 48:08


    The rock walls of Ireland make for a harrowing driving experience. Is it calamity or comedy? Do musicians love song requests or not? How to stand out with good food. The Lost Druid Brewery tells their tale. Why do musicians forget lyrics during shows? I can't speak for most musicians. But I will share my reasons. This is Pub Songs & Stories #252. WHO'S PLAYING IN THE PUB TODAY Welcome to Pub Songs & Stories. This is the Virtual Public House to share stories and inspiration behind music with your host Marc Gunn. Subscribe to the podcast and download free music at PubSong.com. 0:27 - WHAT'S NEW? If you're new to the Pub Songs & Stories, please subscribe and post a comment on Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. Today's show is brought to you by my Gunn Runners on Patreon. Special thanks to mine Robert, Mikey Mason, Jacob and Sue Background sounds from The Pocket in North Georgia Check out the new Mont St-Michel Video. What are you doing while listening to Pub Songs & Stories? I'd love your thoughts and feedback. Take a picture of where you are. Post it on social media. Use the hashtag #pubstories so I can find it and share your story. 5:05 - CONCERNED FOR AIR, NOT CLIMATE CHANGE One of my big goals with mentioning the Climate Almanac in the last show was to start a discussion. Someone emailed me last week. They responded “my concern about air and water (not climate change) are more health related than political.” I know I didn't make myself clear. My fight against climate change is not political either. I don't care about your politics. Sure 95% of all Climate scientists say human-made climate change is real. And so yes, I trust the science. If you wanna call that political, that's up to you. But I've been passively supporting the environment long before the climate change discussion began, back when I was a member of the Surfrider Foundation in college, when I was actually studying to be a marine biologist. But I'm not talking about climate change for the science I can't see, but rather for the empirical evidence that I can see. And you can see. We both see and feel the repercussions of pollution. I remember picking up a Budweiser beer can that someone left on the bank of a lake in Alabama. That's something you can see. Or have you seen the oil film left on the water of a lake? My friend pointed out the public health effects on asthma. In Texas, they frequently have air quality warnings. I didn't need the warnings. Every time one of those days came about, I used my inhaler BEFORE I heard the warning. For those of us who live with asthma. That is something to fight against. And it will get worse. Taking care of the planet is an everyone issue. Remember that the human population on earth grows exponentially. It might not affect you… right now. But it will one day. Because more people means more pollution. Whether that's air pollution, water pollution, whatever. You, your kids and other people will feel the effects. We are a community. So we should take care of one another. So even if you don't believe scientists who warn about human-made Climate Change. There is no harm done in supporting the Climate Change movement. Even small changes can make a big difference over time. Because if each of us makes a small change, that means BIG change. That's what the Climate Almanac is about. 7:34 - Old Blind Dogs “Bonnie Earl” from Four on the Floor 12:16 - NEW TO IRISH & CELTIC MUSIC: BEST OF 2022 PLAYLIST There's a lot of great new music added to our Best of 2022 playlist on Spotify and Amazon Music. Wolf & Clover Lissa Schneckenburger Jenna Monynihan Heather Dale Marc Gunn “Breathing” Old Blind Dogs Kathy Barwick Marys Lane Listen to the playlists on Spotify or Amazon Music. 12:54 - UPCOMING SHOWS APR 2-3: Sherwood Forest Faire, Paige, TX APR 9-10: Sherwood Forest Faire, Paige, TX One show daily with Brobdingnagian Bards. Others with Jamie Haeuser APR 16: : Ironshield Brewing in Lawrenceville, GA @ 7:00 – 10:00 PM. APR 22-24: JordanCon, Atlanta, GA 13:37 - Kathy Barwick “My Native Home” from In My Life 18:45 - STORY OF JOUSTING WITH JALOPIES Have you ever driven in Ireland? The roads were not made for our modern automobiles. They're kind of narrow. It comes with its own challenges. Dublin Abbey is a band out of Seattle. They share their story of driving the narrow rural roads of Ireland. 21:50 - “Jousting With Jalopies” by Dublin Abbey from Single It is always interesting driving in Ireland. Those narrow roads are just crazy. It's actually very fine art to drive in them. While also doing it on the wrong side of the road. Sometimes even with a stick shift. I can definitely appreciate Dublin Abbey's comedy 24:04 - HOW THE LOST DRUID BREWERY STANDS OUT WITH FOOD I love good, creative, interesting food. I'm happy to say The Lost Druid Brewery stands out on that front. And there's a reason as Rob and Stacia will tell you about. 29:17 - Beyond the Pale “Mooney (The Donegal Fiddler)” from Queen of Skye 35:03 - SUPPORT WHAT YOU LOVE The musicians on this podcast are happy to share their music freely with you. However, if you hear something you love, these artists need your financial support. Please visit their website, sign up to their mailing list and buy something. Your purchase allows them to keep making music. And if you're not into the physical stuff, many artists accept tips or are on Patreon like I am. So please support the arts. If this show made you happy, then you can also join the Gunn Runners Club on Patreon. Your support pays for the production and promotion of my music and this podcast. If you have questions or comments, drop me an email. - The War Doctor (Podcast) - Donald MacGillavry (Music) - Breathing in Mont-Saint-Michel (Video) - Battle of Aughrim/Star of Munster (Music) - St Patrick's Day Irish Music & Dance (Podcast) - Dunvegan Castle & Gardens (Video) 36:20 - Wolf & Clover “The Columbus Set” from Twelvemonth and a Day 40:31 - STORY OF TORTURING MUSICIANS WITH SONG REQUESTS I love song requests. Heck, I think most indie musicians do. It saves me from having to think about what song to play next. Some musicians are even great asking for a tip to go with the song request. I'm not so great at that. But I still love getting and fulfilling the requests. The one problem I have is that I have 24 solo albums. I do not know the lyrics for all of the songs on those CDs. Did you ever see Middleman? I loved that TV show. They had this “stump the band” game. Someone would ask the musician if he could play a song. Andrew does that sometimes. He's a whiz when it comes to playing melodies on the recorder. I, on the other hand, am not. I can barely remember many of the songs I've recorded. And that's sort of how the story of “Why Do You Torture Me?” got started. For about two years, I had a monthly residency in Marietta, Georgia at Johnnie MacCracken's Irish Pub. I was living in Birmingham at the time. I drove there once a month to play for a small group of fans. Almost every month, Chris would request the song “Christmastime in Texas”. This is a song I wrote early on in the Brobdingnagian Bards career. Andrew helped me refine it. It's a satirical song about how they celebrate Christmas in Texas. Chris loves that song. I loved it when I wrote. But I'll be honest. Sometimes I write a song. I love it. And a while later, I realize it's not as good as I thought it was or I hoped it was. That was certainly the case with “Christmastime in Texas”. It was after midnight one evening. Chris requested the song. On a whim, I replied with that first line of the chorus: “Why do you toruture me? Why do you request a song that I can't sing.” Happily, my digital recorder was running while I improvised a new song. In fact, it wasn't very different from the one you can hear on the latest CD, Selcouth. I definitely tightened up the verses. But it wasn't too different. The song captures the quirky things about writing and recording songs. Like the fact that I have written song lyrics in front of me while recording. I play the song over and over again, until I get it right. But I think my favorite verse is the last one. Because it visually captures that moment when you're singing a song and you forget the lyrics. It used to be a running joke with me. Because I forgot the lyrics so often during shows. Fortunately, I realized if I actually had a set list, I'd spend more time focusing on the song I'm performing and less on what the next song would be. So I remember more lyrics these days. 44:43 - Marc Gunn “Why Do You Torture Me?” from Selcouth 47:21 - NEXT TIME - Arbor Day and Ellen Gibling Pub Songs & Stories was produced by Marc Gunn. The show is edited by Mitchell Petersen with graphics by Miranda Nelson Designs. You can subscribe and listen wherever you find podcasts. You can also subscribe to my mailing list. You will get regular updates of new music, podcasts, special offers, and you'll get 21 songs for free. Welcome to the pub at www.pubsong.com! #pubstories #dublinabbey #aprilfoolsday

    Fireside Breakdowns
    S2 | SS34: Why is everything so expensive?!

    Fireside Breakdowns

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 57:30


    Biden says it's Putin's fault; Fox News says it's Biden's fault; but the one thing most Americans know is that shit has gotten real expensive. Inflation is high, gas prices are high, and confidence in the health of the US economy is really, really low.  So, we want to take some time to talk about what the hell is going on.  No, you're not experiencing deja vu right now. We've covered these topics before - recently, actually,  but a lot has changed since we talked about inflation around Christmastime. And even more since we looked at gas prices in September. This episode will include a significant amount of recap information from previous episodes, so if you listened to those you might hear some content that sounds familiar. If you didn't, don't worry; we'll give you enough background to make sure you can follow along.   Then, there's plenty of new information to cover including whether the conflict in Ukraine is contributing to rising inflation, whether or not we can blame Joe Biden for how much it cost to fill our gas tanks this week, and yeah, we're going to talk about that Ben Shapiro video (even though it hurts). If you'd like to get in touch with us… You can leave us a review at: https://ratethispodcast.com/fireside Or you can drop us a note from our Contact page! You can find all of our sources in our Show Notes. And, if you'd like to help us reach our goal of hiring a professional editor, you can check out our Patreon Page! Patrons get priority topic requests, behind the scenes content, and more!

    Era Uma Vez Um Podcast
    A Cigarra e a Formiga

    Era Uma Vez Um Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 8:04


    Uma versão diferente da clássica fábula A Cigarra e a Formiga. Ela conta a história de forma rimada a história da cigarra que canta no verão, enquanto as formigas só trabalham, porém, no inverno, quando a cigarra para de cantar, as formigas sentem falta de seu canto e a rainha do formigueiro deseja que a cigarra faça um show para elas. Ouça essa história super fofa pra saber o que acontece. Ensinamento para as crianças: Cada um tem seu talento próprio e seu espaço na vida. Escrita por: Marcelo Andrighetti Narrada por: Carol Camanho Apoie o podcast e entre para o clube aqui: https://anchor.fm/eraumavezumpodcast/subscribe E ouça histórias exclusivas, mini-histórias, versões de histórias mais calmas e relaxantes, perfeitas para hora de dormir, acesso antecipado de até 6 meses de algumas histórias que entrarão no podcast e muito mais! Além de apoiar o podcast preferido do seu filho(a). :) Confira mais histórias infantis no nosso site: eraumavezumpodcast.com.br e compartilhe com outras mães, ou pais, ou tias, avós, madrinhas, babás, professoras... fale sobre esse podcast e espalhe a sementinha da imaginação fértil! Mande-me uma mensagem, sugestão ou até uma história enviando um email para contato@eraumavezumpodcast.com.br que vou adorar ler! E já apertou o botão de "Seguir" no podcast no seu player favorito?! Então siga e não perca mais nenhuma história! ;) É de graça!! E nos siga no Instagram: @eraumavezumpodcast Beijos e até a próxima história! Trilha Sonora: The Return by Alexander Nakarada Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4914-the-return License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Midnight Magic by Rafael Krux Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/5426-midnight-magic- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license It's Christmas Time 2 by Frank Schröter Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/7189-it-s-christmas-time-2 License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license Sugar Fairies by Rafael Krux Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/5429-sugar-fairies- License: https://filmmusic.io/standard-license

    Baywatch Watch
    CJ's Fleabag - "Silent Night, Baywatch Night: Parts 1 and 2" with special guest Jackie Gonzalez-Durruthy!

    Baywatch Watch

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 128:10


    It's Christmastime at the beach. Kyla and Joey pull grifts. Hobie gets roped in. Tracy has a secret. CJ falls for a priest. Matt meets Santa's helpers. Joey loves cigarettes. Join Zach, Charlie, and special guest Jackie Gonzalez-Duruthy (The Most Wonderful pod of the year) for a supersized Christmas episode!

    Reset with Bonnie Sala
    The Life-Changing Power of Forgiven Debt

    Reset with Bonnie Sala

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 2:00


    Jason's best friend, Matt, moved to Japan to be a missionary. When Matt met his future wife there, they planned a wedding near Christmastime. Jason bought a plane ticket to attend the wedding months in advance for nearly $1000. But as the wedding neared, Jason realized he'd mistakenly bought his ticket for November and his flight had left without him a month ago. Jason was devastated because he couldn't afford to replace the ticket.

    Visibly Fit with Wendie Pett
    Episode 35: The Meaning of Christmas from Wendie Pett and other Spark Media Network Podcasters

    Visibly Fit with Wendie Pett

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 37:12


    The Christmas season isn't just to be acknowledged or celebrating during December. Jesus is the reason for the season and should be celebrated all year long. It's always great to recall childhood memories and dig deep into the heart for the true meaning of this holiday. Here is a collection of Christmastime thoughts from multiple Christian podcasters within the Spark Media Network. Enjoy!

    Halloween is Forever
    Minisode 23: Deathcember (2019) PART 2

    Halloween is Forever

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 81:09


    This week we continue to spread holiday fear as Meg sits down with Dave Cerminara, horror nerd and owner of Apis Meadery in Pittsburgh. They're discussing shorts films 9 thru 16 in the advent calendar of terror known as Deathcember. Do Meg and Dave find this batch of films more palatable? How much Santa violence is too much? What's scarier than children around Christmastime? All this, plus learn about a Mead Master's horror nerd origin story. Don't forget to go back to Part 1 for Brian's take on the first 8 films; then Part 3 for Steve covering the last 8. Find Us Online- Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/halloweenisforever/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HallowForever Tik Tok: https://www.tiktok.com/@halloweenisforeverpod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HalloweenIsForeverPod E-Mail: Halloweenisforeverpod@gmail.com

    A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
    Episode 140: “Trouble Every Day” by the Mothers of Invention

    A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021


    Episode one hundred and forty of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Trouble Every Day" by the Mothers of Invention, and the early career of Frank Zappa. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Christmas Time is Here Again" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources I'm away from home as I upload this and haven't been able to do a Mixcloud, but will hopefully edit a link in in a week or so if I remember. The main biography I consulted for this was Electric Don Quixote by Neil Slaven. Zappa's autobiography, The Real Frank Zappa Book, is essential reading if you're a fan of his work. Information about Jimmy Carl Black's early life came from Black's autobiography, For Mother's Sake. Zappa's letter to Varese is from this blog, which also contains a lot of other useful information on Zappa. For information on the Watts uprising, I recommend Johnny Otis' Listen to the Lambs. And the original mix of Freak Out is currently available not on the CD issue of Freak Out itself, which is an eighties remix, but on this "documentary" set. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Just a quick note before I begin -- there are a couple of passing references in this episode to rape and child abuse. I don't believe there's anything that should upset anyone, but if you're worried, you might want to read the transcript on the podcast website before or instead of listening. But also, this episode contains explicit, detailed, descriptions of racial violence carried out by the police against Black people, including against children. Some of it is so distressing that even reading the transcript might be a bit much for some people. Sometimes, in this podcast, we have to go back to another story we've already told. In most cases, that story is recent enough that I can just say, "remember last episode, when I said...", but to tell the story of the Mothers of Invention, I have to start with a story that I told sixty-nine episodes ago, in episode seventy-one, which came out nearly two years ago. In that episode, on "Willie and the Hand Jive", I briefly told the story of Little Julian Herrera at the start. I'm going to tell a slightly longer version of the story now. Some of the information at the start of this episode will be familiar from that and other episodes, but I'm not going to expect people to remember something from that long ago, given all that's happened since. The DJ Art Laboe is one of the few figures from the dawn of rock and roll who is still working. At ninety-six years old, he still promotes concerts, and hosts a syndicated radio show on which he plays "Oldies but Goodies", a phrase which could describe him as well as the music. It's a phrase he coined -- and trademarked -- back in the 1950s, when people in his audience would ask him to play records made a whole three or four years earlier, records they had listened to in their youth. Laboe pretty much single-handedly invented the rock and roll nostalgia market -- as well as being a DJ, he owned a record label, Original Sound, which put out a series of compilation albums, Oldies But Goodies, starting in 1959, which started to cement the first draft of the doo-wop canon. These were the first albums to compile together a set of older rock and roll hits and market them for nostalgia, and they were very much based on the tastes of his West Coast teenage listenership, featuring songs like "Earth Angel" by the Penguins: [Excerpt: The Penguins, "Earth Angel"] But also records that had a more limited geographic appeal, like "Heaven and Paradise" by Don Julian and the Meadowlarks: [Excerpt: Don Julian and the Meadowlarks, "Heaven and Paradise"] As well as being a DJ and record company owner, Laboe was the promoter and MC for regular teenage dances at El Monte Legion Stadium, at which Kip and the Flips, the band that featured Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston, would back local performers like the Penguins, Don and Dewey, or Ritchie Valens, as well as visiting headliners like Jerry Lee Lewis. El Monte stadium was originally chosen because it was outside the LA city limits -- at the time there were anti-rock-and-roll ordinances that meant that any teenage dance had to be approved by the LA Board of Education, but those didn't apply to that stadium -- but it also led to Laboe's audience becoming more racially diverse. The stadium was in East LA, which had a large Mexican-American population, and while Laboe's listenership had initially been very white, soon there were substantial numbers of Mexican-American and Black audience members. And it was at one of the El Monte shows that Johnny Otis discovered the person who everyone thought was going to become the first Chicano rock star, before even Ritchie Valens, in 1957, performing as one of the filler acts on Laboe's bill. He signed Little Julian Herrera, a performer who was considered a sensation in East LA at the time, though nobody really knew where he lived, or knew much about him other than that he was handsome, Chicano, and would often have a pint of whisky in his back pocket, even though he was under the legal drinking age. Otis signed Herrera to his label, Dig Records, and produced several records for him, including the record by which he's now best remembered, "Those Lonely Lonely Nights": [Excerpt: Little Julian Herrera, "Those Lonely, Lonely, Nights"] After those didn't take off the way they were expected to, Herrera and his vocal group the Tigers moved to another label, one owned by Laboe, where they recorded "I Remember Linda": [Excerpt: Little Julian Herrera and the Tigers, "I Remember Linda"]  And then one day Johnny Otis got a knock on his door from the police. They were looking for Ron Gregory. Otis had never heard of Ron Gregory, and told them so. The police then showed him a picture. It turned out that Julian Herrera wasn't Mexican-American, and wasn't from East LA, but was from Massachusetts. He had run away from home a few years back, hitch-hiked across the country, and been taken in by a Mexican-American family, whose name he had adopted. And now he was wanted for rape. Herrera went to prison, and when he got out, he tried to make a comeback, but ended up sleeping rough in the basement of the stadium where he had once been discovered. He had to skip town because of some other legal problems, and headed to Tijuana, where he was last seen playing R&B gigs in 1963. Nobody knows what happened to him after that -- some say he was murdered, others that he's still alive, working in a petrol station under yet another name, but nobody has had a confirmed sighting of him since then. When he went to prison, the Tigers tried to continue for a while, but without their lead singer, they soon broke up. Ray Collins, who we heard singing the falsetto part in "I Remember Linda", went on to join many other doo-wop and R&B groups over the next few years, with little success. Then in summer 1963, he walked into a bar in Ponoma, and saw a bar band who were playing the old Hank Ballard and the Midnighters song "Work With Me Annie". As Collins later put it, “I figured that any band that played ‘Work With Me Annie' was all right,” and he asked if he could join them for a few songs. They agreed, and afterwards, Collins struck up a conversation with the guitarist, and told him about an idea he'd had for a song based on one of Steve Allen's catchphrases. The guitarist happened to be spending a lot of his time recording at an independent recording studio, and suggested that the two of them record the song together: [Excerpt: Baby Ray and the Ferns, "How's Your Bird?"] The guitarist in question was named Frank Zappa. Zappa was originally from Maryland, but had moved to California as a child with his conservative Italian-American family when his father, a defence contractor, had got a job in Monterey. The family had moved around California with his father's work, mostly living in various small towns in the Mojave desert seventy miles or so north of Los Angeles. Young Frank had an interest in science, especially chemistry, and especially things that exploded, but while he managed to figure out the ingredients for gunpowder, his family couldn't afford to buy him a chemistry set in his formative years -- they were so poor that his father regularly took part in medical experiments to get a bit of extra money to feed his kids -- and so the young man's interest was diverted away from science towards music. His first musical interest, and one that would show up in his music throughout his life, was the comedy music of Spike Jones, whose band combined virtuosic instrumental performances with sound effects: [Excerpt: Spike Jones and his City Slickers, "Cocktails for Two"] and parodies of popular classical music [Excerpt: Spike Jones and his City Slickers, "William Tell Overture"] Jones was a huge inspiration for almost every eccentric or bohemian of the 1940s and 50s -- Spike Milligan, for example, took the name Spike in tribute to him. And young Zappa wrote his first ever fan letter to Jones when he was five or six. As a child Zappa was also fascinated by the visual aesthetics of music -- he liked to draw musical notes on staves and see what they looked like. But his musical interests developed in two other ways once he entered his teens. The first was fairly typical for the musicians of his generation from LA we've looked at and will continue to look at, which is that he heard "Gee" by the Crows on the radio: [Excerpt: The Crows, "Gee"] He became an R&B obsessive at that moment, and would spend every moment he could listening to the Black radio stations, despite his parents' disapproval. He particularly enjoyed Huggy Boy's radio show broadcast from Dolphins of Hollywood, and also would religiously listen to Johnny Otis, and soon became a connoisseur of the kind of R&B and blues that Otis championed as a musician and DJ: [Excerpt: Zappa on the Late Show, “I hadn't been raised in an environment where there was a lot of music in the house. This couple that owned the chilli place, Opal and Chester, agreed to ask the man who serviced the jukebox to put in some of the song titles that I liked, because I promised that I would dutifully keep pumping quarters into this thing so that I could listen to them, and so I had the ability to eat good chilli and listen to 'Three Hours Past Midnight' by Johnny 'Guitar' Watson for most of my junior and senior year"] Johnny “Guitar” Watson, along with Guitar Slim, would become a formative influence on Zappa's guitar playing, and his playing on "Three Hours Past Midnight" is so similar to Zappa's later style that you could easily believe it *was* him: [Excerpt: Johnny "Guitar" Watson, "Three Hours Past Midnight"] But Zappa wasn't only listening to R&B. The way Zappa would always tell the story, he discovered the music that would set him apart from his contemporaries originally by reading an article in Look magazine. Now, because Zappa has obsessive fans who check every detail, people have done the research and found that there was no such article in that magazine, but he was telling the story close enough to the time period in which it happened that its broad strokes, at least, must be correct even if the details are wrong. What Zappa said was that the article was on Sam Goody, the record salesman, and talked about how Goody was so good at his job that he had even been able to sell a record of Ionisation by Edgard Varese, which just consisted of the worst and most horrible noises anyone had ever heard, just loud drumming noises and screeching sounds. He determined then that he needed to hear that album, but he had no idea how he would get hold of a copy. I'll now read an excerpt from Zappa's autobiography, because Zappa's phrasing makes the story much better: "Some time later, I was staying overnight with Dave Franken, a friend who lived in La Mesa, and we wound up going to the hi-fi place -- they were having a sale on R&B singles. After shuffling through the rack and finding a couple of Joe Huston records, I made my way toward the cash register and happened to glance at the LP bin. I noticed a strange-looking black-and-white album cover with a guy on it who had frizzy gray hair and looked like a mad scientist. I thought it was great that a mad scientist had finally made a record, so I picked it up -- and there it was, the record with "Ionisation" on it. The author of the Look article had gotten it slightly wrong -- the correct title was The Complete Works of Edgard Varèse, Volume I, including "Ionisation," among other pieces, on an obscure label called EMS (Elaine Music Store). The record number was 401.I returned the Joe Huston records and checked my pockets to see how much money I had -- I think it came to about $3.75. I'd never bought an album before, but I knew they must be expensive because mostly old people bought them. I asked the man at the cash register how much EMS 401 cost. "That gray one in the box?" he said. "$5.95." I'd been searching for that record for over a year and I wasn't about to give up. I told him I had $3.75. He thought about it for a minute, and said, "We've been using that record to demonstrate hi-fi's with -- but nobody ever buys one when we use it. I guess if you want it that bad you can have it for $3.75."" Zappa took the record home, and put it on on his mother's record player in the living room, the only one that could play LPs: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Ionisation"] His mother told him he could never play that record in the living room again, so he took the record player into his bedroom, and it became his record player from that point on. Varese was a French composer who had, in his early career, been very influenced by Debussy. Debussy is now, of course, part of the classical canon, but in the early twentieth century he was regarded as radical, almost revolutionary, for his complete rewriting of the rules of conventional classical music tonality into a new conception based on chordal melodies, pedal points, and use of non-diatonic scales. Almost all of Varese's early work was destroyed in a fire, so we don't have evidence of the transition from Debussy's romantic-influenced impressionism to Varese's later style, but after he had moved to the US in 1915 he had become wildly more experimental. "Ionisation" is often claimed to be the first piece of Western classical music written only for percussion instruments. Varese was part of a wider movement of modernist composers -- for example he was the best man at Nicolas Slonimsky's wedding -- and had also set up the International Composers' Guild, whose manifesto influenced Zappa, though his libertarian politics led him to adapt it to a more individualistic rather than collective framing. The original manifesto read in part "Dying is the privilege of the weary. The present day composers refuse to die. They have realized the necessity of banding together and fighting for the right of each individual to secure a fair and free presentation of his work" In the twenties and thirties, Varese had written a large number of highly experimental pieces, including Ecuatorial, which was written for bass vocal, percussion, woodwind, and two Theremin cellos. These are not the same as the more familiar Theremin, created by the same inventor, and were, as their name suggests, Theremins that were played like a cello, with a fingerboard and bow. Only ten of these were ever made, specifically for performances of Varese's work, and he later rewrote the work to use ondes martenot instead of Theremin cellos, which is how the work is normally heard now: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Ecuatorial"] But Varese had spent much of the thirties, forties, and early fifties working on two pieces that were never finished, based on science fiction ideas -- L'Astronome, which was meant to be about communication with people from the star Sirius, and Espace, which was originally intended to be performed simultaneously by choirs in Beijing, Moscow, Paris, and New York. Neither of these ideas came to fruition, and so Varese had not released any new work, other than one small piece, Étude pour espace, an excerpt from the  larger work, in Zappa's lifetime. Zappa followed up his interest in Varese's music with his music teacher, one of the few people in the young man's life who encouraged him in his unusual interests. That teacher, Mr Kavelman, introduced Zappa to the work of other composers, like Webern, but would also let him know why he liked particular R&B records. For example, Zappa played Mr. Kavelman "Angel in My Life" by the Jewels, and asked what it was that made him particularly like it: [Excerpt: The Jewels, "Angel in My Life"] The teacher's answer was that it was the parallel fourths that made the record particularly appealing. Young Frank was such a big fan of Varese that for his fifteenth birthday, he actually asked if he could make a long-distance phone call to speak to Varese. He didn't know where Varese lived, but figured that it must be in Greenwich Village because that was where composers lived, and he turned out to be right. He didn't get through on his birthday -- he got Varese's wife, who told him the composer was in Europe -- but he did eventually get to speak to him, and was incredibly excited when Varese told him that not only had he just written a new piece for the first time in years, but that it was called Deserts, and was about deserts -- just like the Mojave Desert where Zappa lived: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Deserts"] As he later wrote, “When you're 15 and living in the Mojave Desert, and you find out that the World's Greatest Composer (who also looks like a mad scientist) is working in a secret Greenwich Village laboratory on a song about your hometown (so to speak), you can get pretty excited.” A year later, Zappa actually wrote to Varese, a long letter which included him telling the story about how he'd found his work in the first place, hoping to meet up with him when Zappa travelled to the East Coast to see family. I'll read out a few extracts, but the whole thing is fascinating for what it says about Zappa the precocious adolescent, and I'll link to a blog post with it in the show notes. "Dear Sir: Perhaps you might remember me from my stupid phone call last January, if not, my name again is Frank Zappa Jr. I am 16 years old… that might explain partly my disturbing you last winter. After I had struggled through Mr. Finklestein's notes on the back cover (I really did struggle too, for at the time I had had no training in music other than practice at drum rudiments) I became more and more interested in you and your music. I began to go to the library and take out books on modern composers and modern music, to learn all I could about Edgard Varese. It got to be my best subject (your life) and I began writing my reports and term papers on you at school. At one time when my history teacher asked us to write on an American that has really done something for the U.S.A. I wrote on you and the Pan American Composers League and the New Symphony. I failed. The teacher had never heard of you and said I made the whole thing up. Silly but true. That was my Sophomore year in high school. Throughout my life all the talents and abilities that God has left me with have been self developed, and when the time came for Frank to learn how to read and write music, Frank taught himself that too. I picked it all up from the library. I have been composing for two years now, utilizing a strict twelve-tone technique, producing effects that are reminiscent of Anton Webern. During those two years I have written two short woodwind quartets and a short symphony for winds, brass and percussion. I plan to go on and be a composer after college and I could really use the counsel of a veteran such as you. If you would allow me to visit with you for even a few hours it would be greatly appreciated. It may sound strange but I think I have something to offer you in the way of new ideas. One is an elaboration on the principle of Ruth Seeger's contrapuntal dynamics and the other is an extension of the twelve-tone technique which I call the inversion square. It enables one to compose harmonically constructed pantonal music in logical patterns and progressions while still abandoning tonality. Varese sent a brief reply, saying that he was going to be away for a few months, but would like to meet Zappa on his return. The two never met, but Zappa kept the letter from Varese framed on his wall for the rest of his life. Zappa soon bought a couple more albums, a version of "The Rite of Spring" by Stravinsky: [Excerpt: Igor Stravinsky, "The Rite of Spring"] And a record of pieces by Webern, including his Symphony opus 21: [Excerpt: Anton Webern, "Symphony op. 21"] (Incidentally, with the classical music here, I'm not seeking out the precise performances Zappa was listening to, just using whichever recordings I happen to have copies of). Zappa was also reading Slonimsky's works of musicology, like the Thesaurus of Scales and Melodic Patterns. As well as this "serious music" though, Zappa was also developing as an R&B musician.  He later said of the Webern album, "I loved that record, but it was about as different from Stravinsky and Varèse as you could get. I didn't know anything about twelve-tone music then, but I liked the way it sounded. Since I didn't have any kind of formal training, it didn't make any difference to me if I was listening to Lightnin' Slim, or a vocal group called the Jewels (who had a song out then called "Angel in My Life"), or Webern, or Varèse, or Stravinsky. To me it was all good music." He had started as a drummer with a group called the Blackouts, an integrated group with white, Latino, and Black members, who played R&B tracks like "Directly From My Heart to You", the song Johnny Otis had produced for Little Richard: [Excerpt: Little Richard, "Directly From My Heart to You"] But after eighteen months or so, he quit the group and stopped playing drums. Instead, he switched to guitar, with a style influenced by Johnny "Guitar" Watson and Guitar Slim. His first guitar had action so bad that he didn't learn to play chords, and moved straight on to playing lead lines with his younger brother Bobby playing rhythm. He also started hanging around with two other teenage bohemians -- Euclid Sherwood, who was nicknamed Motorhead, and Don Vliet, who called himself Don Van Vliet. Vliet was a truly strange character, even more so than Zappa, but they shared a love for the blues, and Vliet was becoming a fairly good blues singer, though he hadn't yet perfected the Howlin' Wolf imitation that would become his stock-in-trade in later years. But the surviving recording of Vliet singing with the Zappa brothers on guitar, singing a silly parody blues about being flushed down the toilet of the kind that many teenage boys would write, shows the promise that the two men had: [Excerpt: Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart, "Lost in a Whirlpool"] Zappa was also getting the chance to hear his more serious music performed. He'd had the high school band play a couple of his pieces, but he also got the chance to write film music -- his English teacher, Don Cerveris, had decided to go off and seek his fortune as a film scriptwriter, and got Zappa hired to write the music for a cheap Western he'd written, Run Home Slow. The film was beset with problems -- it started filming in 1959 but didn't get finished and released until 1965 -- but the music Zappa wrote for it did eventually get recorded and used on the soundtrack: [Excerpt: Frank Zappa, "Run Home Slow Theme"] In 1962, he got to write the music for another film, The World's Greatest Sinner, and he also wrote a theme song for that, which got released as the B-side of "How's Your Bird?", the record he made with Ray Collins: [Excerpt: Baby Ray and the Ferns, "The World's Greatest Sinner"] Zappa was able to make these records because by the early sixties, as well as playing guitar in bar bands, he was working as an assistant for a man named Paul Buff. Paul Buff had worked as an engineer for a guided missile manufacturer, but had decided that he didn't want to do that any more, and instead had opened up the first independent multi-track recording studio on the West Coast, PAL Studios, using equipment he'd designed and built himself, including a five-track tape recorder. Buff engineered a huge number of surf instrumentals there, including "Wipe Out" by the Surfaris: [Excerpt: The Surfaris, "Wipe Out"] Zappa had first got to know Buff when he had come to Buff's studio with some session musicians in 1961, to record some jazz pieces he'd written, including this piece which at the time was in the style of Dave Brubeck but would later become a staple of Zappa's repertoire reorchestrated in a  rock style. [Excerpt: The PAL Studio Band, "Never on Sunday"] Buff really just wanted to make records entirely by himself, so he'd taught himself to play the rudiments of guitar, bass, drums, piano, and alto saxophone, so he could create records alone. He would listen to every big hit record, figure out what the hooks were on the record, and write his own knock-off of those. An example is "Tijuana Surf" by the Hollywood Persuaders, which is actually Buff on all instruments, and which according to Zappa went to number one in Mexico (though I've not found an independent source to confirm that chart placing, so perhaps take it with a pinch of salt): [Excerpt: The Hollywood Persuaders, "Tijuana Surf"] The B-side to that, "Grunion Run", was written by Zappa, who also plays guitar on that side: [Excerpt: The Hollywood Persuaders, "Grunion Run"] Zappa, Buff, Ray Collins, and a couple of associates would record all sorts of material at PAL -- comedy material like "Hey Nelda", under the name "Ned and Nelda" -- a parody of "Hey Paula" by Paul and Paula: [Excerpt: Ned and Nelda, "Hey Nelda"] Doo-wop parodies like "Masked Grandma": [Excerpt: The PAL Studio Band, "Masked Grandma"] R&B: [Excerpt: The PAL Studio Band, "Why Don't You Do Me Right?"] and more. Then Buff or Zappa would visit one of the local independent label owners and try to sell them the master -- Art Laboe at Original Sound released several of the singles, as did Bob Keane at Donna Records and Del-Fi. The "How's Your Bird" single also got Zappa his first national media exposure, as he went on the Steve Allen show, where he demonstrated to Allen how to make music using a bicycle and a prerecorded electronic tape, in an appearance that Zappa would parody five years later on the Monkees' TV show: [Excerpt: Steve Allen and Frank Zappa, "Cyclophony"] But possibly the record that made the most impact at the time was "Memories of El Monte", a song that Zappa and Collins wrote together about Art Laboe's dances at El Monte Stadium, incorporating excerpts of several of the songs that would be played there, and named after a compilation Laboe had put out, which had included “I Remember Linda” by Little Julian and the Tigers. They got Cleve Duncan of the Penguins to sing lead, and the record came out as by the Penguins, on Original Sound: [Excerpt: The Penguins, "Memories of El Monte"] By this point, though, Pal studios was losing money, and Buff took up the offer of a job working for Laboe full time, as an engineer at Original Sound. He would later become best known for inventing the kepex, an early noise gate which engineer Alan Parsons used on a bass drum to create the "heartbeat" that opens Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon: [Excerpt: Pink Floyd, "Speak to Me"] That invention would possibly be Buff's most lasting contribution to music, as by the early eighties, the drum sound on every single pop record was recorded using a noise gate. Buff sold the studio to Zappa, who renamed it Studio Z and moved in -- he was going through a divorce and had nowhere else to live. The studio had no shower, and Zappa had to just use a sink to wash, and he was surviving mostly off food scrounged by his resourceful friend Motorhead Sherwood. By this point, Zappa had also joined a band called the Soots, consisting of Don Van Vliet, Alex St. Clair and Vic Mortenson, and they recorded several tracks at Studio Z, which they tried to get released on Dot Records, including a cover version of Little Richard's “Slippin' and Slidin'”, and a song called “Tiger Roach” whose lyrics were mostly random phrases culled from a Green Lantern comic: [Excerpt: The Soots, "Tiger Roach"] Zappa also started writing what was intended as the first ever rock opera, "I Was a Teenage Maltshop", and attempts were made to record parts of it with Vliet, Mortenson, and Motorhead Sherwood: [Excerpt: Frank Zappa, "I Was a Teenage Maltshop"] Zappa was also planning to turn Studio Z into a film studio. He obtained some used film equipment, and started planning a science fiction film to feature Vliet, titled "Captain Beefheart Meets the Grunt People". The title was inspired by an uncle of Vliet's, who lived with Vliet and his girlfriend, and used to urinate with the door open so he could expose himself to Vliet's girlfriend, saying as he did so "Look at that! Looks just like a big beef heart!" Unfortunately, the film would not get very far. Zappa was approached by a used-car salesman who said that he and his friends were having a stag party. As Zappa owned a film studio, could he make them a pornographic film to show at the party? Zappa told him that a film wouldn't be possible, but as he needed the money, would an audio tape be acceptable? The used-car salesman said that it would, and gave him a list of sex acts he and his friends would like to hear. Zappa and a friend, Lorraine Belcher, went into the studio and made a few grunting noises and sound effects. The used-car salesman turned out actually to be an undercover policeman, who was better known in the area for his entrapment of gay men, but had decided to branch out. Zappa and Belcher were arrested -- Zappa's father bailed him out, and Zappa got an advance from Art Laboe to pay Belcher's bail. Luckily "Grunion Run" and "Memories of El Monte" were doing well enough that Laboe could give Zappa a $1500 advance. When the case finally came to trial, the judge laughed at the tape and wanted to throw the whole case out, but the prosecutor insisted on fighting, and Zappa got ten days in prison, and most of his tapes were impounded, never to be returned. He fell behind with his rent, and Studio Z was demolished. And then Ray Collins called him, asking if he wanted to join a bar band: [Excerpt: The Mothers, "Hitch-Hike"] The Soul Giants were formed by a bass player named Roy Estrada. Now, Estrada is unfortunately someone who will come up in the story a fair bit over the next year or so, as he played on several of the most important records to come out of LA in the sixties and early seventies. He is also someone about whom there's fairly little biographical information -- he's not been interviewed much, compared to pretty much everyone else, and it's easy to understand why when you realise that he's currently half-way through a twenty-five year sentence for child molestation -- his third such conviction. He won't get out of prison until he's ninety-three. He's one of the most despicable people who will turn up in this podcast, and frankly I'm quite glad I don't know more about him as a person. He was, though, a good bass player and falsetto singer, and he had released a single on King Records, an instrumental titled "Jungle Dreams": [Excerpt, Roy Estrada and the Rocketeers, "Jungle Dreams"] The other member of the rhythm section, Jimmy Carl Black, was an American Indian (that's the term he always used about himself until his death, and so that's the term I'll use about him too) from Texas. Black had grown up in El Paso as a fan of Western Swing music, especially Bob Wills, but had become an R&B fan after discovering Wolfman Jack's radio show and hearing the music of Howlin' Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson. Like every young man from El Paso, he would travel to Juarez as a teenager to get drunk, see sex shows, and raise hell. It was also there that he saw his first live blues music, watching Long John Hunter, the same man who inspired the Bobby Fuller Four, and he would always claim Hunter as the man whose shows taught him how to play the blues. Black had decided he wanted to become a musician when he'd seen Elvis perform live. In Black's memory, this was a gig where Elvis was an unknown support act for Faron Young and Wanda Jackson, but he was almost certainly slightly misremembering -- it's most likely that what he saw was Elvis' show in El Paso on the eleventh of April 1956, where Young and Jackson were also on the bill, but supporting Elvis who was headlining. Either way, Black had decided that he wanted to make girls react to him the same way they reacted to Elvis, and he started playing in various country and R&B bands. His first record was with a group called the Keys, and unfortunately I haven't been able to track down a copy (it was reissued on a CD in the nineties, but the CD itself is now out of print and sells for sixty pounds) but he did rerecord the song with a later group he led, the Mannish Boys: [Excerpt: Jimmy Carl Black and the Mannish Boys, "Stretch Pants"] He spent a couple of years in the Air Force, but continued playing music during that time, including in a band called The Exceptions which featured Peter Cetera later of the band Chicago, on bass. After a brief time working as lineman in Wichita, he moved his family to California, where he got a job teaching drums at a music shop in Anaheim, where the bass teacher was Jim Fielder, who would later play bass in Blood, Sweat, and Tears. One of Fielder's friends, Tim Buckley, used to hang around in the shop as well, and Black was at first irritated by him coming in and playing the guitars and not buying anything, but eventually became impressed by his music. Black would later introduce Buckley to Herb Cohen, who would become Buckley's manager, starting his professional career. When Roy Estrada came into the shop, he and Black struck up a friendship, and Estrada asked Black to join his band The Soul Giants, whose lineup became Estrada, Black, a sax player named Davey Coronado, a guitarist called Larry and a singer called Dave. The group got a residency at the Broadside club in Ponoma, playing "Woolly Bully" and "Louie Louie" and other garage-band staples. But then Larry and Dave got drafted, and the group got in two men called Ray -- Ray Collins on vocals, and Ray Hunt on guitar. This worked for a little while, but Ray Hunt was, by all accounts, not a great guitar player -- he would play wrong chords, and also he was fundamentally a surf player while the Soul Giants were an R&B group. Eventually, Collins and Hunt got into a fistfight, and Collins suggested that they get in his friend Frank instead. For a while, the Soul Giants continued playing "Midnight Hour" and "Louie Louie", but then Zappa suggested that they start playing some of his original material as well. Davy Coronado refused to play original material, because he thought, correctly, that it would lose the band gigs, but the rest of the band sided with the man who had quickly become their new leader. Coronado moved back to Texas, and on Mother's Day 1965 the Soul Giants changed their name to the Mothers. They got in Henry Vestine on second guitar, and started playing Zappa's originals, as well as changing the lyrics to some of the hits they were playing: [Excerpt: The Mothers, "Plastic People"] Zappa had started associating with the freak crowd in Hollywood centred around Vito and Franzoni, after being introduced by Don Cerveris, his old teacher turned screenwriter, to an artist called Mark Cheka, who Zappa invited to manage the group. Cheka in turn brought in his friend Herb Cohen, who managed several folk acts including the Modern Folk Quartet and Judy Henske, and who like Zappa had once been arrested on obscenity charges, in Cohen's case for promoting gigs by the comedian Lenny Bruce. Cohen first saw the Mothers when they were recording their appearance in an exploitation film called Mondo Hollywood. They were playing in a party scene, using equipment borrowed from Jim Guercio, a session musician who would briefly join the Mothers, but who is now best known for having been Chicago's manager and producing hit records for them and Blood, Sweat, and Tears. In the crowd were Vito and Franzoni, Bryan Maclean, Ram Dass, the Harvard psychologist who had collaborated with Timothy Leary in controversial LSD experiments that had led to both losing their jobs, and other stalwarts of the Sunset Strip scene. Cohen got the group bookings at the Whisky A-Go-Go and The Trip, two of the premier LA nightclubs, and Zappa would also sit in with other bands playing at those venues, like the Grass Roots, a band featuring Bryan Maclean and Arthur Lee which would soon change its name to Love. At this time Zappa and Henry Vestine lived together, next door to a singer named Victoria Winston, who at the time was in a duo called Summer's Children with Curt Boettcher: [Excerpt: Summer's Children, "Milk and Honey"] Winston, like Zappa, was a fan of Edgard Varese, and actually asked Zappa to write songs for Summer's Children, but one of the partners involved in their production company disliked Zappa's material and the collaboration went no further. Zappa at this point was trying to incorporate more ideas from modal jazz into his music. He was particularly impressed by Eric Dolphy's 1964 album "Out to Lunch": [Excerpt: Eric Dolphy, "Hat and Beard"] But he was also writing more about social issues, and in particular he had written a song called "The Watts Riots Song", which would later be renamed "Trouble Every Day": [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Trouble Every Day"] Now, the Watts Uprising was one of the most important events in Black American history, and it feels quite wrong that I'm covering it in an episode about a band made up of white, Latino, and American Indian people rather than a record made by Black people, but I couldn't find any way to fit it in anywhere else. As you will remember me saying in the episode on "I Fought the Law", the LA police under Chief William Parker were essentially a criminal gang by any other name -- they were incompetent, violent, and institutionally racist, and terrorised Black people. The Black people of LA were also feeling particularly aggrieved in the summer of 1965, as a law banning segregation in housing had been overturned by a ballot proposition in November 1964, sponsored by the real estate industry and passed by an overwhelming majority of white voters in what Martin Luther King called "one of the most shameful developments in our nation's history", and which Edmund Brown, the Democratic governor said was like "another hate binge which began more than 30 years ago in a Munich beer hall". Then on Wednesday, August 11, 1965, the police pulled over a Black man, Marquette Frye, for drunk driving. He had been driving his mother's car, and she lived nearby, and she came out to shout at him about drinking and driving. The mother, Rena Price, was hit by one of the policemen; Frye then physically attacked one of the police for hitting his mother, one of the police pulled out a gun, a crowd gathered, the police became violent against the crowd, a rumour spread that they had kicked a pregnant woman, and the resulting protests were exacerbated by the police carrying out what Chief Parker described as a "paramiltary" response. The National Guard were called in, huge swathes of south central LA were cordoned off by the police with signs saying things like "turn left or get shot". Black residents started setting fire to and looting local white-owned businesses that had been exploiting Black workers and customers, though this looting was very much confined to individuals who were known to have made the situation worse. Eventually it took six days for the uprising to be put down, at a cost of thirty-four deaths, 1032 injuries, and 3438 arrests. Of the deaths, twenty-three were Black civilians murdered by the police, and zero were police murdered by Black civilians (two police were killed by other police, in accidental shootings). The civil rights activist Bayard Rustin said of the uprising, "The whole point of the outbreak in Watts was that it marked the first major rebellion of Negroes against their own masochism and was carried on with the express purpose of asserting that they would no longer quietly submit to the deprivation of slum life." Frank Zappa's musical hero Johnny Otis would later publish the book Listen to the Lambs about the Watts rebellion, and in it he devotes more than thirty pages to eyewitness accounts from Black people. It's an absolutely invaluable resource. One of the people Otis interviews is Lily Ford, who is described by my copy of the book as being the "lead singer of the famous Roulettes". This is presumably an error made by the publishers, rather than Otis, because Ford was actually a singer with the Raelettes, as in Ray Charles' vocal group. She also recorded with Otis under the name "Lily of the Valley": [Excerpt: Lily of the Valley, "I Had a Sweet Dream"] Now, Ford's account deserves a large excerpt, but be warned, this is very, very difficult to hear. I gave a content warning at the beginning, but I'm going to give another one here. "A lot of our people were in the street, seeing if they could get free food and clothes and furniture, and some of them taking liquor too. But the white man was out for blood. Then three boys came down the street, laughing and talking. They were teenagers, about fifteen or sixteen years old. As they got right at the store they seemed to debate whether they would go inside. One boy started a couple of times to go. Finally he did. Now a cop car finally stops to investigate. Police got out of the car. Meanwhile, the other two boys had seen them coming and they ran. My brother-in-law and I were screaming and yelling for the boy to get out. He didn't hear us, or was too scared to move. He never had a chance. This young cop walked up to the broken window and looked in as the other one went round the back and fired some shots and I just knew he'd killed the other two boys, but I guess he missed. He came around front again. By now other police cars had come. The cop at the window aimed his gun. He stopped and looked back at a policeman sitting in a car. He aimed again. No shot. I tried to scream, but I was so horrified that nothing would come out of my throat. The third time he aimed he yelled, "Halt", and fired before the word was out of his mouth. Then he turned around and made a bull's-eye sign with his fingers to his partner. Just as though he had shot a tin can off a fence, not a human being. The cops stood around for ten or fifteen minutes without going inside to see if the kid was alive or dead. When the ambulance came, then they went in. They dragged him out like he was a sack of potatoes. Cops were everywhere now. So many cops for just one murder." [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Trouble Every Day"] There's a lot more of this sort of account in Otis' book, and it's all worth reading -- indeed, I would argue that it is *necessary* reading. And Otis keeps making a point which I quoted back in the episode on "Willie and the Hand Jive" but which I will quote again here -- “A newborn Negro baby has less chance of survival than a white. A Negro baby will have its life ended seven years sooner. This is not some biological phenomenon linked to skin colour, like sickle-cell anaemia; this is a national crime, linked to a white-supremacist way of life and compounded by indifference”. (Just a reminder, the word “Negro” which Otis uses there was, in the mid-sixties, the term of choice used by Black people.) And it's this which inspired "The Watts Riot Song", which the Mothers were playing when Tom Wilson was brought into The Trip by Herb Cohen: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Trouble Every Day"] Wilson had just moved from Columbia, where he'd been producing Dylan and Simon and Garfunkel, to Verve, a subsidiary of MGM which was known for jazz records but was moving into rock and roll. Wilson was looking for a white blues band, and thought he'd found one. He signed the group without hearing any other songs. Henry Vestine quit the group between the signing and the first recording, to go and join an *actual* white blues band, Canned Heat, and over the next year the group's lineup would fluctuate quite a bit around the core of Zappa, Collins, Estrada, and Black, with members like Steve Mann, Jim Guercio, Jim Fielder, and Van Dyke Parks coming and going, often without any recordings being made of their performances. The lineup on what became the group's first album, Freak Out! was Zappa, Collins, Estrada, Black, and Elliot Ingber, the former guitarist with the Gamblers, who had joined the group shortly before the session and would leave within a few months. The first track the group recorded, "Any Way the Wind Blows", was straightforward enough: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Any Way the Wind Blows"] The second song, a "Satisfaction" knock-off called "Hungry Freaks Daddy", was also fine. But it was when the group performed their third song of the session, "Who Are The Brain Police?", that Tom Wilson realised that he didn't have a standard band on his hands: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Who Are the Brain Police?"] Luckily for everyone concerned, Tom Wilson was probably the single best producer in America to have discovered the Mothers. While he was at the time primarily known for his folk-rock productions, he had built his early career on Cecil Taylor and Sun Ra records, some of the freakiest jazz of the fifties and early sixties. He knew what needed to be done -- he needed a bigger budget. Far from being annoyed that he didn't have the white blues band he wanted, Wilson actively encouraged the group to go much, much further. He brought in Wrecking Crew members to augment the band (though one of them. Mac Rebennack, found the music so irritating he pretended he needed to go to the toilet, walked out, and never came back). He got orchestral musicians to play Zappa's scores, and allowed the group to rent hundreds of dollars of percussion instruments for the side-long track "Return of the Son of Monster Magnet", which features many Hollywood scenesters of the time, including Van Dyke Parks, Kim Fowley, future Manson family member Bobby Beausoleil, record executive David Anderle, songwriter P.F. Sloan, and cartoonist Terry Gilliam, all recording percussion parts and vocal noises: [Excerpt: The Mothers of Invention, "Return of the Son of Monster Magnet"] Such was Wilson's belief in the group that Freak Out! became only the second rock double album ever released -- exactly a week after the first, Blonde on Blonde, by Wilson's former associate Bob Dylan. The inner sleeve included a huge list of people who had influenced the record in one way or another, including people Zappa knew like Don Cerveris, Don Vliet, Paul Buff, Bob Keane, Nik Venet, and Art Laboe,  musicians who had influenced the group like Don & Dewey, Johnny Otis, Otis' sax players Preston Love and Big Jay McNeely, Eric Dolphy, Edgard Varese, Richard Berry, Johnny Guitar Watson, and Ravi Shankar, eccentric performers like Tiny Tim, DJs like Hunter Hancock and Huggy Boy, science fiction writers like Cordwainer Smith and Robert Sheckley, and scenesters like David Crosby, Vito, and Franzoni. The list of 179 people would provide a sort of guide for many listeners, who would seek out those names and find their ways into the realms of non-mainstream music, writing, and art over the next few decades. Zappa would always remain grateful to Wilson for taking his side in the record's production, saying "Wilson was sticking his neck out. He laid his job on the line by producing the album. MGM felt that they had spent too much money on the album". The one thing Wilson couldn't do, though, was persuade the label that the group's name could stay as it was. "The Mothers" was a euphemism, for a word I can't say if I want this podcast to keep its clean rating, a word that is often replaced in TV clean edits of films with "melon farmers", and MGM were convinced that the radio would never play any music by a band with that name -- not realising that that wouldn't be the reason this music wouldn't get played on the radio. The group needed to change their name. And so, out of necessity, they became the Mothers of Invention.

    god america tv love american new york california history black texas world children chicago english europe hollywood education los angeles lost mother law mexico french young dj spring blood speak police western trip keys harvard memories maryland massachusetts wolf valley beatles mothers martin luther king jr dying hunt cd paradise cops tears columbia milk west coast democratic rock and roll elvis dark side air force east coast beijing latino lonely moscow dolphins cocktails var tigers bob dylan djs sake lp spike invention sweat lsd satisfaction munich silly el paso pink floyd slim watts black americans halt anaheim penguins guild my life symphony chester lambs mgm national guard ned christmastime blonde green lantern herrera grassroots tijuana pal scales estrada ems crows manson jewels wichita mexican americans buckley sirius mixcloud late show ray charles tilt frank zappa sophomores rite american indian flips little richard monterey dewey buff gee vito monkees tom wilson italian americans terry gilliam garfunkel goodies juarez espace rock music la mesa motorhead oldies chicano greenwich village ram dass coronado blackouts verve mojave deserts frye sunset strip zappa incidentally exceptions wipeout debussy jerry lee lewis freak out stravinsky david crosby tiny tim timothy leary sun ra gamblers belcher goody mojave desert lenny bruce steve allen wrecking crew ferns howlin midnight hour east la dave brubeck wind blows city slickers slippin captain beefheart el monte theremin vliet fielder ravi shankar negroes thesaurus varese ritchie valens canned heat alan parsons complete works earth angel bayard rustin monster magnet wanda jackson tim buckley peter cetera broadside mortenson slidin spike jones louie louie wolfman jack lightnin western swing spike milligan bob wills eric dolphy cecil taylor van dyke parks oldies but goodies sonny boy williamson richard berry whisky a go go for mother arthur lee franzoni webern kim fowley johnny guitar watson trouble every day mothers of invention steve mann in black midnighters sam goody any way roulettes bruce johnston robert sheckley king records faron young cheka i fought rocketeers ray collins johnny otis anton webern bobby fuller four ray hunt nelda herb cohen edgard var laboe original sound theremins bobby beausoleil ionisation cordwainer smith studio z mac rebennack don van vliet big jay mcneely brain police long john hunter edgard varese chief parker ecuatorial ron gregory tilt araiza
    Our American Stories
    EP152: Stories Behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas and The Importance of Giving and Serving during Christmas Time

    Our American Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 38:16


    On this episode of Our American Stories, Ace Collins, author of Stories Behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas, introduces us to people we've never met, stories we've never heard, and meanings we have never imagined. Once arriving back home from a mission trip, Ashley Freeman realized service work could be done right in her own community. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate) Time Codes: 00:00 - Ace Collins on Stories Behind the Best-Loved Songs of Christmas 35:00 - The Importance of Giving and Serving during Christmas Time Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    We Would Be Dead
    Scary Ghost Stories Vol. 2 (Victorian Christmas Tales)

    We Would Be Dead

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 65:35


    Gather 'round the fire fiends and let's bring back a time honored tradition...again! Christmastime ghost stories. Another episode perfect for a chilly and festive evening. Merry Christmas, fiends!   WWBD Merch Buy your WWBD swag here!  Join the Conversation         

    Chasing Elephants Audio Podcast
    The Fullness of Christmas | Christmas Time Ep. 3

    Chasing Elephants Audio Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 31:06


    Student Leadership University's mission is to develop and equip student leaders to think, dream, and lead. We strive to instill future tense thinking; character-driven decision making; ownership of biblical values; and a commitment to influence through service.Show Notes:The Philosophy of Advent"Advent" not only refers to the remembering of the first coming of Jesus but reminds us to be expectant toward the second coming of Jesus.Advent is a time to pause and reflect on what has come and to reflect on what is coming.Advent is God getting us out of our mess and bringing us home.The more we reflect the more we are convinced of the hope that we have.We can't focus on the problems, we need to focus on the promises of Jesus made real in Advent.Advent season prepares us for a lifetime of looking forward to restoration.Instead of being the end of the story, redemption is the beginning of a story that ends in the restoration of all things in the Heaven Country.We live between two promises.The Practice of AdventThere is no single "right way" to practice Advent. But Christians for millennia before us have handed down good practices to help us focus on remembering the Coming of Jesus.Light different candles.Praying for something specific.Fasting from food or Abstaining from something.If after Advent is done you desire the things of God and you long for Heaven more, you know you've done Advent right.The practice of Advent is important but not primary. What is primary is being in the presence of God.Connect with SLU:InstagramRegister for SLULearn more about The LIFT TourLearn more about YPSConnect with our HostsBrent's InstagramBrent's TwitterJeff's InstagramJeff's Twitter

    Speakin' Spooky
    Ep 7: A Christmastime Crime & A (not so) Very Merry Krampus

    Speakin' Spooky

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 56:31


    Merry Christmas, Grinches! Grace's case discusses one Chicago teen, Alexis Valdez, who decked the halls with….murder?! Marisa's mystery tells the tale of a Christmas cryptid who is baaaad to the bone. __________________________________________________________________ Sources:  https://www.cbsnews.com/news/report-teen-decapitated-aunts-boyfriend-as-present/ https://www.huffpost.com/entry/alexis-valdez-chicago_n_4512331 https://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20131227/hermosa/man-mutilated-aunts-boyfriend-left-his-body-parts-her-bed-authorities/ https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/breaking/chi-police-teen-in-custody-after-man-found-decapitated-in-northwest-side-apartment-20131225-story.html https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/teen-cuts-off-aunts-boyfriends-head-in-grisly-murder/id1193068130?i=1000502607652 CONLEY, ROBIN. “Living with t