Podcasts about striking

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  • 1,467PODCASTS
  • 2,142EPISODES
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  • Jan 12, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about striking

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Latest podcast episodes about striking

Agtech - So What?
The Tricky Business of Scaling Soil Tech - Adam Litle, CEO, Sound Agriculture

Agtech - So What?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 34:10


The science and technology of soil is rapidly evolving, but translating it into a scalable business that can offer viable products to farmers has long been a tricky proposition. But it's one that Adam Litle, the CEO of Sound Agriculture, has devoted much of his career to answering.Adam was part of the executive team at Granular, the farm management software company acquired by Dupont (now Corteva) for $300M. Now, at Sound Ag, he's leading a company that's raised more than $95M to develop a product which activates microbes in soil to increase the uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus, thereby enabling farmers to use less fertilizer.In this episode Adam shares his insights on:Striking a balance between scientific rigor, technological innovation, and investor returnsWhy the SaaS business model is challenging in agricultureHow to build trust in a startup team of scientists and industry people, while bringing in commercial experience.Why soil innovations are receiving an increase in attention as farmers continue to grapple with the rising costs of fertilizer.For more information, visit our website.

Geeks Under Grace Podcast
Episode 289: Phantom Thieves, The Hobbit, and Striking First-er

Geeks Under Grace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 69:39


This week, Shelley and L.J. catch up on all the things they geeked out on over the holiday break. Then, in the news, we talk about mobile games and animation in movies and TV.   GAMING Dying Light 2 devs clarify on playtime https://www.gameinformer.com/psa/2022/01/10/update-dying-light-2-main-story-lasts-about-20-hours Take-Two acquires Zynga for $12.7 billion https://www.gameinformer.com/2022/01/10/take-two-acquires-zynga-for-nearly-13-billion     MOVIES: Turning Red skipping theaters for D+ https://screenrant.com/turning-red-pixar-movie-disney-plus-streaming-free/   Morbius delayed https://screenrant.com/morbius-release-delay-spiderman-no-way-home-avoid/   TV Scott Pilgrim anime in development https://www.gameinformer.com/gamer-culture/2022/01/10/scott-pilgrim-anime-in-the-works-at-netflix   Original Wolverine VA recording for X-Men 97 https://screenrant.com/xmen-97-animated-show-wolverine-cal-dodd-image/   MORE INFO Send us your questions! podcast@geeksundergrace.com For more Geeks Under Grace: http://www.geeksundergrace.com http://www.twitter.com/geeksundergrace http://www.twitch.tv/geeksundergrace https://geeksundergrace.com/give     For more Cody Armour: http://twitter.com/CodyArmour https://www.instagram.com/codyarmour/     For more Shelley Nollan: http://twitter.com/theshellshock24     For more L.J. Lowery: Lj.Lowery@geeksundergrace.com https://twitter.com/WarHeroLJ

The Oyedepo Podcast
Striking Testimony Divine Healing

The Oyedepo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 2:48


Okpere Mittabel shares how God healed her of Migraine, and she is healed forever. To God be the glory!

The Oyedepo Podcast
Striking Testimony Rescued from Death (Language: French)

The Oyedepo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 3:13


In this episode, Leandre Augusta, shares how God rescued her from death. Today, she is well and fine. To God be all the glory!

The Sharp 600
338: Episode 338: NFL Week 18 with Scott Shapiro

The Sharp 600

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 15:55


Host Rob Cressy welcomes TwinSpires Analyst, Scott Shapiro, to recap Week 17 action and prep for some important Week 18 matchups. Rob and Scott discuss: - What they learned in Week 17, nailing the Steelers & Raiders games. - Striking gold on a Buffalo Bills live bet against the Falcons. - Dealing with uncertainties of Week 18 absences (COVID, sitting out). - Analyzing Steelers-Ravens and Patriots-Dolphins. - Other key Week 18 matchups. You can find Scott on Twitter @ScottShap34. Connect with Rob @robcressy on Twitter and send in your feedback, best bets and bad beats. Be sure to subscribe, rate, and review The Sharp 600 podcast.

The Max Kellerman Show
Hour 3: Striking Midnight

The Max Kellerman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:23


Former Steelers QB Charlie Batch joins the show to continue the discussion on Antonio Brown's antics, and on Big Ben's career ending. Giants HC Joe Judge went on an epic rant after their loss to the Bears. Plus, ESPN NFL Analyst Rex Ryan!

Golic and Wingo
Hour 3: Striking Midnight

Golic and Wingo

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:23


Former Steelers QB Charlie Batch joins the show to continue the discussion on Antonio Brown's antics, and on Big Ben's career ending. Giants HC Joe Judge went on an epic rant after their loss to the Bears. Plus, ESPN NFL Analyst Rex Ryan!

The Stephen A. Smith Show
Hour 3: Striking Midnight

The Stephen A. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:23


Former Steelers QB Charlie Batch joins the show to continue the discussion on Antonio Brown's antics, and on Big Ben's career ending. Giants HC Joe Judge went on an epic rant after their loss to the Bears. Plus, ESPN NFL Analyst Rex Ryan!

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis
Hour 3: Striking Midnight

Mornings with Keyshawn, LZ and Travis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:23


Former Steelers QB Charlie Batch joins the show to continue the discussion on Antonio Brown's antics, and on Big Ben's career ending. Giants HC Joe Judge went on an epic rant after their loss to the Bears. Plus, ESPN NFL Analyst Rex Ryan!

Keyshawn, JWill & Max
Hour 3: Striking Midnight

Keyshawn, JWill & Max

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 43:23


Former Steelers QB Charlie Batch joins the show to continue the discussion on Antonio Brown's antics, and on Big Ben's career ending. Giants HC Joe Judge went on an epic rant after their loss to the Bears. Plus, ESPN NFL Analyst Rex Ryan!

One Visit Away
#068 McDonald's, Striking Oil, and 4 Hour Visits

One Visit Away

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 18:10


Can McDonalds and Cracker Barrel lead to significant giving? Find out by listening to this episode!

Just Fly Performance Podcast
287: Helen Hall on Heel Striking and Leveraging Hills for Foot Function in Running Performance

Just Fly Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 53:58


Today's show welcomes back running coach and biomechanist, Helen Hall.  Helen is the author of “Even With Your Shoes On”.  She is an endurance athlete, minimalist ultra-distance runner, 6 times Ironman and credited with being the world's first ‘barefoot' Iron(wo)man.  Helen is the owner of the Perpetual Forward Motion School of Efficient Running, as well as a running injury clinic, using the latest movement science and gait analysis technology to help people find solutions for their pain and injuries.  She appeared on episode 180 speaking on all things joint mechanics and technique in running. One of the most common things I hear (and have seen, especially in my club track years) about athletes is those who have a heavy heel strike when they run.  Excessive passive forces in athletic motion is never a good thing, but it's always important to understand binary concepts (you had a heel-strike or you didn't) in further detail.  There is a spectrum of potential foot strike positions in running, and nobody stays on their heel in gait, as we always move towards the forefoot. On the show today, Helen goes in depth on heel striking and the biomechanics of the heel in the running cycle, as well as the difference in heel striking motions in jogging versus sprinting.  One of the topics I frequently enjoy covering is how the human body can interact with nature and natural features to optimize itself (which includes optimizing running technique) and Helen speaks on how one can use uphill and downhill grades to help athletes and individuals self-organize their own optimal running technique. Today's episode is brought to you by SimpliFaster, Inside Tracker, and Lost Empire Herbs. For 25% off of an Inside Tracker order go to info.insidetracker.com/justflysports For 15% off your Lost Empire Herbs order, head to lostempireherbs.com/justfly. View more podcast episodes at the podcast homepage. Timestamps and Main Points 5:27 – Why Helen feels individuals heel strike in the first place 11:33 – Helen's “happy medium” when it comes to socks in running 14:28 – Helen's view on the heel bone and pronation in the initial strike in running 21:03 – How Helen would help an athlete who heel strikes in a sprint when it is not desired 29:28 – The importance of relaxation and “letting” the body move and react, versus trying to force the body into motion 38:41 – Nuances of using uphill and downhill running, what to notice, and how to integrate that into one's stride 45:29 – How un-even surfaces can create grounds by which individuals can self-organize their stride and foot action 48:35 – How to leverage hills to optimize the function of the glutes in running “I never change somebody's first point of contact; their bodies change their first point of contact themselves” “There can't be a right or wrong, since there are so many people whose first point of contact is the heel, and they are not in pain” “If you land in front of the heel, then you get the eccentric loading of the Achilles and what it attaches to” “People decide they are in “this camp” or “that camp” and thereby the camps run parallel to each other and never exchange ideas” “You want to be landing, not in a pronating foot.. in the context of running… the descent is arguably a posteriorly tilted calcaneus because you are landing in a supinating foot… unless your foot is going to go “splat” immediately” “You want to land on a foot that is relaxed enough to give” “They are reaching for the step, and by reaching on the step through hip flexion, they are ending up on their heel first, and that may be giving them more control as they go through the forefoot” “In my experience, people do not go back to the heel-strike, and all you need is a slope (to correct it)” “If you want to slow down, the most natural thing in the world is to shove your foot out, and brake with your heel”

Infinite Loops
Thomas J Bevan — Avoiding the Middle Ground (EP.84)

Infinite Loops

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 46:23


Thomas J Bevan is an author and essayist. He pens The Commonplace newsletter which includes workshops on writing, movie reviews, and essays on life. We talk about: Starting a commonplace Striking a balance between the physical and digital Not defining growth with metrics The Soaring 20s Social Club And MUCH more! Follow Thomas on Twitter at https://twitter.com/thomasjb3van and subscribe to his newsletter at https://thomasjbevan.substack.com/

Redefining Caregiving -Devoted to Caregivers
#76 Crippled with Fear - How to get ahead of fear

Redefining Caregiving -Devoted to Caregivers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 14:06


The opposite of fear is faith, but what do you have faith in. It's important to protect what you allow to manipulate your thoughts around fears. Striking a balance of receiving critical information and getting sucked into exaggerated fear-based messages. Learn how you can go from anxiety to acceptance of what you can do, in order to have more peace. Patreon - Support me in supporting caregivers: https://www.patreon.com/redefiningcaregiving YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzULzcV1Uzz0C1eG-HSre0g FB-Redefining Caregiving: https://www.facebook.com/redefiningcaregiving personalized one-on-one coaching via phone, or Zoom. I can help you get a grip on what is falling apart and bring momentum where you want results most. We'll design a personalized plan that fits you and what you want to achieve in life. Free 15 minute caregiver "get to know you' consultation, call 971-678-4395 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/redefiningcaregiving/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/redefiningcaregiving/support

Locked On ACC- Daily College Football & Basketball Podcast
ACC Football Bowl Games Striking Out As Louisville Loses First Responder Bowl, Other Games Canceled

Locked On ACC- Daily College Football & Basketball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 31:59


The Louisville Cardinals took out the Air Force Tuesday in a close matchup but fell short 31-28. After 4 bowl games have been canceled due to COVID, it remains to be seen if the ACC will win one game this bowl season. Locked On Boston College Host AJ Black joins Candace Cooper to talk about the current state of affairs for ACC Football and what we may see for the rest of basketball season. Follow @LockedOnACC on Twitter & Subscribe on YouTube. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors!Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

History Ago Go
American Comics: A History (Jeremy Dauber)

History Ago Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 49:46


Comics have conquered America. From our multiplexes, where Marvel and DC movies reign supreme, to our television screens, where comics-based shows like The Walking Dead have become among the most popular in cable history, to convention halls, best-seller lists, Pulitzer Prize–winning titles, and MacArthur Fellowship recipients, comics shape American culture, in ways high and low, superficial, and deeply profound.In American Comics, Columbia professor Jeremy Dauber takes readers through their incredible but little-known history, starting with the Civil War and cartoonist Thomas Nast, creator of the lasting and iconic images of Uncle Sam and Santa Claus; the golden age of newspaper comic strips and the first great superhero boom; the moral panic of the Eisenhower era, the Marvel Comics revolution, and the underground comix movement of the 1960s and '70s; and finally into the twenty-first century, taking in the grim and gritty Dark Knights and Watchmen alongside the brilliant rise of the graphic novel by acclaimed practitioners like Art Spiegelman and Alison Bechdel.Dauber's story shows not only how comics have changed over the decades but how American politics and culture have changed them. Throughout, he describes the origins of beloved comics, champions neglected masterpieces, and argues that we can understand how America sees itself through whose stories comics tell. Striking and revelatory, American Comics is a rich chronicle of the last 150 years of American history through the lens of its comic strips, political cartoons, superheroes, graphic novels, and more.HOST:  Rob MellonFEATURED BREW:  Buzzman Mutant American Ale, Unsung Brewing Company, Orange County, CaliforniaBOOK:  American Comics: A Historyhttps://www.amazon.com/American-Comics-History-Jeremy-Dauber/dp/0393635600/ref=sr_1_1?crid=1FHZA7LKG90GU&keywords=jeremy+dauber+american+comics&qid=1640730901&sprefix=jeremy+dauber%2Caps%2C478&sr=8-1MUSIC:  Bones Forkhttps://bonesfork.com/

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard - A TRILOGY FOR XMAS - Reissue

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 46:22


Nothing is ever normal at 19 Nocturne Boulevard.  So when Olivia, our sultry announcer, decides to read the listeners a few of her favorite Xmas tales, things get a bit out of hand. Adapted by Julie Hoverson from stories by Arnold Bennett, Rudyard Kipling, and Joseph Conrad, appearing in A Christmas Garland edited by Max Beerbohm, published in 1912 Cast List Olivia - Julie Hoverson Emily Wrackgarth - Beverly Poole Jos Wrackgarth - Russell Gold Albert Grapp - Gareth Bowley Kipling/narrator - Rick Lewis Judlip - Cole Hornaday Mr. Williams - Michael Coleman [from Tales of the Extradordinary] Mahamo - Pat McNally Music:  Kevin MacLeod (Incompetech.com) Editing and Sound:   Julie Hoverson Cover Photo:  Sanja Gjenero (courtesy of Stock Xchange.com)   "Puh-leeze!  Do I sound like the type to offend with yet another rendition of A Christmas Carol?"   **************************************************** A TRILOGY FOR CHRISTMAS Cast: Olivia SCRUTS Emily Wrackgarth Jos Wrackgarth Albert Grapp   PC X36 Kipling Judlip Father Christmas   THE FEAST Williams Mahamo ANNOUNCER    The stories for tonight's show have been abridged and dramatized by Julie Hoverson     OLIVIA     Did you have any trouble finding it?  Well sit right down.  I want to read you my favorite Christmas stories.  No, don't go!  [disgusted] Oh, puh-lease!  Do I seem the type to offend with yet another rendition of A Christmas Carol, or The night Before Christmas?  Even the Velveteen Rabbit, which is a truly disturbing tale to any small child, is far too common for this house.  MUSIC CREEPS IN OLIVIA    Indulge me, won't you?  I promise I won't disappoint.  I have selected three of my most favorite Christmas tales to share with you, and even if one is a bit romantic and sentimental, well, you have to let me be girly sometimes, right?  So - I'll get sentiment out of the way and move right into the more... meaty stories.  The first story, then, is Scruts by Arnold Bennett MUSIC CHANGES OLIVIA     Emily Wrackgarth stirred the Christmas pudding till her right arm began to ache. But she did not cease for that. SOUND    KITCHEN, STIRRING OLIVIA    She stirred on till her right arm grew so numb that it might have been the right arm of some girl at the other end of Bursley. And yet something deep down in her whispered EMILY    [muttered] It is your right arm! And you can do what you like with it! OLIVIA    She did what she liked with it. Relentlessly she kept it moving till it reasserted itself as the arm of Emily Wrackgarth, prickling and tingling as with red-hot needles in every tendon from wrist to elbow. And still Emily Wrackgarth hardened her heart. EMILY    Mine.  You are mine. OLIVIA    Presently she saw the spoon no longer revolving, but wavering aimlessly in the midst of the basin. EMILY    Ridiculous! This must be seen to! OLIVIA    In the down of dark hairs that connected her eyebrows there was a marked deepening of that vertical cleft which, visible at all times, warned you that here was a young woman not to be trifled with. Her brain despatched to her hand a peremptory message—which miscarried. The spoon wabbled as though held by a baby. EMILY    [exasperated noise] OLIVIA    Emily knew that she herself as a baby had been carried into this very kitchen to stir the Christmas pudding. Year after year, as she grew up, she had been allowed to stir it "for luck." And those, she reflected, were the only cookery lessons she ever got. EMILY    How like Mother! OLIVIA    Mrs. Wrackgarth had died in the past year, of a complication of ailments.  Emily still wore on her left shoulder that small tag of crape which is as far as the Five Towns go in the way of mourning. Her father had died in the year previous to that, of a still more curious and enthralling complication of ailments.  Jos, his son, carried on the Wrackgarth Works, EMILY    [interrupting] and I kept house for Jos. I with my own hand made this pudding. But for me, this pudding would not have been. Fantastic! Utterly incredible! OLIVIA    [slightly miffed] And yet so it was. She was grown-up. She was mistress of the house. She could make or unmake puddings at will. And yet she was Emily Wrackgarth. Which was absurd. EMILY    It is doubtful whether the people of southern England have even yet realised how much introspection there is going on all the time in the Five Towns. OLIVIA    [ahem!]  Emily was now stirring the pudding with her left hand. The ingredients had already been mingled indistinguishably in that rich, undulating mass of tawniness which proclaims perfection. But Emily was determined to give her left hand, not less than her right, what she called EMILY    "a doing." OLIVIA    Emily was like that.  At mid-day, when her brother came home from the Works, she was still at it. EMILY    Brought those scruts with you? JOS    That's a fact. OLIVIA    And he dipped his hand into the sagging pocket of his coat.  It is perhaps necessary to explain what scruts are. In the daily output of every potbank there are a certain proportion of flawed vessels. These are cast aside by the foreman, EMILY    with a lordly gesture, OLIVIA    and in due course are hammered into fragments. These fragments, which are put to various uses, are called scruts; and one of the uses they are put to is a sentimental one. EMILY    The dainty and luxurious Southerner looks to find in his Christmas pudding a wedding-ring, a gold thimble, a threepenny-bit, or the like. To such fal-lals the Five Towns would say fie. OLIVIA     A Christmas pudding in the Five Towns contains nothing but suet, flour, lemon-peel, cinnamon, brandy, almonds, raisins—and two or three scruts. There is a world of poetry, beauty, romance, in scruts—though you have to have been brought up on them to appreciate it. Scruts have passed into the proverbial philosophy of the district. EMILY    "Him's a pudden with more scruts than raisins to 'm" OLIVIA    is a criticism not infrequently heard. It implies respect, even admiration. Of Emily Wrackgarth herself people often said, in reference to her likeness to her father, JOS    "Her's a scrut o' th' owd basin."  [realizing he cut in] Oh, Hmm.  Pardon. OLIVIA    Jos had emptied out from his pocket on to the table a good three dozen of scruts. EMILY     I laid aside my spoon, rubbed the palms of my hands on the bib of my apron, and proceeded to finger these scruts with the air of a connoisseur, rejecting one after another. OLIVIA    The pudding was a small one, designed merely for herself and Jos, with remainder to "the girl"; so that it could hardly accommodate more than two or three scruts. EMILY     I knew well that one scrut is as good as another. Yet I did not want my brother to feel that anything selected by him would necessarily pass muster. OLIVIA     For his benefit she ostentatiously wrinkled her nose. JOS    By the by, you remember Albert Grapp? I've asked him to step over from Hanbridge and help eat our snack on Christmas Day. EMILY    [incensed] You've asked that Mr. Grapp? JOS    No objection, I hope? He's not a bad sort. And he's considered a bit of a ladies' man, you know. EMILY    [incensed noise] SOUND    CLATTER OF SCRUTS INTO BOWL OLIVIA    Emily gathered up all the scruts and let them fall in a rattling shower on the exiguous pudding. Two or three fell wide of the basin. EMILY    [vengefully]  I made sure they all fit, too. JOS    [alarmed] Steady on!  What's that for? EMILY    That's for your guest.  And if you think you're going to palm me off on to him, or on to any other young fellow, you're a fool, Jos Wrackgarth! JOS    I - I would never-- EMILY    Don't think I don't know what you've been after, just of late. Cracking up one young sawny and then another on the chance of me marrying him! I never heard of such goings on. But here I am, and here I'll stay, as sure as my name's Emily Wrackgarth, Jos Wrackgarth! OLIVIA    It is difficult to write calmly about Emily at this point. For her, in another age, ships would have been launched and cities besieged. But brothers are a race apart, and blind. It is a fact that Jos would have been glad to see his sister "settled" JOS    [muttered] —preferably in one of the other four Towns. OLIVIA    [chuckle] She took up the spoon and stirred vigorously. The scruts grated and squeaked together around the basin, while the pudding feebly wormed its way up among them. MUSIC CHANGES ALBERT    [whispered] Is it me?  Oh!  [up]  Albert Grapp, ladies' man though he was, was humble of heart. Nobody knew this but himself. OLIVIA    Not one of his fellow clerks in Clither's Bank knew it. The general theory in Hanbridge was "Him's got a stiff opinion o' hisself." ALBERT    But this arose from what was really a sign of humility in him. He made the most of himself. OLIVIA    He had, for instance, a way of his own in the matter of dressing. He always wore a voluminous frock-coat, with a pair of neatly-striped vicuna trousers-- ALBERT    --which he placed every night under his mattress, thus preserving in perfection the crease down the centre of each. OLIVIA     He had two caps, one of blue serge, the other of shepherd's plaid. These he wore on alternate days. He wore them in a way of his own—well back from his forehead, so as not to hide his hair.  OLIVIA    On wet days he wore a mackintosh. This, as he did not yet possess a great-coat, he wore also, but with less glory, on cold days. ALBERT    He had hoped there might be rain on Christmas morning. But there was no rain. [sigh, resigned] Like my luck. OLIVIA    [whispered, urgent] Stop referring to yourself in the third person, no one else does.  [back up] Since Jos Wrackgarth had introduced Albert to his sister at the Hanbridge Oddfellows' Biennial Hop, ALBERT    when he -I- danced two quadrilles with her, OLIVIA    --he had seen her but once. He had nodded to her, Five Towns fashion, and she had nodded back at him, but with a look that seemed to say-- EMILY    You needn't nod next time you see me. I can get along well enough without your nods. ALBERT    A frightening girl! And yet her brother had since told ...me... she seemed "a bit gone, like" on me!  Impossible! He, Albert Grapp, make an impression on the brilliant Miss Wrackgarth! Yet she had sent him a verbal invite to spend Christmas in her own home. OLIVIA    You're doing it again. ALBERT    [oblivious, enchanted] And the time had come. He was on his way. Incredible that he should arrive! The tram must surely overturn, or be struck by lightning. And yet no! He arrived safely. OLIVIA    [sigh] The small servant who opened the door gave him another verbal message from Miss Wrackgarth. [disapproving] Wipe your feet well on the mat.  [narrating again] In obeying this order he experienced a thrill of satisfaction he could not account for. He must have stood shuffling his boots vigorously for a full minute. ALBERT    This, he told himself, was life. He, Albert Grapp, was alive. And the world was full of other men, all alive; and yet, because they were not doing Miss Wrackgarth's bidding, none of them really lived. OLIVIA    In the parlour he found Jos awaiting him. The table was laid for three. JOS    So you're here, are you? OLIVIA    Said the host, using the Five Towns formula. JOS    Emily's in the kitchen.  Happen she'll be here directly. ALBERT    I hope she's tol-lol-ish? JOS    She is.  But don't you go saying that to her. She doesn't care about society airs and graces. You'll make no headway if you aren't blunt. ALBERT    Oh, right you are. OLIVIA    A moment later Emily joined them, still wearing her kitchen apron. EMILY    So you're here, are you? OLIVIA    She said, but did not shake hands. The servant had followed her in with the tray, and the next few seconds were occupied in the disposal of the beef and trimmings.  The meal began, Emily carving. JOS    [sigh] The main thought of a man less infatuated than Albert Grapp would have been "This girl can't cook. And she'll never learn to." The beef, instead of being red and brown, was pink and white. Uneatable beef! ALBERT    [rapturizing] And yet he relished it more than anything he had ever tasted. This beef was her own handiwork. Thus it was because she had made it so....  [up]  Happen I could do with a bit more, like. OLIVIA    Emily hacked off the bit more and jerked it on to the plate he had held out to her. ALBERT    Thanks! OLIVIA    Only when the second course came on did he suspect that the meal was a calculated protest. This a Christmas pudding? The litter of fractured earthenware was hardly held together by the suet and raisins. ALBERT    All his pride of manhood—and there was plenty of pride mixed up with Albert Grapp's humility—dictated a refusal to touch that pudding. Yet he soon found himself touching it, though gingerly, with spoon and fork. OLIVIA    In the matter of dealing with scruts there are two schools—the old and the new. The old school pushes its head well over its plate and drops the scrut straight from its mouth. The new school emits the scrut into the fingers of its left hand and therewith deposits it on the rim of the plate. ALBERT    Albert noticed that Emily was of the new school. OLIVIA    Oh, I give up. ALBERT    But might she not despise as affectation in him what came natural to herself? On the other hand, if he showed himself as a prop of the old school, might she not set her face the more stringently against him? OLIVIA    The chances were that whichever course he took would be the wrong one. ALBERT    It was then that he had an inspiration—an idea of the sort that comes to a man once in his life and finds him, likely as not, unable to put it into practice. OLIVIA    Albert was not sure he could consummate this idea of his. He had indisputably fine teeth— JOS    "a proper mouthful of grinders" OLIVIA    in local phrase. But would they stand the strain he was going to impose on them? He could but try them. OLIVIA    [con't] Without a sign of nervousness he raised his spoon, with one scrut in it, to his mouth. This scrut he put between two of his left-side molars, bit hard on it, and—eternity of that moment!—felt it and heard it snap in two. SOUND    GRINDING, CRUNCHING ALBERT    He was conscious that at sound of the percussion Emily started forward and stared at him. But he did not look at her. EMILY    [amazed] That was none so dusty. [similar to "not too shabby"] OLIVIA    Calmly, systematically, with gradually diminishing crackles, he reduced that scrut to powder, and washed the powder down with a sip of beer. SOUND    DRINK OLIVIA    While he dealt with the second scrut, he talked to Jos about the Borough Council's proposal to erect an electric power-station on the site of the old gas-works down Hillport way. ALBERT    He was aware of a slight abrasion inside his left cheek. No matter. He must be more careful. OLIVIA    There were six scruts still to be negotiated. ALBERT    He knew that what he was doing was a thing grandiose, unique, epical; a history-making thing; a thing that would outlive marble and the gilded monuments of princes. Yet he kept his head. OLIVIA    He did not hurry, nor did he dawdle. Scrut by scrut, he ground slowly but he ground exceeding small. ALBERT    And while he did so he talked wisely and well. OLIVIA    He passed from the power-station to a first edition he had picked up for sixpence in Liverpool, and thence to the Midland's proposal to drive a tunnel under the Knype Canal so as to link up the main-line with the Critchworth and Suddleford loop-line. JOS    I was too amazed to put in a word, but sat merely gaping—a gape that merged by imperceptible degrees into a grin. Presently I ceased to watch our guest. I sat watching my sister. OLIVIA    Not once did Albert himself glance in her direction. She was just a dim silhouette on the outskirts of his vision. ALBERT    But there she was, unmoving, and he could feel the fixture of her unseen eyes. The time was at hand when he would have to meet those eyes. Would he flinch? Was he master of himself? GRINDING STOPS OLIVIA    The last scrut was powder. No temporising! He jerked his glass to his mouth. ALBERT    A moment later, holding out his plate to her, he looked Emily full in the eyes. They were Emily's eyes, but not hers alone. They were collective eyes—that was it! They were the eyes of stark, staring womanhood. OLIVIA    Her face had been dead white, but now suddenly up from her throat, over her cheeks, through the down between her eyebrows, went a rush of colour, up over her temples, through the very parting of her hair. ALBERT    [casual] Happen, I'll have a bit more, like. OLIVIA    Emily flung her arms forward on the table and buried her face in them. EMILY    [breaking into sobs] OLIVIA    It was a gesture wild and meek. It was the gesture foreseen and yet incredible. It was recondite, inexplicable, and yet obvious. EMILY    [aside, not teary] It was the only thing to be done—and yet, by gum, I had done it. [back to sobbing] OLIVIA    Her brother had risen from his seat and was now at the door. JOS    [pleased with himself] Think I'll step round to the Works, and see if they banked up that furnace aright. OLIVIA    NOTE.—The author has in preparation a series of volumes dealing with the life of Albert and Emily Grapp. MUSIC BACK TO NEUTRAL OLIVIA    Sweet romance, eh?  Well, I've indulged my sentimental side, now how about some gritty policework?  EMILY    Hold up.  You really think I'll get hitched over some fellow who sups pottery? OLIVIA    That's how the story ends.  And he's a good looking chap. EMILY    And your accent is wretched. OLIVIA    Go back to your story. EMILY    Won't. OLIVIA    Your story is over.  Shut up.  EMILY    Can't make me - you're no better'n me - have ten toes and ten fingers just the same. OLIVIA    I'll close the book, and then you'll be gone until someone else reads you - and you're far enough out of print, THAT won't happen any time soon. EMILY    [annoyed, seething]  Right.  I'll sit here, then shall I? OLIVIA    Don't care.  Just keep quiet.  [deep breath] My next tale is PC X-36, by Rudyard Kipling. JUDLIP    Then it's collar 'im tight, In the name o' the Lawd! 'Ustle 'im, shake 'im till 'e's sick! Wot, 'e would, would 'e? Well, Then yer've got ter give 'im 'Ell, An' it's trunch, trunch, truncheon does the trick OLIVIA    From police station ditties. EMILY    Sounds like a donkey. OLIVIA    Shh! KIPLING    I had spent Christmas Eve at the Club, listening to a grand pow-wow between certain of the choicer sons of Adam. OLIVIA    Hold on!  I'm the one reading this story! KIPLING    But I'm the narrator. EMILY    Hear Hear. OLIVIA    I'm the reader.  You need to keep quiet. KIPLING    You might have thought first before taking on a first person narrative, mightn't you? OLIVIA    Well, I'll endeavor to sound like you.  Now!  Wait for your cue.  [clears throat] Then Slushby had cut in. Slushby is one who writes to newspapers and is theirs obediently "HUMANITARIAN." When Slushby cuts in, men remember they have to be up early next morning.  KIPLING    Sharp round a corner on the way home, I collided with something firmer than the regulation pillar-box. OLIVIA    [gritted teeth] I righted myself after the recoil and saw some stars that were very pretty indeed. Then I perceived the nature of the obstruction. KIPLING    "Evening, Judlip," [quickly spitting out his descriptives] I said sweetly, when I had collected my hat from the gutter. "Have I broken the law, Judlip? If so, I'll go quiet." JUDLIP    [Gruff] Time yer was in bed.  Yer Ma'll be lookin' out for yer. KIPLING    This from the friend -- OLIVIA    Ahem!  --of my bosom! It hurt. Many were the night-beats I had been privileged to walk with Judlip, imbibing curious lore that made glad the civilian heart of me. Seven whole 8x5 inch note-books had I pitmanised to the brim with Judlip. EMILY    And now to be repulsed as one of the uninitiated! It hurt horrid.  OLIVIA    Don't you start in again! EMILY    Hah! OLIVIA    Don't!  [back to the story] There is a thing called Dignity. Small boys sometimes stand on it. Then they have to be kicked. Then they get down, weeping. I don't stand on Dignity. KIPLING     "What's wrong, Judlip?" I asked, more sweetly than ever. "Drawn a blank to-night?" JUDLIP     Yuss. Drawn a blank blank blank. 'Avent 'ad so much as a kick at a lorst dorg. Christmas Eve ain't wot it was. KIPLING    I felt for my note-book. JUDLIP    Lawd! I remembers the time when the drunks and disorderlies down this street was as thick as flies on a fly-paper. One just picked 'em orf with one's finger and thumb. A bloomin' buffet, that's wot it wos. KIPLING    "The night's yet young, Judlip," [quickly] I insinuated, with a jerk of my thumb at the flaring windows of the "Rat and Blood Hound." At that moment-- OLIVIA    [Catching up] --the saloon-door swung open, emitting a man and woman who walked with linked arms and exceeding great care. EMILY    [sarcastic]  How sweet. OLIVIA    Judlip eyed them longingly as they tacked up the street. Then he sighed. Now, when Judlip sighs the sound is like unto that which issues from the vent of a Crosby boiler when the cog-gauges are at 260 degrees. KIPLING    "Come, Judlip!" I said. "Possess your soul in patience. You'll soon find someone to make an example of. Meanwhile"—I threw back my head and smacked my lips [he does] —"the usual, Judlip?" OLIVIA    In another minute I emerged through the swing-door, bearing a furtive glass of that same "usual," and nipped down the mews where my friend was wont to await these little tokens of esteem. KIPLING    "To the Majesty of the Law, Judlip!" OLIVIA    When he had honoured the toast, I scooted back with the glass, leaving him wiping the beads off his beard-bristles. He was in his philosophic mood when I rejoined him at the corner. JUDLIP    "Wot am I?  [pronouncing] A bloomin' cypher. Wot's the sarjint? 'E's got the Inspector over 'im. Over above the Inspector there's the Sooprintendent. Over above 'im's the old red-tape-masticatin' Yard. Over above that there's the 'Ome Sec. Wot's 'e? A cypher, like me. Why? KIPLING    Judlip looked up at the stars. JUDLIP    Over above 'im's We Dunno Wot. Somethin' wot issues its horders an' regulations an' divisional injunctions, inscrootable like, but p'remptory; an' we 'as ter see as 'ow they're carried out, not arskin' no questions, but each man goin' about 'is dooty.' KIPLING    "''Is dooty,'" said I, looking up from my note-book. "Yes, I've got that." JUDLIP    Life ain't a bean-feast. It's a 'arsh reality. An' them as makes it a bean-feast 'as got to be 'arshly dealt with accordin'. That's wot the Force is put 'ere for from Above. Not as 'ow we ain't fallible. We makes our mistakes. An' when we makes 'em we sticks to 'em. For the honour o' the Force. Which same is the jool Britannia wears on 'er bosom as a charm against hanarchy. That's wot the brarsted old Beaks don't understand. Yer remember Smithers of our Div? KIPLING    [takes breath, but is interupted] OLIVIA    I remembered Smithers - well. As fine, upstanding, square-toed-- [hand over mouth] EMILY    [Picking up quickly, but struggling slightly] bullet-headed, clean-living - go on! - son of a gun-- KIPLING    Ta! --as ever perjured himself in the box. There was nothing of the softy about Smithers. I took off my billicock to Smithers' memory. JUDLIP    Sacrificed to public opinion? Yuss, KIPLING    Judlip paused at a front door, flashing his light down the slot of a two-grade Yale. JUDLIP    Sacrificed to a parcel of screamin' old women wot ort ter 'ave gorn down on their knees an' thanked Gawd for such a protector. 'E'll be out in another 'alf year. JUDLIP     Wot'll 'e do then, pore devil? Go a bust on 'is conduc' money an' throw in 'is lot with them same hexperts wot 'ad a 'oly terror of 'im. EMILY    Then Judlip swore gently. KIPLING     What should you do, O Great One, if ever it were your duty to apprehend him? JUDLIP    Do? Why, yer blessed innocent, yer don't think I'd shirk a fair clean cop? Same time, I don't say as 'ow I wouldn't 'andle 'im tender like, for sake o' wot 'e wos. Likewise cos 'e'd be a stiff customer to tackle. Likewise 'cos— OLIVIA    [muffled struggle] KIPLING    He had broken off, and was peering fixedly upwards across the moonlit street. JUDLIP    [drawn-out, hoarse whisper] Ullo! SOUND    STRUGGLE OLIVIA    [muffled, then deep breath]  Back off! EMILY    Hmph.  [shrug] I made a good go. OLIVIA    Striking an average between the direction of his eyes—for Judlip, when on the job, has a soul-stirring squint—I perceived someone in the act of emerging from a chimney-pot.  Judlip's voice clove the silence. JUDLIP    Wot are yer doin' hup there? OLIVIA    The person addressed came to the edge of the parapet. KIPLING    I saw then that he had a hoary white beard, a red ulster with the hood up, and what looked like a sack over his shoulder. OLIVIA    He said something or other in a voice like a concertina that has been left out in the rain. EMILY    [muttered] Not so very hard to pass it round, is it? JUDLIP    I dessay.  Just you come down, an' we'll see about that. OLIVIA    The old man nodded and smiled. Then—as I hope to be saved—he came floating gently down through the moonlight, with the sack over his shoulder and a young fir-tree clasped to his chest. He alighted in a friendly manner on the curb beside us. EMILY    Come along - let us have a go! KIPLING    Judlip was the first to recover himself. Out went his right arm-- EMILY    --and the airman was slung round by the scruff of the neck, spilling his sack in the road. KIPLING    I made a bee-line for his shoulder-blades. Burglar or no burglar, he was the best airman out, and I was muchly desirous to know the precise nature of the apparatus under his ulster. OLIVIA    Fine.  Let's just keep it moving - A back-hander from Judlip's left caused me to hop quickly aside. The prisoner was squealing and whimpering. He didn't like the feel of Judlip's knuckles at his cervical vertebræ. JUDLIP    Wot wos yer doin' hup there? EMILY    asked Judlip, tightening the grip. SANTA CLAUS     I'm S-Santa Claus, Sir. P-please, Sir, let me g-go.. KIPLING    "Hold him," I shouted. "He's a German." JUDLIP    It's my dooty ter caution yer that wotever yer say now may be used in hevidence against yer, yer old sinner. Pick up that there sack, an' come along o' me. EMILY    The captive snivelled something about peace on earth, good will toward men. JUDLIP    Yuss.  That's in the Noo Testament, ain't it? The Noo Testament contains some uncommon nice readin' for old gents an' young ladies. But it ain't included in the librery o' the Force. We confine ourselves to the Old Testament — O-T, 'ot. An' 'ot you'll get it. Hup with that sack, an' quick march! OLIVIA    I have seen worse attempts at a neck-wrench, but it was just not slippery enough for Judlip. EMILY    And the kick that Judlip then let fly was a thing of beauty and a joy for ever. KIPLING    "Frog's-march him!" I shrieked, dancing. "For the love of heaven, frog's-march him!" OLIVIA    Trotting by Judlip's side to the Station, I reckoned it out that if Slushby had not been at the Club I should not have been here to see. ALL    Which shows that even Slushbys are put into this world for a purpose. MUSIC CHANGES OLIVIA    Oh, this is just getting silly. EMILY    Only just?  I should have said it's been a laugh for several miles. KIPLING    D'you have some problem with a bit of a laugh? OLIVIA    The third story I want to read is very serious.  If this goes on, I won't be able to do it justice. EMILY    What is it then? OLIVIA    The Feast.  By Joseph Conrad. KIPLING    Conrad?  He wrote a Christmas story? EMILY    Who is this Conrad fellow? KIPLING    Wrote something called heart of Darkness. OLIVIA    Yes, yes, yes!  Look, it's ruined now.  I'm just going to give up and read The Night before Christmas. EMILY    [disgusted noise] KIPLING    That sentimental pap? OLIVIA    [huffy] The mood is gone. EMILY AND KIPLING    [whisper in the background] EMILY    We might-- KIPLING    Let me! EMILY    I don't think so!  [annoyed grunt] Look you! - um - I think we've not been introduced? OLIVIA    [sulky] Olivia. EMILY    Right.  Olivia.  Why not let us help read the story.  We can do that well enough, can't we? KIPLING    Certainly. OLIVIA    And keep the comments to a minimum? KIPLING    Well... EMILY    I'll box his ears for you if he steps across the line. OLIVIA    It's worth a try. MUSIC TURNS TROPICAL OLIVIA    The hut in which slept the white man was on a clearing between the forest and the river. EMILY    Silence, the silence murmurous and unquiet of a tropical night, brooded over the hut that, baked through by the sun, sweated a vapour beneath the cynical light of the stars. KIPLING    Mahamo lay rigid and watchful at the hut's mouth. In his upturned eyes, and along the polished surface of his lean body black and immobile, the stars were reflected, creating an illusion of themselves who are illusions. OLIVIA    The roofs of the congested trees, writhing in some kind of agony private and eternal, made tenebrous and shifty silhouettes against the sky, like shapes cut out of black paper by a maniac who pushes them with his thumb this way and that, irritably, on a concave surface of blue steel. EMILY    Resin oozed unseen from the upper branches to the trunks swathed in creepers that clutched and interlocked with tendrils venomous, frantic and faint. KIPLING     Down below, by force of habit, the lush herbage went through the farce of growth—that farce old and screaming, whose trite end is decomposition.  [aside] Optimist, eh?  Ouch! OLIVIA    Ssh.  Within the hut the form of the white man, corpulent and pale, was covered with a mosquito-net that was itself illusory like everything else, only more so. Flying squadrons of mosquitoes inside its meshes flickered and darted over him, working hard, but keeping silence so as not to excite him from sleep. EMILY    [with distaste] Cohorts of yellow ants disputed him against cohorts of purple ants, the two kinds slaying one another in thousands. KIPLING    [avid] The battle was undecided when suddenly, with no such warning as it gives in some parts of the world, the sun blazed up over the horizon, turning night into day, and the insects vanished back into their camps. OLIVIA    The white man ground his knuckles into the corners of his eyes, emitting that snore final and querulous of a middle-aged man awakened rudely. With a gesture brusque but flaccid he plucked aside the net and peered around. EMILY    The bales of cotton cloth, the beads, the brass wire, the bottles of rum, had not been spirited away in the night. So far so good. KIPLING    The faithful servant of his employers was now at liberty to care for his own interests. He regarded himself, passing his hands over his skin. WILLIAMS    [shouted] Hi! Mahamo! I've been eaten up. OLIVIA    The islander, with one sinuous motion, sprang from the ground, through the mouth of the hut. Then, after a glance, he threw high his hands in thanks to such good and evil spirits as had charge of his concerns. In a tone half of reproach, half of apology, he murmured— MAHAMO    You white men sometimes say strange things that deceive the heart. WILLIAMS    Reach me that ammonia bottle, d'you hear?  This is a pretty place you've brought me to!  Christmas Day, too! Of all the —— But I suppose it seems all right to you, you heathen, to be here on Christmas Day? MAHAMO    We are here on the day appointed, Mr. Williams. It is a feast-day of your people? OLIVIA    Mr. Williams had lain back, with closed eyes, on his mat. Nostalgia was doing duty to him for imagination. EMILY    He was wafted to a bedroom in Marylebone, where in honour of the Day he lay late dozing, with great contentment; outside, a slush of snow in the street, the sound of church-bells; from below a savour of especial cookery. [chuckles a bit] WILLIAMS    Yes, it's a feast-day of my people. MAHAMO    Of mine also. WILLIAMS    [disinterested] Is it though? But they'll do business first? MAHAMO    They must first do that. WILLIAMS    And they'll bring their ivory with them? MAHAMO    Every man will bring ivory. OLIVIA    The islander answered with a smile gleaming and wide. WILLIAMS    How soon'll they be here? MAHAMO    Has not the sun risen? They are on their way. WILLIAMS    Well, I hope they'll hurry. The sooner we're off this cursed island of yours the better. Take all those things out-- OLIVIA    Mr. Williams added, pointing to the merchandise. WILLIAMS    --and arrange them.  Neatly, mind you! KIPLING    In certain circumstances it is right that a man be humoured in trifles. Mahamo, having borne out the merchandise, arranged it very neatly. OLIVIA    While Mr. Williams made his toilette, the sun and the forest, careless of the doings of white and black men alike, waged their warfare implacable and daily. The forest from its inmost depths sent forth perpetually its legions of shadows that fell dead in the instant of exposure to the enemy whose rays heroic and absurd its outposts annihilated. EMILY    What's all this to do with Christmas? KIPLING    Want me to cuff her one? OLIVIA    It takes place on Christmas day - they already said that. EMILY    But this is all jungle creepers and spooky shadows - and vermins.  If there's one thing that doesn't come to my mind when I think of Christmas, it's ants and mosquitoes and such.  KIPLING    You should see some of the places I've been. OLIVIA    Why don't we just finish the story? KIPLING    There came from those inilluminable depths the equable rumour of myriads of winged things and crawling things newly roused to the task of killing and being killed. Thence detached itself, little by little, an insidious sound of a drum beaten. This sound drew more near.  [aside]  A-ha, I see where this is going.  Drums in the distance are never a good sign. EMILY    [huffy] Maybe I haven't traveled all over the great wide world, fellow, but even I can probably guess at that. DRUMS SNEAK IN OLIVIA    Mr. Williams, issuing from the hut, heard it, and stood gaping towards it. WILLIAMS    Is that them? MAHAMO    That is they. OLIVIA    The islander murmured, moving away towards the edge of the forest.  EMILY    Does he not notice?  What sort of a dullard is he?  [calling to williams] Do you have a gun? OLIVIA    [exasperated sigh] KIPLING    Calm down, it's just a story. EMILY    Don't go telling me when to calm down!  I just hate stories where stupid people do very stupid things - what possessed this fool to sail half round the world anyway? OLIVIA    [resigned, trying to get it back on track] Sounds of chanting were a now audible accompaniment to the drum. WILLIAMS    What's that they're singing? MAHAMO    [off a bit] They sing of their business. WILLIAMS    [shocked] Oh!  I'd have thought they'd be singing of their feast. MAHAMO    It is of their feast they sing. OLIVIA    It has been stated that Mr. Williams was not imaginative. WILLIAMS    Oh, I say--! OLIVIA    Oh, no!  You stay put! KIPLING    [very knowingly] But a few years of life in climates alien and intemperate had disordered his nerves. There was that in the rhythms of the hymn which made bristle his flesh.  EMILY    Suddenly, when they were very near, the voices ceased, leaving a legacy of silence more sinister than themselves. And now the black spaces between the trees were relieved by bits of white that were the eyeballs and teeth of Mahamo's brethren. MAHAMO    It was of their feast, it was of you, they sang. EMILY    I knew it! KIPLING    It was obvious. WILLIAMS    Look here--! OLIVIA    Cried Mr. Williams in his voice of a man not to be trifled with. WILLIAMS    --Look here, if you've— SOUND    JAVELIN HIT OLIVIA    He was silenced by sight of what seemed to be a young sapling sprung up from the ground within a yard of him—a young sapling tremulous, with a root of steel. KIPLING    Then a thread-like shadow skimmed the air, and another spear came impinging the ground within an inch of his feet. EMILY    As he turned in his flight he saw the goods so neatly arranged at his orders, and there flashed through him, even in the thick of the spears, the thought that he would be a grave loss to his employers. OLIVIA     This—for Mr. Williams was, not less than the goods, of a kind easily replaced—was an illusion. It was the last of Mr. Williams illusions. MOMENT OF SILENCE EMILY    So what shall we do now? SOUND    LARGE BOOK SHUTS DECISIVELY, CUTTING HER OFF OLIVIA    Happy Holidays, all - wherever and whatever they may be. CLOSER OLIVIA    Now that you know how to find us, you'll have to come back.  Maybe next week?  Don't be a stranger - we have enough of those already... The stories dramatized in tonight's episode appeared in a collection titled "A Christmas Garland", first published in October of 1912, collected by Max Beerbohm.  Scruts was written by Arnold Bennett, PC X-36 was written by Rudyard Kipling, and The Feast was written by Joseph Conrad.  These stories have been edited slightly to fit the program.          

The LA Report
How to deal with COVID anti-vaxxers in your life. Plus: Striking ice cream makers, a Coachella name battle, and Drakeo concert security – The Morning Edition

The LA Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 5:34


Here's your morning news: L.A. Supervisors show support for striking ice cream producers in Santa Fe Springs; Omicron dominates new cases in U.S.; Tips for dealing with COVID anti-vaxxers in your life; Christmas set to gift rain and snow to the area; U.S. judge grants restraining order in favor of Coachella organizers; Drakeo the Ruler concertgoers say security was lax. This program is made possible in part by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a private corporation funded by the American people.   Support the show: https://laist.com

The Progressive Voice
NEWS 12/21/21: Kellogg's Striking Workers WIN! Pramila Jayapal Gets EXPOSED!

The Progressive Voice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 15:01


NEWS 12/21/21: Kellogg's Striking Workers WIN! Pramila Jayapal Gets EXPOSED!#Kelloggs #KelloggsStrike #PramilaJayapal #Jayapal

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
Sharing Love Abundantly In Special Needs Families With Jolene Philo

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 33:14


On this episode, Julia and Gino interview Jolene Philo. Jolene is a published author, speaker, wife, and mother of a son with special needs. Her first book, A Different Dream for My Child: Meditations for Parents of Critically or Chronically Ill Children, was released in 2009 by Discovery House Publishers (DHP). Since then she has published 4 more books for the special needs community. The most recent is Does My Child Have PTSD? What to Do When Your Child Is Hurting from the Inside Out, which came out in October of 2015.   Key Insights 00:00 Introduction 01:10 Jolene's story 08:11 Challenges being part of life 09:30 Sharing Love Abundantly 12:20 Three important questions you need to address 18:05 Message for parents with kids having special needs 20:32 Striking a balance 23:05 Tips for a healthy marriage while raising a fmaily 29:40 Being a problem solver   Visit Jolene's website: https://differentdream.com/   About Jake & Gino Jake & Gino are multifamily investors, operators, and mentors who have created a vertically integrated real estate company that controls over $100,000,000 in assets under management. They have created the Jake & Gino community to teach others their three-step framework: Buy Right, Finance Right and Manage Right®, and to become multifamily entrepreneurs.   Subscribe to this channel: https://ytube.io/3McA   Sign up for free training: https://jakeandgino.mykajabi.com/freetraining   The resources you need to succeed at every level of apartment investing: https://jakeandgino.com/resources/   Apply for Mentorship: https://jakeandgino.com/apply/   #realestate #multifamilyrealestate #multifamilyinvesting #investing #apartmentinvesting   Jake & Gino Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jakeandgino/ Jake & Gino Twitter: https://twitter.com/JakeandGino Jake & Gino Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/jake-and-gino-llc/ Jake & Gino Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jakeandgino/

The TMossBoss Show
S:86 EP:5 Copyright Striking A Hater 1.5

The TMossBoss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 15:57


Had a few more things to say about the topic. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tmossboss/support

Unwaxed with Sophia & Sistine Stallone
Striking Out with Jack Flaherty

Unwaxed with Sophia & Sistine Stallone

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 59:30


Did you know that every hot dog you eat takes off 36 minutes of your life? Well it won't stop us! Jack Flaherty joins us today to teach us how many innings are in a baseball game (there are 9), and to talk all about what it's like being a professional pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals. He talks about what it was like being drafted to the MLB, how he feels when he's on the mound, what it's like when a teammate gets traded, and how the players date while on the road. #dontthink Subscribe: https://bit.ly/unxwaxed Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/3lIb6cQ Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3lIeNiT Unwaxed instagram: @unwaxedpodcast Sophia's instagram: @sophiastallone Sistine's instagram: @sistinestallone Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)
B‘Yam Darkechah-Derech Avodah (44) Striking the Right Balance

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 11:04


The Sick Podcast with Tony Marinaro
Urban Meyer Gone, Omicron Striking The NFL, Our Sick Picks and more! - NFL Talk With Ian Rapoport and Adam Rank Week 15

The Sick Podcast with Tony Marinaro

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 21:10


On this episode of The Sick Podcast, Ian Rapoport and Adam Rank from the NFL Network join Tony Marinaro to discuss the hottest topics of the NFL heading into week 15. Don't forget to follow The Sick Podcast on iHeartRadio, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube, and all other podcast platforms!

Countrystride
Countrystride #71: A Lake District Christmas

Countrystride

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 43:24


...in which we take a seasonal Grasmere wander in the company of historian, journalist and collector of Cumbrian cultural traditions, Alan Cleaver. Striking up moss-cloistered Huntingstile ('stile' means steep), we discuss the seasonal ballad 'Down t' Lonnin', recited each year by the Grasmere Players – and read to us by Elaine Nelson of Sam Read bookshop. Failing to persuade Alan to sing Arthur Somervell's 'Grasmere Carol', we arrive above Red Bank to reflect on seasonal misrule and authority attempts to ban all manner of Cumbrian fun – from snowball fights in 1840s Workington, to bringing pistols to school in 1700s Carlisle. Descending down icy Easedale, we learn about the Christmas tragedy of the Green family, and consider how the children – fending for themselves as their parents perished – became a model of Victorian fortitude. In fading light, we arrive at Allan Bank, where local lad Paul Nelson reads Hardwicke Rawnsley's evocative description of the Keswick 'old folks Christmas do'. You can buy Alan's book 'A Lake District Christmas' at www.inspiredbylakeland.co.uk/products/a-lake-district-christmas Alan is on Twitter at twitter.com/thelonningsguy Elaine owns Sam Read bookshop in Grasmere. www.samreadbooks.co.uk With thanks to Elaine and Paul for their contributions to the podcast.

Mike Lenz Voice - A Journey Into Voice Acting
129 - Anne Cloud Interview

Mike Lenz Voice - A Journey Into Voice Acting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 37:39


Anne Cloud has been writing her own story for a long time: from moving to New York days after college graduation (without a plan) to buying an old school bus on a whim with a hope of converting it into a tiny home on wheels. She has gone her own way in her voice over career as well. Striking out with a vengeance into the genres that interest her most and actively seeking out the people who could help her achieve her goals.   Anne lives in a 200 foot skoolie with her husband and three small kids and traveled full time for nearly two years, pulling a cargo trailer decked out with a broadcast quality remote studio along with them. This set up allows Anne to work full-time as a Voice Actor from wherever they happen to land. Anne has had the opportunity to train with incredible coaches and friends, and work with dream clients like The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Kia Worldwide, and Khan Academy Kids.  Living and traveling in a converted school bus with her husband and three wild monkeys, this versatile and colorful voice talent enjoys the flexibility her sweet gypsy lifestyle gives her to work anytime, day or night. Whether she's winding up a mountain in her tiny home on wheels, rambling through the desert, or parked at her North Carolina farm, Sweet Gypsy VO is always ready to go. https://annecloudvoiceover.com/

Donovan Sharpe's Red Pill Podcast - The Sharpe Reality (TSR Live)
Did Fresh & Fit Go Too Far With Copyright Striking Aba & Preach, The Lead Attorney & Spencer Cornelia

Donovan Sharpe's Red Pill Podcast - The Sharpe Reality (TSR Live)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 145:20


Donovan Sharpe talks about what he risks by standing up for Fresh & Fit with the black YouTube community and dives into the the controversy regarding the slew of copyright claims they have doled out in order to protect their reputation and their podcast business. Subscribe to Unlock ALL THE Full Episodes! Subscribe on Youtube to catch LIVE SHOWS! Join the community, access the Archive & Chat on Sharpestream during live shows at https://patreon.com/donovansharpe or https://sharpestream.com The Books of Womanese are Only $16 bucks! - Go to https://tsracademy.com Get the Free SharpeStream app! https://sharpestream.com/app/ For iOS & Android Devices Download Donovan's 2 FREE Ebooks when you join the newsletter https://donovansharpe.com/newsletter/ To Support the show donate via Cash.app at https://cash.app/$DonovanSharpe ○ Visit Donovan's websites: https://donovansharpe.com/ (Video Clips) https://sharpestream.com (Full Videos, Ad-Free, LiveStreams) https://tsracademy.com (Online Courses/Products) GET FUN TSR MERCH! https://donovansharpe.com/merch/ Follow Donovan Sharpe on Social Media https://donovansharpe.com/bio/ ***NOTICE*** Donovan Sharpe™ is a registered trademark of Boldstone Media, LLC. All Content © Copyright 2021 Boldstone Media, LLC, All Rights Reserved. Do Not Use Donovan Sharpe™ In Any Content Or Use Any Content In Part or In Whole Without Written Permission from Boldstone Media, LLC. Violations on Any Platform Will Be Pursued.

People are Revolting
Striking Union Members at Kelloggs Reject Contract

People are Revolting

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 12:28


Striking Union Members at Kelloggs Reject Contract https://bctgm.org/2021/10/08/5-ways-to-support-the-kelloggstrike/ https://www.commondreams.org/news/2021/12/07/unbreakable-solidarity-kelloggs-workers-reject-contract-would-leave-new-employees https://truthout.org/articles/calls-for-boycott-grow-after-kellogg-says-its-permanently-replacing-strikers/ #peoplearerevolting twitter.com/peoplerevolting Peoplearerevolting.com movingtrainradio.com

Ben Ferguson Morning Update
MAGA IS WINNING: Senate Votes ‘Yes' to Repeal Biden's Federal Vaccine Mandate. This on top of 2 different judges striking down vax mandates for healthcare and govt contract workers!

Ben Ferguson Morning Update

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 43:17


Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bloody Vegans Podcast
The Way of the Rabbit author, Mark Hawthorne

Bloody Vegans Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 53:02


Mark Hawthorne has fostered numerous house rabbits, including seven he adopted. He has rescued abandoned rabbits, volunteered with rabbit rescue groups, and educated people about rabbits through his published writing and public outreach. In addition to The Way of the Rabbit, he is the author of A Vegan Ethic: Embracing a Life of Compassion Toward All, Bleating Hearts: The Hidden World of Animal Suffering, and Striking at the Roots: A Practical Guide to Animal Activism (all from Changemakers Books). His writing has been featured in Vegan's Daily Companion (Quarry Books) and in the anthologies, Stories to Live By: Wisdom to Help You Make the Most of Every Day and The Best Travel Writing 2005: True Stories from Around the World (both from Travellers' Tales). You can pick up a copy of the outstanding 'The Way of the Rabbit' at this link. Discover & support The Bloody Vegans Podcast here This is a Bloody Vegans Production.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
12-09-21 - Native American Emailer - Day Two Update On ASU Hunger Strikers And Imagining Other Jobs Striking - Bigfoot Loch Ness And Flat Earth Believers Rant But John Can Be Swayed On Moon Landings

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 29:21


Marketplace All-in-One
Kellogg’s plans to replace hundreds of striking workers. Can it actually do that?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 7:58


Kellogg's cereal plant employees have been on strike for more than two months. Earlier this week, they voted to reject a contract offer from the company. Now, Kellogg's says it is done negotiating and will begin permanently replacing the striking workers. That opens up a few questions. Child care is still struggling with the labor shortage, and there are ripple effects. Spotify finds itself in a battle with comedians over royalties after removing their work from its platform. Your first donation to Marketplace goes TWICE as far with a dollar-for-dollar match from the Investors Challenge Fund! Give Now.

Marketplace Morning Report
Kellogg’s plans to replace hundreds of striking workers. Can it actually do that?

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 7:58


Kellogg's cereal plant employees have been on strike for more than two months. Earlier this week, they voted to reject a contract offer from the company. Now, Kellogg's says it is done negotiating and will begin permanently replacing the striking workers. That opens up a few questions. Child care is still struggling with the labor shortage, and there are ripple effects. Spotify finds itself in a battle with comedians over royalties after removing their work from its platform. Your first donation to Marketplace goes TWICE as far with a dollar-for-dollar match from the Investors Challenge Fund! Give Now.

Chris Simms Unbuttoned
WTF Happened: Lamar vs the blitz + striking out 5-year-olds

Chris Simms Unbuttoned

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 99:33


(4:10) Justin Herbert: Why doesn't he always throw it deep this often?(22:00) Joe Burrow: The Chargers kept the pressure on him.(30:40) 49ers defense: "They let the Seahawks offense off the hook"(40:20) 49ers offense: Is it time to turn to Trey Lance?(44:50) Jamal Adams: Has trading for him been a failure for the Seahawks?(49:00) Steelers offense: How did the Ravens aggressiveness open the door for Big Ben?(1:05:00) Lamar Jackson: Why is he struggling vs the blitz? And Devin Bush almost was the goat on the 2-point conversion.(1:23:15) Play(s) of the F*^*ing Day: Damien Harris breaks through,  and the Lions finally get a win.

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
12-08-21 - Michaela Danzer Body Positive Model - Do Hunger Strikes Ever Work Aside From Ghandi - ASU Students Only Striking From 9 to 6 - Fox 10's Bailey Miller Reporting On Strike - Kirby's Got Another Recital

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 43:47


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - Wednesday December 8, 2021

Show & Vern
12/7 HR 1 – Pats-Bills not striking fear in the heart of the Chiefs

Show & Vern

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 47:26


- Bills-Patriots reaction - Mecole is officially out of the picture - Another indication of how unlucky Mahomes has been - The Alex Standard - You Got Chopped See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Fight Dialogue
How Good is Oliveira's Striking?

The Fight Dialogue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 18:41


Charles Oliveira is one of the most feared grapplers in the history of the sport, but not all of his amazing finishes came by way of submission. He is set to defend his title soon so I thought it was a good time to give a detailed breakdown of his stand up skills. Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCe7PjUj3LI9jxmuK8yv8hCQ/join GET 20% OFF + FREE SHIPPING with the code TFD20 at www.Manscaped.com. Unlock your confidence and always use the right tools for the job with MANSCAPED™. Your balls will thank you! Patreon --- https://www.patreon.com/TFD1 For quality martial arts training equipment, check out our sponsor RevGear! 10% off through our link! --- https://revgear.com?aff=198 For CBD tinctures, creams, and gummies check out our sponsor ENHANCD and get 10% off with our link! --- https://bit.ly/2VL4yAO SCORES --- https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ong_hUsNVD_oB44XcmLx7UjHaii54OUy/edit?usp=sharing&ouid=113744518508073651580&rtpof=true&sd=true Follow us on facebook and IG @fightdialogue Join the Discord! --- https://discord.gg/qsrJFz9DRT Support our podcast on Anchor! --- https://anchor.fm/podcast-tfd Music --- "Storm" & "Out of the basement" by HomageBeats --- www.youtube.com/channel/UCbavHy2_zVCMCvVdR8qp2UQ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/podcast-tfd/support

17Twenty
Lauren Abeyta - The Pegasus

17Twenty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 90:29


This week we sit down in-studio with Lauren Abeyta, founder & COO at Construction Discovery Experts.  As usual, the conversation winds around Lauren's story of growing up, the impact of sports in her life, ending up in Dallas, and the resulting journey to entrepreneurship.  Striking in today's episode is the conversational pace with Lauren which feathers in-and-out of humorous bits and very serious life experiences, resulting in quite a few "driveway moments" where you're going to be latched to the steering wheel listening to the dialogue. Listen.  Learn.  Grow.  #movemountains //  Show Notes //Texas A&M's 12th Man Storyhttps://bit.ly/3rwL1SqDare to Lead Podcast, by Brené Brown Fearing Less, with Dr. Pippa Grangehttps://bit.ly/3xF9nuqFear Less: How to Win at Life Without Losing Yourself, by Pippa Grangehttps://amzn.to/31iGqs0Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses Programhttps://bit.ly/3pkMdWqThe History of the Pegasushttps://bit.ly/3xK6sAFAll the Light We Cannot See: A Novel, by Anthony Doerrhttps://amzn.to/3lqD4dRBoundaries: When to Say Yes, How to Say No to Take Control of Your Life, by Henry Cloud  and John Townsendhttps://amzn.to/3rp6PiZ

GI Joburg
Episode 227: Sky Striking

GI Joburg

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 119:56


We are into the final days of the Skystriker HasLab... maybe... Time to sink our teeth into this meaty topic that has the Joe community in a flat spin stall engine flameout. Also we talk art with Cujo! JoeVember Featured Art: Zak Kinsella https://twitter.com/ZakKinsella/status/1465850367279697920?s=20 https://twitter.com/ZakKinsella/status/1465365495217983492?s=20 Tim Shinn https://twitter.com/TimShinn73/status/1462280182904111111?s=20 https://twitter.com/TimShinn73/status/1465067622182146064?s=20 https://twitter.com/TimShinn73/status/1461918465179193354?s=20 @Vonoelhoffen1 https://twitter.com/Vonoelhoffen1/status/1463301865156849671?s=20 https://twitter.com/Vonoelhoffen1/status/1462063847624302598?s=20 https://twitter.com/Vonoelhoffen1/status/1460242713060823043?s=20 Sean Neprud aka @baddeacon https://twitter.com/baddeacon/status/1460062725711618048?s=20 https://twitter.com/baddeacon/status/1459033024218030082?s=20 https://twitter.com/baddeacon/status/1457570196730744833?s=20 ObscuriThings https://twitter.com/ObscuriThings/status/1455553918004391944?s=20 Cujo https://twitter.com/TrooperLaser/status/1455202136053227522?s=20 https://twitter.com/86Cujo/status/1456490809121906695?s=20 https://twitter.com/86Cujo/status/1456103667610779649?s=20 Audible Interlude: A GI Joe Podcast: https://www.podbean.com/podcast-detail/q54jw-1ebb89/Audible-Interlude-A-GI-Joe-Podcast Got something to say to GI Joburg? We can be reached at arealsouthafricanhero@gmail.com We have an official Patreon page! Go to https://www.patreon.com/GIJOBURG?fan_landing=true Want some of the most unique GI Joe apparel out there? Check out our official GI JOBURG merch at: https://teespring.com/stores/gi-joburg-the-merch #GIJoe #Skystriker #haslab

The Life Stylist
Trusting the Orchestration of Our Life: Luke as Guest on The Great Unlearn w/ Cal Callahan (Bonus Rebroadcast)

The Life Stylist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 72:11


A bonus rebroadcast of my chat with my dear friend and spiritual powerhouse, Cal Callahan, on his podcast, “The Great Unlearn.”  Join us as we discuss how to harness the power from traumatic life experiences, how we've unpacked the shell of masculinity to channel its most divine expression, and our mission to be of service to others – starting with the self.  04:00 — Divine Masculinity  Integrating fitness into lifestyle Exploring divine masculinity  How to find a “Warrior energy” balance The journey to conscious parenting  Support from the male community  Being of service and appreciating past suffering 20:22 — The Path to Now Evolving consciousness through dips in the road The fine line between guilt and responsibility What the collective purge will reveal  Reframing “bad” and “good”  Lessons learned from hitting rock bottom  56:00 — TV “Programming”  Striking a balance between staying informed and protecting your energy  Unsubscribing from sensationalism Programming trauma Why it's not your job to save everyone    Connect with Luke on social media to learn how to take your lifestyle to the next level, plus catch exclusive live interviews & events: INSTAGRAM - @lukestorey // instagram.com/lukestorey/ FACEBOOK - facebook.com/MrLukeStorey/ TWITTER - @MrLukeStorey // twitter.com/MRLUKESTOREY YOUTUBE - youtube.com/c/LukeStorey HELP SUPPORT THIS SHOW! Love the show? You'll really love Luke's Master Market Online Store!  It's a win-win! Get direct links to all of Luke's hand-picked biohacking and health products all in one place, exclusive discounts, and support the show by making purchases through the web store >> SHOP NOW.   Other ways to support:  SUBSCRIBE >> Apple Podcasts + Stitcher + Google Podcasts + Spotify LEAVE APPLE PODCASTS REVIEW >> Simple step-by-step instructions SHARE >> Spread the word! Tell your family, friends, neighbors, and all your social pals Resources Website: thegreatunlearn.com Are you ready to block harmful blue light, and look great at the same time? Check out Gilded By Luke Storey. Where fashion meets function: gildedbylukestorey.com Join me on Telegram for the uncensored content big tech won't allow me to post. It's free speech and free content: www.lukestorey.com/telegram

MetroNews This Morning
MetroNews This Morning 12-2-21

MetroNews This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 14:23


Striking workers at Cabell-Huntington Hospital ratify a new contract. WVU President Gordon Gee in hot water with the faculty Senate. Abortion defenders are keeping a sharp eye on the U.S. Supreme Court case out of Mississippi which could impact the Roe v. Wade decision. A fire continues to burn in the New River Gorge, although rain has helped and Charleston remembers a fallen police officer a year after she was killed in the line of duty. In Sports, players are ready to compete for state titles this weekend in high school football at the Super 6 in Wheeling. Those stories and more in today's MetroNews This Morning podcast.

MetroNews This Morning
MetroNews This Morning 12-1-21

MetroNews This Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 15:19


Striking employees at Cabell Huntington Hospital vote on another contract offer today. Crews battle a smoldering fire in the New River Gorge. State officials take a wait-and-see approach to the Omicron variant of Covid 19, but continue to encourage folks to get vaccinated and a booster shot. Flags are lowered in honor of former state Treasurer Larrie Bailey. Holiday shopping after Black Friday and Cyber Monday is shaping up to be solid for West Virginia retailers. In Sports, WVU rolls over Bellermine and teams face stiff challenges to claim a state title this weekend in Wheeling. Those stories and more in today's MetroNews This Morning podcast.

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW
#880 - You're Better Looking Than You Think!!! (RICH CELENZA Podcast)

THE RICH CELENZA SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 7:58


RICH CELENZA talks about how a lot of people may not realize how good-looking they really are. Or how sexy they may be.  A lot of women may not know how beautiful they truly are. A lot of men may not realize how handsome they are. People also underestimate how unique they are. People also need to stop looking at all the flaws they have regarding their looks instead of looking at their strengths. People also may underestimate how good their body looks as well.  

Screaming in the Cloud
Striking a Balance on the Cloud with Rachel Stephens

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 39:11


About RachelRachel Stephens is a Senior Analyst with RedMonk, a developer-focused industry analyst firm. RedMonk focuses on how practitioners drive technological adoption. Her research covers a broad range of developer and infrastructure products, with a particular focus on emerging growth technologies and markets. (But not crypto. Please don't talk to her about NFTs.)Before joining RedMonk, Rachel worked as a database administrator and financial analyst. Rachel holds an MBA from Colorado State University and a BA in Finance from the University of Colorado.Links: RedMonk: https://redmonk.com/ Great analysis: https://redmonk.com/rstephens/2021/09/30/a-new-strategy-r2/ “Convergent Evolution of CDNs and Clouds”: https://redmonk.com/sogrady/2020/06/10/convergent-evolution-cdns-cloud/ “Everything is Securities Fraud?”: https://cafe.com/stay-tuned/everything-is-securities-fraud-with-matt-levine/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/rstephensme TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by my friends at ThinkstCanary. Most companies find out way too late that they've been breached. ThinkstCanary changes this and I love how they do it. Deploy canaries and canary tokens in minutes and then forget about them. What's great is the attackers tip their hand by touching them, giving you one alert, when it matters. I use it myself and I only remember this when I get the weekly update with a “we're still here, so you're aware” from them. It's glorious! There is zero admin overhead  to this, there are effectively no false positives unless I do something foolish. Canaries are deployed and loved on all seven continents. You can check out what people are saying at canary.love. And, their Kub config canary token is new and completely free as well. You can do an awful lot without paying them a dime, which is one of the things I love about them. It is useful stuff and not an, “ohh, I wish I had money.” It is speculator! Take a look; that's canary.love because it's genuinely rare to find a security product that people talk about in terms of love. It really is a unique thing to see. Canary.love. Thank you to ThinkstCanary for their support of my ridiculous, ridiculous non-sense.   Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. The last time I spoke to Rachel Stephens over at RedMonkwas in December of 2019. Well, on this podcast anyway; we might have exchanged conversational tidbits here and there at some point since then. But really, if we look around the world there's nothing that's materially different than it was today from December in 2019, except, oh, that's right everything. Rachel Stephens, you're still a senior analyst at RedMonk, which hey, in this day and age, longevity at a company is something that is almost enough to occasion comment on its own. Thanks for coming back for another round, I appreciate it.Rachel: Oh, I'm so happy to be here, and it's exciting to talk about the state of the world a few years later than the last time we talked. But yeah, it's been a hell of a couple years.Corey: Really has, but rather than rehashing pandemic stuff because I feel like unless people have been living in a cave for the last couple of years—because we've all been living in caves for the last couple of years—they know what's up with that. What's new in your world? What has changed for you aside from all of this in the past couple of years working in one of the most thankless of all jobs, an analyst in the cloud computing industry?Rachel: Well, the job stuff is all excellent and I've had wonderful time working at RedMonk. So, RedMonk overall is an analyst firm that is focused on helping people understand technology trends, particularly from the view of the developer or the practitioner. So, helping to understand how the people who are using technologies are actually driving their overall adoption. And so there has been all kinds of interesting things that have happened in that score in the last couple of years. We've seen a lot of interesting trends, lots of fun things to look at in the space and it's been a lot.On a personal side, like a week into lockdown I found out that I was pregnant, so I went through all of locking down and the heart of the pandemic pregnant. I had my maternity leave earlier this year and came back and so excited to be back in. But it's also just been a lot to catch up on in the space as you come back from leave which I'm sure you are well familiar with.Corey: Yes, I did the same thing, slightly differently timed. My second daughter Josephine was born at the end of September. When did your kiddo arrive on the scene to a world of masked strangers?Rachel: So, I have an older daughter who just turned four, and then my youngest is coming up on his first birthday. He was born in December.Corey: Excellent. It sounds like our kids are basically the same age, in both directions. And from my perspective, at least looking back, what advice would I give someone for having a baby in a pandemic? It distills down to ‘don't,' just because it changes so much, it's no longer a trivial thing to have a grandparent come out and spend time with the kid. It's the constant… drumbeat of is this over? Is this not over?And that manifested a bunch of different ways. And I'm glad that I got the opportunity to take some time off to spend time with my family during that timeframe, but at the same time, it would've great if there were options such as not being stuck at home with every rambunctious—at the time—three-year-old as I went through that entire joy of having the kid.Rachel: Yeah. No, for the longest time, my thing was like, okay, like, there's no amount of money you could pay me to go back to middle school. I would never do it. And my new high bar there is no amount of money that you could pay me to go back to April 2020. That was the hardest month of my entire life was getting through that, like, first trimester, both parents at home, toddler at home, nowhere to go, no one to help. That was a [BLEEP] hard month. [laugh] that was bad.Corey: Oh, my God, yes, and we don't talk about this because we're basically communicating with people on social media, and everyone feels bad looking at social media because they're comparing their blooper reel with everyone else's highlights. And it feels odd on some level to complain about things like that. And let's be very clear as a man, I wind up in society getting lauded for even deigning to mention that I have children, whereas when mothers wind up talking about anything even slightly negative it's, “Oh, you sound like a bad mom.” And it is just one of the most abhorrent things out there in the world, I suppose. It's a strange inverted thing but one of the things that surprised me the most when I was expecting my first kid was looking at the different parenting forums, and the difference in tone was palpable where on the dad forums, everyone is super supportive and you got this dude it's great. You're fine. You're doing your best.Sure, these the occasional, “I gave my toddler beer and now people yell at me,” and it's, “What is wrong with you asshole?” But everyone else is mostly sane and doing their best. Whereas a lot of the ‘mommy' forums seem to bias more toward being relatively dismissive other people's parenting choices. And I understand I'm stereotyping wildly, not all forums, not all people, et cetera, et cetera, but it really was an interesting window into an area that as a stereotypical white man world, I don't see a lot of places I hang out with that are traditionally male that are overwhelmingly supportive in quite the same way. It was really an eye-opening experience for me.Rachel: I think you hit on some really important trends. One of the things that I have struggled with is—so I came into RedMonk—I've had a Twitter account forever, and it was always just, like, my personal Twitter account until I started working at RedMonk five years ago. And then all of a sudden I'm tweeting in technical and work capacities as well. And finding that balance initially was always a challenge.But then finding that balance again after having kids was very different because I would always—it was, kind of, mix of my life and also what I'm seeing in the industry and what I'm working on and this mix of things. And once you started tweeting about kids, it very much changes the potential perception that people have of who you are, what you're doing. I know this is just a mommy blogger kind of thing.You have to be really cognizant of that balance and making sure that you continue to put yourself in a place where you can still be your authentic self, but you really as a mom in the workspace and especially in tech have to be cognizant of not leaning too far into that. Because it can really damage your credibility with some audiences which is a super unfortunate thing, but also something I've learned just, like, I have to be really careful about how much mom stuff I share on Twitter.Corey: It's bizarre to me that we have to shade aspects of ourselves like this. And I don't know what the answer is. It's a weird thing that I never thought about before until suddenly I find that, oh, I'm a parent. I guess I should actually pay attention to this thing now. And it's one of those once you see it you can't unsee it things and it becomes strange and interesting and also more than a little sad in some respects.Rachel: I think there are some signs that we are getting to a better place, but it's a hard road for parents I think, and moms, in particular, working moms, all kinds of challenges out there. But anyways, it's one of those ones that is nice because love having my kids as a break, but sometimes Mondays come and it's such a relief to come back to work after a weekend with kids. Kids are a lot of work. And so it has brought elements of joy to my personal life, but it has also brought renewed elements of joy to my work life as really being able to lean into that side of myself. So, it's been a good year.Corey: Now that I have a second kid, I'm keenly aware of why parents are always very reluctant to wind up—the good parents at least to say, “Oh yeah, I have X number of kids, but that one's my favorite.” And I understand now why my mom always said with my brother and I that, “I can't stand either one of you.” And I get that now. Looking at the children of cloud services it's like, which one is my favorite?Well, I can't stand any of them, but the one that I hate the most is the Managed NAT Gateway because of its horrible pricing. In fact, anything involving bandwidth pricing in this industry tends to be horrifying, annoying, ill-behaved, and very hard to discipline. Which is why I think it's probably time we talk a little bit about egress charges in cloud providers.You had a great analysis of Cloudflare's R2, which is named after a robot in Star Wars and is apparently also the name of their S3 competitor, once it launches. Again, this is a pre-announcement, yeah, I could write blog posts that claim anything; the proof is really going to be in the pudding. Tell me more about, I guess, what you noticed from that announcement and what drove you to, “Ah, I have thoughts on this?”Rachel: So, I think it's an interesting announcement for several reasons. I think one of them is that it makes their existing offering really compelling when you start to add in that object store to something like the CDN, or to their edge functions which is called their Workers platform. And so, if you start to combine some of those functionalities together with a better object storage story, it can make their existing offering a lot more compelling which I think is an interesting aspect of this.I think one of the aspects that is probably gotten a lot more of the traction though is their lack of egress pricing. So, I think that's really what took everyone's imaginations by storm is what does the world look like when we are not charging egress pricing on object storage?Corey: What I find interesting is that when this came out first, a lot of AWS fans got very defensive over it, which I found very odd because their egress charges are indefensible from my point of view. And their response was, “Well, if you look at how a lot of the data access patterns work this isn't as big of a deal as it looks like,” and you're right. If I have a whole bunch of objects living in an object store, and a whole bunch of people each grab one of those objects this won't help me in any meaningful sense.But if I have one object that a bunch of people grab, well, suddenly we're having a different conversation. And on some level, it turns into an interesting question of what differentiates this with their existing CDN-style approach. From my perspective, this is where the object actually lives rather than just a cache that is going to expire. And that is transformative in a bunch of different ways, but my, I guess, admittedly overstated analysis for some use cases was okay, I store a petabyte in AWS and use it with and without this thing. Great, the answer came out to something like 51 or $52,000 in egress charges versus zero on Cloudflare. That's an interesting perspective to take. And the orders of magnitude in difference are eye-popping assuming that it works as advertised, which is always the caveat.Rachel: Yeah. I remember there was a RedMonk conversation with one of the cloud vendors set us up with a client conversation that want to, kind of, showcase their products kind of thing. And it was a movie studio and they walked us through what they architecturally have to do when they drop a trailer. If you think about that thing from this use case where all of a sudden you have videos that are all going out globally at the same time, and everybody wants to watch it and you're serving it over and over, that's a super interesting and compelling use case and very different from a cost perspective.Corey: You'll notice the video streaming services all do business with something that is not AWS for what they stream to end-users from. Netflix has its own Open Connect project that effectively acts as their own homebuilt CDN that they partner with providers to put in their various environments. There are a bunch of providers that focus specifically on this. But if you do the math for the Netflix story at retail pricing—let's be clear at large scale, no one pays retail pricing for anything, but okay—even assuming that you're within hailing distance of the same universe as retail pricing; you don't have to watch too many hours of Netflix before the data egress charges cost more than you're paying a month than subscription. And I have it on good authority—read as from their annual reports—that a much larger expense for Netflix than their cloud and technology and R&D expenses is their content expenses.They're making a lot of original content. They're licensing an awful lot of content, and that's way more expensive than providing it to folks. They have to have a better economic model. They need to be able to make a profit of some kind on streaming things to people. And with the way that all the major cloud providers wind up pricing this stuff, it's not tenable. There has to be a better answer.Rachel: So, Netflix calls to mind an interesting antidote that has gone around the industry which is who can become each other faster? Can HBO become Netflix faster, or can Netflix become HBO faster? So, can you build out that technology infrastructure side, or can you build out that content side? And I think what you're talking to with their content costs speaks to that story in terms of where people are investing and trying to actually make dents in their strategic outlays.I think a similar concept is actually at play when we talk about cloud and CDN. We do have this interesting piece from my coworker, Steve O'Grady, and he called it “Convergent Evolution of CDNs and Clouds.” And they originally evolved along separate paths where CDNs were designed to do this edge-caching scenario, and they had the core compute and all of the things that go around it happening in the cloud.And I think we've seen in recent years both of them starting to grow towards each other where CDNs are starting to look a lot more cloud-like, and we're seeing clouds trying to look more CDN-like. And I think this announcement in particular is very interesting when you think about what's happening in the CDN space and what it actually means for where CDNs are headed.Corey: It's an interesting model in that if we take a look at all of the existing cloud providers they had some other business that funded the incredible expense outlay that it took to build them. For example, Amazon was a company that started off selling books and soon expanded to selling everything else, and then expanded to putting ads in all of their search portals, including in AWS and eroding customer trust.Google wound up basically making all of their money by showing people ads and also killing Google Reader. And of course, Microsoft has been a software company for a lot longer than they've been a cloud provider, and given their security lapses in Azure recently is the question of whether they'll continue to be taken seriously as a cloud provider.But what makes Cloudflare interesting from this approach is they start it from the outside in of building out the edge before building regions or anything like that. And for a lot of use cases that works super well, in theory. In practice, well, we've never seen it before. I'm curious to see how it goes. Obviously, they're telling great stories about how they envision this working out in the future. I don't know how accurate it's going to be—show, don't tell—but I can at least acknowledge that the possibility is definitely there.Rachel: I think there's a lot of unanswered questions at this point, like, will you be able to have zero egress fees, and edge-like latencies, and global distribution, and have that all make sense and actually perform the way that the customer expects? I think that's still to be seen. I think one of the things that we have watched with interest is this rise of—I think for lack of a better word techno-nationalism where we are starting to see enclaves of where people want technology to be residing, where they want things to be sourced from, all of these interesting things.And so having this global network of storage flies in the face of some of those trends where people are building more and more enclaves of we're going to go big and global. I think that's interesting and I think data residency in this global world will be an interesting question.Corey: It also gets into the idea of what is the data that's going to live there. Because the idea of data residency, yes, that is important, but where that generally tends to matter the most is things like databases or customer information. Not the thing that we're putting out on the internet for anyone who wants to, to be able to download, which has historically been where CDNs are aiming things.Yes, of course, they can restrict it to people with logins and the rest, but that type of object storage in my experience is not usually subject to heavy regulation around data residency. We'll see because I get the sense that this is the direction Cloudflare is attempting to go in, and it's really interesting to see how it works. I'm curious to know what their stories are around, okay, you have a global network. That's great. Can I stipulate which areas my data can live within or not?At some point, it's going to need to happen if they want to look at regulated entities, but not everyone has to start with that either. So, it really just depends on what their game plan is on this. I like the fact that they're willing to do this. I like the fact they're willing to be as transparent as they are about their contempt for AWS's egress fees. And yes, of course, they're a competitor.They're going to wind up smacking competition like this, but I find it refreshing because there is no defense for what they're saying, their math is right. Their approach to what customers experience from AWS in terms of egress fees is correct. And all of the defensiveness at, well, you know, no one pays retail price for this, yeah, but they see it on the website when they're doing back-of-the-envelope math, and they're not going to engage with you under the expectation that you're going to give them a 98% discount.So, figure out what the story is. And it's like beating my head against the wall. I also want to be fair. These networks are very hard to build, and there's a tremendous amount of investment. The AWS network is clearly magic in some respects just because having worked in data centers myself, the things that I see that I'm able to do between various EC2 instances at full network line rate would not have been possible in the data centers that I worked within.So, there's something going on that is magic and that's great. And I understand that it's expensive, but they've done a terrible job of messaging that. It just feels like, oh, bandwidth in is free because, you know, that's how it works. Sending it out, ooh, that's going to cost you X and their entire positioning and philosophy around it just feels unnecessary.Rachel: That's super interesting. And I think that also speaks to one of the questions that is still an open concern for what happens to Cloudflare if this is wildly successful. Which, based off of people's excitement levels at this point, it's seems like it's very potentially going to be successful. And what does this mean for the level of investment that they're going to have to make in their own infrastructure and network and order to actually be able to serve all of this?Corey: The thing that I find curious is that in a couple of comment threads on Hacker News and on Twitter, Cloudflare's CEO, Matthew Prince—who's always been extremely accessible as far as executives of giant cloud companies go—has said that at their scale and by which they he's referring to Cloudflare, and he says, “I assume that Amazon can probably get at least as decent economics on bandwidth pricing as we can,” which is a gross understatement because Amazon will spend years fighting over 50 cents.Great, but what's interesting is that he refers to bandwidth at that scale as being much closer to a fixed cost than something that's a marginal cost for everything that a customer uses. The way that companies buy and sell bandwidth back and forth is complex, but he's right. It is effectively a fixed monthly fee for a link and you can use as much or as little of that link as you want. 95th percentile billing aficionados, please don't email me.But by and large, that's the way to think about it. You pay for the size of the pipe, not how much water flows through it. And as long as you can keep the links going without saturating them to the point where more data can't fit through at a reasonable amount of time, your cost don't change. So, yeah, if there's a bunch of excitement they'll have to expand the links, but that's generally a fixed cost as opposed to a marginal cost per gigabyte.That's not how they think about it. There's a whole translation layer that's an economic model. And according to their public filings, they have something like a 77% gross margin which tells me that, okay, they are not in fact losing money on bandwidth even now where they generally don't charge on a metered basis until you're on the Cloudflare Enterprise Plan.Rachel: Yeah. I think it's going to just be really interesting to watch. I'm definitely interested to see what happens as they open this up, and like, 11 9s of availability feels like a lot of availabilities. It's just the engineering of this, the economics of this it feels like there's a lot of open questions that I'm excited to watch.Corey: You're onto my favorite part of this. So, the idea of 11 9s because it sounds ludicrous. That is well within the boundaries of probability of things such as, yeah, it is likely that gravity is going to stop working than it is that's going to lose data. How can you guarantee that? Generally speaking, although S3 has always been extremely tight-lipped about how it works under the hood, other systems have not been.And it looks an awful lot like the idea of Reed-Solomon erasure coding, where for those of us who spent time downloading large files of questionable legality due to copyright law and whatnot off of Usenet, they had the idea of parity files where they'd take these giant media files up—they're Linux ISOs; of course they are—and you'd slice them into a bunch of pieces and then generate parity files as well.So, you would wind up downloading the let's say 80 RAR files and, oh, three of them were corrupt, each parity file could wind up swapping in so as long as you had enough that added up to 80, any of those could wind up restoring the data that had been corrupted. That is almost certainly what is happening at the large object storage scale. Which is great, we're going to break this thing into a whole bunch of chunks. Let's say here is a file you've uploaded or an object.We're going to break this into a hundred chunks—let's say arbitrarily—and any 80 of those chunks can be used to reconstitute the entire file. And then you start looking at where you place them and okay, what are the odds of simultaneous drive failure in these however many locations? And that's how you get that astronomical number. It doesn't mean what people think of does. The S3 offers 11 9s of durability on their storage classes, including the One Zone storage class.Which is a single availability zone instead of something that's an entire region, which means that they're not calculating disaster recovery failure scenarios into that durability number. Which is fascinating because it's far, like, you're going to have all the buildings within the same office park burn down than it is all of the buildings within a hundred square miles burn down, but those numbers remain the same.There's a lot of assumptions baked into that and it makes for an impressive talking point. I just hear it as, oh yeah, you're a real object-store. That's how I see it. There's a lot that's yet to be explained or understood. And I think that I'm going to be going up one side and down the other as soon as this exists in the real world and I'm looking forward to seeing it. I'm just a little skeptical because it has been preannounced.The important part for me is even the idea that they can announce something like this and not be sued for securities fraud tells me that it is at least theoretically economically possible that they could be telling the truth on this. And that alone speaks volumes to just how out-of-bounds it tends to be in the context of giant cloud customers.Rachel: I mean, if you read Matt Levine, “Everything is Securities Fraud?“ so, I don't know how much we want to get excited about that.Corey: Absolutely. A huge fan of his work. Corey: You know its important to me that people learn how to use the cloud effectively. Thats why I'm so glad that Cloud Academy is sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense. They're a great way to build in demand tech skills the way that, well personally, I learn best which I learn by doing not by reading. They have live cloud labs that you can run in real environments that aren't going to blow up your own bill—I can't stress how important that is. Visit cloudacademy.com/corey. Thats C-O-R-E-Y, don't drop the “E.” Use Corey as a promo-code as well. You're going to get a bunch of discounts on it with a lifetime deal—the price will not go up. It is limited time, they assured me this is not one of those things that is going to wind up being a rug pull scenario, oh no no. Talk to them, tell me what you think. Visit: cloudacademy.com/corey,  C-O-R-E-Y and tell them that I sent you!Corey: So, we've talked a fair bit about what data egress looks like. What else have you been focusing on? What have you found that is fun, and exciting, and catches your eye in this incredibly broad industry lately?Rachel: Oh, there's all kinds of exciting things. One of the pieces of research that's been on my back-burner, usually I do it early summer, and it is—due to a variety of factors—still in my pipeline, but I always do a piece of research about base infrastructure pricing. And it's an annual piece of looking about what are all of the cloud providers doing in regards to their pricing on that core aspect of compute, and storage, and memory.And what does that look like over time, and what does that look like across providers? And it is absolutely impossible to get an apples-to-apples comparison over time and across providers. It just can't actually be done. But we do our best [laugh] and then caveat the hell out of it from there. But that's the piece of research that's most on my backlog right now and one that I'm working on.Corey: I think that there's a lot of question around the idea of what is the cost of a compute unit—or something like that—between providers? The idea of if I have this configuration will cost me more on cloud provider a or cloud provider B, my pet working theory is that whenever people ask for analyses like that—or a number of others, to be perfectly frank with you—what they're really looking for is confirmation bias to go in the direction that they wanted to go in already. I have yet to see a single scenario where people are trying to decide between cloud providers and they say, “That one because it's going to be 10% less.” I haven't seen it. That said I am, of course, at a very particular area of the industry. Have you seen it?Rachel: I have not seen it. I think users find it interesting because it's always interesting to look at trends over time. And in particular, with this analysis, it's interesting to watch the number of providers narrow and then widen back out because we've been doing this since 2012. So, we used to have [unintelligible 00:26:24] and HPE used to be in there. So, like, we used to—CenturyLink. We used to have this broader list of cloud providers that we considered that would narrow down to this doesn't really count anymore.And now why do you need to back out? It's like, okay, Oracle Cloud you're in, Alibaba, Tencent, like, let's look at you. And so, like, it's interesting to just watch the providers in the mix shift over time which I think is interesting. And I think one of just the broad trends that is interesting is early years of this, there was steep competition on price, and that leveled off for solid three, four years.We've seen some degree of competitiveness reemerge with competitors like Oracle in particular. So, those broad-brush trends are interesting. The specifics of the pricing if you're doing 10% difference kind of things I think you're missing the point of the analysis largely, but it's interesting to look at what's happening in the industry overall.Corey: If you were to ask me to set up a simple web app, if there is such a thing, and tell you in advance what it was going to cost to host, and I can get it accurate within 20%, I am on fire in terms of both analysis and often dumb luck just because it is so difficult to answer the question. Getting back to our earlier conversational topic, let's say I put CloudFront, Amazon's sorry excuse for a CDN, in front of it which is probably the closest competitor they have to Cloudflare as a CDN, what'll it cost me per gigabyte? Well, that's a fascinating question. The answer comes down to where are you visiting it from? Depending where on the planet, people who are viewing my website, or using my web app are sitting, the cost per gigabyte will vary between eight-and-a-half cents—retail pricing—and fourteen cents. That's a fairly wide margin and there's no way to predict that in advance for most use cases. It's the big open-ended question.And people build out their environments and they want to know they're making a rational decision and that their provider is not charging three times more than their competitor is for the exact same thing, but as long as it's within a certain level of confidence interval, that makes sense.Rachel: Yeah, and I think the other thing that's interesting about this analysis and one of the reasons that it's a frustrating analysis for me, in particular, is that I feel like that base compute is actually not where most of the cloud providers are actually competing anymore. So, like, it was definitely the interesting story early in cloud.I think very clearly not the focus area for most of us now. It has moved up an abstraction layer. It's moved to manage services. It has moved to other areas of their product portfolio. So, it's still useful. It's good to know. But I think that the broader portfolio of the cloud providers is definitely more the story than this individual price point.Corey: That is an interesting story because I believe it, and it speaks to the aspirational version of where a lot of companies see themselves going. And then in practice, I see companies talking like this constantly, and then I look in their environment and say, “Okay, you're basically spending 70% of your entire cloud bill on EC2 instances, running—it's a bunch of VMs that sit there.”And as much as they love to talk about the future and how other things are being considered and how their—use of machine learning in the rest, and Kubernetes, of course, a lot of this stuff all distills down to, yeah, it runs in software. It sits on top of EC2 instances and that's what you get billed for. At re:Invent it's always interesting and sad at the same time that they don't give EC2 nearly enough attention or stage time because it's not interesting, despite it being a majority of AWS bill.Rachel: I think that's a fantastic point, well made.Corey: I'll take it even one step further—and this is one where I think is almost a messaging failure on some level—Google Cloud offers sustained use discounts which apparently they don't know how to talk about appropriately, but it's genius. The way this works is if you run a VM for more than in a certain number of hours in a month, the entire month is now charged for that VM at a less than retail rate because you've been using it in a sustained way.All you have to do to capture that is don't turn it off. You know, what everyone's doing already. And sure if you commit to usage on it you get a deeper discount, but what I like about this is if you buy some reserved instances is or you buy some committed use discounting, great, you'll save more money, but okay, here's a $20 million buy. You should click the button on, people are terrified to click at that button because I don't usually get to approve dollar figure spend with multiple commas in them. That's kind of scary. So, people hem and they haw and they wait six months. This is maybe not as superior mathematically, but it's definitely an easier sell psychologically, and they just don't talk about it.It's what people say they care about when people actually do are worlds apart. And the thing that continually astounds me because I didn't expect it, but it's obvious in hindsight that when it comes to cloud economics it's more about psychology than it is about math.Rachel: I think one of the things that, having come from the finance world into the analyst world, and so I definitely have a particular point of view, but one of the things that was hardest for me when I worked in finance was not the absolute dollar amount of anything but the variability of it. So, if I knew what to expect I could work with that and we could make it work. It was when things varied in unexpected ways that it was a lot more challenging.And so I think one of the things that when people talked about, like, this shift to cloud and the move to cloud, and everyone is like, “Oh, we're moving things from the balance sheet to the income statement.” And everyone talked about that like it's a big deal. For some parts of the organization that is a big deal, but for a lot of the organization, the shift that matters is the shift from a fixed cost to a variable cost because that lack of predictability makes a lot of people's jobs, a lot more difficult.Corey: The thing that I always find fun is a thought exercise is okay, let's take a look at any given cloud company's cloud bill for the last 18 to 36 months and add all of that up. Great, take that big giant number and add 20% to it. If you could magically go back in time and offer that larger number to them as here's your cloud bill and all of your usage for the next 18 to 36 months. Here you go. Buy this instead.And the cloud providers laugh at me and they say, “Who in the world would agree to that deal?” And my answer is, “Almost everyone.” Because at the company's scale it's not like the individual developer response of, “Oh, my God, I just spent how much money? I've got to eat this month.” Companies are used to absorbing those things. It's fine. It's just a, “We didn't predict this. We didn't plan for this. What does this do to our projections, our budget, et cetera?”If you can offer them certainty and find some way to do it, they will jump at that. Most of my projects are not about make the bill lower, even though that is what is believed, in some cases by people working on these projects internally at these companies. It's about making it understandable. It's about making it predictable, it's about understanding when you see a big spike one month. What project drove that?Spoiler, it's almost always the data science team because that's what they do, but that's neither here nor there. Please don't send me letters. But yeah, it's about understanding what is going on, and that understanding and being able to predict it is super hard when you're looking at usage-based pricing.Rachel: Exactly.Corey: I want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me. If people want to hear more about your thoughts, your observations, et cetera, where can they find you?Rachel: Probably the easiest way to get in touch with me is on Twitter, which is @rstephensme that's R-S-T-E-P-H-E-N-S-M-E.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:34:08]. Thank you so much for your time. I appreciate it.Rachel: Thanks for having me. This was great.Corey: Rachel Stephens, senior analyst at RedMonk. I'm Cloud Economist, Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment, angrily defending your least favorite child, which is some horrifying cloud service you have launched during the pandemic.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff
Parliament Striking Back By Instituting Declaratory & Townshend Acts

Colonial Era to Present Day History Buff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 51:36


Learn how Parliament proceeded after officially repealing Stamp Act from March 1766. Learn for whom Townshend Acts are named after. Discover whether Parliament was divided over proposing new taxes geared towards Revenue benefiting British Government. Find out significance behind date of June 29, 1767. Discover which gender preferred drinking Tea. Learn what John Hancock supports behind English Imports including what all was mentioned in a resolution he crafted come October 1767. Find out what honorary post John Hancock got re-elected to come March 14, 1768 and whether or not he owned vessels used for transporting goods. Find out if any merchants in Boston remained loyal to Britain's East India Company. Learn what takes place in England come January 1770 and whether or not any items get repealed from new legislation enacted by Parliament. Find out if one particular item remained intact in terms of taxation purposes. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kirk-monroe/support

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More
In Praise of Love by Alain Badiou, Nicolas Truong, Translated by Peter Bush

Bookey App 30 mins Book Summaries Knowledge Notes and More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 11:16


Everyone needs love. Everyone is potentially able to love; yet, especially in our fast-paced era, a time of uneasiness and uncertainty, not everyone understands love. Love may often be accompanied by pervasive feelings of insecurity. Multiple dating and matchmaking websites have emerged to take advantage of people's anxieties around love. Striking, around the streets of Paris, are eye-catching advertisements with words such as “Get love without chance!” or “Be in love without falling in love!” They are produced by Meetic, the largest dating website in Europe. The message they try to convey is direct, “Come on, we can offer you a guarantee of love.” Yes, Meetic promise to offer you “coaching in love”. You may agree, this sounds attractive, right? They will provide you with all the information you need to precisely sift out the person you want for your ideal love interest, such as their photo, date of birth, hobbies, and zodiac sign. The proposal appears uncomplicated, safe, effortless even, meeting your expectations and needs of an appropriate person for your feelings and affections. However, in the public interview that is the source of this book, Alain Badiou states that drawing on his 71 years of life experience, such a view of love is wrong. So, what is love from Badiou's point of view? Are there other incorrect views of love? And how do people find true love? In unlocking the book In Praise of Love today, we will try to answer these questions.

Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast
On Striking the Perfect Balance Between People, Place and Technology with Frank Cottle

Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 35:40


Frank Cottle is the founder and CEO of the Alliance group of companies, and an experienced speaker, strategist, entrepreneur, advisor, business leader, and investor.Since 1979 he's been building flexible workspace companies under the Alliance brand and its predecessor companies, focusing on new ways of working that genuinely meet the needs of today's entrepreneurs by combining three fundamental components: people, place, and technology.His primary areas of expertise include integrating flexible workspace models to assist with corporate real estate repositioning, investment banking, finance, workplace technology, and business leadership. He is a regular on the conference circuit and frequently consults with multinational firms to plan and formulate strategies for the future of work.In our conversation, we discussed:-Define agility and remote work-Biggest frustration to the 1031 exchange when selling highly appreciated businessesConnect with Frank Cottle:https://capitalgainstaxsolutions.com/on-striking-the-perfect-balance-between-people-place-and-technology-with-frank-cottle/Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!Here's How »Join the Capital Gains Tax Solutions Community today:capitalgainstaxsolutions.comCapital Gains Tax Solutions FacebookCapital Gains Tax Solutions Twitter

The Michael Berry Show
5th Circuit Of Appeals Striking Down Biden's Vax Mandate | AM Show Hr 2

The Michael Berry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 34:23


Sacred Symbols: A PlayStation Podcast
#173: Mouse and Runeboard

Sacred Symbols: A PlayStation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 177:57


If you listen to this show (and we know that you do), you would have known months ago that God of War was coming to PC, because we told you it was. Well, if you didn't believe us, it is indeed true: 2018's God of War is indeed PC-bound, and it has some players in their feelings... and not in a good way. Is it time for PlayStation's audience to embrace the inevitable? Or will stragglers hold on for dear life as the industry moves past console exclusivity above all else? Meanwhile, the upcoming Uncharted movie has its first trailer, and it's not as bad as we thought it'd be, while some 2022 DC games are looking mighty hot and Blue Box is suffering under the weight of its endless conspiracy. Plus: Elden Ring is delayed, Dbrand punches Sony in the mouth, a new Splinter Cell is indeed in production, and more, and listener inquiries bring us to just some of the following topics: Striking workers, the rise of SEGA, Gamepass' flat growth, and the proper placement of toothpaste on the toothbrush. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices