Podcasts about Windsor Castle

Official country residence of the British monarch

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Best podcasts about Windsor Castle

Latest podcast episodes about Windsor Castle

Six O'Clock News
03/02/2023 A man becomes the first person to be convicted of treason in the UK for more than 40 years

Six O'Clock News

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2023 30:35


Jaswant Singh Chail was caught with a loaded crossbow in the grounds of Windsor Castle, metres away from Queen Elizabeth's private apartments.

House Guest by Country & Town House | Interior Designer Interviews

My House Guest today is Luke Deering, an art director, artist and occasional product designer whose work in the art department includes Spiderman and The Crown. “It is an area of artistry that's not often spoken about or understood,” says Luke. We chat about the craftsmanship and collaboration behind a set like a fire-damaged Windsor Castle. Working for the Oscar-winning production designer Martin Childs and with art director Chris Wyatt. Luke and the team designed the ravaged interior with blackened floors, half-destroyed paintings and twisted timber. “Everything starts with the script,” according to Luke, and then drawings, sketches, models… until everyone is happy. A painstaking process and fascinating to hear all about it. Tune in for more.

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter
Prince Harry says the Royal family is a ‘death cult' — Windsor Castle is a ‘tomb.' Harry claims mom would be ‘heartbroken' at William's betrayal. Harry slammed for denying royal family ‘racism' claims, blaming ‘press'

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 21:17 Very Popular


The Duke of Sussex, 38, wrote many shocking anecdotes - but none more bizarre than describing his family as a “death cult.” Prince Harry said that his late mom, Princess Diana, would be “heartbroken” at the way his bully brother, Prince William, betrayed him. The Duke of Sussex is now under fire for vehemently denying claims that he called the royals “racist” in his Oprah interview. Rob's best pal Delaina Dixon from DivaGalsDaily's joins him today. Don't forget to vote in today's poll on Twitter at @naughtynicerob or in our Facebook group.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pardon My American
6 Year Old Shoots Teacher And Prince Harry's Bold ”60 Minutes”

Pardon My American

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 58:53


* CORRECTION, WE REFERENCED ABBY ZWERNER'S DEATH FROM THE SHOOTING BUT WE WERE MISTAKEN. SHE IS CURRENTLY IN CRITICAL BUT STABLE CONDITION * The first-grade teacher in Virginia who was shot by her 6-year-old student was about to confiscate the gun when the child pulled the trigger.  She was listed in serious but stable condition at Riverside Regional Medical Center,  Massive crowd of Brazilians have descended on the capital of Brasilia to protest the elections and are currently storming the National Congress. Police are using tear gas, Gunfire has been reported. Prince Harry wrote many shocking anecdotes about his life as the “Spare” heir to the British throne — but none more bizarre than describing his family as a “death cult.” Harry noted in his book that their lives “were built on death” and their experiences were overshadowed by grief. Harry also says how Windsor Castle,  one of the Firm's royal residences in England,  is a “tomb, the walls filled with ancestors.” The Tower of London, Harry explained, is “held together with the blood of animals.”   Pardon My American podcast (PMA) is an opinion-based podcast that explores politics, entertainment, paranormal, and culture all while having a good laugh. They keep things lighthearted as they dive into subjects that inspire you to think and ask questions.   Support Our Sponsors ► Aura ► Ghostbed ► Fum   Support Our Show ► Website ► Buy Merch ► Patreon   Watch & Follow Our Show ► YouTube ► Rumble ► Rokfin ► Instagram ► Telegram  

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

Charles Skaggs & Jesse Jackson are joined by special guest companion Holly Mac as they discuss "Silver Nemesis", the third serial from Doctor Who Season 25 in 1988, featuring Sylvester McCoy as the Seventh Doctor, Sophie Aldred as Ace, and the return of the Cybermen! Find us here:Twitter: @NextStopWho, @CharlesSkaggs, @JesseJacksonDFW @HollyMac_79 Instagram: @nextstopeverywherepodcast Facebook: Facebook.com/Nextstopeverywherepodcast Email: NextStopWho@gmail.com Listen and subscribe to us in Apple Podcasts and leave us a review!

Front Row
The Pale Blue Eye and Happy Valley reviewed, Artist Alexander Creswell

Front Row

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 41:56


Critics Tim Robey and Rhianna Dhillon join Front Row to watch the murder-mystery gothic horror film The Pale Blue Eye, starring Christian Bale, Gillian Anderson and Harry Melling, as Edgar Allan Poe, and the return of Happy Valley starring Sarah Lancashire and written by Sally Wainwright for what will be its final series. After the Windsor Castle fire in 1992, the artist Alexander Creswell was commissioned by the Queen to initially chart the destruction and five years later to capture the restoration of the castle. It was the only series of paintings that the Queen ever commissioned. Alexander Creswell reflects on the commission that led to him creating twenty-one watercolour paintings. The series is not currently on public display, but can be viewed on the Royal Collection Trust website. Picture credit of Harry Melling and Lucy Boynton in The Pale Blue Eye: Scott Garfield/Netflix © 2022 Presenter: Samira Ahmed Producer: Sarah Johnson

Deep Dive Movie Reviews
The Crown (Season 5) - Series Review

Deep Dive Movie Reviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 43:32


A new cast assembles for the penultimate season of The Crown and sees Queen Elizabeth (Imelda Staunton) dealing with fire at Windsor Castle, the marriage collapse of the Prince and Princess of Wales, and a British public that seems much less interested in maintaining a Royal Family. Also starring Jonathan Pryce, Lesley Manville, Jonny Lee Miller, Dominic West and Elizabeth Debicki. ** Deep Dive Movie Reviews contain spoilers ** 1:37 - Why the “Yankee” loves “The Crown” 10:52 - James & Steve differ on the “liberties” taken in Season 5 21:46 - Season 5's take on John Major 25:35 - New cast is top shelf 28:30 - In Season 6 we want more Philip and more gaffs 35:40 - The Hong Kong Handover 38:40 - Final Score for The Crown

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge
The Bridge: Encore Presentation - The Final Goodbye

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 52:08


Today an encore presentation of an episode that originally aired on September 19h. The long goodbye for Queen Elizabeth is over with her body now on its way to its final resting place at Windsor Castle.  The end of an historic ten-day period since her passing.  Today the Bridge deals with that with Andrew MacDougall joining us from London.  But today's program also deals with issues surrounding journalism and its coverage of politicians. Andrew, a former Director of Communications for Prime Minister Stephen Harper helps us on that too.

London Walks
Today (December 11) in London History – Abdication

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 14:57


SAFC Unfiltered
Episode #31 Unfiltered Special with Gary Bennett MBE

SAFC Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 52:06


Gary Bennett played 443 times for Sunderland AFC, in this special episode the former captain sat down with Frankie & Danny to discuss his career and his campaigning for anti racism organisations that this week saw him receive and MBE from HRH King Charles III at Windsor Castle

Women Worth Knowing
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Part 2 with Robin Jones Gunn

Women Worth Knowing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 46:11


Through the characters in her famous novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, this daughter of a minister exposed the horrors of slavery and influenced the course of American history. Nine years after the release of her instantly best-selling book, the Civil War began. Harriet's deep love for God and her sense of justice is evident in all of the books she wrote. She traveled extensively, spoke to thousands in the US and abroad, and even dined with Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle. Even through the times of tragedy in her life, Harriet continued to give generously to others. After the Civil War, she bought a plantation and hired back the displaced former slaves. She personally taught hundreds of former slaves to read and write. Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe Mightier than the Sword: Uncle Tom's Cabin and the Battle for America by David S. Reynolds

London Walks
Today (November 20) in London History – “the fierce light which beats upon a throne”

London Walks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 14:53


The Daily Gardener
November 17, 2022 Solway Moss, Henry Muhlenberg, Ethel Zoe Bailey, Shelby Foote, Rosa by Peter Kukielski, and Archibald Lampman

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 34:15


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1771 On this day, heavy rains caused the ancient raised peat bog known as the Solway Moss to burst over its earthen banks and flowed down into a valley covering four hundred acres of farmland. The next day, Solway Moss covered the surrounding land with 15 feet of thick feculent mud. Solway Moss was a one-by-two-mile-long moss land growing since the end of the last Ice Age. The raised bog was an estimated 50 feet higher than the surrounding farmland. The living surface of the Solway Moss was a unique mix of bog cotton, sphagnum, and heather. The porous soupy surface hosted a few shrubs and standing pools of water. But the rotting vegetation created a dangerous predicament that no man or cattle would dare traverse throughout the year. Over two hundred years before the Solway Moss burst, the English and the Scots fought over the land surrounding the bog in the Battle of Solway Moss. After the English victory, hundreds of Scots drowned in the bog as they tried to return home by crossing the moss hillside. Like a sponge, peat expands to absorb moisture when it gets wet. And, during wet months like November of 1771, the peat swells; in this case, the peat swelled until it bursts. The incredible event was recorded in a journal: A farmer who lived nearest the moss was alarmed with an unusual noise. The crust had at once given way, and the black deluge was rolling toward his house. He gave notice to his neighbors with all expedition; others received no other advice but... by its noise, many by its entrance into their houses.... some were surprised with it even in their beds. [while some] remaining totally ignorant…until the morning when their neighbors with difficulty got them out through the roof. The eruption burst… like a cataract of thick ink... intermixed with great fragments of peat... filling the whole valley... leaving... tremendous heaps of turf.   1785 Birth of Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg, American Lutheran Pastor and botanist. He was always referred to by his second name Heinrich. The Muhlenberg family was a founding family of the United States, and Heinrich came from a long line of pastors. His father, Pastor Heinrich Melchior Mühlenberg, was known as the patriarch of the Lutheran Church in America. His brother was a major in the Revolutionary War, and his other brother was a Congressman. Muhlenberg's journals are a treasure trove of his thoughts on botanical self-improvement. He would write: How may I best advance myself in the knowledge of plants?   And Muhlenberg would set goals and reminders to challenge himself, writing: It is winter, and there is little to do . . . Toward spring I should go out and [put together] a chronology of the trees; how they come out, the flowers, how they appear,. . . . I should especially [take not of] the flowers and fruit. The grass Muhlenbergia was named for Heinrich Muhlenberg. Muhly grasses are beautiful native grasses with two critical strengths in their plant profile: drought tolerance and visual punch. In addition, Muhly grasses are easy-going, growing equally well in harsh conditions and perfectly manicured gardens. The Muhly cultivar 'White Cloud' offers gorgeous white plumes. When the coveted Pink Muhly blooms, people often stop and ask the name of the beautiful pink grass. Lindheimer's Muhly makes a fantastic screen, and Bamboo Muhly commands attention when it is featured in containers. All Muhly grasses like well-drained soil and full sun. If you plant them in the fall, be sure to get them situated and in the ground at least a month before the first frost. And here's an interesting side note: Muhlenberg also discovered the bog turtle. In 1801, the turtle was named Clemmys muhlenbergii in his honor.   1818 Death of England's Queen Charlotte, the wife of George III. Charlotte is remembered as the patroness of the arts, an amateur botanist, and a champion of Kew Gardens. In addition to the astounding fact that Charlotte gave birth to 15 children, she was a fascinating royal. Born in Mecklenburg-Strelitz, Germany, Charlotte was the first person in England to bring a Christmas tree indoors to celebrate the holiday season. Charlotte had gotten the idea from her home country of Germany. In December 1800, Charlotte selected a yew which was brought inside Windsor Castle and festively decorated. Charlotte and her husband, King George, both loved botany. After his mother died, George gained control of Kew and Charlotte set about expanding Kew Gardens. On the property, Charlotte had a little cottage installed along with a rustic cottage garden. Her daughter Elizabeth likely painted the attic room ceiling with nasturtium and morning glory. Charlotte was quite serious in her pursuit of botany. She collected plants and had a personal herbarium to help with her studies. The President of the Linnean Society, Sir James Edward Smith, personally tutored Charlotte in botany, along with her four daughters. And. George and Charlotte both became close friends with the botanical tissue paper artist Mary Delaney. At the end of Mary's life, George and Charlotte gave her a house at Windsor along with a pension. When plant hunters in South Africa discovered the Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia reginae) flower, it was sent to England and named for Charlotte's birthplace, Strelitz. The botanical name for the Bird of Paradise is Strelitzia reginae, "stray-LIT-zee-ah REJ-in-ee." The early part of Charlotte's reign occurred before the American Revolution, which is why so many American locations were named in Charlotte's honor. Eleven cities are named Charlotte, the most famous being Charlotte, North Carolina. It's no wonder that Charlotte, NC, has the nickname The Queen's City," and there's a 25-foot tall bronze statue of Charlotte outside the Charlotte airport. Mecklenburg County in North Carolina and Virginia are both named in honor of Charlotte's home in Germany. Charlotte died at 74 in the smallest English royal palace, Kew Palace, at Kew Gardens. She reigned for 57 years. Today, gardeners love the Japanese Anemone Queen Charlotte. It's the perfect plant for adding late color to the garden with light pink petals and golden-yellow centers.   1889 Birth of Ethel Zoe Bailey, American botanist. Ethel graduated from Smith College in 1911 after majoring in zoology. Ethel was the daughter of the American horticulturist Liberty Hyde Bailey. Her father instilled in her a love for botany, adventure, and archiving. Liberty brought Ethel along on his travels to Latin America and Asia in his quest for new plant discoveries. One of her obituaries shared a story from one of their more daring trips: One of the pair's most daring expeditions was to the wild jungle island of Barro Colorado in the Panama Canal Zone. Disregarding warnings about disease and boa constrictors, Miss Bailey her father, then 73, and a few other botanists trekked through hip-deep water of the Mohinja Swamp in search of a rare palm. They found it growing in the swamp, as Bailey had predicted, and photographed it in the pouring rain with the camera tripod almost submerged in water. In turn, Ethel became the curator of the Bailey herbarium above the Mann Library at Cornell University - a position she held for over two decades until 1957. For Ethel, maintaining the collection was her personal mission. She was essentially the steward of her father's work after he donated his private plant collection to Cornell University. For Ethel, Cornell was home. In fact, she was one of the few people to have the honor of being born on the Cornell campus on the spot where Phillips Hall now stands.   One biography of Ethel noted that  She continued to volunteer on a daily basis at the Hortorium, until her death in 1983. Still driving herself to and from work, Miss Bailey had reached the auspicious age of 93. Driving had always been an important part of Miss Bailey's life. She was the first woman in Ithaca to receive a chauffeur's (driver's) license. Ethel's remarkable ability to organize and catalog large amounts of information led to an impressive notecard filing system of every single plant that had been listed in most of the published plant catalogs during Ethel's lifetime. This massive indexing project on simple 3" x 5" cards helped Ethel's father with his research and became an invaluable resource to other researchers and plant experts worldwide. The catalog was later named the Ethel Z. Bailey Horticultural Catalogue in her honor. Ethel received much well-deserved recognition for her work during her lifetime, including the George Robert White Medal in 1967 from the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Smith College Medal in 1970.   1916 Birth of Shelby Foote, American writer, historian, and journalist.  He is remembered for his massive, three-volume, 3,000-page history of the Civil War - a project he completed in 1974. Shelby lived in Memphis and loved to spend days in his pajamas. He did most of his writing in his home study with a view of his small and tidy garden. Shelby was old-fashioned. He took to writing with hand-dipped pens, which slowed the pace of his writing - a practice he felt made him a better writer. One of his favorite books was The Black Flower by Howard Bahr, an acclaimed historical fiction book set during the Civil War.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation Rosa by Peter Kukielski ("Kooh-KEL-ski") This book came out in 2021, and the subtitle is The Story of the Rose. Peter is a world-renowned rosarian or rose expert. He has written many popular books on roses, including Roses Without Chemicals. He spent twelve years as the curator of the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden. During that time, he oversaw a $2.5 million redesign of a massive rose collection in a garden designed by Beatrix Farrand. He helped lead the launch of the Royal Botanical Gardens in Ontario. He also promotes disease-resistant roses as a leader on the National EarthKind team. A review in Maine Gardener by Tom Atwell raved that this book is a beauty with lavish illustrations and the long, fascinating history of the rose. In chapter one, Kukielski lists all the plants other than roses in the Rosacea family (surprising ones include mountain ash, apples, raspberries and strawberries.) He also shows, with pictures (the book has 256 color illustrations in total), the many different classes of roses. Modern roses, defined as those introduced since 1867, get their own section.   Tom Atwell's review also revealed the origin story of this book. Three or four times, editors and publishers at Yale University Press asked Portland resident and rose expert Peter E Kukielski to please write a history of the rose. Kukielski kept saying no. The last time they asked, he responded, "Perhaps you should ask why I am saying no." When they did, he told them he'd had read many rose histories, and they all said the same thing. The world didn't need another one, he said. What Kukielsk wanted to do was tell stories about roses. Yes, include some history, but also encompasses the rose's role in religion, literature, art, music and movies. He wanted to offer true plant geeks a bit about the rose's botany, too. In the end, that's the book he was able to write.   In Rosa, Peter takes us on a chronological journey through the history of the rose, including a close look at the fascinating topic of the rose water or rose oil industry. These rose-based products were an essential part of life in the middle east and Asia, with entire population centers springing up around the craft. In a 2007 article in the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Peter shared that, the only way to know a rose is to grow roses. [Peter] grew up watching his grandmother tend her rose garden in Stone Mountain, Ga. Little did she know that she was planting the seed for her grandson's future career.   And in a 2008 article featured in the Red Deer Advocate, Peter shared great insights into why roses reign supreme in the fall. It turns out, as many gardeners will attest, roses often save their best blooms for fall. All year long, roses store energy, which is ultimately released at the end of their season, resulting in gorgeous showy blossoms in autumn. Peter advised, "In my opinion, late September into October is a very close second to June as far as beauty. The days are nicer, the nights are cooler and the sunlight is better, coating everything with a golden glow." Summer is hard on roses, which require a lot of energy to flower.  "It's hot, humid and exhausting. Roses have their fabulous spring, shut down a bit in summer and then display another burst of glorious colour in the fall when they're less stressed."   And in a 2021 interview with Margaret Roach, Peter shared his tip regarding what rose to plant.  Talk to the local rose society, Kukielski suggests, and neighbours who garden: "If the person down the street is growing Queen Elizabeth and it looks great, take that as a cue.   And that passion and pragmatism made Peter Kukielski the perfect author for this book on roses. This book is 256 of the story of the rose, the Queen of flowers, and her long reign through human history. You can get a copy of Rosa by Peter Kukielski and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes for around $7.   Botanic Spark 1861 Birth of Archibald Lampman, Canadian poet, and naturalist. Archibald loved camping and the countryside. The natural world inspired his verse, and he became known as "The Canadian Keats." As a result of contracting rheumatic fever in his childhood, Archibald's life was cut short, and he died at 37. Archibald's poem Knowledge compares our quest for wisdom to a garden. What is more large than knowledge and more sweet; Knowledge of thoughts and deeds, of rights and wrongs, Of passions and of beauties and of songs; Knowledge of life; to feel its great heart beat Through all the soul upon her crystal seat; To see, to feel, and evermore to know; To till the old world's wisdom till it grow A garden for the wandering of our feet. Oh for a life of leisure and broad hours, To think and dream, to put away small things, This world's perpetual leaguer of dull naughts; To wander like the bee among the flowers Till old age find us weary, feet and wings Grown heavy with the gold of many thoughts.   Archibald is buried at Beechwood Cemetery in Ottawa, and a plaque near his grave is inscribed with his poem "In November," which ends with these words: The hills grow wintery white, and bleak winds moan About the naked uplands. I alone Am neither sad, nor shelterless, nor grey, Wrapped round with thought, content to watch and dream.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

The Crown: The Official Podcast
Episode 4: Annus Horribilis

The Crown: The Official Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 43:54


In a speech celebrating her 40th year on the throne at the end of 1992, the Queen recounts that her year has been an 'Annus Horribilis', an accurate description for the year in which she saw three of her four children separate or divorce and Windsor Castle suffer a devastating fire. But her more private pain is the accusation by her sister that she is responsible for Margaret's lifetime of unhappiness by refusing to allow her to marry Peter Townsend.In this episode, Edith Bowman talks with Director May el-Toukhy, Head of Research Annie Sulzberger, and the actor playing the character of Princess Margaret, Lesley Manville. The Crown: The Official Podcast is produced by Netflix and Somethin' Else, in association with Left Bank Pictures.

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast
Hundreds of Paddington Bears left for queen to go to charity

レアジョブ英会話 Daily News Article Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 1:40


More than 1,000 Paddington Bears and other teddies left in tribute to the late Queen Elizabeth II in London and Windsor will be donated to a children's charity, Buckingham Palace said. Mourners left thousands of tributes, including flowers and teddy bears, outside Buckingham Palace and in royal parks in London and outside Windsor Castle in an outpouring of grief after the U.K.'s longest-reigning monarch died on Sept. 8 at age 96. The queen became linked to Paddington Bear, another British national treasure, after the two appeared together in a short comedy video during Platinum Jubilee celebrations earlier this year to mark the monarch's 70 years on the throne. The video, which featured the queen taking afternoon tea with a computer-animated Paddington Bear, saw her telling the bear that she shared his love for marmalade sandwiches — and that she liked to hide them in her purse “for later.” Buckingham Palace and the royal parks said the hundreds of bears left in tribute of the queen will be professionally cleaned before being delivered to Barnardo's, a children's charity. Elizabeth was a patron of the charity for over 30 years, and in 2016 she passed the patronage to Camilla, the wife of King Charles III and now known as the Queen Consort. “We are honored to be able to give homes to the teddies that people left in her memory,” said Lynn Perry, chief executive of Barnardo's. “We promise to look after these bears who will be well-loved and bring joy to the children we support.” This article was provided by The Associated Press.

My Time Capsule
Ep. 240 - Lloyd Griffith

My Time Capsule

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 52:10


Lloyd Griffith is a comedian, actor, presenter and classically trained singer. As an actor you may have seen him in Ted Lasso, It's A Sin, Infinite on Paramount, and Not Going Out. Lloyd fronted the BBC documentary ‘Can You Beat The Bookies?' and he was co-host of Soccer AM on Sky Sports. You may also have seen him on 8 Out Of 10 Cats, House of Games, Jonathan Ross' Comedy Club, Pointless Celebrities, Comedy Central Live at The Comedy Store, Roast Battle, Drunk History, Football's Funniest Moments, The Premier League Show and Songs of Praise. Lloyd is a classically trained choral singer and can often be heard performing with the choirs of Westminster Abbey and St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. Lloyd Griffith is guest number 239 on My Time Capsule and chats to Michael Fenton Stevens about the five things he'd like to put in a time capsule; four he'd like to preserve and one he'd like to bury and never have to think about again .Follow Lloyd Griffith on Twitter & Instagram @LloydGriffith .Follow My Time Capsule on Twitter, Instagram & Facebook: @MyTCpod .Follow Michael Fenton Stevens on Twitter: @fentonstevens & Instagram @mikefentonstevens .Produced and edited by John Fenton-Stevens for Cast Off Productions .Music by Pass The Peas Music .Artwork by matthewboxall.com .This podcast is proud to be associated with the charity Viva! Providing theatrical opportunities for hundreds of young people. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Music Talks
Episode 80 Pt.1 - Geoff Sutton - Read All About It ......

Music Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 51:21


My guest in this episode is Geoff Sutton. The stereotype of a Microsoft employee is a Computer Sciences nerd in a check shirt and chinos. Whilst they do exist Geoff is a great example of the diversity of background and experience that existed in the company as was my previous guest Neil Jordan (7 years as a Choirister at Windsor Castle) and indeed myself with my English Lit Degree (specialist subjects - Anglo-Saxon Poetry and Medieval Mystery Plays) Geoff joined Microsoft in 1996 to set up MSN News after 16 years as a journalist, including spells at the Daily Mail, Today, Sunday Express and Daily Mirror. It's no surprise then that he has a raft of stories and in this episode, we hear hilarious and fascinating stories about his time on Mail Showbiz including: ·       Running with Madonna ·       Being a waiter at Bill Wyman's Wedding ·       A one-off appearance as Elvis on the West End Stage·       Motivating Boy George to kick his heroin addiction ·       Princess Di and Fergie pretending to be WPCs at Annabel's He then moved over to News and had the challenging experience of covering three major tragedies in the UK in 87/88 namely the King's Cross Fire, the explosion and sinking of the Piper Alpha Oil Platform and Lockerbie Terrorist Attack. Born in Hackney but today Geoff lives in Bermondsey with his wife Asli and he has two grown-up children Helen and Daniel. He is a lifelong Arsenal fan, and he describes his early teens as being all about “Football and Music'. His passion for both continues to shine through and that includes learning to play the Saxophone in lock down (but more on that in Part 2!) . His song choices in this episode are: 60's – Three Coins in The Fountain          Frank Sinatra70's – No Action                                                   Elvis Costello80's – Club Tropicana                                        Wham Enjoy

Gardeners' Corner
Gardening on the set of The Crown, a banquet for birds and it's time to bury some tulip bulbs

Gardeners' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 56:07 Very Popular


November is the perfect time to plant tulip bulbs and that's what Claire Woods is doing when David Maxwell visits her at Hillsborough Castle. Then it's off to the RSPB's Belfast Wow where Tim McCann has lots of tips on getting garden birds through the worst of winter. With the new season of The Crown due to start on Netflix, David chats to the Duchess of Rutland whose home and garden stands in for Windsor Castle in the series. Also on the programme, Emma McIlveen heads to Augher Central Primary School where the school garden has been transformed with help from the BBC's Little Green Fingers project and Brendan Little joins David in studio to take live questions. Email the programme on gardenerscorner@bbc.co.uk

The Cold Coffee Club
Creating Families through Fostering and Adoption

The Cold Coffee Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 38:20


This episode is brought to you by Home Clean Heroes, our favorite home cleaning solution! Mention Houston Moms when you book for $100 off your 1st cleaning! November is National Adoption Month, and we are reminded that there is no wrong way to make a family. Ashley and Jenny get to chat about fostering and adoption with HM contributors, Whitney and Kirsten about their experiences! Kirsten wrote a post about the best ways to help love and support foster families, and it can most definitely be used to support adoptive families as well! If you're interested in getting more information about the adoption process, AdoptUSKids is an incredibly thorough resource to guide you! “Cream & Sugar” Recommendations: Awesome Exhibition, as display of incredibly fun and unique Lego® structures, built by "The Brickman," Ryan McNaught, and his team, is coming to Houston Oct. 29 thru Dec. 30. Check out all the sites like Windsor Castle, the Delorean and a family of penguins, all built of Lego® bricks, and build your own masterpieces to display at the event. Living Spaces, a furniture store across from Katy Mills Mall, is Jenny's new favorite place to let the kids run around and play in the designated kids' area, while she and her husband enjoy drinks and snacks on the cheap! Houston Moms “House Blend” Posts: Family Friendly Vegetarian Eating around Houston by Becca Vidrine Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Screenings Save Lives by Mary B

Music Talks
Episode 79 - Neil Jordan - ' It Takes Two'

Music Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 74:34


Neil is a 30-year I.T. veteran, the last 23 years of which have been spent at Microsoft where today he is the WW General Manager for Retail & Health Innovation. Born in Bristol he now lives in Kirkland, WA with his wife Ciara and their three young children Oliver, Archie and Ophelia, and their cat Boris. Despite a love of technology, that started at a young age, Neil's story at its core is a musical one and he describes himself as having a lifelong ‘addiction' to music, whether that be listening, playing, or singing. During our chat he describes the impact of music on himself in numerous ways including ‘soothing, stimulating,  solace, a release, healing and of course magic'. Some of his performance highlights include: ·       As a teenager being in a 6 piece Acapella group, ‘Ok Chorale' who performed at the BBC, made records, & won an award at the Edinburgh Fringe·         Getting a Choral Scholarship at Trinity College Cambridge and travelling all over the world performing at the highest level·         Being a Tenor Lay Clark at St. George's Windsor Castle and singing in the chapel each day ·         Singing the Tenor Solo at the Queen's 70th Birthday celebration and having a ‘nice chat' with her afterwards·         Getting a chance side-gig with the Seattle Opera that he thought was for one show (Tosca) which lasted for nine years. He also talks very honestly about having to leave the role in Windsor Castle due to the breakdown in his singing voice and facing the challenge of vocal nodules in recent years. Neil is a real student of music and I guarantee you will learn something from our chat.  I am also pretty sure it will be the only time you will hear the phrase ‘crazy enharmonic chord progression' on Music Talks. Neil's song selections were 60's        Good Vibrations                               The Beach Boys 70's        More Than A Feeling                      Boston80's        He Knows You Know                      Marillion90's        Something To Save                          George Michael 00's        Just Listen                                            Ocean Lab10's        Ophelia                                                  The Lumineers20's        Happiness Is Easy                            Talk Talk Enjoy

Kammy & Ben's Proper Football Podcast
Proper Football with Sean Dyche

Kammy & Ben's Proper Football Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 51:05


Who regularly called Sean Dyche ‘My angel, my darling'? Could he do Pep Guardiola's job at Manchester City? And why did he suggest Jose Mourinho was using Kammy ahead of a TV interview? The former Burnley manager answers these and more on this week's Kammy and Ben's Proper Football Podcast. He talks about his sacking from Burnley, why joking with the press can backfire and how he came to meet the twins who sued Mark Zuckerberg over the creation of Facebook. He also recalls how good Sir Alex Ferguson's wine was, how Steve Hodge nearly sold Maradona's shirt for significantly less than £7 million and reaching the FA Cup semi final with League 1 side Chesterfield. Meanwhile, Kammy remembers meeting the Queen, and how a major upset at the races stopped him visiting Her Majesty at Windsor Castle. He also reveals which current player is most similar to him and what you should never say when you're the best man at a mate's wedding. To get in touch with Kammy and Ben, just email kammyandben@bbc.co.uk.

Skip the Queue
State of the nation report, with Steve Mills

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 34:11


EPISODE NOTESSkip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this podcastCompetition ends January 31st 2023. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://decisionhouse.co.uk/https://twitter.com/decision_househttps://www.linkedin.com/in/steve-mills-0528661b/ Steve Mills set up Decision House in July 2017, having spent 15 years at leading insight agency BDRC where he was Board Director and Head of the Culture & Tourism team.His work focusses on generating and sharing insight to further understanding of both how to deliver better experiences for existing visitors, members, customers or other stakeholders and how to effectively grow audiences and develop new markets. During the pandemic, Steve provided regular insight to the sector through ALVA, producing regular reports and webinars on public sentiment towards returning to visitor attractions and reaction to the ‘new' visit experience in a Covid world.  In more ‘normal' recent times he has delivered insight for clients across the culture and leisure attraction sector including Historic Royal Palaces, Royal Collection, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Royal Museums Greenwich and the National Trust, as well as developing Voice of the Visitor, a new template helping attractions to gather and benchmark visitor feedback.    Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world.In today's episode, I speak with Steve Mills, founder of Decision House. What does the cost of living crisis mean for attractions as we move into winter and beyond? Steve gives us a snapshot of how your potential visitors are feeling, and what the next few months might hold for the sector.If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue. We have a small issue with Steve's audio, but don't let that detract from the important content. This is a really, really important episode.Kelly Molson: Steve, thank you so much for joining me on Skip the Queue podcast today. It's really good to see you.Steve Mills: Pleasure. Thanks for inviting me, Kelly.Kelly Molson: I've got a few icebreaker questions for you, Steve.Steve Mills: Go for it.Kelly Molson: You can only save one of the Muppets. Which Muppet do you choose, and why?Steve Mills: Oh my God. Well, I'll tell you the one I'd like to be, I'd like to be the drummer, Animal. Aspiring to be fun and exciting and a bit off the wall, really, to be honest. But I would say very much it's an aspiration rather than reality with me, to be honest. I'm probably more like Scooter, who is the more rational, down to earth, logical one.Kelly Molson: I think that might come across in what we talk about today, Steve.Steve Mills: Okay. Fair enough, fair enough. No, that's definitely it for me.Kelly Molson: All right. How would you describe your job to a two year old?Steve Mills: I find out all the fun stuff that people like doing.Kelly Molson: That's a great answer. That is a great answer. You nailed that, Steve.Steve Mills: Good.Kelly Molson: Okay. Last show that you binge-watched on your television viewing platform of choice? I don't know why I've done that. I'm not the BBC. No one cares what I say.Steve Mills: No, no, it's all right.Kelly Molson: Netflix, Amazon, whatever. Disney+.Steve Mills: I'm quite sporty, so Disney+, I've been watching this series called Welcome to Wrexham, which is all about Wrexham Football Club and the fact that Ryan Reynolds and the other guy whose name everybody always forgets ... Jim, Joe, McElhenney or whatever it is, taking over the football club. And it's a kind of fly on the wall documentary about how they've taken over the club, and trying to make a success of it. But very interestingly, there's lots of these fly on the wall, football type documentaries, and this one is made for an American audience. It has some quite subtle differences in there, so they have things like translations between English and American phrases for things like bloke means buddy and that kind of thing. It has got a little twist in it, which I quite enjoy.Kelly Molson: That's interesting. That's on my list, to watch that one. But we've watched the Tottenham one that was on Amazon, because we're big Tottenham fans. And we watched ... What was the one ... Was it Sunderland? Was there one about-Steve Mills: Yeah.Kelly Molson: Yeah, we watched that one as well, that was really good. Okay, we'll watch that one, and there's little, subtle differences because it's for Americans.Steve Mills: Yes.Kelly Molson: All right, Steve. What is your unpopular opinion?Steve Mills: That's an interesting first question because given my profession, which we'll come on to, my job is really about conveying others' opinions rather than having them of my own, to be honest with you. But my unpopular opinion is sticking with the sporting theme, really, is that I think that there's no better sporting drama than a five day cricket test match.Kelly Molson: Oh God.Steve Mills: Which is definitely an unpopular opinion, to be honest. Or even a four day cricket county championship match that's watched by three men and a dog on a wet Tuesday in April, to be honest. Because I know it's difficult to believe that anyone could be interested in a sport where you could have a draw after five days' worth of activity, but for me, it's like reading a novel, but it's being played out in front of your eyes, in many ways. There's time to get to know all the characters properly, and story kind of ebbs and flows, and you get these unexpected instances happening that change the plot. And you can see these individual battles gradually unfolding during five days that you'd never get in a couple of hours.Steve Mills: And what I like about it is it's a kind of test of character and a test of patience for the players, not just the audience, as well as pure, sporting ability. Yeah, I'm sure it's a very unpopular opinion, but I think it's a kind of antidote to where we're going as a society generally, so it's the whole antidote to having low attention span, these quick rewards and these superficial pleasures. You don't want any of that, go and watch a five day test match. Which ironically, I don't think I've ever done, to be honest with you. But it's certainly something I've got in mind when I retire in a few years' time.Kelly Molson: Steve, it was a really beautiful analogy. I really enjoyed your analogy about it being like a novel, and playing out the roles and the characters and stuff, but you have not sold it to me.Steve Mills: I wasn't intending to.Kelly Molson: But well done on the analogy. All right, listeners, let us know what you think about Steve's cricket is a novel analogy, and we should all be in watching cricket for five days. I know that I've got a lot of different things that I could be spending my days on, but there you go. Thank you for sharing.Steve Mills: That's all right.Kelly Molson: Right, Steve, I've asked you to come on today because we're going to do a bit of a state of the nation chat. But tell us a little bit about you and what Decision House does, for our listeners that haven't heard of you, which I will be surprised if they haven't.Steve Mills: Okay. No, thank you, yeah. I started Decision House back in 2017. I used to head up the Tourism and Culture team at BDRC, which is now called BVA BDRC. I headed those up for a good few years before that. Decision House really specialises in generating insights that help organisations in the culture and tourism sector specifically, and particularly attractions, really. Just helping them to make better decisions for their organisation, hence the Ronseal type name, Decision House.Steve Mills: And we mainly do that by conducting fresh, primary research, either with your current customers, so whether you call your current customers visitors or bookers or members, and that helps with making sure that we deliver, or they can deliver, optimum experiences for their visitors. Or, we do research with prospective customers, so more market and audience research to understand how they can grow their customer bases, actually. We can do that. We do both quantitative research, so the typical surveys, online surveys, face-to-face surveys et cetera, or we also do qualitative research as well, so things like focus groups, in-depth interviews, which really get under the skin of the issues that organisations have. Typically, quantitative surveys will measure visitor opinion, whereas qualitative gets to the root of why visitors have those particular opinions.Steve Mills: That's really what we do, and during COVID, we did an awful lot of work to really track public sentiment. And that led us to setting up visitor benchmarking surveys to understand reactions the visitors had to COVID measures being put in place once attractions reopened back in 2020. And that's really, both of those surveys, public sentiment work for ALVA and the visitor benchmark and consumer views for the last couple of years and still going now, really, albeit they've evolved into pieces of work that aren't COVID related anymore. They're more general sentiment work now.Kelly Molson: And they've been incredibly valuable, Steve. And I reference them continuously, and I do reference the BVA BDRC's work as well. And they've been incredibly insightful. Now, we spoke a couple of weeks ago about coming on to talk about the state of the nation and where people at, because what had been happening is I had been contacted by a few attractions, saying, "What have you heard? Numbers are down a little bit. What have you heard? What's the sentiment like?" And I always fire them your way, but I thought why not get the man in himself to talk us through where we're at?Kelly Molson: We've got a really weird situation at the moment in the UK. I mean, we're recording this. It's the fifth of October. We're in the run-up to what is usually a busy half-term, and then the run up to Christmas which can be quite quiet for a number of attractions, depending on what you're doing. But we've got the cost of living crisis, we've got the pound was at its lowest since the '70s, which blows my mind. We've had the death of our monarch, we have a new king, and a new prime minister, all happening at once. I mean, that's quite a lot to be dealing with. But I guess, what does all of this mean for attractions as we move into that winter period and beyond? And I thought this is what we could talk about today, Steve. So, where are we at? It's big question, but where are we at?Steve Mills: A massive question. I'll try my best to try and pick some of those issues apart, really. I think if we deal with the death of Her Majesty the Queen first of all, and what the ramifications of that might be ... And this is, I guess, a personal opinion, first of all, really. I mean, I think domestically, it's not going to have a huge impact, if I'm perfectly honest. People will move on relatively quickly from that. I suspect attractions won't see ... Unless you are something that is specifically related to the monarchy, you probably won't see a huge amount of difference. I mean, clearly somewhere like Windsor Castle is already seeing queues of people outside the gates, for example.Steve Mills: But I think outside of that niche, domestically, I doubt we'll see a huge difference. But then, obviously, internationally, it has raised the profile. And actually, I think showcased all the positive associations that people abroad associate with the UK, and why they travel here. It has emphasised our heritage, it has emphasised our amazing ability in terms of the pomp and ceremony, et cetera. And it has been a great showcase for London sites, to be honest. I think internationally, it should have a significant impact going into next year, allied of course with the low value of the pound. Now, it's not all good, obviously, but obviously, in exchange rates terms, it's a good thing for next year, particularly [inaudible 00:10:48]. I guess that's where I'd see the death of the monarch situation.Kelly Molson: It's interesting, what you said about the pomp. I mean, as we watched the funeral here, a very emotional day, actually. And I was transfixed to the ceremony for the entire day. It was quite mesmerising. But in my head, I just kept thinking, people outside of the UK that watched this, it's strange, isn't it? It's quite strange, and it's very grand, and it's a real sense of what the UK is about, that kind of level of ceremony, and people coming together. It was quite phenomenal. And it did make me think ultimately, it's a really sad day, but it's such a big thing for the UK to be able to do. I wonder if that does represent a surge in international tourism because of that, and people wanted to come and be a small part in that kind of thing.Steve Mills: Yeah. I think increasingly, whether it's people from the UK or people coming into the UK, people want to do things now that is different. And they want to be seen to be doing things that you can only do in one particular location. And I think the UK, I don't think there is anywhere quite like it in terms of ability to deliver on things like the pomp and ceremony. And that's what really sets us apart from many other countries around the world. And I think we shouldn't forget that, and not be afraid to promote it.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. And then that brings us to the new king. There will be a coronation at some point.Steve Mills: Yeah, it's similar, similar.Kelly Molson: So, similar kind of reaction to that, probably, and something very positive to celebrate as well.Steve Mills: Yeah. But then yeah, the other side of it is I think you mentioned cost of living.Kelly Molson: Small, little issue that we're all struggling with.Steve Mills: Probably yeah, less positive. I think with that one, as a lot of listeners will know, we have been commissioned by ALVA throughout COVID, and also a couple of waves this year, just to gauge public sentiment into how people are feeling about visitor attractions. We did a wave back in June this year, which first highlighted some financial concerns for the attraction-visiting public. And it also said at that point that COVID actually was still a noticeable barrier, particularly for the older generation and those who are more vulnerable. We're just literally hot off the press at the end of September, so we did another wave the 22nd and 27th of September, just to update that and try to understand how people are feeling about visiting attractions in the autumn and the winter, up until about February next year. So, how attractions are going to cope.Steve Mills: And one of the key questions we asked is just a completely open question. People can respond in any way they like to this question. But we just ask, "At the moment, how are you feeling about visiting attractions over the next few months?" As I said, they could say absolutely anything there. We've not prompted them with anything. And I think the issues that are coming up here, first of all on the positive side, is that COVID is being mentioned by less and less people. I think the assumption is that it's completely not an issue any more, but I wouldn't say it has done that. But back in June, we still had 15% of people at that point saying something to do with COVID was putting me off going to visitor attractions, which was partially explaining why we hadn't seen that bounceback to pre pandemic levels.Steve Mills: That has now, in the September wave, come down to 9%, so it's disappearing. That said, you've still got one in 10 people who have still got some sort of concerns around COVID. As I say, it's particularly older people and vulnerable people that are still saying that. But that's quite positive.Steve Mills: But then on the other side, the financial concerns have gone up considerably. Again, back in June, we had about 15% of people mentioning some sort of financial concern as a barrier to why they wouldn't be visiting attractions, or would maybe think twice. But that has now gone up to 24, 25%, something like that. So, quite a significant increase. And again, it's as you would expect, it's especially among those with lower incomes, but also families are increasingly expressing financial concerns. And this time around, we asked a specific question as well about whether there was any positive benefit of all the government support around energy bills. And actually, we're finding that it's probably not because any sort of positive benefit of government support is being negated by just the still absolute rises in energy costs.Steve Mills: It's a difficult situation at the moment, and we've now got around about half the country really feeling that they feel worse off than they did at the same point last year. Clearly, that's going to have an impact.Kelly Molson: Yeah. I wonder, I mean, I can give you an example. I went to an attraction on Monday. I took my daughter, I met up with some friends, and went to Paradise Wildlife Park for the day. And I definitely thought more about what I was going to spend when I got there than I usually would. And I thought well, I'm quite lucky. My daughter is a big eater. She's not fussy. She eats anything. But I went, do you know what? I'm going to just pack her a packed lunch, so she has got sandwiches, fruit, whatever, and I'll buy myself my lunch when I'm there, and that just saves just a tiny, little bit of money. And it sounds silly. It's insignificant, but it was enough to make me, in my head, go, "I feel a bit better about that."Kelly Molson: And I probably spent longer at the attraction as well, because in my head I was like, well, "I've paid, I want to get my money's worth. We'll go here and we'll go in the Tumble Tots place and we'll do the soft play." And I just really extended the time that I was at the attraction as well, for the money that I paid for it. And it wasn't unreasonable at all. We had a great day, it's a brilliant, brilliant day out. But it did make me think about just small changes I wouldn't have thought about six months ago.Steve Mills: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. I think you've picked up on secondary spend there. I think that is one thing that's going to be a challenge. And also, memberships as well. We were, a bit earlier in the year, seeing people saying things like, "Well, I'll squeeze as much as I possibly can out of my existing memberships," which is a good thing. Makes you more likely to renew. But I think now we've reached the stage where people are starting to do that a bit less, because they've actually scared of any visit occasion because there is secondary spends associated with even a visit occasion that is associated with a membership, because you've got to travel to get there. And then you've got to potentially have something to eat there, or buy something in the shop. And I think the situation is now with some people that they're, even when they have a membership of some organisation, they're actually more reluctant to use it now, more than trying to squeeze as much as possible out of it.Steve Mills: I think it's going to be a tough time for memberships over the next few months, definitely. We've got, again, evidence from that piece of work that is saying people are less likely to renew and less likely to acquire new memberships over the next few months, because of their personal financial situation. And it's all within that 50% of people who are feeling worse off, obviously. Which I guess on the positive side, what we're seeing is that I guess if there was going to be a prediction, it's that at the high end, limited supply-type products, there's virtually going to be no change there. If you've got limited supply of something that's priced at a high level, I think there is still going to be plenty of demands for that sort of thing. And you see it all the time, really.Steve Mills: I mean, I think things like the Christmas lights displays, for example, at attractions, I have a feeling they're still going to be okay and do well. I mean, I tried to go to, there's one reasonably local to me at Walterstone. And I don't know if it's completely sold out yet, but I know the slots that we wanted to try and book, we booked three or four weeks ago for it. I think those sorts of events and the higher price point end with limited supply should be okay, in my view.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And I would agree with that, again from personal experience of trying to book the Audley End miniature railway Christmas experience. All of the weekends are gone. I did manage to get a Friday, thankfully. More for me, to be perfectly honest. I can't wait to go on it. But yeah, those peak Saturdays and weekend slots sold out within hours, and they're all gone completely. Yeah, I definitely agree with you on that.Kelly Molson: Do you think that that then leads attractions to they're just going to have to try harder in terms of the experience that they're putting on? Should they be looking at trying to offer things that are a bit more unique, at a higher price point?Steve Mills: Yeah, I think yes, definitely. I think as well, it's important to point out that this isn't going to be across the board. Again, there's a lot of evidence for ... Again, I guess this is all very intuitive, but there's going to be a much higher negative impact on paid attractions than free attractions, so again, there's very strong evidence that people will be switching out from paid attractions to free attractions. But then even within that, within paid attractions, it's perhaps starting to emphasise that this is all going to be about value message. And what else can you do to add value to whatever ticket price is, really?Steve Mills: Yeah, and again, a third of people said they will visit paid attractions less than normal, and only 13% said more. Whereas on the free attractions side, you've got a third saying they will visit free attractions more than usual, and only 8% said less. And again, that's all driven by those that feel worse off. Yeah, I think it's all completely about that value message over the winter. Need that reassuring communications around it.Steve Mills: And I think as well, what has also come out of this is there's this assumption that the cost of visiting attractions will be rising at the same rate as everything else in the economy. There were quite a few people saying things like, "just assuming that the cost of visiting attractions was going to be going up". I think there is a really important communications message to put in there, some thought actions to come across, is that we are maybe holding our prices at '22 levels, or whatever it is. Or only increasing it by a small amount, or adding this extra value item in or whatever it is. I think something that is related to value and price has to be the message this year, just to reassure people that actually, we're not going up at the same price as energy and wheat and sunflower oil and all the rest of it. Actually, it's going to be fairly marginal, if anything, for visitor attractions, which I thought was one of the quite interesting things that came out of it.Kelly Molson: That's really interesting, isn't it? Yeah, I hadn't considered that. I mean, look, it's unfair to say that attractions won't be putting up their prices, because their energy bills are going up just as ours are. Actually, their energy bills are going up more dramatically than ours, because there's currently no cap on businesses. There isn't a reassurance piece to be done, but I think that has to be done quite tactically by the attraction because they can't come out and say, "Look, we're not putting our prices up. We're not doing this," because they might have to because of the cost of living. Okay, but that's something that I wasn't expecting, that they just assumed that it would rise that rapidly.Steve Mills: Yeah. And coincidentally, I read something somewhere recently in the trade press as well of just someone had done some research across other sectors as well, and was seeing a very similar sort of scenario as well. Actually, when you think about it, average Joe Public, if inflation is at 10%, your immediate thought is well, everything is going up 10%. Why wouldn't it be? Most members of the public wouldn't think about the nuances of what's going up and what isn't going up.Steve Mills: I think it's just something to bear in mind. Although again, what I would say is that I'm of the view that attractions should try and hold their nerve in terms of pricing. And I suspect there won't be much merit in reducing prices or holding prices as they are just for the sake of it, because I don't think we're talking here about those people who are financially squeezed. The odd pound or two lower admission price at a visitor attraction I don't think is going to make a huge amount of difference to whether they visit or not, to be honest. All you'll be doing is rewarding the people who would visit anyway. Why would you do that? I think it's holding your nerve and being confident that you offer a good value, worthwhile experience.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Good advice, Steve. And that also backs up the last interview that we had with Simon Addison about being confident in what you're delivering, and the price that you're charging for it. Yeah, really, really good advice. Okay, what else have you discovered?Steve Mills: I think they were probably the main points, really. Yeah, I mean I think as I said, it's going to be pretty tough for membership, so existing members, we're now seeing they're less likely to renew than they were back in June, and they're less likely to acquire new memberships as well. And yeah, just more reticent about using and squeezing as much value out of their existing membership as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah. It's interesting, the membership one, because my National Trust membership is up for renewal in January time. We were very kindly gifted it for a wedding present last year. And I'm absolutely going to renew, because for me, it's such incredible value for money. And we were literally talking about it last night. We were like, "Well, that's fine. We'll renew our membership. We'll make sure that we are not only using the brilliant National Trust parks that are around us, like Wimpole and Anglesea Abbey, et cetera, Ickworth, but go further afield as well. Actually, if we're going to use that membership, then we don't mind traveling a little bit further, even though that's going to cost us a bit more in petrol, to go to that attraction because you're then not paying the attraction fee on top of the travel costs as well. Yeah, it's funny. I'd never even considered not renewing it.Steve Mills: Yeah. And I'm exactly the same. And I guess, let's be clear, here. I said 50% of the population are feeling worse off than they did at this point last year, but then 50% are feeling okay, the same or better. And I think it was something like 15% or so were actually feeling better off than last year, which I think says something about where we're going as a society. You've got people dividing even further, to be honest with you. There are still significant proportions of people that are feeling fine about things, and will renew their memberships, or see them as a charitable donation.Kelly Molson: Steve, I want to ask you a little bit about pre booking, because I mean we've talked about this for years now, pre booking. Obviously, it was kind of forced upon attractions during the pandemic, when they were allowed to open. I still don't know why anyone wouldn't pre book in advance, but then I am an organised planner. I need to know that I've got my ticket and I'm going to get in. I'm not going to have a wasted journey. And obviously, from an operational side, aspect from attractions, it's a brilliant thing to be able to do.Kelly Molson: What's the kind of sentiment now from general public? Are they still happy with it? Are they starting to want to go back to the old days, where things were just a little bit more flexible and bit more spontaneous?Steve Mills: Yeah. Well, I think almost, it's switching that around a little bit. I mean, I think obviously COVID was this fantastic opportunity to almost change the culture of the public to one where, as you said, it's why wouldn't you pre book an attraction in the same way that you would pre book lots of other things in society, like going to the theatre or going to a restaurant or whatever? Certainly, paid attractions. There was a really good opportunity to change the culture. And so I think the main point for me is that attractions need to be proactive in encouraging that behaviour.Steve Mills: It's not something that will naturally come to the public, and public sentiment won't change unless attractions are proactive in changing it. Why would it, really? I think it's incumbent upon attractions to really create that appetite for pre booking. And I think to an extent, we're beginning to get there. But I think there's a lot more to be done in terms of what nudges can we put to the public to encourage to pre book? I think things like online discounts that are notable, or switching it around premiums to walk-ups, depending on which way you want to look at it, should be used more than they probably are at the moment.Steve Mills: And things like dynamic pricing for advanced booking, for example. Again, I know you talked to Simon Addison about dynamic pricing last week. But the more that that can be used, in particular for things like advanced booking, I think just will encourage pre booking. And then gradually over a period of time, it then gets ingrained into the people's psyche, "I'm going to an attraction, therefore I will pre book."Steve Mills: I think it's just one of those that I think the industry as a whole almost needs to come together and say, "Right, we're going to push pre booking as much as we possibly can because we need to change the way that society thinks about booking attractions." Easy for me to sit here and say that, and much more difficult to do. But I think that's what needs to be done because yeah, as we've seen, there's huge benefits in terms of creating that relationship with anybody as soon as you grab their email address. And that investment or the discounts you offer may well pay dividends in years to come because you've managed to keep that relationship going, which means you get more repeat visits, you get more top of mind so you get more recommendation being spread around, et cetera. I think it's a worthwhile investment.Kelly Molson: Brilliant, yeah. Good advice. I agree with every, single word you have said, Steve. Thanks for backing up everything that I put online about it as well.Steve Mills: It's all right. And to be honest, it helped me as well on my visitor surveys. I now try and make sure that they are online, post visit surveys, which tend to help the more pre bookers people have got. It makes that research a lot more cost effective, shall we say, as well.Kelly Molson: Helping us all round, Steve. That's what I like. Sector collaboration and all that. Right, Steve, thank you for sharing your insights today. It's really appreciated, and I know that this will help a lot of people that are feeling a little bit anxious about what's going on and just not really sure how to approach things. Thank you very much.Kelly Molson: I always ask our guests to recommend a book that they love or something that has helped shape their career in some way. What have you got for us today?Steve Mills: Okay. I've read this book called Silt Road, silt road rather than silk road, by a guy called Charles Rangeley-Wilson or Rangeley-Wilson. Not quite sure, to be honest. And he's quite niche based, so be prepared. It tells the social history of High Wycombe, which is where I live, through the lens of the River Wye, which sort of runs through it, although most of it has been culverted and put under a shopping centre and a flyover, these days. Yeah, it tells that story through the lens of a river. It tells a story about things like the mills on the river, the history of Wycombe as a furniture and chair making town, which led to me actually being ... I'm now Chair of the Wycombe Chair Museum, which is rather ironic.Kelly Molson: That's niche as well, isn't it? I love it.Steve Mills: It is. It's incredibly niche. It's incredibly niche. And it also tells the story of things like how trout became ... Trout are a thing in New Zealand, apparently, and they are a thing in New Zealand because they were taken from the River Wye and transported over thousands of miles to New Zealand many years ago.Steve Mills: But the reason why I mention it is because I'm not originally from Wycombe. I've lived here for about 15 years. But it really helped me form this identity with the town, because Wycombe is a few miles outside London. It's very commuter-able, which means that actually, there's not many people live in Wycombe who are originally from Wycombe. I'm a big believer in getting pride in your local area so you look after it better and make you want to contribute to the community.Steve Mills: Books like this help with that because it has really helped me to understand Wycombe in more detail, understand the social history, and feel more proud of the place I live.Kelly Molson: Steve, I love that.Steve Mills: It's not really a recommendation to read that specific book. It's more of a kind of a plea to go and find out a bit more about your local area, read about the social history, so that you feel more proud about the places you live in.Kelly Molson: And more connected to it as well.Steve Mills: Completely, yeah, yeah, yeah. Pride and connection.Kelly Molson: Steve, I think that's lovely. It's amazing, the stuff that you can learn on this podcast. Who knew? Who knew? Who knew that Wycombe ... I had no idea that it was a big chair and furniture manufacturing place, and that you had got a Chair Museum as well.Steve Mills: We do, yes. It's mentioned in Gavin and Stacey as well.Kelly Molson: Is it?Steve Mills: Yeah, there you go.Kelly Molson: Well, I mean I'm an Essex girl, so that fits for me too.Steve Mills: Well, James Corden is from High Wycombe, so that's why it's mentioned in there.Kelly Molson: Got you. Right, okay. Well, look, listeners, if you want to win Steve's book, and why wouldn't you? If you go over to our Twitter account and you retweet this episode announcement with the word, "I Want Steve's Book", then we'll get you a copy of that book. We'll get you a copy of it, and you could be in with a chance of winning it, and then you can find out about High Wycombe as well. Thank you, Steve. It has been an education.Steve Mills: Absolute pleasure.Kelly Molson:  Thanks for listening to Skip The Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Gardeners' Corner
Tree ferns, taming ramblers and why heritage fruit is good for your health

Gardeners' Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 56:16 Very Popular


David heads to the annual symposium at Kells Bay gardens in County Kerry which attracts top horticulturalists from across the country. John Anderson from Windsor Castle gardens is planning for the future with climate change in mind. Alasdair Moore from the Lost Gardens of Heligan in Cornwall is championing the health benefits of heritage fruit. Also on the programme, Averil Milligan joins David to tackle listeners' questions and Maurice Parkinson tames a rambling rose. Contact the programme on gardenerscorner@bbc.co.uk

House Guest by Country & Town House | Interior Designer Interviews
How to decorate a castle, Carole Annett chats to the Duchess of Rutland

House Guest by Country & Town House | Interior Designer Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 25:36 Very Popular


Emma Manners the Duchess of Rutland lives in one of Britain's most magnificent stately homes, Belvoir Castle. The Duchess chats to Carole about her journey from running around on a Welsh farm as a child to running a 200-room stately home when she married the 11th Duke of Rutland 30 years ago. As a keen decorator, she gives an insight into how she stamped her personality onto the private areas of the house and how looking after fabrics and wallpapers in the State Rooms requires a delicate hand. Belvoir Castle's stand in as Windsor Castle in the upcoming season 5 of The Crown - The Duchess prefers to keep out of the way during filming, which she describes as ‘a long process'. Her joy is in the gardens - she is so hands-on, she earned the nickname ‘Digger Duchess”. Emma's new book is out now - The Accidental Duchess. Tune in for more

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp
BONUS EPISODE: Farewell to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II with Martyn Whittock (S3E62)

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 56:29


Ken welcomes back historian and author, Martyn Whittock, from his home outside Bath in England. The two got acquainted when Ken interviewed Martyn (S2E58) about his new book. They discussed the misappropriation of biblical prophesy throughout history, and especially today. Since then, Ken learned that Martyn was a popular television guest in the U.K., offering historical context for the week-long series of events surrounding the remembrance of Queen Elizabeth II, and the long-anticipated accession of King Charles to the throne. Ken shares his personal connection through his grandmother, born in London in 1903, and Ken's visit to London the same week Princess Diana was memorialized in August of 1997. Ken and Martyn trace the events from Balmoral in Scotland to London - Buckingham Palace, Westminster Cathedral, and Windsor Castle. Ken shares his mixed emotions, citing friends who just cannot watch - the conspicuous wealth, the history of colonization, and the display of "theocracy." Martyn brings a rich perspective to it all, bringing context and depth. Ken's affection for his grandmother's homeland and Martyn's knowledge and appreciation of America's perspective makes for a lively, informative, and stimulating exchange. Thank you, Martyn Whittock! SHOW NOTES - find Martyn's books, links to television appearances, and additional biographical information.Become a Patron: www.patreon.com/beachedwhitemaleSupport the show

Keeping Up With The Windsors
Catherine: The Children's Princess | The Prince and Princess of Wales Visit Wales | King Charles Cypher Unveiled

Keeping Up With The Windsors

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 34:24 Very Popular


After the official Royal mourning has ended, we adjust to our new normal without Queen Elizabeth at the helm, we discuss: The Prince and Princess of Wales visiting Wales this week with some adorable encounters from some tiny Royal fans. We discuss whether Catherine really is ‘The Children's Princess? The changes that have happened to transition the new monarch including The King's cypher, new banknotes, stamps and the social media channels. We take a look at the engagements from The Princess Royal and the Earl of Wessex as they give thanks to those military personnel that took part in Queen Elizabeth's funeral And we give you the details of ‘The Crown series 5 release date on Netflix. 

The Uncensored Unprofessor
278 The Queen's Death

The Uncensored Unprofessor

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 45:39


On Thursday, September 8, 2022 Queen Elizabeth died. I watched the long parade-drive to Windsor Castle and have, for 2+ weeks, been listening to her funerary music. How did that touch me? What stood out to me? How does it point to the Parousia of Christ himself? I also muse about Youtube censorship, Alex Berenson's legal victory, the state of Texas vs. media censorship, and share more about a corporate churchly bearing/presence vis-a-vis culture. 

Sky News - Paul Murray Live
Paul Murray Live, Tuesday 20 September

Sky News - Paul Murray Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 48:42


The Queen leaves behind a 96-year legacy as she is laid to rest at Windsor Castle, plus, the latest Biden gaffe even has him questioning whether he will run for president in the next U.S. election. Cory Bernardi hosts Paul Murray Live.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Economist Morning Briefing
Elizabeth II is buried at Windsor; Hurricane Fiona hits Dominican Republic, and more

The Economist Morning Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 4:06


Public funeral events for Elizabeth II concluded with a service at Windsor Castle, where the queen was buried in a private ceremony. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Post Reports
Does the world need a British monarchy anymore?

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 26:47 Very Popular


On today's show, we take you to London for Queen Elizabeth II's funeral. Plus, the colonial legacy and potential future of the monarchy without her leadership.Read more: The coffin of Queen Elizabeth II, Britain's longest-serving monarch, was laid in the royal vault at Windsor Castle on Monday. The funeral procession marks the end of 10 days of national mourning. London correspondent Karla Adam describes how thousands of people camped near Westminster Abbey to watch the funeral procession. “There were sleeping bags. A lot of people brought toys or games or chess sets just to pass the time because they've been camping out for a day or two,” she said, while others watched from big screens across the city.The queen's passing has been marked around the world with tributes from world leaders and around-the-clock media coverage. But as foreign affairs columnist Ishaan Tharoor shares later in the show, it also sparked criticism of the monarchy's past and debates about the relevancy of the institution. “It's important to look at the queen in her own right as opposed to the queen as this icon of the empire,” Tharoor says. “It is also very hard to separate that, because what is the queen without being an icon of empire?”Follow The Post's live coverage of the funeral here.

Armstrong and Getty
Go Berzerk!

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 37:29 Very Popular


Hour 1 of Monday's A&G: Breaking News! The Queen is still dead. Non-stop news coverage as her casket is shipped to Windsor Castle. Declarations of Doom and Gloom a plenty. Biden was on 60 Minutes, what controversy did he start? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Queen Elizabeth remembered in elaborate and poignant state funeral

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 10:22


Queen Elizabeth II was honored Monday with an elaborate and poignant state funeral in London before being taken to her final resting place at Windsor Castle. Malcolm Brabant reports on the sights and the sounds of a remarkable day. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

CNN News Briefing
9 AM ET: Queen's final journey, Hurricane Fiona, TikTok misinformation & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:30


Queen Elizabeth II is being carried to Windsor Castle, where her family will say goodbye and she'll be buried alongside her late husband. The whole island of Puerto Rico is without power because of Hurricane Fiona - we'll bring you the details. Former President Donald Trump's financial documents have begun arriving for the House Oversight Committee. There's anger in China after a bus crash killed 27 people who were being taken to a quarantine facility. Plus, a new report finds many of TikTok's search results have misinformation.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

CNN News Briefing
12 PM ET: US-Taliban prisoner swap, Queen Elizabeth's burial, Biden's on the fence & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 4:17


An American kidnapped in Afghanistan more than two and a half years ago has been released in a prisoner swap with the Taliban. Queen Elizabeth II's coffin has reached Windsor Castle, where her family will bury her later today. Hurricane Fiona continues to pummel the Caribbean while Puerto Rico grapples with the fallout caused by heavy rain and dangerous flooding. Ukrainian officials say Russian forces have shelled another nuclear power plant in the country's southern region. Plus, President Joe Biden reassures Americans about the economy, and isn't firm on running again for president. To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge
THE FINAL GOODBYE

The Bridge with Peter Mansbridge

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 52:29


The long goodbye for Queen Elizabeth is over with her body now on its way to its final resting place at Windsor Castle.  The end of an historic ten-day period since her passing.  Today the Bridge deals with that with Andrew MacDougall joining us from London.  But today's program also deals with issues surrounding journalism and its coverage of politicians. Andrew, a former Director of Communications for Prime Minister Stephen Harper helps us on that too.

Newshour
Queen Elizabeth II buried at Windsor Castle

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 48:25


Queen Elizabeth II buried at Windsor Castle where Britain's longest serving monarch was laid to rest after a private service. It's been a day of immense pageantry and also of reflection -- for the monarchy, for the United Kingdom. Also in the programme: spreading unrest in Iran over the death of a woman being held by the morality police; and a US-Taliban prisoner swap. (Photo: Pall bearers carry the coffin of the late Queen, with the Imperial State Crown resting on top to St. George's Chapel in Windsor. Credit: Reuters)

Here & Now
The music that defined Queen Elizabeth II; Monkey Island franchise returns

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 26:23


Puerto Rico is without power Monday following Hurricane Fiona. NPR's Luis Trelles joins us from San Juan. Then, when Queen Elizabeth II was laid to rest at Windsor Castle on Monday, she was accompanied by a lifetime companion: music. Paul Gambaccini, host of Her Majesty's Music on the BBC, joins us to talk about the tunes that inspired and defined the late queen. And, "The Secret of Monkey Island" broke ground in 1990 with a pirate adventure game full of puzzles and wit. Now, the original game designers are back with "Return to Monkey Island." Producer James Mastromarino reports.

Global News Podcast
Queen Elizabeth buried at Windsor Castle

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 26:17


In a private ceremony, the Queen is interred alongside her parents, husband and sister. Also, two people killed in Iran following demonsrations sparked by the death of a young woman detained for allegedly dressing immodestly, and Hurricane Fiona hits the Dominican Republic.

Armstrong & Getty Podcast

Hour 1 of Monday's A&G: Breaking News! The Queen is still dead. Non-stop news coverage as her casket is shipped to Windsor Castle. Declarations of Doom and Gloom a plenty. Biden was on 60 Minutes, what controversy did he start? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: Queen Elizabeth's grand funeral--Hurricane Fiona slams into Puerto Rico--California inflation relief checks--Purple tomatoes--Phantom of the Opera to shut down on Broadway

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 47:49


A country lays to rest its Queen of 70 years. The UK honored Queen Elizabeth today with a massive state funeral--the first since Winston Churchill. Crowds of people lined the streets of London and around Windsor Castle to pay tribute to the only monarch many of them had ever known. We go In Depth into the funeral of Queen Elizabeth.  President Biden says the COVID pandemic is over but not everyone agrees.  Puerto Rico is hit with another big hurricane that left the whole island without electricity. The damage is being called "catastrophic."  If you're bank account is getting drained by rising prices, some relief is coming soon thanks to the state. But is it enough? We go In Depth.  Pharmacies are running short of a drug to help people with ADHD. A new food item might be coming soon to the produce section---a purple tomato. Yes, purple.  The Phantom of the Opera's famous chandelier will drop on Broadway for the final time in a few months. The popular musical is ending its record-setting run.  To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The History Hour
Queen Elizabeth II

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 50:04 Very Popular


We hear personal accounts of historical moments during the seventy year reign of Queen Elizabeth II. Memories from the Queen's maids of honour from her coronation in 1953; the huge race her horse very nearly won as well as the Windsor Castle fire and the opening to the public of Buckingham Palace. Presented by Max Pearson. (Photo: Queen Elizabeth II. Credit: Getty Images)

Diva Behavior
Princess of Wales, Catherine Astrology: Capricorn Queen

Diva Behavior

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 67:07


Greetings Trashlings! Molly Mulshine & Sara Armour touch base during the week between Queen Elizabeth's death and Queen Elizabeth's funeral.00:36 TV RoundUp: Shout/Out Farrah Farley, Molly is loving the Real Housewives of Dubai - must discuss! Molly find's The Real Girlfriends of Paris cast highly interchangeable. The enjoyability of 20-something-drama vs the mystique of middle-aged-woman drama. Lifestyle Porn, Sara's too broke for bravo, and Molly's northeastern nostalgia.10:48 The vibe in the UK in the days following the Queen's Passing. British power structures vs US power structures. The value of having a Monarchy vs corrupt democracy. Land empires, succession, and the legal loopholes for The Monarchy.27:34 Armie Hammer natal chart primer. Donald Trump, Harry Styles, powerful friendships, the future of democracy.37:43 Meghan Markle's new podcast is fun to listen to despite a lack of self-awareness40:47 A photo / video clip of Meghan, Harry, Princess Kate and Prince William approaching Windsor Castle for a walkabout sends the internet ablaze with bunk body language analysis.42:48 Surprise! On the Gemini Moon, Molly Meets Sara's Gemini Moon Mom who's wearing her Gemini Moon Merch lol49:20 The college come-up of Catherine, Princess of Wales, royal barbie, and working class hero and the only hope for the future of the monarchy. Prince William cheating rumors squashed.55:56 Astrology of Catherine, Princess of Wales aka Kate Middleton born to be Queen and a perfect match for Prince William!1:02:14 Sara defends King Charles & Queen Consort Camilla's love story and hopes for at least a Hollywood biopic or two.Leave a 5-Star Review! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Gossip With Celebitchy
134: Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry's walkabout with Princess Kate and Prince William, King Charles III is petty and grumpy

Gossip With Celebitchy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 31:56 Very Popular


Introduction: Minutes 0 to 4:30 I got a German Shepherd puppy and he's 16 weeks old now! He's a lot of work and he's very smart. I've been watching House of the Dragon and I like it but am not sure I will stick with it. Chandra finished What We Do in the Shadows. It had tone problems this season. Royals: Minutes 4:30 to 27:30 Last week right before we recorded we heard that Queen Elizabeth II had passed at 96. Harry went to Scotland, but sadly did not arrive before she passed. Both Kate and Meghan stayed behind, and at first we heard that Meghan would travel to Balmoral with Harry. After that it was reported that Charles told Harry that it was a somber occasion for the close family and that Meghan should not come. The British press did the most to smear her for wanting to support her husband. King Charles II made his first public statement on Friday, during which he announced that William and Kate would be getting the Prince and Princess of Wales titles. He also expressed support for Harry and Meghan. The Kensington Royal accounts changed their titles on social media to The Prince and Princess of Wales quickly. Before that, just a few hours after the Queen died, they changed their titles to The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and Cambridge. The Line of Succession was updated and Harry and Meghan's children were not given titles. The latest news is that Archie and Lilibet will get titles, they just won't get HRH status. Chandra thinks Harry and Meghan are letting the royals make asses of themselves. Queen Elizabeth's funeral will be on Monday, and just like before Philip's funeral there's a lot of drama over which royals will get to wear military uniforms. Word was that only working royals will get to wear uniforms, meaning both Andrew and Harry won't have them, although it was reported that Andrew would get to wear his on one occasion. It looked exclusionary when Harry, a combat veteran, wasn't wearing a uniform at the funeral procession on Wednesday. Harry's people issued a statement the day before stating in part that “his decade of military service is not determined by the uniform he wears.” On Saturday Harry, Meghan, William and Kate arrived together outside Windsor Palace to greet the crowd. Meghan looked scared, Kate wasn't interacting with Meghan and you could tell there was a lot of tension. There are two videos of King Charles getting mad at pens. During his proclamation ceremony he made a face for his staff to move some pens that were in his way. There's another video of him signing something in Northern Ireland with Camilla. He seems mad to have gotten ink on himself and says “I can't bear this bloody thing.” The Queen's funeral is going to be a massive event and there's the question of security for world leaders. We know Trump and his buddy Putin aren't invited while Joe and Dr. Jill Biden are coming. Politico claimed that attendees were asked to fly commercial and take a bus to Westminster Abbey due to limited capacity, which sounds like a security nightmare. It's likely that was just for lower level diplomats and that there will be exceptions. Chandra reminds me of Prince Philip's memorial service in which many people came to show their respect for the Queen. After Charles announced that William and Kate would be the Prince and Princess of Wales, Duchess Kate issued a statement in which it sounded like she wanted to continue business as usual. Valentine Low at The Times wrote a shady piece that sounded like Kate better step up and do more work. There's a related story that William and Kate won't move into Windsor Castle anytime soon. I play a segment from Zoom where we talk about the royals. As Zakia mentioned in the Zoom segment, Meghan got criticized for taking 45 minutes to get ready for the walkabout. There was speculation that Meghan was wearing a mic pack there, which a source denied. William was the one to reach out to Harry about the walkabout at the last minute. Comments of the Week: Minutes 27:30 to end My comment of the week is from Sue E Generis on the post about Sheryl Lee Ralph's Emmy acceptance speech. Chandra mentions an interview Sheryl did on the red carpet where she mentions advice Robert DeNiro gave her early in her career.  Kaiser's comment of the week is from Eowyn in the post about Gisele Bundchen's interview with Elle in which she admits that she's told Tom Brady to be more present with their family. Thanks for listening bitches!

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald
Work Place Affair's, Jimmy Kimmel, Fat Shaming

Juicy Scoop with Heather McDonald

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 72:30


Big announcement! I am going on tour! Get tickets at heathermcdonald.net The new Little Mermaid live-action trailer is out, and the reactions on TikTok are priceless. I watched the Emmys and have much to say about Jimmy Kimmel and the fashions. Britney fat-shamed Christina Aguilera's backup dancers. I will update you on what's happening at Windsor Castle since the Queen's passing. The Bravo Con schedule is out, and it seems like a Family Feud rip-off. Sherri Papini was sentenced to 8 months. Then Jamie Fiore Higgins is here to talk about her book Bully Market. She talks about her experience as a woman who worked on Wall Street at Goldman Sachs. She addresses the toxic work culture and how it impacted her personal life leading her to do things she never thought she would. So juicy! Get extra juice on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/juicyscoophttps://heathermcdonald.net/.Support our sponsors:https://www.betterhelp.com/HEATHERlivingproof.com/juicy bestegg.com/juicyMedterracbd.com/JUICYDogtopia.comoxiclean.comhttps://sleepnumber.com/JUICYworthy.com/JUICYSo continue your credit journey with Chime. No Monthly Fees. No vibe-killing fees. Sign-up for a Chime Checking Account. Only takes two minutes and doesn't affect your credit score. Get started at chime.com/juicy

Witness History
Windsor Castle fire

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 8:58


In November 1992, a fire devastated Windsor Castle - a symbol of the British monarchy and Queen Elizabeth II's weekend home. Coming at the end of a year of family problems, the blaze upset the Queen deeply and led her to declare 1992 her ‘annus horribilis'. In 2012, Simon Watts spoke to Sir Hugh Roberts, one of Her Majesty's art experts. (Photo: Windsor Castle on fire. Credit: Press Association)

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter
Prince William invited Harry, Meghan to greet crowds at Windsor. Buckingham Palace updates line of succession – but no titles yet for Harry, Meghan's kids. King Charles III will now not have a passport or a driving license

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 21:51 Very Popular


Prince William, the Prince of Wales, invited his estranged brother Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle to participate in greeting the crowds outside Windsor Castle on Saturday afternoon. Buckingham Palace website has updated the official line of succession. The King will be the only person in Britain who can drive without a license. Rob is joined by his dear pal Garrett Vogel from Elvis Duran and the Morning Show with all the scoop. Don't forget to vote in today's poll on Twitter at @naughtynicerob or in our Facebook group.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CBS This Morning - News on the Go
9/12: Thousands pay respects to Queen Elizabeth. Humiliation for Putin as Ukraine's army advances, recapturing more territory from Russia.

CBS This Morning - News on the Go

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 15:05


Mourners gather in Scotland to say farewell to Queen Elizabeth before her coffin is flown to London. This morning, in his first public statement on the Queen's death, Prince Harry called his grandmother a "guiding compass" for the nation. Over the weekend, Harry, his brother Prince William, and their wives greeted wellwishers outside Windsor Castle, where the Queen lived for most of her final years. Ukrainian troops have raised their flag in multiple towns and villages previously occupied by Russian troops. Thousands more Americans are under evacuation orders in the West, where several wildfires are burning out of control.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dubious
The End Of An Era and The New King For Climate: What's Next For The British Monarchy?

Dubious

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 50:06


After 70 years of service to the people of the United Kingdom, the Realms and the Commonwealth, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth Windsor passed away at 96, surrounded by her family at Balmoral Castle in Scotland.Whether you're a monarchist or not, you have to admit that Elizabeth Regina II – Lilibet et as Prince Phillip used to call her - was a magnificent monarch and also a most capable and beloved mother figure for the British people. She was also The United Kingdom's longest reigning monarch. If you like our content, please become a patron to get our bonus episodes and our public episodes ad-free. 1, 2 Now, the UK has a new king: King Charles III. Camilla became Queen Consort and William, the heir to the throne, is now Duke of Cornwall and will become Duke of Windsor. Prince George is second in line to the throne. When her father George VI died in February 1952, Elizabeth—then 25 years old—became queen regnant of seven independent Commonwealth countries: the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, and Ceylon (known today as Sri Lanka), as well as Head of the Commonwealth. During her reign, she had 15 Prime Ministers, from Winston Churchill to Liz Truss. The Queen's coronation in 1953 and her marriage to Prince Phillip, the birth of her 4 children (King Charles, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew Duke of York and Prince Edward Earl of Wessex), the celebrations of her Silver, Golden, Diamond, and Platinum jubilees in 1977, 2002, 2012, and 2022, are some of the important milestones of her life. She had several residences: Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Balmoral Castle, Holyrood Place, Sandringham Estate, and Hillsborough Castle. King Charles also has several homes: Clarence House, Highgrove, Birkhall and Llwynywermod. King Charles III has a passion for gardening, plants and green spaces and was way ahead of his time with his care for the environment, a worry he expressed in his 1970 speech in which he warns about plastic, pollution and the dangers of climate change. He also loves sustainable architecture and built an eco-town called Pundbury on the outskirts of Dorchester, in Dorset. He enjoys organic farming and products, which he has been growing since before the word “organic” became fashionable. 3, 4, 5, 1. Anneta Konstantindes. American tourists once met the Queen and had no idea who she was — so she played a joke on them. Business Insider India. June 2022. ⇤2. British Royal Films Youtube channel. Queen Elizabeth cracks a joke!. Youtube. March 2009. ⇤3. The Royal Family Youtube channel. The Prince of Wales reflects on 50 years since his first speech on the environment. Youtube. February 2020. ⇤4. Royal Institue of British Architects Facebook page. Next month marks 30 years since Prince Charles's (in)famous ‘Carbuncle' speech.... Facebook. April 2014. ⇤5. A speech by HRH The Prince of Wales at the 150th anniversary of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), Royal Gala Evening at Hampton Court Palace. Prince of Wales Official Website. May 1984. ⇤

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Crowds flock to Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle to mourn Queen Elizabeth II

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 5:23


Shortly after Queen Elizabeth II's death was announced, large crowds gathered outside of royal residences to mourn. Special correspondent Willem Marx joined Judy Woodruff from Buckingham Palace where a sparkling rainbow appeared after the queen's passing and Malcolm Brabant traveled to Windsor Castle and was there as Britons absorbed the news. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Bakery Bears Radio Show
Episode 70 'Our top ten places to visit the UK'

The Bakery Bears Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 42:14


  In todays show we try and pull together ten must visit locations for anyone visiting the United Kingdom. Along the way we also discuss why some of the most famous locations are our least favourites. If you have ever day dreamed about visiting the UK but you didn't know where to start, this is the show for you!    Join Kay & Dan as they: See a regular runner who is extremely inspiring! Discuss the places they would recommend as musts, for anyone coming to visit England Share some of the things about each destination that they love Offers some advice on what types of destination might suit different types of people Discuss London and why they don't think it reflects England as a country particularly well Discuss Bath and why it wouldn't make there recommended list We mentioned our ‘Walking the Dales' series https://bakerybears.com/walking-the-dales/  Places we mentioned: Chatsworth https://www.chatsworth.org  Haddon Hall https://www.haddonhall.co.uk  The Heights of Abraham https://www.heightsofabraham.com  The Lake District https://www.lakedistrict.gov.uk  Windermere https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/windermere-lake/  Ambleside https://www.visitcumbria.com/amb/ambleside/  Hardknott Fort https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/hardknott-roman-fort/  Reeth https://www.yorkshire.com/places/yorkshire-dales/reeth  Arkengarthdale https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arkengarthdale  Dover Castle https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/dover-castle/  Tintagel Castle https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/tintagel-castle/  Middleham Castle https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/middleham-castle/  Windsor Castle https://www.rct.uk/visit/windsor-castle  Ripon https://www.visitharrogate.co.uk/explore/ripon  York https://www.visityork.org  York Minster https://yorkminster.org  York Bar Walls https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/York_city_walls  Jorvik Viking Centre https://www.jorvikvikingcentre.co.uk  We'll be back in two weeks with our next 'Radio Show'! You can find past episodes of the Radio Show here: On Podbean : https://bakerybearsradioshow.podbean.com On Apple Podcasts : https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-bakery-bears-radio-show/id1474815454 Follow the Bakery Bears on Twitter https://twitter.com/bakerybears Follow the Bakery Bears on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/bakerybears/