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English-language Catholic Bible translation

  • 28PODCASTS
  • 2,002EPISODES
  • 8mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 22, 2022LATEST
New American Bible

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Best podcasts about New American Bible

Latest podcast episodes about New American Bible

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 22, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsDay of Prayer for the Legal Protection of Unborn Children Lectionary: 316All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Vincent of ZaragossaMost of what we know about this saint comes from the poet Prudentius. His Acts have been rather freely colored by the imagination of their compiler. But Saint Augustine, in one of his sermons on Saint Vincent, speaks of having the Acts of his martyrdom before him. We are at least sure of his name, his being a deacon, the place of his death and burial. According to the story we have, the unusual devotion he inspired must have had a basis in a very heroic life. Vincent was ordained deacon by his friend Saint Valerius of Zaragossa in Spain. The Roman emperors had published their edicts against the clergy in 303, and the following year against the laity. Vincent and his bishop were imprisoned in Valencia. Hunger and torture failed to break them. Like the youths in the fiery furnace, they seemed to thrive on suffering. Valerius was sent into exile, and Dacian, the Roman governor, now turned the full force of his fury on Vincent. Tortures that sound very modern were tried. But their main effect was the progressive disintegration of Dacian himself. He had the torturers beaten because they failed. Finally he suggested a compromise: Would Vincent at least give up the sacred books to be burned according to the emperor's edict? He would not. Torture on the gridiron continued, the prisoner remaining courageous, the torturer losing control of himself. Vincent was thrown into a filthy prison cell—and converted the jailer. Dacian wept with rage, but strangely enough, ordered the prisoner to be given some rest. Friends among the faithful came to visit him, but he was to have no earthly rest. When they finally settled him on a comfortable bed, he went to his eternal rest. Reflection The martyrs are heroic examples of what God's power can do. It is humanly impossible, we realize, for someone to go through tortures such as Vincent had and remain faithful. But it is equally true that by human power alone no one can remain faithful even without torture or suffering. God does not come to our rescue at isolated, “special” moments. God is supporting the super-cruisers as well as children's toy boats. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.22.22 Vespers, Saturday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 16:46


Vespers, Evening Prayer I for the 2nd Sunday of Ordinary Time, January 22nd, 2022. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God, Come to My Assistance" Hymn: "Great is Thy Faithfulness" Thomas O. Chisholm Psalm 113 Psalm 116v10-19 Canticle: Philippians 2v6-11 Reading: Hebrews 13v20-21 Responsory: Our hearts are filled with wonder as we contemplate your works, O Lord. Magnificat (English, Tone 8) Intercessions: Show us your love, Lord. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.22.22 Lauds, Saturday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 16:42


Lauds, Saturday Morning Prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours, on the 2nd Saturday in Ordinary Time, January 22nd, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Check out our website at singthehours.org! To support this work, please visit: https://www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God Come To My Assistance" Hymn: "Diei Luce Reddita," St. Ambrose of Milan (4th century) Psalm 92 (tone 1) Canticle: Deuteronomy 32v1-12 (tone 2) Psalm 8 (STH tone) Reading: Romans 12v14-16a Responsory: It is my joy, O God, to praise you with song. Benedictus (English, Tone 8, Luke 1v68-79) Intercessions: "Perfect us in love, Lord." The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Immaculate Mary (verse 1, anonymous c.1905) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, January 20, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Second Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 314All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint AgnesAlmost nothing is known of this saint except that she was very young—12 or 13—when she was martyred in the last half of the third century. Various modes of death have been suggested—beheading, burning, strangling. Legend has it that Agnes was a beautiful girl whom many young men wanted to marry. Among those she refused, one reported her to the authorities for being a Christian. She was arrested and confined to a house of prostitution. The legend continues that a man who looked upon her lustfully lost his sight and had it restored by her prayer. Agnes was condemned, executed, and buried near Rome in a catacomb that eventually was named after her. The daughter of Constantine built a basilica in her honor. Reflection Like that of Maria Goretti in the 20th century, the martyrdom of a virginal young girl made a deep impression on a society enslaved to a materialistic outlook. Also like Agatha, who died in similar circumstances, Agnes is a symbol that holiness does not depend on length of years, experience, or human effort. It is a gift God offers to all. Saint Agnes is the Patron Saint of: Girls Girl Scouts Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.21.22 Vespers, Friday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 16:54


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 2nd Friday in Ordinary Time, January 21st, 2022, the Feast of St. Agnes, Virgin and Martyr. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Martyr Dei," 10th century, Liber Hymnarius p.283. Psalm 116v1-9 (StH Eastern tone#2) Psalm 116v10-19 (StH Eastern tone#2) Canticle: Revelation 4v11; 5v9, 10, 12 (tone 4) Reading: 1 Peter 4v13-14 Responsory: The Lord chose her, his loved one from the beginning. Magnificat (English, tone 8) – Luke 1:46-55 Intercessions: We praise you, O Lord. The Lord’s Prayer (Latin) Concluding Prayers Alma Redemptoris Mater The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.21.22 Lauds, Friday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 17:43


Lauds, Friday Morning Prayer of the Liturgy of the Hours, on the 2nd Friday in Ordinary Time, the Feast of the St. Agnes, Virgin and Martyr! January 21st, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Check out our website at singthehours.org! To support this work, please visit: https://www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God Come To My Assistance" Text: “Agnes Beatae Virginis,” Liber Hymnarius (pg.341), St. Ambrose of Milan (4th cenutry) Translation and Arrangement: Roman, Hymnal for the Hours, Fr, Samuel Weber, (pg.444) Psalm 63v2-9 Canticle: Daniel 3v57-88, 56 Psalm 149 Reading: 2 Corinthians 1v3-5 Responsory: The Lord will help her; his loving presence will be with her. Benedictus (English, Tone 8, Luke 1v68-79) Intercessions: "You redeemed us by Your blood." The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers "Hail, Holy Queen Enthroned Above," Roman Hymnal, 1884 The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.20.22 Vespers, Thursday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 15:13


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 2nd Thursday in Ordinary Time, January 20th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. OR venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Deus qui cæli lumen," St. Ambrose of Milan (4th century), English translation by John Rose (copyright) and Sing the Hours Psalm 72 (part 1, tone 2) Psalm 72 (part 2, tone 6) Canticle: Revelation 11v17-18; 12v10b-12a (tone 4) Reading: 1 Peter 1v22-23 Responsory: The Lord is my shepherd, I shall want for nothing. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 (tone 8) Intercessions: Bless your people, Lord. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Salve Regina The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.20.22 Lauds, Thursday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 16:02


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 2nd Thursday in Ordinary Time, January 20th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: O Salutaris Hostia, St. Thomas Aquinas Psalm 80 Canticle: Isaiah 12v1-6 Psalm 81 Reading: Romans 14v17-19 Responsory: In the early hours of the morning, I think of you, O Lord. Canticle of Zechariah Intercessions: Enlighten us, Lord. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, January 19, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Second Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 313All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint FabianFabian was a Roman layman who came into the city from his farm one day as clergy and people were preparing to elect a new pope. Eusebius, a Church historian, says a dove flew in and settled on the head of Fabian. This sign united the votes of clergy and laity, and he was chosen unanimously. He led the Church for 14 years and died a martyr's death during the persecution of Decius in 250 A.D. Saint Cyprian wrote to his successor that Fabian was an “incomparable” man whose glory in death matched the holiness and purity of his life. In the catacombs of Saint Callistus, the stone that covered Fabian's grave may still be seen, broken into four pieces, bearing the Greek words, “Fabian, bishop, martyr.” St. Fabian shares the celebration of his liturgical feast with St. Sebastian on January 20. Reflection We can go confidently into the future and accept the change that growth demands only if we have firm roots in the past, in a living tradition. A few pieces of stone in Rome are a reminder to us that we are bearers of more than 20 centuries of a living tradition of faith and courage in living the life of Christ and showing it to the world. We have brothers and sisters who have “gone before us with the sign of faith,” as the First Eucharistic Prayer puts it, to light the way for us. Check out these seven books on saints! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.19.22 Vespers, Wednesday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 16:30


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 2nd Wednesday in Ordinary Time, January 19th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. OR venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Caeli Deus Sanctissime," St. Gregory the Great Psalm 62 Psalm 67 Canticle: Colossians 1v12-20 Reading: 1 Peter 5v5b-7 Responsory: Keep us O Lord, as the apple of Your eye. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: Increase Your grace, and Your peace, Lord. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Salve Regina The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.19.22 Lauds, Wednesday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 17:34


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 2nd Wednesday in Ordinary Time, January 19th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, please visit: https://www.patreon.com/singthehours. OR venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Fulgentis Auctor Aetheris," The Frankish Hymnal (6th century), English translation by Fr. Dylan Schrader Psalm 77 Canticle: 1 Samuel 2v1-10 Psalm 97 Reading: Romans 8:35, 37 Responsory: I will bless the Lord, all my life long. Benedictus (English, Tone 8, Luke 1v68-79) Intercessions: "Remain with us, Lord." The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 18, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the Second Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 312All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Charles of SezzeCharles thought that God was calling him to be a missionary in India, but he never got there. God had something better for this 17th-century successor to Brother Juniper. Born in Sezze, southeast of Rome, Charles was inspired by the lives of Salvator Horta and Paschal Baylon to become a Franciscan; he did that in 1635. Charles tells us in his autobiography, “Our Lord put in my heart a determination to become a lay brother with a great desire to be poor and to beg alms for his love.” Charles served as cook, porter, sacristan, gardener and beggar at various friaries in Italy. In some ways, he was “an accident waiting to happen.” He once started a huge fire in the kitchen when the oil in which he was frying onions burst into flames. One story shows how thoroughly Charles adopted the spirit of Saint Francis. The superior ordered Charles—then porter—to give food only to traveling friars who came to the door. Charles obeyed this direction; simultaneously the alms to the friars decreased. Charles convinced the superior the two facts were related. When the friars resumed giving goods to all who asked at the door, alms to the friars increased also. At the direction of his confessor, Charles wrote his autobiography, The Grandeurs of the Mercies of God. He also wrote several other spiritual books. He made good use of his various spiritual directors throughout the years; they helped him discern which of Charles' ideas or ambitions were from God. Charles himself was sought out for spiritual advice. The dying Pope Clement IX called Charles to his bedside for a blessing. Charles had a firm sense of God's providence. Father Severino Gori has said, “By word and example he recalled in all the need of pursuing only that which is eternal” (Leonard Perotti, St. Charles of Sezze: An Autobiography, page 215). He died at San Francesco a Ripa in Rome and was buried there. Pope John XXIII canonized him in 1959. Reflection The drama in the lives of the saints is mostly interior. Charles' life was spectacular only in his cooperation with God's grace. He was captivated by God's majesty and great mercy to all of us. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.18.22 Vespers, Tuesday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 15:59


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 2nd Tuesday in Ordinary Time, January 18th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Sator Princepsque Temporum," 7th Century Psalm 49 (antiphon 1) Psalm 49 (antiphon 2) Canticle: Revelation 4v11, 5-9, 10, 12 Reading: Romans 3v23-25a Responsory: I shall know the fullness of joy, when I see your face, O Lord. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: Protect your people, Lord. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Salve Regina The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.18.22 Lauds, Tuesday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 16:02


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 2nd Tuesday in Ordinary Time, January 18, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Or visit our website at www.singthehours.org. To support this work, please visit: https://www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "O Salutaris Hostia," St. Thomas Aquinas Psalm 43 Canticle: Isaiah 38v10-14, 17b-20 Psalm 65 Reading: 1 Thessalonians 5v4-5 Responsory: Lord, listen to my cry; all my trust is in your promise. Benedictus (English, Tone 8, Luke 1v68-79) Intercessions: "Keep us Lord, on Your path." The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, January 17, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Anthony. Abbot Lectionary: 311All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Anthony of EgyptThe life of Anthony will remind many people of Saint Francis of Assisi. At 20, Anthony was so moved by the Gospel message, “Go, sell what you have, and give to [the] poor” (Mark 10:21b), that he actually did just that with his large inheritance. He is different from Francis in that most of Anthony's life was spent in solitude. He saw the world completely covered with snares, and gave the Church and the world the witness of solitary asceticism, great personal mortification and prayer. But no saint is antisocial, and Anthony drew many people to himself for spiritual healing and guidance. At 54, he responded to many requests and founded a sort of monastery of scattered cells. Again, like Francis, he had great fear of “stately buildings and well-laden tables.” At 60, he hoped to be a martyr in the renewed Roman persecution of 311, fearlessly exposing himself to danger while giving moral and material support to those in prison. At 88, he was fighting the Arian heresy, that massive trauma from which it took the Church centuries to recover. “The mule kicking over the altar” denied the divinity of Christ. Anthony is associated in art with a T-shaped cross, a pig and a book. The pig and the cross are symbols of his valiant warfare with the devil—the cross his constant means of power over evil spirits, the pig a symbol of the devil himself. The book recalls his preference for “the book of nature” over the printed word. Anthony died in solitude at age 105. Reflection In an age that smiles at the notion of devils and angels, a person known for having power over evil spirits must at least make us pause. And in a day when people speak of life as a “rat race,” one who devotes a whole life to solitude and prayer points to an essential of the Christian life in all ages. Anthony's hermit life reminds us of the absoluteness of our break with sin and the totality of our commitment to Christ. Even in God's good world, there is another world whose false values constantly tempt us. Saint Anthony of Egypt is the Patron Saint of: Butchers Gravediggers Skin Diseases Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.17.22 Vespers, Monday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 16:48


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 2nd Monday in Ordinary Time, January 17th, 2022, Memorial of St. Anthony of the Desert. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website www.singthehours.org. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: Doxastikon of the Praises (in Gregorian Tonus Peregrinus), from Greek Matins of St. Anthony. Translated into English, © 2019 by Fr. Seraphim Dedes (Greek Orthodox Diocese of America). Psalm 45 (two parts, tone 2) Canticle: Ephesians 1:3-10 Reading: 1 Thessalonians 2v13 Responsory: Accept my prayer, O Lord, which rises up to you. Magnificat: Luke 1v46-55 (English, tone 8) Intercessions: Answer the prayers of your people, Lord. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Alma Redemptoris Mater The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.17.22 Lauds, Monday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 15:16


Lauds, Morning Prayer for Monday of the 2nd Week of Ordinary Time, January 17th, 2022, Memorial of St. Anthony of the Desert. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: Kontakion (tone #1) and Oikos from Greek Matins of St. Anthony. Translated into English, © 2019 by Fr. Seraphim Dedes (Greek Orthodox Diocese of America). Psalm 42 Canticle: Sirach 36v1-5, 10-13 Psalm 19A Reading: Jeremiah 15v16 Responsory: Sing for joy, God’s chosen ones, give him the praise that is due. Benedictus (Luke 1:68-79) Intercessions: "Preserve us in your ministry, Lord." The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Hail Mary (StH arrangement #2) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C..

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.16.22 Vespers, Sunday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 18:20


Vespers II, Sunday Evening Prayer on the 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, January 16th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Text: Lucis creátor óptime, Saint Ambrose of Milan, 4th century, Translated by John Mason Neale, 19th century Psalm 110v1-5, 7 Psalm 115 Canticle: See Revelation 19v1-7 Reading: 2 Thessalonians 2v13-14 Responsory: Our Lord is great, mighty is his power. Canticle of Mary (Magnificat) Intercessions: Remember your people, Lord. The Lord’s Prayer – "Pater Noster" Concluding Prayers Alma Redemptoris Mater – "Kind One, The Ransomer's Mother" John Rose and SingtheHours c.2021 The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C..

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.16.22 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 17:11


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 2nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, January 16th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Latin, Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 15, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 310All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Paul the HermitIt is unclear what we really know of Paul's life, how much is fable, how much is fact. Paul was reportedly born in Egypt, where he was orphaned by age 15. He was also a learned and devout young man. During the persecution of Decius in Egypt in the year 250, Paul was forced to hide in the home of a friend. Fearing a brother-in-law would betray him, he fled in a cave in the desert. His plan was to return once the persecution ended, but the sweetness of solitude and heavenly contemplation convinced him to stay. He went on to live in that cave for the next 90 years. A nearby spring gave him drink, a palm tree furnished him clothing and nourishment. After 21 years of solitude, a bird began bringing him half of a loaf of bread each day. Without knowing what was happening in the world, Paul prayed that the world would become a better place. Saint Anthony of Egypt attests to his holy life and death. Tempted by the thought that no one had served God in the wilderness longer than he, Anthony was led by God to find Paul and acknowledge him as a man more perfect than himself. The raven that day brought a whole loaf of bread instead of the usual half. As Paul predicted, Anthony would return to bury his new friend. Thought to have been about 112 when he died, Paul is known as the “First Hermit.” His feast day is celebrated in the East; he is also commemorated in the Coptic and Armenian rites of the Mass. Reflection The will and direction of God are seen in the circumstances of our lives. Led by the grace of God, we are free to respond with choices that bring us closer to and make us more dependent upon the God who created us. Those choices might at times seem to lead us away from our neighbor. But ultimately they lead us back both in prayer and in fellowship to one another. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.15.22 Vespers, Saturday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 16:13


Saturday Vespers I, Evening Prayer for the 2nd Sunday in Ordinary, January 15th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website www.singthehours.org. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "At the Lamb's High Feast We Sing" Psalm 119v105-112 Psalm 16 Canticle: Philippians 2v6-11 Reading: Colossians 1v2b-6a Responsory: From the rising of the sun to its setting, may the name of the Lord be praised. Magnificat: Luke 1v46-55 (English, tone 8) Intercessions: Lord, we trust in You. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Catholic Answers Live
#10455 Your Bible Questions - Jimmy Akin

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022


Questions Covered: 01:26 – In Revelation 12, it talks about how the woman has birth pains when delivering her son. Is there any evidence that this refers to Mary's pain at the foot of the cross? 12:25 – From scripture, is there a difference between dogma and doctrine? 17:10 – Is there anything that describes if the prophecies of Isaiah have all come true? 20:41 – In Matthew 27:52-53 when all the people rose from the dead when Christ was crucified, why is it not recorded in any gospels other than Matthew? What kind of impact did it have on Jerusalem? 28:44 – In Samuel 4:1-11, the Philistines went and got the Ark of the Lord from Shiloh. What is the ark? Why did the Lord leave Israel to lose to the Philistines? 34:24 – When we pray in accordance with the scriptures, what scriptures are we referring to? 39:32 – What amount of awareness did Mary have during the passion of Christ? 44:58 – The New American Bible has a note that the 2nd story of creation in Genesis is a much older narrative than the 1st. Does this mean that the 2nd story was written before the 1st? 49:37 – In Matthew 24:34, what do you think about the events that must happen before the end of time? What did Jesus mean by “this generation”? 52:24 – When Jesus cursed the fig tree, was it just to teach a lesson or was he truly angry? …

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.15.22 Lauds, Saturday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 13:47


The Liturgy of the Hours, Lauds, Morning Prayer for 1st Saturday in Ordinary Time, January 15th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Check out our website at singthehours.org! Please consider supporting this mission at patreon.com/singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: Aurora jam spargit polum by Ambrose of Milian (St. Augustine's mentor), Translated by Edward Caswall (19th century) "The Dawn is Sprinkling in the East." Psalm 119 Canticle – Exodus 15v1-4a, 8-13, 17-18 Psalm 117 Reading: 2 Corinthians 1:3-5 Responsory: I cry to You, O Lord, for you are my refuge. Canticle of Zechariah Intercessions: Lord, share with us the treasure of your love. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Hail Holy Queen Enthroned Above The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, January 14, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 309All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Gregory NazianzenAfter his baptism at 30, Gregory gladly accepted his friend Basil's invitation to join him in a newly founded monastery. The solitude was broken when Gregory's father, a bishop, needed help in his diocese and estate. It seems that Gregory was ordained a priest practically by force, and only reluctantly accepted the responsibility. He skillfully avoided a schism that threatened when his own father made compromises with Arianism. At 41, Gregory was chosen suffragan bishop of Caesarea and at once came into conflict with Valens, the emperor, who supported the Arians. An unfortunate by-product of the battle was the cooling of the friendship of two saints. Basil, his archbishop, sent him to a miserable and unhealthy town on the border of unjustly created divisions in his diocese. Basil reproached Gregory for not going to his See. When protection for Arianism ended with the death of Valens, Gregory was called to rebuild the faith in the great see of Constantinople, which had been under Arian teachers for three decades. Retiring and sensitive, he dreaded being drawn into the whirlpool of corruption and violence. He first stayed at a friend's home, which became the only orthodox church in the city. In such surroundings, he began giving the great sermons on the Trinity for which he is famous. In time, Gregory did rebuild the faith in the city, but at the cost of great suffering, slander, insults, and even personal violence. An interloper even tried to take over his bishopric. His last days were spent in solitude and austerity. He wrote religious poetry, some of it autobiographical, of great depth and beauty. He was acclaimed simply as “the Theologian.” St. Gregory Nazianzen shares the celebration of his liturgical feast with St. Basil the Great on January 2. Reflection It may be small comfort, but post-Vatican II turmoil in the Church is a mild storm compared to the devastation caused by the Arian heresy, a trauma the Church has never forgotten. Christ did not promise the kind of peace we would love to have—no problems, no opposition, no pain. In one way or another, holiness is always the way of the cross. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.14.22 Vespers, Friday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 17:56


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 1st Friday of Ordinary Time, January 14th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Plasmator Hominis Deus," (English) St. Gregory the Great (pg. 205 in the Liber Hymnarius), Translation by John David Chambers (1803-1893), Tune from Hymnal for the Hours by Fr. Samuel Weber Psalm 41 Psalm 46 Canticle: Revelation 15v3-4 Reading: Romans 15v1-3 Responsory: Christ loved us and washed away our sins, in his own blood. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: Lord, show us your mercy. The Lord's Prayer (Latin) Concluding Prayers Salve Regina The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.14.22 Lauds, Friday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 19:31


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 1st Friday in Ordinary Time, January 14th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Aeterna Caeli Gloria," Ambrose of Milan (4th century), "Eternal Glory of the Sky" translation by J.M. Neale (19th century) Psalm 51 Canticle: Isaiah 45v15-25 Psalm 100 Reading: Ephesians 4v29-32 Responsory: At daybreak, be merciful to me. Canticle of Zechariah Intercessions: Lord, pour out your mercy upon us. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, StH arrangement#2) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, January 13, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 308All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Hilary of PoitiersThis staunch defender of the divinity of Christ was a gentle and courteous man, devoted to writing some of the greatest theology on the Trinity, and was like his Master in being labeled a “disturber of the peace.” In a very troubled period in the Church, his holiness was lived out in both scholarship and controversy. He was bishop of Poitiers in France. Raised a pagan, he was converted to Christianity when he met his God of nature in the Scriptures. His wife was still living when he was chosen, against his will, to be the bishop of Poitiers in France. He was soon taken up with battling what became the scourge of the fourth century, Arianism, which denied the divinity of Christ. The heresy spread rapidly. Saint Jerome said “The world groaned and marveled to find that it was Arian.” When Emperor Constantius ordered all the bishops of the West to sign a condemnation of Athanasius, the great defender of the faith in the East, Hilary refused and was banished from France to far off Phrygia. Eventually he was called the “Athanasius of the West.” While writing in exile, he was invited by some semi-Arians (hoping for reconciliation) to a council the emperor called to counteract the Council of Nicea. But Hilary predictably defended the Church, and when he sought public debate with the heretical bishop who had exiled him, the Arians, dreading the meeting and its outcome, pleaded with the emperor to send this troublemaker back home. Hilary was welcomed by his people. Reflection Christ said his coming would bring not peace but a sword (see Matthew 10:34). The Gospels offer no support for us if we fantasize about a sunlit holiness that knows no problems. Christ did not escape at the last moment, though he did live happily ever after—after a life of controversy, problems, pain and frustration. Hilary, like all saints, simply had more of the same. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.13.22 Vespers, Thursday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 15:24


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 1st Thursday of Ordinary Time, January 13th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support, venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "O Gladsome Light," Phos Hilaron (3rd century), translation and arrangement copyright John Rose Psalm 30 Psalm 32 Canticle: Revelation 11v17-18; 12v10b-12a Reading: 1 Peter 1v6-9 Responsory: The Lord has given us food, bread of the finest wheat. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: Look kindly on your children, Lord. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Immaculate Mary (verse 1, anonymous, c.1905) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.13.22 Lauds, Thursday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 16:23


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 1st Thursday in Ordinary Time, January 13th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Sol Ecce Surgit Igneus," Prudentius (4th Century) Psalm 57 Canticle: Jeremiah 31v10-14 Psalm 48 Reading: Isaiah 66v1-2 Responsory: From the depths of my heart I cry to you; hear me, O Lord. Canticle of Zechariah Intercessions: Lord, bless us and bring us close to You. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Hail Mary (StH arrangement #1) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 307All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Marguerite Bourgeoys“God closes a door and then opens a window,” people sometimes say when dealing with their own disappointment or someone else's. That was certainly true in Marguerite's case. Children from European as well as Native American backgrounds in 17th-century Canada benefited from her great zeal and unshakable trust in God's providence. Born the sixth of 12 children in Troyes, France, Marguerite at the age of 20 believed that she was called to religious life. Her applications to the Carmelites and Poor Clares were unsuccessful. A priest friend suggested that perhaps God had other plans for her. In 1654, the governor of the French settlement in Canada visited his sister, an Augustinian canoness in Troyes. Marguerite belonged to a sodality connected to that convent. The governor invited her to come to Canada and start a school in Ville-Marie (eventually the city of Montreal). When she arrived, the colony numbered 200 people with a hospital and a Jesuit mission chapel. Soon after starting a school, she realized her need for coworkers. Returning to Troyes, she recruited a friend, Catherine Crolo, and two other young women. In 1667, they added classes at their school for Indian children. A second trip to France three years later resulted in six more young women and a letter from King Louis XIV, authorizing the school. The Congregation of Notre Dame was established in 1676 but its members did not make formal religious profession until 1698 when their Rule and constitutions were approved. Marguerite established a school for Indian girls in Montreal. At the age of 69, she walked from Montreal to Quebec in response to the bishop's request to establish a community of her sisters in that city. By the time she died, she was referred to as the “Mother of the Colony.” Marguerite was canonized in 1982. Reflection It's easy to become discouraged when plans that we think that God must endorse are frustrated. Marguerite was called not to be a cloistered nun but to be a foundress and an educator. God had not ignored her after all. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.12.22 Vespers, Wednesday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 17:00


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 1st Wednesday of Ordinary Time, January 12th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Caeli Deus Sanctissime," Pope St. Gregory the Great Psalm 27 (two parts) Canticle: Colossians 1v12-20 Reading: James 1v19-22, 25 Responsory: Claim me once more as your own, Lord, and have mercy on me. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: Lord, show us your love. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.12.22 Lauds, Wednesday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 16:14


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 1st Wednesday in Ordinary Time, January 12th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. For direct support, Venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Nox Tenebrae et Nubila," Prudentius (4th century), translation by ©John Rose and Sing the Hours 2021 Psalm 36 Canticle: Judith 16v2-3a, 13-15 Psalm 47 Reading: Tobit 4v15a, 16a, 18a, 19 Responsory: Incline my heart according to your will, O God. Canticle of Zechariah Intercessions: Lord, help your brothers to grow in holiness. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 11, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 306All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed William CarterBorn in London, William Carter entered the printing business at an early age. For many years he served as apprentice to well-known Catholic printers, one of whom served a prison sentence for persisting in the Catholic faith. William himself served time in prison following his arrest for “printing lewd [i.e., Catholic] pamphlets” as well as possessing books upholding Catholicism. But even more, he offended public officials by publishing works that aimed to keep Catholics firm in their faith. Officials who searched his house found various vestments and suspect books, and even managed to extract information from William's distraught wife. Over the next 18 months, William remained in prison, suffering torture and learning of his wife's death. He was eventually charged with printing and publishing the Treatise of Schisme, which allegedly incited violence by Catholics and which was said to have been written by a traitor and addressed to traitors. While William calmly placed his trust in God, the jury met for only 15 minutes before reaching a verdict of guilty. William, who made his final confession to a priest who was being tried alongside him, was hanged, drawn, and quartered the following day: January 11, 1584. He was beatified in 1987. Reflection It didn't pay to be Catholic in Elizabeth I's realm. In an age when religious diversity did not yet seem possible, it was high treason, and practicing the faith was dangerous. William gave his life for his efforts to encourage his brothers and sisters to keep up the struggle. These days, our brothers and sisters also need encouragement—not because their lives are at risk, but because many other factors besiege their faith. They look to us. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.11.22 Vespers, Tuesday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 15:18


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 1st Tuesday in Ordinary Time, January 11th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "The Setting Sun Now Dies Away," Ambrose, translated by Laycock Psalm 20 Psalm 21v2-8, 14 Canticle: Revelation 4v11; 5v9, 10, 12 Reading: 1 John 3v1-3 Responsory: Through all eternity, O Lord, your promise stands unshaken. Magnificat Intercessions: Lord, hear our prayer. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Salve Regina The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.11.22 Lauds, Tuesday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 18:16


The Liturgy of the Hours, Lauds, Morning Prayer for 1st Tuesday in Ordinary Time, January 11th, 2022. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this week (I very much need your help!) visit patreon.com/singthehours. Check out our website at singthehours.org! Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "Pergrata Mundo Nuntiat," pg.197 Liber Hymnarius Psalm 24 Canticle: Tobit 13v1-8 Psalm 33 Reading: Romans 13v11b, 12-13a Responsory: My God stands by me, all my trust is in him. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) Intercessions: Lord, our God and our Savior. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, January 10, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 305All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Gregory of NyssaThe son of two saints, Basil and Emmilia, young Gregory was raised by his older brother, Saint Basil the Great, and his sister, Macrina, in modern-day Turkey. Gregory's success in his studies suggested great things were ahead for him. After becoming a professor of rhetoric, he was persuaded to devote his learning and efforts to the Church. By then married, Gregory went on to study for the priesthood and become ordained (this at a time when celibacy was not a matter of law for priests). He was elected Bishop of Nyssa in 372, a period of great tension over the Arian heresy, which denied the divinity of Christ. Briefly arrested after being falsely accused of embezzling Church funds, Gregory was restored to his see in 378, an act met with great joy by his people. It was after the death of his beloved brother Basil, that Gregory really came into his own. He wrote with great effectiveness against Arianism and other questionable doctrines, gaining a reputation as a defender of orthodoxy. He was sent on missions to counter other heresies and held a position of prominence at the Council of Constantinople. His fine reputation stayed with him for the remainder of his life, but over the centuries it gradually declined as the authorship of his writings became less and less certain. But, thanks to the work of scholars in the 20th century, his stature is once again appreciated. Indeed, Saint Gregory of Nyssa is seen not simply as a pillar of orthodoxy but as one of the great contributors to the mystical tradition in Christian spirituality and to monasticism itself. Reflection Orthodoxy is a word that can raise red flags in our minds. To some people it may connote rigid attitudes that make no room for honest differences of opinion. But it might just as well suggest something else: faith that has settled deep in one's bones. Gregory's faith was like that. So deeply embedded was his faith in Jesus that he knew the divinity that Arianism denied. When we resist something offered as truth without knowing exactly why, it may be because our faith has settled in our bones. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.10.22 Vespers, Monday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 15:21


Vespers, Evening Prayer for the 1st Monday in Ordinary Time, January 10th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. OR venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: "For all the Saints Who From Their Labors Rest" Psalm 11 Psalm 15 Canticle: Ephesians 1v3-10 Reading: Colossians 1v9b-11 Responsory: Lord, you alone can heal me, for I have grieved you by my sins. Canticle of Mary: Luke 1v46-55 (tone 8) Intercessions: Lord, bless your people. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers Immaculate Mary (c.1905) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C. Psalm 11 Psalm 15 Canticle: Ephesians 1v3-10 Reading: Colossians 1v9b-11 Responsory: Lord, you alone can heal me, for I have grieved you by my sins. Intercessions: Lord, bless your people.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.10.22 Lauds, Monday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 15:29


Lauds, Morning Prayer for the 1st Monday in Ordinary Time, January 10th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Hymn: "Splendor Paternae Gloriae," Liber Hymnarius (pg. 191), Ambrose of Milan (4th century) Psalm 5v2-10, 12-13 Canticle: 1 Chronicles 29v10-13 Psalm 29 Reading: 2 Thessalonians 3v10b-13 Responsory: Blessed be the Lord our God, blessed from age to age. Canticle of Zechariah: Luke 1:68-79 Intercessions: Give us your Spirit, Lord. The Lord’s Prayer Hail Mary (StH tune #2) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, January 9, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThe Baptism of the Lord Lectionary: 21All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Adrian of CanterburyThough Saint Adrian turned down a papal request to become Archbishop of Canterbury, England, Pope Saint Vitalian accepted the rejection on the condition that Adrian serve as the Holy Father's assistant and adviser. Adrian accepted, but ended up spending most of his life and doing most of his work in Canterbury. Born in Africa, Adrian was serving as an abbot in Italy when the new Archbishop of Canterbury appointed him abbot of the monastery of Saints Peter and Paul in Canterbury. Thanks to his leadership skills, the facility became one of the most important centers of learning. The school attracted many outstanding scholars from far and wide and produced numerous future bishops and archbishops. Students reportedly learned Greek and Latin and spoke Latin as well as their own native languages. Adrian taught at the school for 40 years. He died there, probably in the year 710, and was buried in the monastery. Several hundred years later, when reconstruction was being done, Adrian's body was discovered in an incorrupt state. As word spread, people flocked to his tomb, which became famous for miracles. Rumor had it that young schoolboys in trouble with their masters made regular visits there. Reflection Saint Adrian spent most of his time in Canterbury not as bishop, but as abbot and teacher. Often the Lord has plans for us that are obvious only on hindsight. How often have we said no to something or someone only to end up in much the same place anyway. The Lord knows what's good for us. Can we trust him? Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
1.9.22 Vespers II, Sunday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 16:46


Vespers II, Sunday Evening Prayer on the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, January 9th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: Lucis creátor óptime, attributed to Gregory the Great, 540-604, Translation: John Mason Neale, 1818-1866 Psalm 110v1-5, 7 Psalm 112 Canticle: Revelation 15v3-4 Reading: Acts 10v37-38 Responsory: Christ comes to us. He comes in water and in blood. Canticle of Mary (Magnificat) Intercessions: Lord send forth your Spirit upon us. The Lord’s Prayer – "Pater Noster" Concluding Prayers Alma Redemptoris Mater The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C..

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 8, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday after Epiphany Lectionary: 217All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Angela of Folignoclass="content"> Jan 8, 2021 Franciscan Media Image: Statue of Saint Angela of Foligno  Saint of the Day for January 8 (1248 – January 4, 1309) Audio file Saint Angela of Foligno's story Some saints show marks of holiness very early. Not Angela! Born of a leading family in Foligno, Italy, she became immersed in the quest for wealth and social position. As a wife and mother, she continued this life of distraction. Around the age of 40, she recognized the emptiness of her life and sought God's help in the Sacrament of Penance. Her Franciscan confessor helped Angela to seek God's pardon for her previous life and to dedicate herself to prayer and the works of charity. Shortly after her conversion, her husband and children died. Selling most of her possessions, she entered the Secular Franciscan Order. She was alternately absorbed by meditating on the crucified Christ and by serving the poor of Foligno as a nurse and beggar for their needs. Other women joined her in a religious community. At her confessor's advice, Angela wrote her Book of Visions and Instructions. In it she recalls some of the temptations she suffered after her conversion; she also expresses her thanks to God for the Incarnation of Jesus. This book and her life earned for Angela the title “Teacher of Theologians.” She was beatified in 1693, and canonized in 2013. Reflection People who live in the United States today can understand Saint Angela's temptation to increase her sense of self-worth by accumulating money, fame or power. Striving to possess more and more, she became more and more self-centered. When she realized she was priceless because she was created and loved by God, she became very penitential and very charitable to the poor. What had seemed foolish early in her life now became very important. The path of self-emptying she followed is the path all holy men and women must follow. The liturgical feast of Saint Angela of Foligno is celebrated on January 7. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, January 7, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsFriday after Epiphany Lectionary: 216All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Raymond of PeafortSince Raymond lived into his hundredth year, he had a chance to do many things. As a member of the Spanish nobility, he had the resources and the education to get a good start in life. By the time he was 20, he was teaching philosophy. In his early 30s he earned a doctorate in both canon and civil law. At 41 he became a Dominican. Pope Gregory IX called him to Rome to work for him and to be his confessor. One of the things the pope asked him to do was to gather together all the decrees of popes and councils that had been made in 80 years since a similar collection by Gratian. Raymond compiled five books called the Decretals. They were looked upon as one of the best organized collections of Church law until the 1917 codification of canon law. Earlier, Raymond had written for confessors a book of cases. It was called Summa de Casibus Poenitentiae. More than simply a list of sins and penances, it discussed pertinent doctrines and laws of the Church that pertained to the problem or case brought to the confessor. At the age of 60, Raymond was appointed archbishop of Tarragona, the capital of Aragon. He didn't like the honor at all and ended up getting sick and resigning in two years. He didn't get to enjoy his peace long, however, because when he was 63 he was elected by his fellow Dominicans to be the head of the whole Order, the successor of Saint Dominic. Raymond worked hard, visited on foot all the Dominicans, reorganized their constitutions and managed to put through a provision that a master general be allowed to resign. When the new constitutions were accepted, Raymond, then 65, resigned. He still had 35 years to oppose heresy and work for the conversion of the Moors in Spain. He convinced Saint Thomas Aquinas to write his work Against the Gentiles. In his 100th year, the Lord let Raymond retire. Reflection Raymond was a lawyer, a canonist. Legalism can suck the life out of genuine religion if it becomes too great a preoccupation with the letter of the law to the neglect of the spirit and purpose of the law. The law can become an end in itself, so that the value the law was intended to promote is overlooked. But we must guard against going to the opposite extreme and seeing law as useless or something to be lightly regarded. Laws ideally state those things that are for the best interests of everyone and make sure the rights of all are safeguarded. From Raymond, we can learn a respect for law as a means of serving the common good. Saint Raymond of Peñafort is a Patron Saint of: Lawyers Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, January 6, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThursday after Epiphany Lectionary: 215All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Andr BessetteBrother André expressed a saint's faith by a lifelong devotion to Saint Joseph. Sickness and weakness dogged André from birth. He was the eighth of 12 children born to a French Canadian couple near Montreal. Adopted at 12, when both parents had died, he became a farmhand. Various trades followed: shoemaker, baker, blacksmith—all failures. He was a factory worker in the United States during the boom times of the Civil War. At 25, André applied for entrance into the Congregation of Holy Cross. After a year's novitiate, he was not admitted because of his weak health. But with an extension and the urging of Bishop Bourget, he was finally received. He was given the humble job of doorkeeper at Notre Dame College in Montreal, with additional duties as sacristan, laundry worker and messenger. “When I joined this community, the superiors showed me the door, and I remained 40 years,” he said. In his little room near the door, he spent much of the night on his knees. On his windowsill, facing Mount Royal, was a small statue of Saint Joseph, to whom he had been devoted since childhood. When asked about it he said, “Some day, Saint Joseph is going to be honored in a very special way on Mount Royal!” When he heard someone was ill, he visited to bring cheer and to pray with the sick person. He would rub the sick person lightly with oil taken from a lamp burning in the college chapel. Word of healing powers began to spread. When an epidemic broke out at a nearby college, André volunteered to nurse. Not one person died. The trickle of sick people to his door became a flood. His superiors were uneasy; diocesan authorities were suspicious; doctors called him a quack. “I do not cure,” he said again and again. “Saint Joseph cures.” In the end he needed four secretaries to handle the 80,000 letters he received each year. For many years the Holy Cross authorities had tried to buy land on Mount Royal. Brother André and others climbed the steep hill and planted medals of Saint Joseph. Suddenly, the owners yielded. André collected $200 to build a small chapel and began receiving visitors there—smiling through long hours of listening, applying Saint Joseph's oil. Some were cured, some not. The pile of crutches, canes and braces grew. The chapel also grew. By 1931, there were gleaming walls, but money ran out. “Put a statue of Saint Joseph in the middle. If he wants a roof over his head, he'll get it.” The magnificent Oratory on Mount Royal took 50 years to build. The sickly boy who could not hold a job died at 92. He is buried at the Oratory. He was beatified in 1982 and canonized in 2010. At his canonization in October 2010, Pope Benedict XVI said that Saint Andre “lived the beatitude of the pure of heart.” Reflection Rubbing ailing limbs with oil or a medal? Planting a medal to buy land? Isn't this superstition? Aren't we long past that superstitious people rely only on the “magic” of a word or action. Brother André's oil and medals were authentic sacramentals of a simple, total faith in the Father who lets his saints help him bless his children. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, January 5, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint John Neumann, Bishop Lectionary: 214All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint John NeumannPerhaps because the United States got a later start in the history of the world, it has relatively few canonized saints, but their number is increasing. John Neumann was born in what is now the Czech Republic. After studying in Prague, he came to New York at 25 and was ordained a priest. He did missionary work in New York until he was 29, when he joined the Redemptorists and became its first member to profess vows in the United States. He continued missionary work in Maryland, Virginia and Ohio, where he became popular with the Germans. At 41, as bishop of Philadelphia, he organized the parochial school system into a diocesan one, increasing the number of pupils almost twentyfold within a short time. Gifted with outstanding organizing ability, he drew into the city many teaching communities of sisters and the Christian Brothers. During his brief assignment as vice provincial for the Redemptorists, he placed them in the forefront of the parochial movement. Well-known for his holiness and learning, spiritual writing and preaching, on October 13, 1963, John Neumann became the first American bishop to be beatified. Canonized in 1977, he is buried in St. Peter the Apostle Church in Philadelphia. Reflection Neumann took seriously our Lord's words, “Go and teach all nations.” From Christ he received his instructions and the power to carry them out. For Christ does not give a mission without supplying the means to accomplish it. The Father's gift in Christ to John Neumann was his exceptional organizing ability, which he used to spread the Good News. Today the Church is in dire need of men and women to continue in our times the teaching of the Good News. The obstacles and inconveniences are real and costly. Yet when Christians approach Christ, he supplies the necessary talents to answer today's needs. The Spirit of Christ continues his work through the instrumentality of generous Christians. Saint John Neumann is a Patron Saint of: Educators/Teachers Start the new year prayerfully! Subscribe to our new Pause+Pray! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 4, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious Lectionary: 213All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Elizabeth Ann SetonMother Seton is one of the keystones of the American Catholic Church. She founded the first American religious community for women, the Sisters of Charity. She opened the first American parish school and established the first American Catholic orphanage. All this she did in the span of 46 years while raising her five children. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is a true daughter of the American Revolution, born August 28, 1774, just two years before the Declaration of Independence. By birth and marriage, she was linked to the first families of New York and enjoyed the fruits of high society. Reared a staunch Episcopalian, she learned the value of prayer, Scripture and a nightly examination of conscience. Her father, Dr. Richard Bayley, did not have much use for churches but was a great humanitarian, teaching his daughter to love and serve others. The early deaths of her mother in 1777 and her baby sister in 1778 gave Elizabeth a feel for eternity and the temporariness of the pilgrim life on earth. Far from being brooding and sullen, she faced each new “holocaust,” as she put it, with hopeful cheerfulness. At 19, Elizabeth was the belle of New York and married a handsome, wealthy businessman, William Magee Seton. They had five children before his business failed and he died of tuberculosis. At 30, Elizabeth was widowed and penniless, with five small children to support. While in Italy with her dying husband, Elizabeth witnessed Catholicity in action through family friends. Three basic points led her to become a Catholic: belief in the Real Presence, devotion to the Blessed Mother and conviction that the Catholic Church led back to the apostles and to Christ. Many of her family and friends rejected her when she became a Catholic in March 1805. To support her children, she opened a school in Baltimore. From the beginning, her group followed the lines of a religious community, which was officially founded in 1809. The thousand or more letters of Mother Seton reveal the development of her spiritual life from ordinary goodness to heroic sanctity. She suffered great trials of sickness, misunderstanding, the death of loved ones (her husband and two young daughters) and the heartache of a wayward son. She died January 4, 1821, and became the first American-born citizen to be beatified (1963) and then canonized (1975). She is buried in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Reflection Elizabeth Ann Seton had no extraordinary gifts. She was not a mystic or stigmatic. She did not prophesy or speak in tongues. She had two great devotions: abandonment to the will of God and an ardent love for the Blessed Sacrament. She wrote to a friend, Julia Scott, that she would prefer to exchange the world for a “cave or a desert.” “But God has given me a great deal to do, and I have always and hope always to prefer his will to every wish of my own.” Her brand of sanctity is open to everyone if we love God and do his will. Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton is a Patron Saint of: Catholic Schools Educators/Teachers Loss of Parents Widows Click here for a meditation on St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, January 3, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsMonday after Epiphany Lectionary: 212All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Most Holy Name of Jesusof the Most Holy Name of Jesus Although Saint Paul might claim credit for promoting devotion to the Holy Name because Paul wrote in Philippians that God the Father gave Christ Jesus “that name that is above every name” (see 2:9), this devotion became popular because of 12th-century Cistercian monks and nuns but especially through the preaching of Saint Bernardine of Siena, a 15th-century Franciscan. Bernardine used devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus as a way of overcoming bitter and often bloody class struggles and family rivalries or vendettas in Italian city-states. The devotion grew, partly because of Franciscan and Dominican preachers. It spread even more widely after the Jesuits began promoting it in the 16th century. In 1530, Pope Clement V approved an Office of the Holy Name for the Franciscans. In 1721, Pope Innocent XIII extended this feast to the entire Church. Reflection Jesus died and rose for the sake of all people. No one can trademark or copyright Jesus' name. Jesus is the Son of God and son of Mary. Everything that exists was created in and through the Son of God (see Colossians 1:15-20). The name of Jesus is debased if any Christian uses it as justification for berating non-Christians. Jesus reminds us that because we are all related to him we are, therefore, all related to one another. Start the new year prayerfully! Subscribe to Pause+Pray! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, January 2, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThe Epiphany of the Lord Lectionary: 20All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Basil the GreatBasil was on his way to becoming a famous teacher when he decided to begin a religious life of gospel poverty. After studying various modes of religious life, he founded what was probably the first monastery in Asia Minor. He is to monks of the East what Saint Benedict is to the West, and Basil's principles influence Eastern monasticism today. He was ordained a priest, assisted the archbishop of Caesarea—now southeastern Turkey—and ultimately became archbishop himself, in spite of opposition from some of the bishops under him, probably because they foresaw coming reforms. Arianism, one of the most damaging heresies in the history of the Church which denied the divinity of Christ, was at its height. Emperor Valens persecuted orthodox believers, and put great pressure on Basil to remain silent and admit the heretics to communion. Basil remained firm, and Valens backed down. But trouble remained. When the great Saint Athanasius died, the mantle of defender of the faith against Arianism fell upon Basil. He strove mightily to unite and rally his fellow Catholics who were crushed by tyranny and torn by internal dissension. He was misunderstood, misrepresented, accused of heresy and ambition. Even appeals to the pope brought no response. “For my sins I seem to be unsuccessful in everything.” Basil was tireless in pastoral care. He preached twice a day to huge crowds, built a hospital that was called a wonder of the world—as a youth he had organized famine relief and worked in a soup kitchen himself—and fought the prostitution business. Basil was best known as an orator. Though not recognized greatly in his lifetime, his writings rightly place him among the great teachers of the Church. Seventy-two years after his death, the Council of Chalcedon described him as “the great Basil, minister of grace who has expounded the truth to the whole earth.” Reflection As the French say, “The more things change, the more they remain the same.” Basil faced the same problems as modern Christians. Sainthood meant trying to preserve the spirit of Christ in such perplexing and painful problems as reform, organization, fighting for the poor, maintaining balance and peace in misunderstanding. Saint Basil the Great is the Patron Saint of: Russia Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, December 31, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThe Seventh Day in the Octave of Christmas Lectionary: 204All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Sylvester IWhen you think of this pope, you think of the Edict of Milan, the emergence of the Church from the catacombs, the building of the great basilicas—Saint John Lateran, Saint Peter's, and others—the Council of Nicaea, and other critical events. But for the most part, these events were planned or brought about by Emperor Constantine. A great store of legends has grown up around the man who was pope at this most important time, but very little can be established historically. We know for sure that his papacy lasted from 314 until his death in 335. Reading between the lines of history, we are assured that only a very strong and wise man could have preserved the essential independence of the Church in the face of the overpowering figure of the Emperor Constantine. In general, the bishops remained loyal to the Holy See, and at times expressed apologies to Sylvester for undertaking important ecclesiastical projects at the urging of Constantine. Reflection It takes deep humility and courage in the face of criticism for a leader to stand aside and let events take their course, when asserting one's authority would only lead to useless tension and strife. Sylvester teaches a valuable lesson for Church leaders, politicians, parents, and others in authority. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, December 30, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThe Sixth Day in the Octave of Christmas Lectionary: 203All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint EgwinYou say you're not familiar with today's saint? Chances are you aren't—unless you're especially informed about Benedictine bishops who established monasteries in medieval England. Born in the seventh century of royal blood, Egwin entered a monastery, and was enthusiastically received by royalty, clergy, and the people as the bishop of Worcester, England. As a bishop he was known as a protector of orphans and the widowed and a fair judge. Who could argue with that? His popularity didn't hold up among members of the clergy, however. They saw him as overly strict, while he felt he was simply trying to correct abuses and impose appropriate disciplines. Bitter resentments arose, and Egwin made his way to Rome to present his case to Pope Constantine. The case against Egwin was examined and annulled. Upon his return to England, Egwin founded Evesham Abbey, which became one of the great Benedictine houses of medieval England. It was dedicated to Mary, who had reportedly made it known to Egwin just where a church should be built in her honor. Egwin died at the abbey on December 30, 717. Following his burial many miracles were attributed to him: The blind could see, the deaf could hear, the sick were healed. Reflection Correcting abuses and faults is never an easy job, not even for a bishop. Egwin attempted to correct and build up the clergy in his diocese and it earned him the wrath of his priests. When we are called to correct someone or some group, plan on opposition, but also know that it might be the right thing to do. Looking to deepen your prayer life? Subscribe to Pause+Pray! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
12.25.21 Christmas Vespers, Saturday Evening Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 18:50


Vespers I, Saturday Evening Prayer, December 25th, 2021 (for the Solemnity of the Nativity of our Lord, a.k.a. CHRISTMAS!) Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. To support this work, visit www.patreon.com/singthehours. Deus in Adjutorium – "O God come to my assistance" Hymn: "Silent Night" Psalm 110v1-5, 7 Psalm 130 Canticle: Colossians 1v12-20 Reading: 1 John 1v1-3 Responsory: The Word was made man, alleluia, alleluia. Magnificat: Luke 1v46-55 Intercessions: May your birth bring peace to all. The Lord's Prayer Concluding Prayers "Alma Redemptoris Mater," Bl. Hermann Contractus 11th century. "Kind one, the Ransomer's Mother," c.John Rose & SingtheHours 2021 The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.