Podcasts about Constantinople

Capital city of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire, the Latin and the Ottoman Empire

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Saint of the Day
The Protection of Our Most Holy Lady the Theotokos and Ever-Virgin Mary

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 1:31


On October 1, 911, during the reign of Emperor Leo the Wise, an all-night vigil was being held at the Blachernae Church of the Mother of God in Constantinople, with many of the faithful crowding the church. St Andrew the Fool for Christ (commemorated tomorrow, October 2) was standing at the back of the church with his disciple Epiphanius. At around four in the morning, the most holy Theotokos appeared above the people, clothed in resplendent garments, surrounded by indescribable radiance, and holding a veil in her outstretched hands, as though to protect all the people. St Andrew said to Epiphanius 'Do you see how the Queen and Lady of all is praying for the whole world?' Epiphanius replied 'Yes, Father, I see it and stand in dread.' This wonderful event is recorded in Epiphanius' life of St Andrew. Because of it, the Church keeps an annual feast on this date.   Note: This feast is particularly well-loved in the Slavic churches. In 1960, the Greek church transferred its observance to October 28, in memory of the Mother of God's protection of the Greek forces holding the Albanian front against Italy in 1940. St Romanos the Melodist of Constantinople (556)

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 30: Saint Jerome, Priest and Doctor

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 6:29


September 30: Saint Jerome, Priest and Doctorc. 345–420Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of archeologists, Biblical scholars, and librariansA prickly scholar translates the Bible into Latin forever and alwaysToday's saint was living in Antioch in the 370s when he had a vision. Jerome was standing in the presence of the seated Christ, who asked him who he was. “I am a Christian,” Jerome responded. “LIAR!” Jesus yelled. “You are a Ciceronian, not a Christian, for where your treasure is, there also is your heart.” Jerome indeed loved Cicero and other Latin stylists. The fine prose in their works gave him the greatest pleasure. But Jerome had also been reared in a Christian home, been baptized as an adult in Rome, and had frequently descended into the darkened catacombs to pray at the tombs of the martyrs and saints. His double identity as a scholar of Latin and Greek rhetoric on the one hand, and as a committed Christian on the other hand, dueled within him. Jerome fervently loved God and the Catholic religion with all his soul, but it was a troubled soul. Jerome was full of spit and vinegar. He was a complex man and a complex saint.Saint Jerome was born in an unknown year in a region northeast of Venice, Italy. His father sent him as a young man to Rome to perfect his education under a famous tutor. Jerome was a superb student and mastered Latin and Greek. At about the age of thirty, he decided to become a monk and traveled to the desert of Syria. For four years he lived a life of austerity, penance, and isolation. He fasted from the classics he loved so much and instead studied Hebrew from a Jewish convert. When he finally came out of the desert, he was ordained a priest in Antioch but never truly exercised any priestly ministry. He studied under the great Saint Gregory Nazianzen in Constantinople and began to publish some translations and biblical commentaries. Around 382 Jerome went to Rome with his bishop to serve as an interpreter and aide. Jerome so impressed Pope Saint Damasus that the Pope then invited the young Jerome to be his secretary. At this point, in his forties and while living in Rome, Jerome began the monumental task of translating the entire Bible into Latin from original Greek and Hebrew texts. It would take him years. The existing Old Latin Bible was not cohesive but a jumble of texts stitched together under one cover. Various scholars had generated divergent translations for purely local use. So the Gospel of John in a Jerusalem-based manuscript differed from the same Gospel in a manuscript in Gaul. The one Church, spread throughout the known world, needed one Bible to match its broad scope and theological unity. Jerome was the man for the job. After just a few years in Rome, after the death of his patron Pope Damasus, and due to the enemies his blunt words and fiery temper always seemed to create, Saint Jerome left Rome for the Holy Land. He lived in a cave near Bethlehem and focused on translating. Some holy and pious women from Rome followed him there and formed a quasi-monastic community around him.Jerome's translation, known as the Vulgate, became the standard Latin version of the Bible over time, pushing the Old Latin version into oblivion. The Council of Trent formally stated that the Vulgate was the official Bible of the Catholic Church. So Catholicism has a “The Bible,” a claim which no other church can make. No “The Bible” ever floated down from heaven on a golden pillow. Except for Jerome's, a “The Bible” doesn't exist. There are thousands of ancient scraps of Scripture from hundreds of ancient texts from scores of libraries and monasteries in dozens of countries, but a publisher and its consultants ultimately choose which texts to include in any published Bible and which to exclude. Catholicism has no such flimsy process. Its sacred word is not dependent on scholarly fashion and whim. It has a baseline. The Vulgate is like a dropped anchor resting on the ocean floor. It keeps the ship of the Church from drifting. Catholicism is a religion of the Word more than of the Book, but it has a definitive book, nonetheless. The fiery Saint Jerome died peacefully in 420, exhausted from his scholarly labors and life of penance. His remains can be found directly below the high altar of Saint Mary Major Basilica in Rome in a handsome porphyry sarcophagus.Saint Jerome, you lived a life dedicated to studying the Word of God, to penance, and to prayer. You placed your knowledge and scholarly gifts at the service of the Church which used them wisely. Help all the faithful to serve the Church as much as the Church serves them.

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송
2022.09.28 Round Trip to Istanbul with Dunia Aljawad

The Drop with Danno on GFN 광주영어방송

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 121:30


As broadcast September 28, 2022 with plenty of Turkish delight for your Wednesday night.  Last week saw our dear Dunia depart Gwangju to move to Istanbul, so what better time to rock one of our first shows together and feel the vibe of her current reality together?  This was a rawkus trip to Anatolya and a brilliant feature of why Turkey is so famous in music, with old and new, funk and funk, rock and pop from all over the country to showcase this week.  Not to worry though, Dunia will continue to do her thing on our show remote once she's set up in Istanbul properly.#feelthegravityTracklisting:Part I (00:00)The Weeknd feat Daft Punk – Starboy Elias Rahbani – Dance of MariaAltin Gun – Goca DunyaMazhar Ve Fuat – Adimiz Miskindir BizimNur Yoldas – Sultan-I YegahOzdemir Erdogan – Ac Kapiyi Gir IceriPart II (32:02)Magollar – Mektup Cem Karaca – Namus Belasi MogollarFikret Kizilok – Yeter KiZulfu Livaneli – Karli Kayin OrmaniEsin Afsar – Sandigimi AcamadimBaris Manco – Donence Part III (60:43)Güliz Ayla- Olmazsan Olmaz DIDOMIDO ft EGLO G – NIMETEdis - ArıyorumBoom Pam & Melike Sahin – Beni Yalniz Komaİbrahim Tatlıses - Tek TekAltin Gun – Yuce Dag BasindaPart IV (92:47)Pinhâni- Sevduğum Yanımda UyusunOzdemir Erdogan - GurbetNil Karaibrahimgil - ben aptal mıyımBaris Manco – Aman Yavas AhesteAlex Chu – Flower pot (화분)Lee So-ra – Wedding Proposal (청혼) 

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, September 26, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Twenty-sixth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 455All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Paul VIBorn near Brescia in northern Italy, Giovanni Battista Montini was the second of three sons. His father, Giorgio, was a lawyer, editor, and eventually a member of the Italian Chamber of Deputies. His mother, Giuditta, was very involved in Catholic Action. After ordination in 1920, Giovanni did graduate studies in literature, philosophy, and canon law in Rome before he joined the Vatican Secretariat of State in 1924, where he worked for 30 years. He was also chaplain to the Federation of Italian Catholic University Students, where he met and became a very good friend of Aldo Moro, who eventually became prime minister. Moro was kidnapped by the Red Brigade in March 1978, and murdered two months later. A devastated Pope Paul VI presided at his funeral. In 1954, Fr. Montini was named archbishop of Milan, where he sought to win disaffected workers back to the Catholic Church. He called himself the “archbishop of the workers” and visited factories regularly while overseeing the rebuilding of a local Church tremendously disrupted by World War II. In 1958, Montini was the first of 23 cardinals named by Pope John XXIII, two months after the latter's election as pope. Cardinal Montini helped in preparing Vatican II and participated enthusiastically in its first sessions. When he was elected pope in June 1963, he immediately decided to continue that Council, which had another three sessions before its conclusion on December 8, 1965. The day before Vatican II concluded, Paul VI and Patriarch Athenagoras revoked the excommunications that their predecessors had made in 1054. The pope worked very hard to ensure that bishops would approve the Council's 16 documents by overwhelming majorities. Paul VI had stunned the world by visiting the Holy Land in January 1964, and meeting Athenagoras, the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople in person. The pope made eight more international trips, including one in 1965, to visit New York City and speak on behalf of peace before the United Nations General Assembly. He also visited India, Columbia, Uganda, and seven Asian countries during a 10-day tour in 1970. Also in 1965, he instituted the World Synod of Bishops, and the next year decreed that bishops must offer their resignations on reaching age 75. In 1970, he decided that cardinals over 80 would no longer vote in papal conclaves or head the Holy See's major offices. He had increased the number of cardinals significantly, giving many countries their first cardinal. Eventually establishing diplomatic relations between the Holy See and 40 countries, he also instituted a permanent observer mission at the United Nations in 1964. Paul VI wrote seven encyclicals; his last one in 1968 on human life—Humanae Vitae—prohibited artificial birth control. Pope Paul VI died at Castel Gandolfo on August 6, 1978, and was buried in St. Peter's Basilica. He was beatified on October 19, 2014, and canonized on October 14, 2018. Reflection Pope Saint Paul's greatest accomplishment was the completion and implementation of Vatican II. Its decisions about liturgy were the first ones noticed by most Catholics, but its other documents—especially the ones about ecumenism, interfaith relations, divine revelation, religious liberty, the Church's self-understanding and the Church's work with the entire human family—have become the Catholic Church's road map since 1965. Click here for more on Pope Paul VI! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 26: Saints Cosmas and Damian, Martyrs

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 5:57


September 26: Saints Cosmas and Damian, Martyrsc. Late third–early fourth centuryOptional Memorial; Liturgical Color: RedPatron Saints of doctors, barbers, and pharmacistsHoly twins are honored for their healing, their poverty, and their deathsThe ancient walls of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem enclose the sacred ground where the life of Jesus Christ culminated in His death, burial, and resurrection. Both the modest hill of Calvary and the rock-cut tomb in which His corpse was laid are found under the roof of this venerable church. Calvary and the tomb have long been protected from relic hunters by slabs of marble and stone cladding that conceal the rough, first-century substrata resting just below. There is a custom, still common today, of allowing the faithful to sleep overnight inside the Church of the Holy Sepulcher. From the time the heavy wooden doors close at dusk until they creek open again at sunrise, the pilgrim must remain in the church. This pious custom of resting and watching in the dark, all night long, near a holy site in order to soak up its latent power is called “incubation.” The custom originated in an ancient church in Constantinople housing the remains of today's saints, Cosmas and Damian, where the faithful incubated themselves in the hope of a miraculous cure.Similar to Saint George, legends about Saints Cosmas and Damian far outrun any verifiable historical details about their lives. The devotion to today's saints across epochs and cultures is as broad as an ocean but as shallow as a lake. Upon a slender bed of long-lost documents rests the narrative that Cosmas and Damian were twins and natives of Saudi Arabia who studied medicine in Syria. They became known as the “moneyless ones” for not accepting payment for their healing services. They were likely martyred north of Antioch in the early fourth century. The earliest historical anchor planting these holy brothers in the ground of history dates to around 400 A.D., when a pagan visitor recorded a visit to a shrine dedicated to Cosmas and Damian in Asia Minor. In the fifth century, a church was built to their memory in Constantinople and, in the sixth century, a pagan temple in the Roman Forum was rededicated as a Basilica in their honor. The bright apse mosaic of Rome's Basilica of Saints Cosmas and Damian still shines and shows Saints Peter and Paul presenting the twins to the glorified Christ.Most of the wealth of miracles that have long been attributed to Saints Cosmas and Damian involve healing, in keeping with their medical profession. The fame of these miracles, together with their martyrdom, was so widespread in the early Church that they joined that elite class of martyrs, saints, virgins, and popes whose names were inserted into the Roman Canon, or Eucharistic Prayer I, where they are still read at Mass today. Their names also ring out in ancient litanies still sung at solemn Masses. Yet close familiarity with their names may dull our curiosity about their gory end.No details have been preserved, but it can be supposed that Cosmas and Damian died like so many other martyrs: by crucifixion, beheading, or drowning at sea; by the goring of beasts, or by their flesh being burned off in a roar of flames. The chilling sentence of death read by a Roman official sent a cold shiver up the spine. It was irrevocable. The martyr's fate was often to be publicly shamed, tortured, and physically destroyed in a brutal fashion in keeping with a brutal world. No miracle saved Cosmas and Damian from their violent end. As physicians, they knew well the frailty of the human body. They understood their own bodies to be cracked vessels flooded temporarily with the Holy Spirit of God. And when the time came for that earthen vessel to return to the clay from whence it came, they bravely gave up what was never theirs. They offered a witness so shocking that it was seared into the memories of those who saw it, a witness so other-worldly that a few emulated it, and untold masses of others honored it through prayer and devotion, as we still do today.Saints Cosmas and Damian, through your heroic witness of martyrdom, we ask your intercession to embolden the weak, to strengthen the hesitant, to give words to the meek, and to unleash the hidden power of the Gospel in all those who could do more.

Half-Arsed History
Episode 222: The Fall of Constantinople

Half-Arsed History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 40:07


In this episode of Half-Arsed History, discover the moment in history generally considered to be the end of the mediaeval period: the Fall of Constaninople, when a 21-year-old Ottoman Sultan captured the ancient city of Constantinople.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Sergius of Radonezh (1392)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 2:20


'Our righteous Father Sergius was born in Rostov, north of Moscow, about the year 1314. Named Bartholomew in baptism, he was brought up in Radonezh, and at the death of his parents he withdrew to the wilderness to become a monk. It is notable that without having been trained in a monastery, he was of such a spiritual stature as to be able to take up the perilous eremitical life from the beginning, without falling into delusion or despondency. When he had endured with courage the deprivations of the solitary life, other monks began to come to him, for whom he was made abbot against his will. On the counsel of Philotheus, Patriarch of Constantinople, he organized his monks according to the cenobitic life, appointing duties to each. While Anthony and Theodosius of Kiev, and the other righteous Fathers before Sergius, had established their monasteries near to cities, Sergius was the leader and light of those who went far into the wilderness, and after his example the untrodden forests of northern Russia were settled by monks. When Grand Duke Demetrius Donskoy was about to go to battle against the invading Tartars, he first sought the blessing of Saint Sergius, through whose prayers he was triumphant. Saint Sergius was adorned with the highest virtues of Christ-like humility and burning love for God and neighbor, and received the gift of working wonders, of casting out demons, and of discretion for leading souls to salvation. When he served the Divine Liturgy, an Angel served him visibly; he was also vouchsafed the visitation of the most holy Theotokos with the Apostles Peter and John. He was gathered to his Fathers on September 25, 1392. At the recovery of his holy relics on July 5th, 1422, his body and garments were found fragrant and incorrupt. His life was written by the monk Epiphanius, who knew him.' (Great Horologion)

The Fall Of The Roman Empire
DISCOUNTED BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT - The Roman Revolution

The Fall Of The Roman Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 1:16


This is just to let you know that you can get my ebook called The Roman Revolution, which accompanies the first part of my podcast, at a discounted price at Amazon for the next few days (until 29th September). It focuses on the transition from the classical Roman Empire to Constantine's Christian-centred empire run out of Constantinople. It's priced at 99 cents or pence in the US, UK, Canada and Australia. Links to it on Amazon by country are below. Link to US Link to UKLink to CanadaLink to Australia

Nick Holmes
DISCOUNTED BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT - The Roman Revolution

Nick Holmes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 1:00


This is just to let you know that you can get my ebook called The Roman Revolution, which accompanies the first part of my new podcast on the Fall of the Roman Empire, at a discounted price at Amazon for the next few days (until 29th September). It focuses on the transition from the classical Roman Empire to Constantine's Christian-centred empire run out of Constantinople. It's priced at 99 cents or pence in the US, UK, Canada and Australia. Links to it on Amazon by country are below.Link to US Link to UKLink to CanadaLink to Australia

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
PREVIEW: Epochs #72 | Harold Hardrada

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 35:28


This week Beau and Carl chat all about the life and times of Harald Hardrada. His adventures spanned decades and most of the western world. From Byzantium and Antioch, to Italy and Sicily. From palace coups in Constantinople, to forging a kingdom for himself in Norway. He was one of the greatest warriors of his age, right up until the moment of his death. https://www.lotuseaters.com/premium-epochs-72-or-harold-hardrada-18-09-22

Christian History Almanac
Friday, September 16, 2022

Christian History Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 6:31


Today on the Almanac, we remember the important 3rd Council at Constantinople in 638. @1517 #christianhistory #byzantine — SHOW NOTES are available: https://www.1517.org/podcasts/the-christian-history-almanac GIVE BACK: Support the work of 1517 today CONTACT: CHA@1517.org SUBSCRIBE: Apple Podcasts Spotify Stitcher Overcast Google Play FOLLOW US: Facebook Twitter Audio production by Christopher Gillespie (gillespie.media).

History of Modern Greece
060: Byzantine Golden Age: Basil II: Part Two

History of Modern Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 38:14


Basil the 2nd was triumphant in his first years as emperor. His major mistake was marching recklessly into battle, and nearly losing his own head, and many of his men. Unfortunately, his actions triggered his closest ally to lose his patience, and rebel against the emperor.The History of Modern Greece Podcast covers the events of the Greek People from the fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the Greek War of Independence in 1821-1832, through to the Greco-Turkish War from 1919 to 1922 to the present day.Website: www.moderngreecepodcast.comMusic by Mark Jungerman: www.marcjungermann.com

Astrophiz Podcasts
Astrophiz156-Amirnezam Amiri

Astrophiz Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 40:38


Astrophiz 156 - Amirnezam Amiri - Metallicity and Galaxy Evolution Amirnezam Amiri is a PhD student at the department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Florence and a PhD researcher at Italy's famous National Institute for Astrophysics and Astronomy (INAF) in Arcetri, Florence, Italy, and the focus of his research is on metallicity measurement in both star-forming and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) galaxies. Amirnezam was awarded the Summer Internship Prize in Tenerife, at the Canary Islands Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Also, Amirnezam is doing fabulous science outreach. He has translated more than 8 books into the Persian language and he has written over 75 public articles in different popular journals and newspapers. In this wonderful interview, Amirnizam tells us the breakthroughs by ancient Iranian and Persian astronomers and scientists and about the famous Persian Maragheh Observatory which was first established in 1259 and which became the model for later observatories in the 15th, 16th and 18th centuries at Samarkand, Constantinople and Jaipur. Then Amirnezam walks us through metallicity, emission lines, the nature of ionised gases and their influence on galaxy evolution and the instruments he uses to further his PhD research. Join us in following Amirnezam's fabulous astrophysics journey.

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina
2.6 Third Constantinople: Where There's a Will, There's Two

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 17:42


Leave it to intellectuals (in any age) to “solve” the world's problems in ways that create bigger problems. Monothelitism was a religious idea concocted by policy wonks in boardrooms. It was supposed to remedy the doctrinal differences that divided Constantinople from Egypt. It failed to do that, and it also provoked a schism between Constantinople and all of western Christendom. The Third Council of Constantinople was called in 680 to clean up the mess. LINKS Christoph Cardinal Schonborn, God Sent His Son: A Contemporary Christology https://www.amazon.com/God-Sent-Christoph-Cardinal-Schonborn/dp/158617410X/ Maximus the Confessor, On the Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ (an anthology of his works) https://www.amazon.com/Cosmic-Mystery-Jesus-Christ/dp/088141249X/ Maximus the Confessor: Selected Writings https://www.amazon.com/Maximus-Confessor-Selected-Writings-Spirituality/dp/0809126591/ Mike Aquilina's website https://fathersofthechurch.com Mike Aquilina's books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/ Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

Saint of the Day
The Universal Exaltation of the Precious and Life-giving Cross

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 2:14


"Saint Helen, the mother of Saint Constantine the Great, when she was already advanced in years, undertook, in her great piety, the hardships of a journey to Jerusalem in search of the Cross, about the year 325. A temple to Aphrodite had been raised up by the Emperor Hadrian upon Golgotha, to defile and cover with oblivion the place where the saving Passion had been suffered. The venerable Helen had the statue of Aphrodite destroyed, and the earth removed, revealing the Tomb of our Lord, and three crosses. Of these, it was believed that one must be that of our Lord, the other two of the thieves crucified with Him; but Saint Helen was at a loss which one might be the Wood of our salvation. At the inspiration of Saint Macarius, Archbishop of Jerusalem, a lady of Jerusalem, who was already at the point of death from a certain disease, was brought to touch the crosses, and as soon as she came near to the Cross of our Lord, she was made perfectly whole. Consequently, the precious Cross was lifed on high by Archbishop Macarius of Jerusalem; as he stood on the ambo, and when the people beheld it, they cried out, "Lord, have mercy." It should be noted that after its discovery, a portion of the venerable Cross was taken to Constantinople as a blessing. The rest was left in Jerusalem in the magnificent church built by Saint Helen, until the year 614. At that time, the Persians plundered Palestine and took the Cross to their own country (See Jan. 22, Saint Anastasius the Persian). Later, in the year 628, Emperor Heraclius set out on a military campaign, retrieved the Cross, and after bringing it to Constantinople, himself escorted it back to Jerusalem, where he restored it to its place." (Great Horologion) A fast is kept today, whatever the day of the week.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, September 13, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint John Chrysostom, Bishop and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 444All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint John ChrysostomThe ambiguity and intrigue surrounding John, the great preacher (his name means “golden-mouthed”) from Antioch, are characteristic of the life of any great man in a capital city. Brought to Constantinople after a dozen years of priestly service in Syria, John found himself the reluctant victim of an imperial ruse to make him bishop in the greatest city of the empire. Ascetic, unimposing but dignified, and troubled by stomach ailments from his desert days as a monk, John became a bishop under the cloud of imperial politics. If his body was weak, his tongue was powerful. The content of his sermons, his exegesis of Scripture, were never without a point. Sometimes the point stung the high and mighty. Some sermons lasted up to two hours. His lifestyle at the imperial court was not appreciated by many courtiers. He offered a modest table to episcopal sycophants hanging around for imperial and ecclesiastical favors. John deplored the court protocol that accorded him precedence before the highest state officials. He would not be a kept man. His zeal led him to decisive action. Bishops who bribed their way into office were deposed. Many of his sermons called for concrete steps to share wealth with the poor. The rich did not appreciate hearing from John that private property existed because of Adam's fall from grace any more than married men liked to hear that they were bound to marital fidelity just as much as their wives were. When it came to justice and charity, John acknowledged no double standards. Aloof, energetic, outspoken, especially when he became excited in the pulpit, John was a sure target for criticism and personal trouble. He was accused of gorging himself secretly on rich wines and fine foods. His faithfulness as spiritual director to the rich widow, Olympia, provoked much gossip attempting to prove him a hypocrite where wealth and chastity were concerned. His actions taken against unworthy bishops in Asia Minor were viewed by other ecclesiastics as a greedy, uncanonical extension of his authority. Theophilus, archbishop of Alexandria, and Empress Eudoxia were determined to discredit John. Theophilus feared the growth in importance of the Bishop of Constantinople and took occasion to charge John with fostering heresy. Theophilus and other angered bishops were supported by Eudoxia. The empress resented his sermons contrasting gospel values with the excesses of imperial court life. Whether intended or not, sermons mentioning the lurid Jezebel and impious Herodias were associated with the empress, who finally did manage to have John exiled. He died in exile in 407. Reflection John Chrysostom's preaching, by word and example, exemplifies the role of the prophet to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable. For his honesty and courage, he paid the price of a turbulent ministry as bishop, personal vilification, and exile. Saint John Chrysostom is the Patron Saint of: Orators Preachers Speakers Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Le Saint du Jour – Radio Notre Dame

Evêque de Constantinople, Docteur de l’Eglise.

Christ Anglican
Evensong for 9/13/2022; commemoration of St. John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople & Teacher of the Faith, 407

Christ Anglican

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 27:15


Psalm 38; Habakkuk 1; Matthew 11 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/christanglican-hotsprings/support

Catholic News
September 13, 2022

Catholic News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 2:37


A daily news briefing from Catholic News Agency, powered by artificial intelligence. Ask your smart speaker to play “Catholic News,” or listen every morning wherever you get podcasts. www.catholicnewsagency.com - Pope Francis has arrived in Kazakhstan for a brief visit to attend an interreligious meeting. The pope was welcomed by a delegation of civil and religious leaders, including President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev. On Wednesday, the opening and plenary session of the VII Congress of Leaders of World and Traditional Religions will take place at the Palace of Independence. At the conference, Pope Francis will have the opportunity to meet with several Muslim leaders attending the congress, including representatives from Saudi Arabia, Iran, Egypt, Turkey, and across Central Asia. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252271/why-is-pope-francis-going-to-kazakhstan-here-s-what-he-plans-to-do The prelate of Opus Dei, Monsignor Fernando Ocáriz, has asked the members of the Catholic institution for their prayers for the reform process ordered by Pope Francis, which took effect August 4. On July 22, the Vatican published the apostolic letter in the form of a motu proprio titled “Ad charisma tuendum” (To safeguard the charism), whereby Pope Francis ordered a reform of Opus Dei. Among the pope's provisions are that the prelate who directs Opus Dei from now on will no longer be a bishop; the institution must adapt its statutes and present an annual report; and it will no longer answer to the dicastery for bishops but to the dicastery for the clergy. Opus Dei is a personal prelature, the only one in the Catholic Church. It was founded in Spain by Saint Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer in 1928 and is present in 68 countries. The overall head of the prelature is the prelate, who is appointed by the pope and who governs the institution as a jurisdiction, similar to a bishop who governs his diocese or assigned territory. In Opus Dei there are priests, celibate lay persons who are called numeraries and associates, and supernumeraries who are married members. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/252270/opus-dei-s-prelate-asks-for-prayers-for-reform-ordered-by-pope-francis Today, the Church celebrates Saint John Chrysostom, considered the greatest preacher in the history of the Church, and the most prominent Greek father of the Church. In 398 he was forcefully appointed Patriarch of Constantinople, and fast became very popular with his flock through his example of preaching and courage in front of the imperial power, whose corruption and decadence he never shirked from criticizing in public. Chrysostom's many writings, especially homilies and commentaries on the Gospels, still exist and have exerted great influence over the centuries. https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/saint/st-john-chrysostom-362

Daybreak
Daybreak for September 13, 2022

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 51:22


Tuesday of the 24th Week in Ordinary Time Memorial of St. John Chrysostom, 344-407; born in Antioch; lived as an anchorite but poor health forced him to return to Antioch; he was ordained and eventually elevated to the see of Constantinople; his enemies had him exiled, and later to further exile in Pythius; he died on his way to Pythius Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for 9/13/22 Gospel: Luke 7:11-17

The Daily Office Podcast
Tuesday // September 13, 2022

The Daily Office Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 25:07


Morning Prayer for Tuesday, September 13, 2022 (Proper 19; John Chrysostom, Bishop of Constantinople and Teacher of the Faith, 407). Psalm and Scripture readings (2-year lectionary; 60-day Psalter): Psalms 32, 36 Habakkuk 1 Matthew 11 Click here to access the text for Morning Prayer at DailyOffice2019.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dailyofficepodcast/support

What the Riff?!?
1990 - January: They Might Be Giants “Flood”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 35:05


They Might Be Giants is an alternative rock band that formed in 1982 by John Flansburgh and John Linnell.  They are known as an absurdist, surreal alternative band popular on modern rock charts and college radio.  They are also known in the DIY music genre and in children's music.  Flood is their third studio album and has been certified platinum.  It is their best selling album, and considered their signature work. During the 80's Flansburgh and Linnell started recording their songs onto an answering machine and advertised the phone number in The Village Voice and other newspapers as “Dial-A-Song.”  The answering machine would play one track at a time, sometimes uncompleted work, sometimes mock advertisements.  It became quite popular, but it was an answering machine, so the quality wasn't great.  One of their slogans was “Always Busy, Often Broken.” It was a local Brooklyn number, so long distance fees applied.  The band advertised it with the line, “Free when you call from work.”TMBG have released 23 studio albums, 10 compilations, 10 live albums, 8 EP's 7 videos and 11 singles.  They have also released five children's albums – Tiny Toon Adventures exposed them to a younger audience, and they leveraged it to expand their career. They made heavy use of the internet since the early 90's, creating one of the first artist-owned music stores in 2004, and have made podcasts on a monthly basis from 2005 to 2014.Bruce brings us this unusual album. Istanbul (Not Constantinople) This is a cover originally written in 1953 on the 500th anniversary of the fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans.  Lyrics are by Jimmy Kennedy, music by Nat Simon, and performed by the Four Lads.  The TMBG version was featured in the first season of MTV's Liquid Television and in an episode of "Tiny Toon Adventures."Your Racist FriendIn discussing this song, John Flansburgh told Songfacts, “You can't confront every person who's making an ass of themselves.  But there are times when you want to.  So it's really about a subtler idea than over-the-top expressions of race hate.  It's more just about the culture.”Somebody Keeps Moving My ChairI think we can all identify with the premise of this song, that there's a lot of unpleasantness that we have to deal with, and we can do that for the most part.  But when somebody keeps moving your chair that is beyond the pale. Theme from FloodThis brief piece starts off the album and leads into “Birdhouse In Your Soul.”  It seemed like a good addition to include, since most of the songs are short.Birdhouse In Your Soul This is the lead single from the album, and is their highest charting single in both the US and the UK, hitting number 3 on the US Modern Rock Tracks chart and number 6 on the UK singles chart.  The lyrics are narrated from the perspective of a blue nightlight shaped like a canary.  We found it fascinating that there are 18 key changes in this song! ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:"The Simpsons Theme" by Danny Elfman (from the television series "The Simpsons”)Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie made their TV series debut in this month in 1990, though they had shorts on The Tracey Ullman Show prior to that. STAFF PICKS:I Remember You by Skid RowBrian starts off this week's staff picks with an acoustic/power pop hair ballad from the band fronted by Sebastian Bach.  Bassist Rachel Boland and guitarist Dave “The Snake” Sabo penned this song which was their third single from their debut album.  It is about the girl from days gone by that you just can't forget. Fly High Michelle by Enuff Z'nuffRob's staff pick was inspired by a tragedy caused by a drug overdose.  Donnie Vie wrote this song in remembrance of a friend who had passed, and it was the biggest hit of the group's career.  The band takes their name from their bassist, Chip Z'nuff.Pure by The Lightning Seeds Wayne features this track from Liverpool's The Lightning Seeds.  The group is the product of producer Ian Broudie, and is really more of a solo project with musicians brought in to create a touring band.  The name comes from a misheard lyric from Prince's “Raspberry Beret.”Girl Like You by The SmithereensBruce's staff pick is the first single from the Smithereens third album,  appropriately (?) named 11.  Madonna was supposed to sing the harmony vocals but didn't show up for the recording session.  The band got Maria Vidal to do the vocals. It hit number 38 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 2 on the US Mainstream Rock charts. NOVELTY TRACK:Swing the Mood by Jive Bunny and the MastermixersThis mashup of swing and early rock songs was on the charts in January 1990.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, September 12, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 443All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Most Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Maryof the Most Holy Name of the Blessed Virgin Mary This feast is a counterpart to the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus; both have the possibility of uniting people easily divided on other matters. The feast of the Most Holy Name of Mary began in Spain in 1513 and in 1671 was extended to all of Spain and the Kingdom of Naples. In 1683, John Sobieski, king of Poland, brought an army to the outskirts of Vienna to stop the advance of Muslim armies loyal to Mohammed IV of Constantinople. After Sobieski entrusted himself to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he and his soldiers thoroughly defeated the Muslims. Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the entire Church. Reflection Mary always points us to God, reminding us of God's infinite goodness. She helps us to open our hearts to God's ways, wherever those may lead us. Honored under the title “Queen of Peace,” Mary encourages us to cooperate with Jesus in building a peace based on justice, a peace that respects the fundamental human rights of all peoples. Enjoy this prayer to Mother Mary! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Diocese of Saginaw Podcast
The Holy Name of Mary- Bishop Gruss Homily

Catholic Diocese of Saginaw Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 6:58


Bishop Gruss gave a great homily about the Holy Name of Mary this morning including the story of how "In 1683, John Sobieski, king of Poland, brought an army to the outskirts of Vienna to stop the advance of Muslim armies loyal to Mohammed IV of Constantinople.After Sobieski entrusted himself to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he and his soldiers thoroughly defeated the Muslims. Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the entire Church."- text from this Franciscan Media article https://bit.ly/3U6LfvtToday is the feast of the Most Holy Name Mary.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 13: Saint John Chrysostom, Bishop and Doctor

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 5:17


September 13: Saint John Chrysostom, Bishop and Doctorc. 347–407Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of preachers and speakersA great preacher, writer, and intellectual suffers for the faithIn the tug and pull of the theological disputes of the fourth and fifth centuries, today's saint was a seminal figure. Along with other luminaries such as Saints Ambrose, Athanasius, Hilary, Basil and many others, he tunneled deep into Scripture and the existing Christian tradition to carve out what is today known as the deposit of faith. Saint John Chrysostom was from Antioch, that “Metropolis of heresy” in Saint John Henry Newman's words, where Arianism was bred, incubated, thrived, and died in the period between the Council of Nicea in 325 and the Council of Constantinople in 381.John received an excellent education in the liberal arts and was baptized at the age of eighteen, in keeping with the custom of adult baptism common to his era. He joined a rustic group of hermits in the hills outside of his hometown in his mid-twenties. The conditions were so physically and psychologically brutal, though, that he left after seven years. Living always isolated and mortified would not be his path. He was ordained a priest in 386. His bishop recognized his gifts and put him in charge of the physical and pastoral care of the poor of Antioch, a ministry in which he honed his natural gifts as a preacher. He was so skillful in preaching that he was given, a century after his death, the title of chrysostom or “golden mouth.” John's theological acumen was no less impressive. His sermons and letters display a refined understanding of the intricacies of the Holy Trinity and of the Gospels. His beautiful theological and spiritual reflections are referenced numerous times in the modern Catechism of the Catholic Church.In 398 Saint John was consecrated the Archbishop of Constantinople, the New Rome, provoking jealousy among some contemporaries. John did himself no favors by his overaggressive reforms as Archbishop. He bluntly criticized women for wearing make-up, Christians for attending races and games on holy days, the imperial court for its extravagances, and the clergy for their laxity and wealth-seeking. Recriminations soon followed. He was falsely charged with treason and other crimes and was exiled in 402. He was reinstated after an earthquake in Constantinople was interpreted as divine punishment for his banishment. But John was exiled a second time shortly thereafter. Like other saints, his time of exile proved fruitful. He wrote numerous letters, specifically to bishops in the Western Empire, including the pope. But also like other exiled popes and bishops, assertions of support were only as sturdy as the paper on which they were written. Practical help never materialized. John died in exile in 407, a victim of cold, rain, a forced march and lack of food. Within a decade after his death, his reputation was restored by the pope, and his remains were transferred for burial in Constantinople. He was recognized as a Father of the Church at the Council of Chalcedon in 451 and declared a Doctor of the Church in 1568.Saint John suffered for his zeal. He was exiled by civil power in an age when correct theology was understood as a form of patriotism, and heresy as treason. He crossed the civil powers of his age, did not back down, and paid a severe price for his fidelity. When Crusaders sacked Constantinople in 1204, they stole John's relics and carried them back to Rome. In 2004 Pope Saint John Paul II authorized the return of some of John's remains to the seat of the Orthodox Patriarch in Saint George Church in present-day Istanbul, John's own episcopal city.Saint John Chrysostom, the heat of your words burned so hot that you were persecuted for your ardor. Inspire all Christian preachers to light a fire of faith in their congregations, without fear for their own reputations or of recrimination.

AcreSoft Story Classic:
Scutari - Florence Nightingale - Kids History Story Bedtime Stories for Children and Adults to Sleep

AcreSoft Story Classic:

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 4:01


Although actually a suburb of Constantinople, Scutari is a town in itself, and a large and ancient one. In the earliest times of the great Persian monarchy, it was called Chrysopolis, the Golden City. Its present name means in Persian a courier who carries royal orders from station to station; that is because the place has always, from its earliest days, been a rendezvous for caravans, messengers, travelers of every description. Here Xenophon and his Greeks, returning from the war against Cyrus, halted for seven days while the soldiers disposed... #story #kidsstory AcreSoft Story Classic ✝️❣️

History of the Papacy Podcast
119j: Freemasonry: Secret and Not So Secret Societies

History of the Papacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 32:11


Today we are joined again by author and historian John Dickie to talk about the Freemasons and how the secret societies changed the politics of Europe. We will get into how secret societies such as the Freemasons and others undermined and in a way reinforced the power of the Church and the Papacy in the 19th century.Today's Guest:John Dickie, author of “The Craft: How Freemasons Made the Modern World”https://johndickie.net/You can learn more about the History of Papacy and subscribe at all these great places:http://atozhistorypage.com/https://www.historyofthepapacypodcast.comemail: steve@atozhistorypage.comhttps://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacyparthenonpodcast.comhttps://www.gettr.com/user/atozhistoryBeyond the Big Screen:Beyondthebigscreen.comThe History of the Papacy on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6DO2leym3kizBHW0ZWl-nAGet Your History of the Papacy Podcast Products Here: https://www.atozhistorypage.com/productsHelp out the show by ordering these books from Amazon!https://smile.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1MUPNYEU65NTFMusic Provided by:"Sonatina in C Minor" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Funeral March for Brass" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"String Impromptu Number 1" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Intended Force" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Agnus Dei X - Bitter Suite Kevin MacLeaod (incomptech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Begin Transcript:Thank you for listening to the History of the Papacy. I am your host Steve. You can find show notes, how to contact me, sign up for our mailing list and how to support the History of the Papacy by going to the website: atozhistorypage.com.Speaking of supporting the show, Patreon is a great way to do that. We're at patreon.com/historyofthepapacy•4 Tiers – Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople and Rome•Inclusion on the History of the Papacy Diptychs, bonus audio and video content, Pope coin, monthly book drawings, early content, and add free, early content. Sign up early so that you have your name at the top of the lists! •History of the Papacy/Diptychs Fun Fact – Catholics are forbidden under threat of excommunication of becoming Freemasons. This ban started in 1738 and has been reiterated as late as 1983.•Now, let us commemorate the Patreon Patrons on the History of the Papacy Diptychs. We have oRoberto, Goran, William B, Brian, Jeffrey, Christina, John, Sarah, William H, Augustus and Keanu at the Alexandria level oDapo, Paul, Justin, Lana, John and Steve, all of who are the Magnificent at the Constantinople Level. oReaching the ultimate power and prestige, that of the See of Rome: we have Peter the Great, Leonard the Great, Alex the Great and Ama the Great!•Today we are joined again by author and historian John Dickie to talk about the Freemasons and how the secret societies changed the politics of Europe. We will get into how secret societies such as the Freemasons and others undermined and in a way reinforced the power of the Church and the Papacy in the 19th century.•With that, here is the next piece of the mosaic of the history of the Popes of Rome and Christian Church.

Saint of the Day
New Martyr Athanasius of Thessalonika (1774)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 1:17


He was born to a distinguished and pious Christian family in Thessalonika. After acquiring an unusually good education he spent a few years in Constantinople, then returned to his native city. He spoke both Turkish and Arabic well, and often conversed with Muslims. Once, while speaking with an emir, Athanasius pronounced the Muslim confession of faith to illustrate a point. The emir, seeing an opportunity, immediately reported Athanasius to the Islamic judge, claiming that he had converted to Islam. The judge found no merit in the case and would have dismissed Athanasius; but the emir and other officials were insistent, and the judge pressured Athanasius to convert. When Athanasius answered that he knew no truth but that of Christ, he was thrown in prison. When he appeared before the judge several days later, he was still firm in his confession, and was sentenced to death. He was hanged outside the city in 1774, at the age of twenty-five.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, September 3, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 436All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Gregory the GreatGregory was the prefect of Rome before he was 30. After five years in office he resigned, founded six monasteries on his Sicilian estate, and became a Benedictine monk in his own home at Rome. Ordained a priest, Gregory became one of the pope's seven deacons, and also served six years in the East as papal representative in Constantinople. He was recalled to become abbot, but at the age of 50 was elected pope by the clergy and people of Rome. Gregory was direct and firm. He removed unworthy priests from office, forbade taking money for many services, emptied the papal treasury to ransom prisoners of the Lombards and to care for persecuted Jews and the victims of plague and famine. He was very concerned about the conversion of England, sending 40 monks from his own monastery. He is known for his reform of the liturgy, and for strengthening respect for doctrine. Whether he was largely responsible for the revision of “Gregorian” chant is disputed. Gregory lived in a time of perpetual strife with invading Lombards and difficult relations with the East. When Rome itself was under attack, he interviewed the Lombard king. His book, Pastoral Care, on the duties and qualities of a bishop, was read for centuries after his death. He described bishops mainly as physicians whose main duties were preaching and the enforcement of discipline. In his own down-to-earth preaching, Gregory was skilled at applying the daily Gospel to the needs of his listeners. Called “the Great,” Gregory has been given a place with Augustine, Ambrose, and Jerome, as one of the four key doctors of the Western Church. An Anglican historian has written: “It is impossible to conceive what would have been the confusion, the lawlessness, the chaotic state of the Middle Ages without the medieval papacy; and of the medieval papacy, the real father is Gregory the Great.” Reflection Gregory was content to be a monk, but he willingly served the Church in other ways when asked. He sacrificed his own preferences in many ways, especially when he was called to be Bishop of Rome. Once he was called to public service, Gregory gave his considerable energies completely to this work. Gregory's description of bishops as physicians fits in well with Pope Francis' description of the Church as a "field hospital." Saint Gregory the Great is the Patron Saint of: England Epilepsy Musicians Teachers Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

History of the Papacy Podcast
119i: Freemasonry, The Catholic Church and the Modern World

History of the Papacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 28:48


Today we begin a two part conversation on the history of Freemasonry during the 19th century. We are joined by author and historian John Dickie to find out who the Freemasons are and why the church and particularly the Catholic Church of the 19th century had so much conflict with Freemasonry.Today's Guest:John Dickie, author of “The Craft: How Freemasons Made the Modern World”https://johndickie.net/You can learn more about the History of Papacy and subscribe at all these great places:http://atozhistorypage.com/https://www.historyofthepapacypodcast.comemail: steve@atozhistorypage.comhttps://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacyparthenonpodcast.comhttps://www.gettr.com/user/atozhistoryBeyond the Big Screen:Beyondthebigscreen.comThe History of the Papacy on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6DO2leym3kizBHW0ZWl-nAGet Your History of the Papacy Podcast Products Here: https://www.atozhistorypage.com/productsHelp out the show by ordering these books from Amazon!https://smile.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1MUPNYEU65NTFMusic Provided by:"Sonatina in C Minor" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Funeral March for Brass" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"String Impromptu Number 1" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Intended Force" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Agnus Dei X - Bitter Suite Kevin MacLeaod (incomptech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Image Credits:Begin Transcript:Thank you for listening to the History of the Papacy. I am your host Steve. You can find show notes, how to contact me, sign up for our mailing list and how to support the History of the Papacy by going to the website: atozhistorypage.com.Speaking of supporting the show, Patreon is a great way to do that. We're at patreon.com/historyofthepapacy•4 Tiers – Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople and Rome•Inclusion on the History of the Papacy Diptychs, bonus audio and video content, Pope coin, monthly book drawings, early content, and add free, early content. Sign up early so that you have your name at the top of the lists! •History of the Papacy/Diptychs Fun Fact – Much like in Christianity where the church is both the physical building and the group of people, the same is for Freemasonry. The lodge refers to both the building and the membership.•Now, let us commemorate the Patreon Patrons on the History of the Papacy Diptychs. We have oRoberto, Goran, William B, Brian, Jeffrey, Christina, John, Sarah, William H and Augustus and Keanu at the Alexandria level oDapo, Paul, Justin, Lana, John and Steve, all of who are the Magnificent at the Constantinople Level. oReaching the ultimate power and prestige, that of the See of Rome: we have Peter the Great, Leonard the Great, Alex and Ama the Great!•Today we begin a two part conversation on the history of Freemasonry during the 19th century. We are joined by author and historian John Dickie to find out who the Freemasons are and why the church and particularly the Catholic Church of the 19th century had so much conflict with Freemasonry.•With that, here is the next piece of the mosaic of the history of the Popes of Rome and Christian Church.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
September 3: Saint Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctor

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 5:44


September 3: Saint Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctorc. 540–604Memorial; Liturgical Color: WhitePatron Saint of musicians, singers, students, and teachersA gifted nobleman serves Rome, becomes a monk, and then a consequential popeWhen your salad is awesome, your car amazing, and your internet connection is great, there's a problem. Overused superlatives diminish their own meaning and crowd the linguistic space reserved for things which are truly awesome, amazing, and great. Today's saint sent the large missionary party that trekked across Europe and converted Saxon England to Catholicism, establishing a culture that endured for almost a millennium. That's awesome! He wrote a theological work that was used for centuries by thousands of bishops to help them become more fatherly pastors. That's amazing! Gregorian chant is named after him; he is one of the four Latin Fathers of the Church; he was the first pope to use “Servant of the Servants of God” as a papal title; he alone preserved the memory of Saint Benedict with a biography; he made revisions to the content and structure of the Mass which are part of the liturgy until today; and he was the most impactful pope of the long span of centuries from the 500s to the 1000s. That's great! These accomplishments thus truly merit the title Great with which Saint Gregory has been justly crowned by history.Pope Saint Gregory the Great was born into a noble Roman family with a history of service to Church and empire. The family home was perched on one of Rome's seven ancient hills, the Caelian, which Via San Gregorio still cuts through today. His father was a Roman senator, although at a time when Italy was in decline and the imperial government was based in Constantinople. Gregory received an education in keeping with his class and became the Prefect of Rome, its highest civil position, in his early thirties. In 579 he was chosen by the pope as his emissary to the emperor's court in Constantinople, primarily to seek the emperor's assistance in protecting Italy from the Lombard tribes that had long ago overrun her.Gregory was elected the bishop of his home city in 590 and was thus obligated to abandon the quiet life of a monk, which he had been living with some friends for a few years in a small monastery near his family home. In numerous letters which have fortunately been preserved, Pope Gregory, soon after his election, bemoans the loss of his monastic solitude, peaceful recollection, and life of prayer. But he had only been a monk for a few short years. Gregory's skills as an administrator, honed in his long years of prior civil and church leadership, proved valuable when he sat on the Chair of Saint Peter. He drew into the orbit of papal authority the bishops of France and Spain who had, until then, been operating somewhat autonomously. He secured the allegiance of Italy's northern tribes to orthodox Catholicism, compelling them to abandon the counterfeit Arian Christianity they had held for centuries. And Gregory made the fateful decision to personally organize and promote the great, and highly successful, missionary journey of Saint Augustine of Canterbury to the Kingdom of Kent in England.Pope Saint Gregory the Great's legacy in liturgy, pastoral doctrine, and miracles left a deep mark on medieval Europe and beyond. The Council of Trent in 1562 mandated the suppression of votive Mass cycles for the dead or for any other need. But the Council Fathers made one exception: The Mass of Saint Gregory, a cycle of thirty Masses on thirty consecutive days for the release of a soul from purgatory, was not suppressed. Almost a thousand years after his death, Gregory's memory was too venerable to suppress. Gregory was an encourager of the encouragers, a bishop who modeled, strengthened, and explained how and why his fellow bishops should be fathers first and lords second.Pope Saint Gregory the Great, your example of holy leadership, of scholarly practicality, of balance between universal and local concerns, helps all Christians to weigh their many duties in a proper balance and to choose correctly what matters most to God and their own salvation.

History of Modern Greece
059: Byzantine Golden Age: Basil II: Part One

History of Modern Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 34:26


Basil the 2nd is the longest-reigning Roman Emperor of all time. But the beginning of his reign was sparked by civil war. In order to hold onto control, he was going to need the help of a great general.The History of Modern Greece Podcast covers the events of the Greek People from the fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the Greek War of Independence in 1821-1832, through to the Greco-Turkish War from 1919 to 1922 to the present day.Website: www.moderngreecepodcast.comMusic by Mark Jungerman: www.marcjungermann.com

Saint of the Day
Sts Alexander (340), John (595), and Paul the New (784), patriarchs of Constantinople

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 1:01


St Alexander took part in the First Ecumenical Council as delegate of Patriarch Metrophanes, who was too frail to attend; and succeeded Metrophanes on the Patriarchal throne. By his prayer to God that the Church might be spared the schemings of Arius, Arius was struck dead.   St John is, by one account, St John the Faster (Sept. 2), who reposed in 595; by another, St John Scholasticus (Feb. 21), who reposed in 577.   St Paul was Patriarch for five years, then renounced the Patriarchal throne to take the Great Schema.

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina
2.6 Second Constantinople: The Emperor and the Waffling Pope

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 19:45


Every council represents a crisis — often provoked by strong and eccentric personalities. But Constantinople II, in 553 AD, may have been the strangest of all. At the center of the drama were an imperial power couple, Justinian and Theodora, and a weak pope who vacillated between cowardice and duty. LINKS Extracts from the Acts https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3812.htm Biography of Justinian https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08578b.htm Biography of Pope Vigilius https://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15427b.htm Mike Aquilina's website https://fathersofthechurch.com Mike Aquilina's books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/ Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

History of the Papacy Podcast
119h: Jesuits Take a Hike

History of the Papacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 42:55


Today we are joined by Fr. Robert Scully, SJ, a member of the Society of Jesus, otherwise known as the Jesuits. Fr. Robert is a professor of history at Lemoyne College in Syracuse, NY. Fr. Robert will take us through the history of the Jesuits in the 19th century. He will show how their power grew, they fell out with the powers that be in Europe and rose again in a very unusual place.Today's Guest:Fr. Robert ScullyLemoyne College, Syracuse, NYYou can learn more about the History of Papacy and subscribe at all these great places:http://atozhistorypage.com/https://www.historyofthepapacypodcast.comemail: steve@atozhistorypage.comhttps://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacyparthenonpodcast.comhttps://www.gettr.com/user/atozhistoryBeyond the Big Screen:Beyondthebigscreen.comThe History of the Papacy on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6DO2leym3kizBHW0ZWl-nAGet Your History of the Papacy Podcast Products Here: https://www.atozhistorypage.com/productsHelp out the show by ordering these books from Amazon!https://smile.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1MUPNYEU65NTFMusic Provided by:"Sonatina in C Minor" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Funeral March for Brass" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"String Impromptu Number 1" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Intended Force" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Agnus Dei X - Bitter Suite Kevin MacLeaod (incomptech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Begin Transcript:Thank you for listening to the History of the Papacy. I am your host Steve. You can find show notes, how to contact me, sign up for our mailing list and how to support the History of the Papacy by going to the website: atozhistorypage.com.Speaking of supporting the show, Patreon is a great way to do that. We're at patreon.com/historyofthepapacy•4 Tiers – Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople and Rome•Inclusion on the History of the Papacy Diptychs, bonus audio and video content, Pope coin, monthly book drawings, early content, and add free, early content. Sign up early so that you have your name at the top of the lists! •History of the Papacy/Diptychs Fun Fact – In this episode we will talk about the Society of Jesus, or the Jesuits as they are more commonly known and their ban for countries around Europe. The Jesuits and Jews were banned from Norway. The ban on Jews in Norway would last until the late 1890s. The Jesuits would have to wait until 1956!•I would like to send out a special thank you to our latest Patreon member, Keanu at the Alexandria level. Thank you so much Keanu for your support!•Now, let us commemorate the Patreon Patrons on the History of the Papacy Diptychs. We have oRoberto, Goran, William B, Brian, Jeffrey, Christina, John, Sarah, William H, Augustus and Keanu at the Alexandria level oDapo, Paul, Justin, Lana, John and Steve, all of who are the Magnificent at the Constantinople Level. oReaching the ultimate power and prestige, that of the See of Rome: we have Peter the Great, Leonard the Great, Alex and Ama the Great!•Today we are joined by Fr. Robert Scully, SJ, a member of the Society of Jesus, otherwise known as the Jesuits. Fr. Robert is a professor of history at Lemoyne College in Syracuse, NY. Fr. Robert will take us through the history of the Jesuits in the 19th century. He will show how their power grew, they fell out with the powers that be in Europe and rose again in a very unusual place.•With that, here is the next piece of the mosaic of the history of the Popes of Rome and Christian Church.

Saint of the Day
Martyrs Adrian and Natalia and 23 companions of Nicomedia (4th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 2:19


"Husband and wife, they were both of noble and wealthy families in Nicomedia. Adrian was the governor of the Praetorium and a pagan, and Natalia was a secret Christian. They were both young, and had lived in wedlock for thirteen months in all before their martyrdom. When the wicked Emperor Maximian visited Nicomedia, he ordered that the Christians be seized and put to torture. There were twenty-three Christians hidden in a cave near the city. Someone handed them over to the authorities and they were cruelly flogged with leather whips and staves, and thrown into prison. They were then taken from prison and brought before the Praetor for their names to be noted. Adrian looked a these people, tortured but unbowed, peaceful and meek, and he put them under oath to say what they hoped for from their God, that they should undergo such tortures. They spoke to him of the blessedness of the righteous in the Kingdom of God. Hearing this, and again looking at these people, Adrian suddenly turned to the scribe and said: 'Write my name along with those of these saints; I also am a Christian.' When the Emperor heard of this, he asked him: 'Have you lost your mind?' Adrian replied: 'I haven't lost it, but found it!' Hearing this, Natalia rejoiced greatly, and, when Adrian sat chained with the others in prison, came and ministered to them all. When they flogged her husband and put him to various tortures, she encouraged him to endure to the end. After long torture and imprisonment, the Emperor ordered that they be taken to the prison anvil, for their arms and legs to be broken with hammers. This was done and Adrian, along with the twenty-three others, breathed his last under the vicious tortures. Natalia took their relics to Constantinople and there buried them. After several days, Adrian appeared to her, bathed in light and beauty and calling her to come to God, and she peacefully gave her soul into her Lord's hands." (Prologue)

History of Modern Greece
058: Fatimid Caliphate

History of Modern Greece

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 35:57


A new Caliphate is born in the Northern territories of Africa, and the island of Sicily. These Arabs follow a different teacher in Islam and are on a quest to become the new dominant power.The History of Modern Greece Podcast covers the events of the Greek People from the fall of Constantinople in 1453 to the Greek War of Independence in 1821-1832, through to the Greco-Turkish War from 1919 to 1922 to the present day.Website: www.moderngreecepodcast.comMusic by Mark Jungerman: www.marcjungermann.com

Talking Lion
Ep. 79: Souveneer

Talking Lion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 111:18


In this episode, we talked to our best friend (/podcast editor/dungeon master) Souveener about accidental naps, New York accents, perfect french fries, emo kids, battle of the bands, The Republic of Wolves (his band), anxiety disorders, creative networks, psychiatry, small goals, history majors, background acting, meeting Sylvie (his partner), moving to LA, fast judgements, Guessing Lion (our trivia team), Sarinity (our Dungeons & Dragons campaign), winning Jeopardy!, our Vampire Weekend cover album ("Don't Call Me A Contra"), the Nika Riots of 532AD in Constantinople, and his records "Dream Journal" & "Sleep Study". Edited by Mason Maggio (Souveneer) Discord: sleepinglionmusic.com/discord    

History of the Papacy Podcast
119g: The Moderates, The Liberals and The Conservatives

History of the Papacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 31:56


In today's episode, we will continue to look at the background of the popes leading up to the Papacy of Pius IX. The Popes of this era face many challenging issues and each approached the issues of Italian Unification, secret societies and much more in unique ways.You can learn more about the History of Papacy and subscribe at all these great places:http://atozhistorypage.com/https://www.historyofthepapacypodcast.comemail: steve@atozhistorypage.comhttps://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacyparthenonpodcast.comhttps://www.gettr.com/user/atozhistoryBeyond the Big Screen:Beyondthebigscreen.comThe History of the Papacy on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6DO2leym3kizBHW0ZWl-nAGet Your History of the Papacy Podcast Products Here: https://www.atozhistorypage.com/productsHelp out the show by ordering these books from Amazon!https://smile.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1MUPNYEU65NTFMusic Provided by:"Sonatina in C Minor" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Funeral March for Brass" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"String Impromptu Number 1" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Intended Force" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Agnus Dei X - Bitter Suite Kevin MacLeaod (incomptech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Begin Transcript:Thank you for listening to the History of the Papacy. I am your host Steve. You can find show notes, how to contact me, sign up for our mailing list and how to support the History of the Papacy by going to the website: atozhistorypage.com.Speaking of supporting the show, Patreon is a great way to do that. We're at patreon.com/historyofthepapacy•4 Tiers – Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople and Rome•Inclusion on the History of the Papacy Diptychs, bonus audio and video content, Pope coin, monthly book drawings, early content, and add free, early content. Sign up early so that you have your name at the top of the lists! •History of the Papacy/Diptychs Fun Fact – All of Italy would eventually be united by Victor Emmanuel, the first King of Italy. Victor Emmanuel was from the House of Savoy. The House of Savoy traces its roots all the way back a millennium to the early years of the 1000s. •Now, let us commemorate the Patreon Patrons on the History of the Papacy Diptychs. We have oRoberto, Goran, William B, Brian, Jeffrey, Christina, John, Sarah, William H and Augustus at the Alexandria level oDapo, Paul, Justin, Lana, John and Steve, all of who are the Magnificent at the Constantinople Level. oReaching the ultimate power and prestige, that of the See of Rome: we have Peter the Great, Leonard the Great, Alex and Ama the Great!•In today's episode, we will continue to look at the background of the popes leading up to the Papacy of Pius IX. The Popes of this era face many challenging issues and each approached the issues of Italian Unification, secret societies and much more in unique ways. •With that, here is the next piece of the mosaic of the history of the Popes of Rome and Christian Church.

Saint of the Day
Martyrs Florus and Laurus of Illyria (2nd c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 1:47


"Brothers in both the flesh and the spirit, they were both zealous Christians, and stonemasons by craft. They lived in Illyria. Some pagan prince set them to build a pagan temple. It happened during the course of their work that a fragment of stone splintered off and flew into the eye of the pagan priest's son, who was watching the building work with curiosity. Seeing his son blinded and bleeding, the priest shouted at Florus and Laurus and tried to thrash them. Then the holy brothers told him that, if he would believe in the God in whom they believed, his son would be restored to health. The priest promised. Florus and Laurus prayed to the one, living Lord with tears and made the sign of the Cross over the child's stricken eye. The child was healed instantly and his eye became whole as it had been before. Then the priest, Merentius, and his son were baptised, and they both very soon suffered for Christ in the flames. But Florus and Laurus, when they had finished the temple, put a Cross on it, called together all the Christians, and consecrated it in the name of the Lord Jesus with an all-night vigil of hymns. Hearing of this, the governor of Illyria burned many of these Christians by fire and had Florus and Laurus thrown alive into a well, which was then filled with earth. Their relics were later discovered and taken to Constantinople. These two wonderful brothers suffered for Christ, and were glorified by Him, in the second century." (Prologue)

StarDate Podcast
More Otto Struve

StarDate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 2:14


Few observatory directors have had as colorful a life as Otto Struve. By the time he was 24 years old, he'd survived having his horse shot from under him, had almost been hit by lightning, and almost starved as a war refugee. Struve was born 125 years ago, in Ukraine — the fourth generation of an astronomical dynasty. He first accompanied his father to an observatory at age eight, and by 10 he was helping take observations. In 1916, Struve joined the Russian army. He was sent to the Turkish front. His horse was shot from under him, and another bullet zipped through his coat sleeve. Struve returned to his studies after the war. During the Russian revolution, though, he joined the White Army and fought against the communists. Afterward, he made his way to Turkey as a refugee. He spent a long, cold winter there, barely finding enough to eat. In the spring, he went to Constantinople, where he got by with odd jobs. He was a lumberjack for a while, and was almost struck by lightning. By chance, Struve received a letter from the director of the University of Chicago's Yerkes Observatory offering him a job. It took some doing, but Struve made his way to the U.S. in 1921. Over the following decade, Struve worked his way up, becoming director of Yerkes in 1932. That same year, he also became the founding director of the brand-new McDonald Observatory in Texas — a new chapter in the colorful life of Otto Struve.  Script by Damond Benningfield Support McDonald Observatory

Roman Emperors: Totalus Rankium
160 Michael VIII

Roman Emperors: Totalus Rankium

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 90:54


So we come at last to the last dynasty of the Roman empire. It's been quite a journey, let's hope the final dynasty live up to at least some of the others! In this episode find out about Micael's heroic recapture of Constantinople! 

History of the Papacy Podcast
119f: St. Napoleon and Locked Up Popes

History of the Papacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 32:06


Reactionary leaders, reactionary popes, papal jiujitsu and much more will be the topic of today's episode. We will see how Europe was fundamentally broken and needed to be changed after Napoleon, but not everyone, including the Popes, didn't want to recognize the fact the status quo couldn't be started over.You can learn more about the History of Papacy and subscribe at all these great places:http://atozhistorypage.com/https://www.historyofthepapacypodcast.comemail: steve@atozhistorypage.comhttps://www.patreon.com/historyofthepapacyparthenonpodcast.comhttps://www.gettr.com/user/atozhistoryBeyond the Big Screen:Beyondthebigscreen.comThe History of the Papacy on YouTube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6DO2leym3kizBHW0ZWl-nAGet Your History of the Papacy Podcast Products Here: https://www.atozhistorypage.com/productsHelp out the show by ordering these books from Amazon!https://smile.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1MUPNYEU65NTFMusic Provided by:"Sonatina in C Minor" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Funeral March for Brass" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"String Impromptu Number 1" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)"Intended Force" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Agnus Dei X - Bitter Suite Kevin MacLeaod (incomptech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 Licensehttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/Begin Transcript:Thank you for listening to the History of the Papacy. I am your host Steve. You can find show notes, how to contact me, sign up for our mailing list and how to support the History of the Papacy by going to the website: atozhistorypage.com.Speaking of supporting the show, Patreon is a great way to do that. We're at patreon.com/historyofthepapacy•4 Tiers – Antioch, Alexandria, Constantinople and Rome•Inclusion on the History of the Papacy Diptychs, bonus audio and video content, Pope coin, monthly book drawings, early content, and add free, early content. Sign up early so that you have your name at the top of the lists! •I'd like to welcome our latest patrons on the History of the Papacy Diptychs. At the Antioch Level we welcome Isaac, at the Alexandria Level we welcome Augustus, at the Constantinople level we have Steve the Magnificent and reaching that ultimate power and prestige, that of the see of Rome we have Ama. Thank you so much Isaac, Augustus, Steve the Magnificent and Ama the Great for joining up and for your support!•History of the Papacy/Diptychs Fun Fact – Paulinus of Pella, a Christian poet who lived during the tumultuous end of the 4th in the mid 5th century AD in southwestern Gaul, wrote in his epic poem, The Thanksgiving (Eucharisticus) about being taught the ABCs by his mom.•Now, let us commemorate the Patreon Patrons on the History of the Papacy Diptychs. We have oRoberto, Goran, William B, Brian, Jeffrey, Christina, John, Sarah, William H and Augustus at the Alexandria level oDapo, Paul, Justin, Lana, John and Steve, all of who are the Magnificent at the Constantinople Level. oReaching the ultimate power and prestige, that of the See of Rome: we have Peter the Great, Leonard the Great, Alex and Ama the Great!•Reactionary leaders, reactionary popes, papal jiujitsu and much more will be the topic of today's episode. We will see how Europe was fundamentally broken and needed to be changed after Napoleon, but not everyone, including the Popes, didn't want to recognize the fact the status quo couldn't be started over. •With that, here is the next piece of the mosaic of the history of the Popes of Rome and Christian Church.