Podcasts about Cyprian

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Best podcasts about Cyprian

Latest podcast episodes about Cyprian

Death To Tyrants Podcast
Ep. 244: The War Within Yourself, with Father Turbo Qualls

Death To Tyrants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 69:14


One of my favorite guests is back with us this week. That would be Father Turbo Qualls. Fr. Turbo is an Orthodox Priest at St. Mary of Egypt Serbian Orthodox Church in Kansas City and part of the excellent "Royal Path" podcast. On this episode, Fr. Turbo and I discuss the spiritual warfare not only in the outside world, but within each of us. Sometimes, getting closer to the Light of Christ is a scary thing as the proverbial fat burns away. The demons play on our lust for comfort especially, and it can feel good in the moment to give into their call. We also dive into Fr. Turbo's punk rock days, and he details how being an "outsider" of sorts prepared him for Orthodoxy. Fr. Turbo drops a lot of wonderful wisdom in this episode, and I have no doubt that you will learn some things. Fr. Turbo's podcast with Cyprian and Andrew: Fr. Turbo's parish website: Sponsors: Lions of Liberty: Paloma Verde CBD ( ): Enter code BUCK at checkout for 20% off your order! Visit my website: Donate to the show here: Audio Production by Podsworth Media: Leave us a review and rating on iTunes! Thanks!

Sovereign Man
Challenge and Response

Sovereign Man

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 66:54


By the third century AD, it was hard to imagine Rome being in worse condition. Historians literally refer to this period in Roman history as the Crisis of the Third Century. And it was brutal. Roman citizens couldn't believe what they were experiencing... it was incomprehensible to them that their fatherland had become so weakened. Inflation was running rampant. The Empire was stuck in a quagmire of foreign wars and had suffered some humiliating defeats. Rome experienced multiple bad pandemics, coupled with even worse government response. Foreign invaders were flooding across their borders on a daily basis. Trade broke down, causing shortages in many vital goods. And terrible social strife dominated people's daily lives. Ordinary Roman citizens were at each other's throats, and it was a time of disunity and outrage. One contemporary writer of the era named Cyprian described the situation as follows: “The World itself... testifies to its own declines by giving manifold concrete evidence of the process of decay... There is a decrease and deficiency in the field, of sailors on the sea, of soldiers in the barracks, of honesty in the marketplace, of justice in court, of concord in friendship, of skill in technique...” Cyprian wasn't just describing Rome's obvious decline. Rather, his summary is an indictment of Rome's inability to stop it's decline. Everyone in the imperial government knew what was happening in Rome. They simply lacked the ability to do anything about it. Historian Arnold Toynbee called this the “Challenge and Response” effect... and it's an interesting idea. The concept is that every society has to deal with certain challenges; if the challenges are too great, the society will not survive... i.e. the desert is too harsh, the tundra is too frozen, etc. But sometimes a society becomes so decadent, so prosperous, that it loses its ability to address challenges. It no longer has the social capital necessary— unity of purpose, the ability to compromise, the capacity to engage in rational debate. That is the position where Rome found itself in the 3rd century AD. And I believe the West is quickly heading in this direction. This is the subject of today's podcast. We start out talking about Rome's mortal enemy... and how, after more than a century, Rome emerged victorious as the lone superpower in the Mediterannean. Everything was great, and peace and prosperity reigned for more than 200 years. But over that time, the decadence set in. Wheras once Romans had valued hard work, freedom, and unity of purpose, their entire value system changed. People expected, then demanded, to be taken care of by the state. Corruption became commonplace.The bureaucracy multiplied. Social conflict soared. And eventually Rome lost the ability to meet its challenges. I make a lot of historical parallels to our modern world, including some specific examples of absurdities which occurred just in the last couple of days. But I also discuss why, in the end, these conditions actually create unique opportunity for creative, hard working, talented people. You can listen to the podcast here. Open Podcast Transcription [00:00:01.290] Today we're going to go back in time nearly 3000 years ago to the year 821 BC. To a city called Tyre, which is located in modern day Lebanon. Now, I want to give you an appreciation for just how old Tyre is, because if we go back to 821 BC, tire had already existed for nearly 2000 years prior to that. That's basically the the difference between us and Julius Caesar, right? So that's how old Tyre is.   [00:00:29.050] That even nearly 3000 years ago, it was already nearly 2000 years old. So that's an old, old city. And again, it still exists today. It's got a population of around 200,000 people. This is a real city today, located again on the Mediterranean and modern day Lebanon thousands of years ago.   [00:00:46.110]

Sovereign Man
Challenge and Response

Sovereign Man

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 66:54


By the third century AD, it was hard to imagine Rome being in worse condition. Historians literally refer to this period in Roman history as the Crisis of the Third Century. And it was brutal. Roman citizens couldn't believe what they were experiencing... it was incomprehensible to them that their fatherland had become so weakened. Inflation was running rampant. The Empire was stuck in a quagmire of foreign wars and had suffered some humiliating defeats. Rome experienced multiple bad pandemics, coupled with even worse government response. Foreign invaders were flooding across their borders on a daily basis. Trade broke down, causing shortages in many vital goods. And terrible social strife dominated people's daily lives. Ordinary Roman citizens were at each other's throats, and it was a time of disunity and outrage. One contemporary writer of the era named Cyprian described the situation as follows: “The World itself... testifies to its own declines by giving manifold concrete evidence of the process of decay... There is a decrease and deficiency in the field, of sailors on the sea, of soldiers in the barracks, of honesty in the marketplace, of justice in court, of concord in friendship, of skill in technique...” Cyprian wasn't just describing Rome's obvious decline. Rather, his summary is an indictment of Rome's inability to stop it's decline. Everyone in the imperial government knew what was happening in Rome. They simply lacked the ability to do anything about it. Historian Arnold Toynbee called this the “Challenge and Response” effect... and it's an interesting idea. The concept is that every society has to deal with certain challenges; if the challenges are too great, the society will not survive... i.e. the desert is too harsh, the tundra is too frozen, etc. But sometimes a society becomes so decadent, so prosperous, that it loses its ability to address challenges. It no longer has the social capital necessary— unity of purpose, the ability to compromise, the capacity to engage in rational debate. That is the position where Rome found itself in the 3rd century AD. And I believe the West is quickly heading in this direction. This is the subject of today's podcast. We start out talking about Rome's mortal enemy... and how, after more than a century, Rome emerged victorious as the lone superpower in the Mediterannean. Everything was great, and peace and prosperity reigned for more than 200 years. But over that time, the decadence set in. Wheras once Romans had valued hard work, freedom, and unity of purpose, their entire value system changed. People expected, then demanded, to be taken care of by the state. Corruption became commonplace.The bureaucracy multiplied. Social conflict soared. And eventually Rome lost the ability to meet its challenges. I make a lot of historical parallels to our modern world, including some specific examples of absurdities which occurred just in the last couple of days. But I also discuss why, in the end, these conditions actually create unique opportunity for creative, hard working, talented people. You can listen to the podcast here.

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina
The African Roots of Western Christianity

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 14:29


Western Christianity is fundamentally African in the way that Eastern Christianity is fundamentally Greek. It was in Africa that a vigorous Christian Latin culture first developed. Carthage had a Latin liturgy for a full century before Rome switched over from Greek. Africa gave the Church great saints and Fathers such as Tertullian, Minucius Felix, Cyprian, Arnobius, Lactantius—and the greatest of all: Augustine. For a Western Christian, to know early African Christianity is to know one's own roots. LINKS Mike Aquilina, Africa and the Early Church: The Almost-Forgotten Roots of Catholic Christianity https://www.amazon.com/Africa-Early-Church-Almost-Forgotten-Christianity/dp/1645852598/ Mike Aquilina's website https://fathersofthechurch.com Mike Aquilina's books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/ Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org

Lexman Artificial
David Fravor on the Nephograph In this episode, Lexman welcomes David Fravor, a composer, sound artist and professor of

Lexman Artificial

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 3:25


In this episode, Lexman welcomes David Fravor, a composer, sound artist and professor of ethnomusicology and musicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. They discuss the nephograph, a musical composition created in 1735 by Englishman Nicholas Fyke.

Mission City Church w/ Pastor Josh Hershey
ACTS (PART 23) — “SENT OUT BY THE SPIRIT—THE CYPRIAN MISSION”

Mission City Church w/ Pastor Josh Hershey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 67:21


We are diving back into the book of Acts! In Acts 13 God sends Saul and Barnabas on a brand new missionary adventure. During a season of worship, prayer, and fasting God speaks to them and sends them out. They boldly traverse land and sea to fulfill the purposes God has for them. God also has new things for you this new year! New assignments, new journeys, fresh encouragement! The same Spirit who equipped Saul and Barnabas, and sent them out, is the same Spirit at work in your life!

Orthodox Wisdom
Christianity or the Church? - St. Hilarion Troitsky (Pt. II/III)

Orthodox Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 38:19


Part II of "Christianity or the Church?" Read the text here: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/sthilarion_church.asp 0:05 To be a Christian means to belong to the visible Church and obey Her hierarchs 1:10 Heretics and schismatics do not have the true, unifying love of God 2:00 Not only no Christian love outside the Church, but no Christian teaching in the true sense 3:32 According to Saint Cyprian, to be outside the Church and yet remain a Christian is impossible, for to be outside the Church is to be outside Christ's camp. 4:46 St. Cyprian: "He who does not have the Church as his mother cannot have God as his Father." 5:13 For this reason St. Cyprian called for schismatics to enter the Church by baptism 6:07 Council of Carthage 256 (and later the 6th EC in Trullo) affirms St. Cyprian's canon though modified his view that all schismatics should be received by baptism. “On this point, the views of Blessed Augustine differ somewhat, although his view of the relationship of Christianity to the Church remains exactly the same.” 7:27 The teaching of Blessed Augustine 8:18 If schismatics retain true baptism, is the Church necessary? Is salvation possible outside the Church? Bl. Augustine answers “No.” 9:03 St. Hilarion repeating Bl. Augustine: “All the wealth of the Church which is possessed by those who have separated themselves from the Church brings them absolutely no benefit, but only harm.” 11:39 “Schismatics are deprived of the hope of salvation not only because their baptism is invalid, but also because they are outside the Church and in enmity with it.” 13:28 “The points of view of Saint Cyprian and Blessed Augustine can be seen to differ somewhat, but they both arrive at exactly the same conclusion: outside the Church there is no salvation!” 15:00 Christ is not only a great teacher, but the Savior of the world. He gave life, not merely teaching 15:48 On the ninth article of the Creed: “[I believe] in One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church” 16:40 The concept of the Church, not Christianity, lay at the head of Christian beliefs from the beginning 17:11 The falsification of the Church with Christianity 18:19 “Thus it seems that we will not err if we express the thought that the truth of the Church, above all other truths, touches the very life of each Christian, defining not only his beliefs, but also his life.” 18:59 Western influence on Russian Society 20:23 Protestantism was created from Latinism and is a purely human creation 21:28 St. Hilarion identifies the Church with love and those who have broken off do not have the love of God in the Church 22:06 “Protestantism placed a papal tiara on every German professor…” 22:48 “The human soul is Church-prone by nature.” 23:04 “Self-love and Self-will received a sort of sanctification and blessing from Protestantism.” 24:02 Individualism blossoms in Protestantism in the West 25:22 Russian Literature has suffered from Protestantism's influence as well 26:22 The Russian people have lost the habit of being Church-minded 27:33 This de-Churchification is a “subtle venom” 28:51 Wisdom from St. Vincent of Lérins 29:29 Christ left no system, no writings, and “there is nothing easier than to re-interpret Christ's teaching according to one's personal taste and to invent "Christianity," passing off, under this name, the dreams of one's heart and the images of one's own idle fantasy.” 32:58 When Christianity = The Church then Christ the God-Man = Jesus of Nazareth --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/orthodox-wisdom/message

Orthodox Wisdom
Christianity or the Church? - St. Hilarion Troitsky (Pt. I/III)

Orthodox Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 38:17


St. Hilarion Troitsky, New Martyr of Russia and righteous Confessor of the Church, brilliantly sets for the Scriptural and Patristic understanding of what Christ came to establish: not an invisible, personal “Christianity” but the Church which He promised He would build (cf. Matt 16:18). The question posed as the title of the work must be asked and answered by everyone who calls themselves a Christian. St. Hilarion is our guide if we are unsure how to answer. Read the text of "Christianity or the Church" here: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/sthilarion_church.aspx 2:47 The Church was designed to reflect the perfect unity of the Three-One God 4:47 There is no form of unity on earth that compares to the unity of the Church 7:17 St. Cyprian and St. Cyril of Alexandria on the unity of the Church 9:02 Christ did not come simply to teach, but to build his Church (cf. Matt 16:18) 10:40 On the Tower of Babel and the inadequacy of human law to rid us of egoism, the obstacle of Church unity 14:05 Church unity is organic, like a tree and its branches 14:22 St. Paul on the physical and organic nature of Church unity 16:19 How is such a unity possible? 16:46 The command to love is not enough, we must have the power, and we have this in the Church 17:43 The Holy Spirit is the source of life and organic Church unity 18:40 What is the unity of the Spirit? St. John Chrysostom, Blessed Theodoret, Blessed Jerome, and Blessed Theopylact answer 20:08 According to the teaching of the Apostle, all Church life is a manifestation of God's Holy Spirit 20:58 God is love and acts in love in His Church 21:31 The teachings of St. Paul on the Church and on love are inseparably linked, despite what some scholars say 22:50 All of [St. Paul's] Christian ethics are based upon the dogmatic teaching about the Church. 23:31 Christ creates not only a moral person, but a perfect society, i.e. the Church 24:05 “Outside the Church and without the Church, Christian life is impossible.” 25:14 On Eph 4:16: “the body of the Church reaches perfection in all its members” 27:07 “the perfection of the human personality depends upon its belonging to the Church as a living organism” 27:46 A hand cut from the body, a branch cut from a tree, a ray separated from the sun 29:29 “Spiritual life can exist only in an organic unity with the Universal Church” 30:04 “Dogmatic truths have moral significance, and Christian morals are founded on dogma.” 31:18 The word "Church" (ekklisia) appears 110 times in the NT, while "Christianity" is completely unknown 32:05 What did it mean to be a Christian in the early days of the Church? 32:57 How St. Paul joined the Church 33:59 Saul (St. Paul) did not persecute followers of some Christian teaching, but the Church 35:29 The Church is not a theory but life itself 35:57 The Church is not a school but a life 36:35 Protestant teaching of an “invisible” church 37:53 We will look at two Church fathers who dealt extensively with the dogma of the Church: St. Cyprian and St. Augustine "Outside the Church and without the Church, Christian life is impossible. Without the Church, the Christian teaching alone remains as an empty sound, for Christian life is Church life. Only in the life of the Church can a person live and develop. In a bodily organism, separate members never grow or develop independently of one another, but always and only in connection with the whole organism. The same applies to the Church. For the growth of the Church is at the same time the growth of its members." -St. Hilarion --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/orthodox-wisdom/message

Born in the Second Century
27. In You and Others Like You. Part 2 of Montanism Trilogy.

Born in the Second Century

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 112:32


The second installment of BORN IN THE SECOND CENTURY'S Montanism Trilogy examines the Christian reactions to this mysterious movement. Host Chris Palmero presents testimonies from Irenaeus, the Shepherd of Hermas, the Didache, Epiphanius, and of course, Eusebius. He also tackles a burning question: did Tertullian really convert to the New Prophecy, or was that illustrious fool merely participating in an elaborate LARP?Anyone who listens to this episode can learn about why Christians blow on the faces of their converts; whether Eusebius can really be trusted; the "Heretic's Journey;" whether the Catholics were trying to assassinate Montanus, Maximilla, and Priscilla; whether Irenaeus was a secret Montanist sympathizer; whether the Didache was originally a Montanist book; what the controversy between Christianity and the New Prophecy was really about; why Tertullian got involved in this movement; and how the pagan Celsus has taught us more about this "heresy" than any Christian commentator ever could. The host also shares a special time-saving technique that anyone can use when writing about Philip's Daughters.Opening reading: The Canons of the Council of Constantinople, from the late fourth century, look forward to the age in which Montanism eventually fades from the earth.Patreon: www.patreon.com/borninthesecondcenturyWebsite: facebook.com/BornInTheSecondCenturyE-mail: secondcenturypodcast@gmail.comMusic: Pompeii Gray on Apple Music, Spotify, SoundCloud00:48 - Reading: COUNCIL OF CONSTANTINOPLE, Canon 7.05:24 - OPENING Remarks.09:33 - Reading: FIRMILIAN, Epistle 74, to Cyprian.15:10 - A SAFETY Briefing before Reading Eusebius.18:41 - Testimony of THE ANONYMOUS. His Confused Origin Story for Montanus.22:14 - The Anonymous: The HERETIC'S JOURNEY.26:43 - The Anonymous: PROPHET-KILLERS.30:49 - The Anonymous: A Possible MATTHEW Reference.34:13 - The Anonymous: AMMIA and QUADRATUS.42:25 - Reading: EPIPHANIUS, Panarion, On the Quintillianists.45:38 - Testimony of IRENAEUS.54:29 - Testimony of CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA.54:58 - Testimony of COMMANDER SHEPHERD OF HERMAS.59:50 - Testimony of THE DIDACHE.1:02:30 - Testimony of EPIPHANIUS.1:09:11 - On the PARACLETE.1:15:21 - On JESUS.1:16:25 - On PHILIP'S DAUGHTERS.1:27:47 - Reading: WILLIAM TABERNEE, Prophets and Gravestones.1:28:45 - Tertullian as Montanist LARPER.1:45:47 - Testimony of CELSUS.1:49:52 - CLOSING Remarks.Support the show

Lions of Liberty
FF 363 - Cyprian Explains Significance of Zelensky's Ban on the Russian Orthodox Church

Lions of Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 86:26


On today's episode John welcomes Cyprian, aka Vin Armani, back to the show and they discussed the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky, and his proposed ban on the practice of Russian Orthodoxy. Several topics of vital importance discussed: The jurisdictions in the Eastern Orthodox Church The significance of the Russian Orthodox Church and Kyiv to Russian identity The importance of areas within Ukraine to the early Christian church Why the actions taken by Zelensky to ban the Russian Orthodox Church should matter to all Christians. Check out Cyrpian's previous appearance on Finding Freedom! This episode is sponsored by Blood of Tyrants wine. Discover the taste of freedom! Order today and save 10% with the code LIONS. Get our new merch AND get 15% off an annual subscription, which includes all of our bonus content on Patreon until the end of the year! Join us on Patreon to take advantage of the annual savings OR support us on Locals! Subscribe to The Marc Clair Show! Check out the Lions of Liberty Store, including our hot-off-the-press Die Hard Christmas 3D Printed Gun merch! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Finding Freedom
Cyprian Explains Significance of Zelensky's Ban on the Russian Orthodox Church

Finding Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 86:26


On today's episode John welcomes Cyprian, aka Vin Armani, back to the show and they discussed the President of Ukraine, Volodymyr Zelensky, and his proposed ban on the practice of Russian Orthodoxy. Several topics of vital importance discussed: The jurisdictions in the Eastern Orthodox Church The significance of the Russian Orthodox Church and Kyiv to Russian identity The importance of areas within Ukraine to the early Christian church Why the actions taken by Zelensky to ban the Russian Orthodox Church should matter to all Christians. Check out Cyrpian's previous appearance on Finding Freedom! This episode is sponsored by Blood of Tyrants wine. Discover the taste of freedom! Order today and save 10% with the code LIONS. Get our new merch AND get 15% off an annual subscription, which includes all of our bonus content on Patreon until the end of the year! Join us on Patreon to take advantage of the annual savings OR support us on Locals! Subscribe to The Marc Clair Show! Check out the Lions of Liberty Store, including our hot-off-the-press Die Hard Christmas 3D Printed Gun merch! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Libertarian Podcast Review
Twitter Files, Crypto, Homeless and Indians - A Clip Show (EP 75)

Libertarian Podcast Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 96:06


It's a Friday Happy Hour and Tyler starts by reminiscing about how Andy is doing. Next we start by going over some clips, legal issues and exciting news of the week. We discuss Tyler's recent interaction with a Big-Time Crypto ego and their interactions. Next we go through some of the Twitter Files (episodes 1 &2); break down some legal cases with the supreme court and play clips of recent shows including Dave Smith, Armstrong and Getty and Hotep Jesus with Cyprian. Please help my KillPodcast co-host (Andy) and his daughter (Emma) https://gofund.me/190a7654 Full Episode details on the substack - https://tylerjanke.substack.com/p/twitter-files-crypto-homeless-and?sd=pf LPR On Other Platforms Rumble: https://rumble.com/c/c-1988814 Anchor: https://anchor.fm/libertypodreview Locals: https://libertarianpodcastreview.locals/ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@LPR:b Substack: tylerjanke.substack.com This show is an attempt to review the libertarian and libertarian adjacent podcasts or video podcasts. Send us your favorite podcasts or ones that you would like to have us critique and analyze.

The Mage's Well
Patron Saints of Witchcraft

The Mage's Well

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:06


The saints of Christianity have long been venerated, each one holding influence over different areas of life. But did you know saints are basically witches and magical users that are verified by the church? And did you also know that there are some saints who actually watch over witchcraft? From St. Cyprian to Simon the Sorcerer join me as we take a tour through the saints of the esoteric, the occult and of witchcraft.All my links are here. Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/themageswell. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/themageswell. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Daily Prayer with the Divine Office
2022-11-25 Friday of the Thirty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time: Office of Readings

Daily Prayer with the Divine Office

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 12:03


Friday of the Thirty-Fourth Week in Ordinary Time Hymn Antiphon: Lord, in your anger, do not punish me. Psalm 38 Antiphon: Lord, you know all my longings. Psalm 38 Antiphon: I confess my guilt to you, Lord; do not abandon me, for your are my savior Psalm 38 Verse: My eyes keep watch for your saving help. Resp: Awaiting the word that will justify me. First reading: 2 Pt 3:1-18 Responsory: See, I will make all things new. Second reading: From a sermon on man's mortality by St. Cyprian, bishop Responsory: He will renew our lowly bodies and make them like his glorified body Presentation of the Liturgy of the Hours (Divine Office) from The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) (c) 1975, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. The texts of Biblical Readings are reproduced from the New American Bible © 1975 Background music: Albinoni - Concerto for 2 Oboes in F Major Op9 no3, 1 Allegro., Albinoni - Concerto for 2 Oboes in F Major Op9 no3, 2 Adagio., and Albinoni - Concerto for 2 Oboes in F Major Op9 no3, 3 Allegro. by Advent Chamber Orchestra. are licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Did the Reformers Actually Reform the Church? (Part 1) (11-25-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 68:06


Topics: Reformation, Catholic, Priests, Church Fathers, Church History, Eucharist, Cyprian of Carthage, Eat My Flesh, Drink My Blood, Communion, Mana From Heaven, Forgive Sins, John 6, John 14, John 20, Royal Priesthood, The RockSupport the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Did Humanity Destroy the Church? (11-23-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 92:46


Topics: The Church, Ecclesia, Church History, Bishops, Elders, Priests, Pastors, Ignatius of Antioch, Cyprian of Carthage, Constantine, Catholic History, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Pulpits, Puritans, Revivalists, The Rock, Matthew 16Support the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Death To Tyrants Podcast
Ep. 236: Does the Covid Cult Deserve Amnesty? with Vin Armani

Death To Tyrants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 78:01


My guest this week is Vin Armani, also known as Cyprian. We are discussing the theme in an article written by Emily Oster in the Atlantic. In the article, she pleads for amnesty on behalf of the Covid regime, for all of the evil they pushed onto society. Masks, jabs, lockdowns, firings, ostracization, a caste system, apartheid, death, and more were all from these people in the name of "safety". Should forgiveness even be considered for these people? If so, under what parameters should we consider granting them forgiveness? Do they deserve prison time? Death? Love? We discuss all of this, and it really is a nice lesson on repentance. We also get into what exactly is going on with this FTX scandal. Here's the article we discuss: For Cyprian's podcast, go here:  Sponsors: FoxNSons Coffee ( ): Enter code BUCK25 at checkout for 25% off your order! Paloma Verde CBD ( ): Enter code BUCK at checkout for 20% off your order! Visit my website: Donate to the show here: Audio Production by Podsworth Media: Leave us a review and rating on iTunes! Thanks!

Ebenezer Reformed Church
God's name properly presented

Ebenezer Reformed Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 2:00


-Hallowed be thy name- does not mean adding holiness to God's name, but His name being hallowed in us per Cyprian of Carthage and the Heidelberg Catechism.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Are Ordained Ministers in the Bible? (11-20-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Play 15 sec Highlight Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 60:06


Topics: Ordained Ministers, Ordained Priest, Ordination, Religious Ceremony, Catholicism, Protestantism, Pastors, Holy Man of God, John 20, 2 Corinthians 3, Ministers of the New Covenant, Church History, Cyprian of Carthage, Appoint, AppointedCORRECTION: I said episkopon (episkopos) means elder, rather than bishop, but episkopon (episkopos) means overseer, not elder. Elder is presbuteros. I also said the office of an overseer from this verse was 1 Timothy 1, but it is 1 Timothy 3:1.Support the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
5 Errors of the Early Church Fathers (11-13-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 59:33


Topics: Church History, Church Fathers, Bishops, Pastors, Elders, Presbyters, Priests, Forgive Men Their Sins, Church Offices, Clemente of Rome, Cyprian of Carthage, Covenant Mixture Theologians, Communion, Eucharist, John 20, Matthew 23, 1 Timothy 3:1, Hebrews 7:23 Support the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Stan po Burzy
Morawiecki chce wsadzić Ziobrę. Kasjerzy Kaczyńskiego to agenci. Ludzie Obajtka utrzymują PiS #OnetAudio

Stan po Burzy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 33:52


Pełnej wersji podcastu posłuchasz w aplikacji Onet Audio. Pozbyliśmy się już wszelkich złudzeń. Tak, miał rację najlepszy surfer politycznego bagna Jacek Kurski — zaiste Mateusz Morawiecki musi być tajnym reprezentantem opozycji. Czy też — by użyć kurzego języka — „szczurem”, podstawionym prezesowi Kaczyńskiemu przez „układ”. No bo tylko opozycyjny szczur mógłby z satysfakcją rzucić nie tylko pomysł wyrzucenia z rządu wybitnego, błyskotliwego i szlachetnego ministra sprawiedliwości Zbigniewa Ziobry, ale wręcz nasłania na niego jego własnej prokuratury, co — o zgrozo — miałoby się skończyć izolacją tego wybitnego lidera w miejscu przymusowego odosobnienia. Toż to bałwochwalcze marzenia, którymi śnią wyłącznie najpodlejsi liderzy opozycji! A tu wizję Ziobry za ciężkimi kratami kreśli premier PiS w mailu do najbliższych rządowych sojuszników... Hańba! Twórcy „Stanu Wyjątkowego” — Andrzej Stankiewicz (ONET.PL) oraz Dominika Długosz („Newsweek”) — nie byliby jednak sobą, gdyby w tej haniebnej intrydze premiera nie znaleźli miejsca na ludzkie dlań zrozumienie. Oto bowiem Mateusz Morawiecki systematycznie traci grunt pod nogami. Wsadzenie Ziobry nie byłoby w tej sytuacji takie złe, tym bardziej że Ziobro zbiera haki na niego i jego małżonkę, znaną w skali kraju posiadaczkę nieruchomości. Potem wystarczyłoby tylko wsadzić Sasina. Dobra, żartujemy. Przecież nad Sasinem pracuje szef MSWiA Mariusz Kamiński, który nasłał na niego CBA, by zbadać, kto finansował schody w jego posesji (poważnie). Jeśli zaś chodzi o najbardziej znanego w skali kraju posiadacza nieruchomości, to Daniel Obajtek akurat ryzyka odsiadki uniknął dzięki Ziobrze, który wycofał z sądu korupcyjny akt oskarżenia przeciw niemu. Dziś pan Daniel jest człowiekiem nr 2 w Polsce, po — jak mawia — „Najwyższym”. Niedługo jednak Orlen może się stać większy od Polski — Obajtek już się chełpi, że przychody jego parówkowo-paliwowo-gazowo-chemiczno-energetyczno-gazetowego koncernu stanowią już niemal 3/4 budżetu państwa i wciąż rosną po kolejnych fuzjach, które błogosławi Najwyższy Prezes Jarosław Kaczyński. A gdy Orlen będzie większy od Polski, to Obajtek stanie się „Najwyższym” — o czym zresztą Kaczyńskiego przestrzegali jego towarzysze na czele z ministrem od energetyki Piotrem Naimskim, który za takie czarnowidztwo został wyrzucony z rządu na zbity pysk. „Stan Wyjątkowy” tej dymisji prawicowca współpracującego od dekad z Kaczyńskim wcale się nie dziwi. Telewizja TVN24 ujawniła bowiem, że 22 menedżerów z różnych spółek Orlenu wpłaciło jednego dnia identyczne co do złotówki kwoty na eurokampanię wyborczą dwóch kandydatek PiS — byłej premier Beaty Szydło i byłej rzeczniczki rządu Joanny Kopcińskiej. Biorąc to pod uwagę, nie ma się co dziwić, że prezes Kaczyński konsekwentnie stawia na Obajtka. No bo któż inny ma tak fantastyczne umiejętności menedżerskie, by równie sprawnie zsynchronizować płynące ze szczerych serc transfery w ramach firmy niemal tak wielkiej jak Polska? Za lekką krytykę pompowania do PiS pieniędzy z Orlenu za pośrednictwem menedżerów wyznaczonych przez PiS oberwał były skarbnik tej partii Stanisław Kostrzewski. To człowiek-legenda — zbudował finanse partyjne, umożliwiając pierwsze zwycięstwa PiS i Lecha Kaczyńskiego w podwójnych wyborach 2005 r. Wcześniej Kostrzewski wysyłał sygnały, że nie wszystko w finansach PiS jest przejrzyste. Ale wtedy dostawał subtelne ostrzeżenia, że milczenie jest złotem. Teraz rozległ się ostatni strzał ostrzegawczy — do ataku przystąpiła Dorota Kania, która jest w PiS kimś pomiędzy rzeczniczką partyjnej dyscypliny a szefową wydziału propagandy. Ta czołowa lustratorka wystrzeliła brejking njusa, że Kostrzewski był w PRL agentem wojskowej bezpieki. Pani Doroto Szanowna, chodzi o TW Cypriana? Dziennikarze „Stanu Wyjątkowego” mają te kwity od lat. I pani mocodawcy też. Jakoś wcześniej, gdy Kostrzewski ściągał kasę dla PiS, nie przeszkadzało to Najwyższemu. A Pani to dostała z centrali dopiero teraz, gdy Kostrzewski zaczął fikać? Może jednak nie ufają Pani w pełni? A co Pani, Wielka Lustratorka, powie na temat wieloletniego szefa partyjnej spółki Srebrna Kazimierza Kujdy? To taki drugi skarbnik PiS. Niedawno przegrał proces lustracyjny i możemy go nazywać TW Ryszard. Ale Najwyższy twierdzi, że to haniebny wyrok i dał mu fuchę u Sasina. Rysiek jest OK, bo milczy o kasie, a Cyprian nie OK, bo chlapie? To pytania retoryczne. Wszak pani Dorota pracuje na Orlenie. I też kiedyś miała śmierdzącą sprawę w sądzie, od której uwolnił ją pan Zbigniew. No więc — wracając do punktu wyjścia — jak można byłoby się pozbyć tak szlachetnego pana Zbyszka, Panie Premierze? Ten Kurski to naprawdę może mieć sporo racji.

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
Fr. Turbo & Cyprian - Path to Illumination

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 83:42


 This week WAWTAR is honored to bring on Fr. Turbo Qualls and Cyprian of the Royal Path podcast. The Royal Path examines Orthodox Christian Tradition as it informs and manifests to us in our modern world. Today Fr. Turbo, Cyprian, and Heers talk race, the notion of being and how we know where we're going. Along the way they also touch on the process of illumination and how is it's possible. Check out the Royal Path Podcast here: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRoyalPath You can also find them on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/107E7HfRaCX7ZSZDJpGAXV And sign up for their growing community here: http://royalpath.network Does the deep immersive experience interest you? You should consider becoming a Vanguard Field Worker for Mozambique! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.org Become a Monthly Donor! - https://first-things.org/donateFor all the updates join our Telegram channel: https://t.me/firstthingsfoundationAnd you should definitely check out Keipi Restaurant

Roar Like The Lamb
3.5: Infinite Stuff for Finite Us

Roar Like The Lamb

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 44:32


Separate studios for us today so Fr. Sam's cold doesn't infect Paola! We'll hear all about Paola's recent retreat with the Sisters of Life, talk about God's abundant gifts to us, and more! SHOW NOTES Sisters of Life You can watch "The Chosen" over at formed.org - make your free account today! That re-baptism controversy we were talking about? Going back to St. Cyprian of Carthage (martyr) and Pope Stephen in the 200s, and continuing to the Donatist heresy in the fourth and fifth centuries, it was a big deal. But from this controversy, the Church was able to articulate the theological idea of ex opere operato, that the grace of the sacraments do not depend on the worthiness of the one administering the sacraments, as well as highlight the enduring grace of baptism even when marred by sin!

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Did Early Church Architecture Harm the Church? (10-19-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 46:36


Topics: Stained Glass, the Steeple, Pulpits, Pews, Constantine, Early Church Fathers, Basilica, Bishop, Bishop's Chair, Throne, Catherdra, Cathedral, House of the Throne, Elder Board, Deacon Board, Ecclesia, Cyprian of Carthage, Egyptian Pyramids, Body of Christ, 1 Corinthians 11-14Ashley T Lee PodcastAshley T. Lee Podcast will cover many life issues such as overcoming stress, anxiety...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Holy Joys Podcast
Church & Sacraments, Part 1: A Neglected Doctrine

Holy Joys Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 40:57


In this episode of the Holy Joys Podcast, Johnathan Arnold teaches the first lesson in a six-week class on the church and sacraments.Topics addressed include:The evangelical emphasis on personal salvationCorruption and hypocrisy in the churchAttitudes towards the church todayThe Bible as a story about God and his peoplePersonal and corporate salvationActs 2:47 and 1 Jn. 2:19Luther, Calvin, Augustine, and Cyprian on the church and salvationRecovering a biblical vision of the churchSupport the show

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Should Christians Go to Church? (10-9-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 81:54


Topics: Church, Hebrews 10:25, Exodus 20:8, Do Not Forsake the Assembly, Remember the Sabbath, Go to Church, Clemente of Alexandria, Ignatius of Antioch, Cyprian of Carthage, Constantine, Pagan Tradition, Necromancy, Pray to the Saints, Church Buildings, Synagogue, Temple, Churches in Revelation, Sabbath Rest, Colossians 2:16, Romans 14:5, 1 Corinthians 11-14Graced HealthFor women who want simple and grace-filled ways to take care of herself and enjoy a...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the show

Saint of the Day
Hieromartyr Cyprian and Virgin-Martyr Justina (304)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 1:12


"Saint Justina, who was from Damascus, lived in virginity for the sake of Christ. Saint Cyprian, who was from Antioch, began as an initiate of magic and worshipper of the demons. A certain foolish young man who had been smitten with Justina's beauty hired Cyprian to draw her to love him; when Cyprian had used every demonic device he knew, and had failed, being repulsed by the power of Christ Whom Justina invoked, he understood the weakness of the demons and came to know the truth. Delivered from demonic delusion, he came to Christ and burned all his books of magic, was baptized, and later ascended the episcopal throne in his country. Later, he and Justina were arrested by the Count of Damascus, and having endured many torments at his hands, they were sent finally to Diocletian in Nicomedia, where they were beheaded in the year 304." (Great Horologion)

A Big Sur Podcast
Lovers of The Place: A conversation between Pico Iyer and Cyprian Consiglio

A Big Sur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 97:10


A conversation between two very accomplished writers and thinkers: Pico Iyer & Father Cyprian Consiglio.The two of them, with the help of the audience, touch on the meaning of life and what happens after death (!), Narcissus and Goldmund, Henry Miller, Thomas Merton, the Trappist's life, Silence, the Monastic Life, the Apophatic tradition, Leonard Cohen, Vaclav Havel, Patrick Leigh Fermor,  Annie Dillard, Emily Dickinson, the Camaldoli Hermitage, Henry Miller (yes! again!), EROS as pre sexual and post genital, and much, much more...Books by Pico IyerFalling Off the Map: Some Lonely Places of The WorldThe Art of Stillness: Adventures in Going NowhereThe Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai LamaBooks by Father Cyprian ConsiglioThe God Who Gave You Birth: A Spirituality of KenosisSpirit, Soul, Body: Toward an Integral Christian SpiritualityPrayer in the Cave of the Heart: The Universal Call to ContemplationMusic by Father Cyprian ConsiglioOn SpotifyOn YouTubeIf you want to read/buy any of these books we prefer you come for a visit to either the Camaldoli Hermitage bookstore or the Henry Miller Library bookstore. As much as Amazon, with their fast delivery and reduced price, helps to spread the word, small bookstores provide a service worth supporting! Thank you!Support the show

Father Daniel's Homilies
Memorial of Saints Cornelius, Pope, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyrs

Father Daniel's Homilies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 5:21


The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ
Saints Cornelius, Pope, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyrs

The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 17:51


We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the week. New reflections will be added every Sunday. *Due to Covid-19, our 2020 reflections are re-purposed from earlier examen episodes.

Daily Homily with Father Kevin Drew
Daily Homily - 091622

Daily Homily with Father Kevin Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 8:00


Join Father Kevin Drew as he preaches on this Memorial of Saints Cornelius, Pope, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyrs. Today's readings First Reading: 2 Cor 4:7-15 Psalm: Ps 126:1bc-2ab, 2cd-3, 4-5, 6 Gospel: Jn 17:11b-19 Catholic Radio Network

The Terry & Jesse Show
16 Sep 22 – Nick Gibboni: Who Is Padre Pio?

The Terry & Jesse Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 51:12


Today's Topics: 1) Gospel - LK 8:1-3 - Jesus journeyed from one town and village to another, preaching and proclaiming the good news of the Kingdom of God. Memorial of Saints Cornelius, Pope, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyrs Saints Cornelius and Cyprian, pray for us! Bishop Sheen quote of the day 2), 3), 4) Interview: Nick Gibboni, Executive Director of the National Centre for Padre Pio

Daily Catholic Mass
2022-09-16 - Fr. John Bosco Sserumaga

Daily Catholic Mass

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 15:00


St. Cornelius, Pope, Martyr and St. Cyprian, Bishop, Martyr (Memorial)

Catholic Answers Focus
#449 St. Cyprian of Carthage’s Advice on Enduring Persecution - Ben Safranksi

Catholic Answers Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022


What can our forebears teach us about dealing with persecution? In this bonus episode, we ask theologian Ben Safranski how one very important early Christian – Cyprian of Carthage – dealt with Roman persecution in some surprising ways. …

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, September 16, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saints Cornelius, Pope, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyrs Lectionary: 447All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint CorneliusThere was no pope for 14 months after the martyrdom of Saint Fabian because of the intensity of the persecution of the Church. During the interval, the Church was governed by a college of priests. Saint Cyprian, a friend of Cornelius, writes that Cornelius was elected pope “by the judgment of God and of Christ, by the testimony of most of the clergy, by the vote of the people, with the consent of aged priests and of good men.” The greatest problem of Cornelius's two-year term as pope had to do with the Sacrament of Penance and centered on the readmission of Christians who had denied their faith during the time of persecution. Two extremes were finally both condemned. Cyprian, primate of North Africa, appealed to the pope to confirm his stand that the relapsed could be reconciled only by the decision of the bishop. In Rome, however, Cornelius met with the opposite view. After his election, a priest named Novatian (one of those who had governed the Church) had himself consecrated a rival bishop of Rome—one of the first antipopes. He denied that the Church had any power to reconcile not only the apostates, but also those guilty of murder, adultery, fornication, or second marriage! Cornelius had the support of most of the Church (especially of Cyprian of Africa) in condemning Novatianism, though the sect persisted for several centuries. Cornelius held a synod at Rome in 251 and ordered the “relapsed” to be restored to the Church with the usual “medicines of repentance.” The friendship of Cornelius and Cyprian was strained for a time when one of Cyprian's rivals made accusations about him. But the problem was cleared up. A document from Cornelius shows the extent of organization in the Church of Rome in the mid-third century: 46 priests, seven deacons, seven subdeacons. It is estimated that the number of Christians totaled about 50,000. He died as a result of the hardships of his exile in what is now Civitavecchia. Reflection It seems fairly true to say that almost every possible false doctrine has been proposed at some time or other in the history of the Church. The third century saw the resolution of a problem we scarcely consider—the penance to be done before reconciliation with the Church after mortal sin. Men like Cornelius and Cyprian were God's instruments in helping the Church find a prudent path between extremes of rigorism and laxity. They are part of the Church's ever-living stream of tradition, ensuring the continuance of what was begun by Christ, and evaluating new experiences through the wisdom and experience of those who have gone before. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Saint of the Day
Holy Hieromartyr Cyprian of Carthage (258)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 2:50


He was born to wealthy and noble parents in Carthage (north Africa), and became a prominent lawyer in that city. Around the year 246 he embraced the Christian faith and was baptized by the priest Caecilianus. Immediately he gave all his goods to the poor and retired to a quiet place in the country to devote himself to prayer and study of Christian writings. In 248 or 249 he was elected Bishop of Carthage by the insistence of the people, though some priests opposed the consecration of such a new Christian.   Soon after his election, the Emperor Decius began a terrible persecution of Christians, during which Cyprian, in hiding, upheld his flock by letters. During this time many Christians gave in to fear of death and either sacrificed to the idols or signed statements that they had done so. When the persecution ended, the problem arose of how to treat the apostates who wished to be received back into the Church. Rigorist groups such as the Novatians and Montanists held that these lapsi had removed themselves from all hope of salvation and could never re-enter the Church. Cyprian rejected this view (as well as the position of some who would immediately reconcile the apostates); he established the position, still standard in the Church, that apostates could be restored after confession and long penance. His position led to a schism in the Church at Carthage when Cyprian's opponents set up Maximus the Montanist as a rival Bishop. The schism was only ended by a plague that swept the Empire and the city of Carthage in 253-254, together with a renewed persecution of Christians. Saint Cyprian's tireless care for the suffering during this time won most of the schismatics back to his side. When peace returned, Cyprian called a series of Councils in Carthage to resolve the conflicts that had troubled the Church. He upheld the African (and Eastern) churches' practice of reconciling heretics to the Church by Baptism rather than by laying on of hands, as was done in Rome; though Cyprian did not seek to impose this practice on other churches, Rome was not so tolerant and broke with the African church until the death of Pope Stephen.   In 256, yet another persecution broke out under the Emperor Valerian. Cyprian was arrested and brought before the Proconsul of the region. He refused to defend himself, and when told that he was to be executed, said only Deo Gratias!(Thanks be to God!). At his execution the holy bishop ordered that twenty-five gold pieces be given to the executioner, and put on the blindfold with his own hands.   Note: St Cyprian is missing on this date from traditional martyrologies because he was once confused with St Cyprian of Antioch (October 2). Today is the date of his martyrdom and the date of his commemoration on the Latin calendar.

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology
Why Christianity is More Than a Philosophy - The Memorial of Saints Cornelius and Cyprian

St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 12:25


The St. Paul Center's daily scripture reflections from the Mass for the Memorial of Saints Cornelius and Cyprian by Dr. John Bergsma. Cornelius, Pope, Martyr, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyr Obligatory Memorial First Reading: First Corinthians 15: 12-20 Responsorial Psalm: Psalms 17: 1bcd, 6-7, 8b and 15 Alleluia: Matthew 11: 25 Gospel: Luke 8: 1-3 Learn more about the Mass at www.stpaulcenter.com

The Good Word
Memorial of Saints Cornelius, Pope, and Cyprian, Bishop, Martyrs, Charlie Hergenroeder, C.Ss.R.

The Good Word

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 3:07


Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio
Father Kubicki - Prayer Reflections September 16, 2022

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 2:00


Today is the feast day of Saint Pope Cornelius and Saint Cyprian of Carthage. Both saints suffered and died as Martyrs while defending the faith. Father reads some reflections from Cyprian regarding Christians who were threatened by the roman Empire.

The Daily Office Podcast
Thursday // September 15, 2022

The Daily Office Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 24:47


Morning Prayer for Thursday, September 15, 2022 (Proper 19; Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage and Martyr, 258). Psalm and Scripture readings (2-year lectionary; 60-day Psalter): Psalm 40 Habakkuk 3 Matthew 12:22-50 Click here to access the text for Morning Prayer at DailyOffice2019.com. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dailyofficepodcast/support

Divine Office Office of Readings
Sep 16, Office of Readings – Memorial for Sts. Cornelius, Po & M, and Cyprian, B & M

Divine Office Office of Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 21:33


Ribbon Placement: Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV: Ordinary: 615 Psalter: Friday, Week IV, 1194 Common of Several Martyrs: 1698 (verse before first reading) Proper of Seasons: 273 (first reading) Proper of Saints: 1406 (second reading, concluding prayer) Christian Prayer: Does not contain Office of Readings. Office of Readings for Friday in Ordinary Time, the... Enter Prayer

Divine Office Office of Readings
Sep 16, About Today for Sts. Cornelius, Po & M, and Cyprian, B & M

Divine Office Office of Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 1:50


September 16 Saints Cornelius, Pope and Martyr, and Cyprian, Bishop and Martyr Memorial Saint Cornelius was ordained bishop of the Church of Rome in 251. He fought against the Novatian schismatics and with the help of Cyprian was able to enforce his authority. Driven into exile by the Emperor Gallus, he died in 253 at Civitavecchia.... Enter Prayer

Forward Day By Day Podcast
September 13, 2022

Forward Day By Day Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 5:56


John 12:14. | Cyprian of Carthage September 2022 meditations are written by Lynn Jordal Martin and recorded by Ellie Singer.   Forward Day by Day is published and produced by Forward Movement. Explore our other podcasts, books, and blogs at forwardmovement.org

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, September 11, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsTwenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 132All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint CyprianCyprian is important in the development of Christian thought and practice in the third century, especially in northern Africa. Highly educated and a famous orator, he became a Christian as an adult. He distributed his goods to the poor, and amazed his fellow citizens by making a vow of chastity before his baptism. Within two years he had been ordained a priest and was chosen, against his will, as Bishop of Carthage. Cyprian complained that the peace the Church had enjoyed had weakened the spirit of many Christians and had opened the door to converts who did not have the true spirit of faith. When the Decian persecution began, many Christians easily abandoned the Church. It was their reinstatement that caused the great controversies of the third century, and helped the Church progress in its understanding of the Sacrament of Penance. Novatus, a priest who had opposed Cyprian's election, set himself up in Cyprian's absence (he had fled to a hiding place from which to direct the Church—bringing criticism on himself) and received back all apostates without imposing any canonical penance. Ultimately he was condemned. Cyprian held a middle course, holding that those who had actually sacrificed to idols could receive Communion only at death, whereas those who had only bought certificates saying they had sacrificed could be admitted after a more or less lengthy period of penance. Even this was relaxed during a new persecution. During a plague in Carthage, Cyprian urged Christians to help everyone, including their enemies and persecutors. A friend of Pope Cornelius, Cyprian opposed the following pope, Stephen. He and the other African bishops would not recognize the validity of baptism conferred by heretics and schismatics. This was not the universal view of the Church, but Cyprian was not intimidated even by Stephen's threat of excommunication. He was exiled by the emperor and then recalled for trial. He refused to leave the city, insisting that his people should have the witness of his martyrdom. Cyprian was a mixture of kindness and courage, vigor and steadiness. He was cheerful and serious, so that people did not know whether to love or respect him more. He waxed warm during the baptismal controversy; his feelings must have concerned him, for it was at this time that he wrote his treatise on patience. Saint Augustine remarks that Cyprian atoned for his anger by his glorious martyrdom. His liturgical feast is celebrated on September 16. Reflection The controversies about Baptism and Penance in the third century remind us that the early Church had no ready-made solutions from the Holy Spirit. The leaders and members of the Church of that day had to move painfully through the best series of judgments they could make in an attempt to follow the entire teaching of Christ and not be diverted by exaggerations to right or left. Saint Cyprian is the Patron Saint of: North Africa Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Downtown Church: Memphis, TN
Let There Be Light: A Community of Self-Sacrificing Love (John 13:21-38) - Richard Rieves

Downtown Church: Memphis, TN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 40:43


Unfortunately, more want to be part of that community, but are not willing to sacrifice to create it. “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another. By this all people will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another (34-35).” Main Idea: Jesus calls us to be an apologetic; a witness to the world of His good news by BEING a community of self-sacrificing love. Downtown Church exists to create a radical new community loving God and neighbor. I. Love will not go unchallenged. First, the other 11 disciples had no clue Judas was Judas. Second, every indication is that Jesus knew Judas would betray Him, and yet He still washed his feet, he still loved! ...if Jesus can love Judas, He can also empower you to love the Judas' in your life. “You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.' But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet only your own people, what are you doing more than others? Do not even pagans do that (Mt. 43-47)?” Third, you will not win everyone with love, but don't stop loving. “To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket—safe, dark, motionless, airless—it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable.” C.S. Lewis, The Four Loves II. The Love to which we are called is defined by Love Himself. Jesus calls us to Jesus' love, not an invention of our imagination or culture. “A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another (34).” WE are created and redeemed to be a reservoir, not a lake. Our hearts must continually be humbled by our sin, more than hardened by the sins of others. “The LORD your God is in your midst, a mighty one who will save; he will rejoice over you with gladness; he will quiet you by his love; he will exult over you with loud singing (Zeph. 3:17).” The way of sin is hiding, the way of Jesus is vulnerability, honesty, confession, repentance, faith and delight in the sufficiency of His finished work that empowers a radical, thus self sacrificing love. III. The world will know us, not by a perfect witness, but a sacrificial love. “Peter asked, ‘Lord, why can't I follow you now? I will lay down my life for you.' Then Jesus answered, “Will you really lay down your life for me? Very truly I tell you, before the rooster crows, you will disown me three times (37-38)!” “We are philosophers not in words but in deeds; we exhibit wisdom not by our dress but by truth; we know virtues by their practice rather than through boasting of them; we do not speak great things but we live them.” Cyprian of Carthage describing the early Christians.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Should There Be Hierarchies in Church? (9-4-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 53:31


Topics: Church History, Pastors, Pulpits, Clergy, Laity, Constantine, Ignatius of Antioch, Cyprian of Carthage, Sit on 12 Thrones, Judge the Twelve Tribes, Matthew 19, Matthew 20, Matthew 20:25-26, Lord it Over Them, Exercise Authority, 1 Peter 4-5, Serve One Another, Infant BaptismIf you more on this topic, here's another YouTube video of mine! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mtl8Zd6jDIgSupport the show

Saint of the Day
Hieromartyr Cyprian, bishop of Carthage (258)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 1:19


He was born around 190 to pagan parents in North Africa. Before baptism he was distinguished in Carthage as a teacher of philosophy and rhetoric. He came to faith in Christ and was baptized at a young age; as soon as he became a Christian he abandoned his prestigious teacher's position, sold his many possessions and gave all his wealth to the poor. He was ordained presbyter in 247, Bishop of Carthage in 248. He was known for his gentleness and paternal care for his flock, combined with firm opposition to heretics. His extensive writings still guide the Church today.   For his confession of Christ, he was beheaded under the Emperor Valerian on September 14; since that is the date of the Exaltation of the Cross, his feast is kept today. At the time of his execution he left twenty-five gold pieces (a huge sum) for the executioner who beheaded him.

The BreakPoint Podcast
How Christianity Created the Hospital

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 5:01


Far from being an otherworldly religion, Christianity teaches both the importance and goodness of life in this world. In fact, from Jesus' healing ministry to the work of modern missionary doctors, a consistent feature of the work of the Church in the world has been to care for the sick and needy, and not just point them to the life to come.  The early Church understood Jesus' ministry to be a paradigm for their own work. So, just as Jesus set believers free from their bondage to sin, early Christians purchased slaves specifically to free them. Whereas Jesus used miraculous power to heal people from physical effects of the Fall, Christians used more ordinary tools to care for the sick and disabled. These activities are not merely good deeds in themselves but serve to advance the Kingdom. Though the Gospel is a message and must be proclaimed, the early Church saw works of mercy and preaching the Gospel as two sides of the same coin.  The first major epidemic faced by the Church was the Antonine Plague (A.D. 166-189). In fear of their lives, the Romans threw the sick out of their homes to die in the streets. Galen, the most prominent physician of the age, knew he could neither heal its victims nor protect himself. So, he fled Rome to stay at his country estate.  Recognizing that all persons were made in the image of God and that Jesus came to make all things new, body and soul, many Christians ran the other direction. They fought the Fall by tending to the sick, at risk (and often at the cost) of their own lives.   Since even basic nursing care can make a significant difference during an epidemic, Christian action saved lives. Their courage and self-sacrifice contributed to the rapid growth of Christianity. For example, when Irenaeus arrived in Lyon from Asia Minor, there were very few Christians. By the time the plague ended, there were 200,000 believers in Lyon.  The Plague of Cyprian, which took place the following century, was named after the bishop of Carthage who documented the epidemic. Dionysius of Alexandria, also a bishop, described what happened this way:   At the first onset of the disease, they pushed the sufferers away and fled from their dearest, throwing them into the roads before they were dead and treating unburied corpses as dirt...  But, he continued...  Most of our brother Christians showed unbounded love and loyalty, never sparing themselves and thinking only of one another. Heedless of danger, they took charge of the sick, attending to their every need and ministering to them in Christ.  From the earliest centuries, Christians embraced the medical theories and practices of the day. Contrary to stereotypes, the early Church did not attribute illness to demons, though they did recognize demonization as a real phenomenon. The real difference between Christians and physicians of the day was the willingness to risk death in order to treat the sick, convinced that if they died it would only mean a transition to a better life. The physicians, on the other hand, fled.  Christians also founded the first hospitals in history. By the late fourth century, there were hospitals in both the eastern and western halves of the empire. By the Central Middle Ages, hospitals and leprosaria (leprosy hospitals) could be found throughout most of the Christian world. When universities began granting medical degrees during the period, church-affiliated institutions continued to provide much of the care.   By the 18th century, the medical field had become increasingly professionalized and separate from the clergy. Though monasteries still provided care for the poor and nursing was almost entirely in the hands of sisters and nuns, professional physicians increasingly handled medical issues for those who could afford to pay. Clergy attended to the dying and contributed to discussions of medical ethics but had few other responsibilities for the sick.  However, medicine was an integral part of the modern mission movement of the 19th century. Because Christianity has always affirmed the importance of the body, hospitals soon followed wherever missionaries went. This is another way the Church has been essential throughout history.   Many Christians and critics today are skeptical that the Church is essential or necessary in the modern world. It is. To learn how and why, please join the new online Breakpoint course The Essential Church: Why the World (and Christians) Still Need the Body of Christ. Hosted by Colson Center theologian-in-residence Dr. Timothy Padgett, the course will feature thought leaders Dr. Peter Leithart, Dr. Glenn Sunshine, and Collin Hansen. Go to colsoncenter.org/August. 

The BreakPoint Podcast
The Christian History of Abolition v. The Christian History of Abortion

The BreakPoint Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 5:02


In most of the world today, slavery is unthinkable. Is it possible that we could ever reach that same place with abortion in America?  Just as there were once states where it was legal to own slaves and other states where it wasn't, we are now a nation deeply divided on the issue of abortion on a state-by-state level. In certain states, abortion is allowed, encouraged, and even subsidized abortion. In others, abortion is all but illegal. The history of the Church's stance on both issues, abolition and abortion, is instructive as we seek to obey Christ in a post-Roe world.  Clearly, the early Church did not like slavery. The New Testament condemns behaviors that were endemic to the slave trade. In his letter to Philemon, Paul gave broad hints that masters should free their Christian slaves. Early Christians often purchased slaves specifically to set them free.   Even so, neither the New Testament nor the early Church pushed for full abolition of slavery, for at least two reasons.  First, taking a public stand would have brought even more unwanted attention to an already targeted group. Second, the ancient world offered no model to Christians for a society without slaves, so few could envision what that would look like. Though Christians saw slavery as a curse, they could not conceive of being rid of it entirely (any more than they could imagine a world rid of disease or poverty). This failure of moral imagination meant that it would be centuries before the implications of the Gospel would lead Christian rulers to take definitive steps toward abolishing slavery.  By the Middle Ages, overt slavery was rare in Europe, and Church leaders spoke out against it. Thomas Aquinas claimed that slavery might be part of the “law of nations” but was against the law of nature and therefore a sin. When, centuries later, the infamous Atlantic slave trade began, Portugal and Spain defied the decrees of four different popes to spread it in their colonies. In the English-speaking world, the rampant practice of slavery found opposition among Quakers and a rising evangelicalism that eventually ended first the slave trade, then slavery altogether.  All this means that the American theologians who defended slavery were following the culture's lead, not Church teaching. Though it took far too long for the implications of the Gospel to become clear, the teaching of both Jesus and Paul of the spiritual and moral equality of all persons meant that slavery was incompatible with Christianity, and its abolition in Christian states was only a matter of time. Eventually, because of the commitment to the worth and dignity of every human being as created in the image of God, Christians fought to end the abuse of slavery.  In contrast, the Christian position on abortion has been clear from day one. In the Didache, the earliest non-New Testament Christian work to survive, Christians are instructed “you shall not murder a child by abortion nor kill that which is born.” Similarly, the late first or early second century Epistle of Barnabas, a manual of ethics in this early period, says “you shall not murder a child by abortion, nor again kill it when it is born.” In “A Plea for Christians,” written in 177, Athenagoras of Athens wrote, “[w]e say that those women who use drugs to bring on abortion commit murder …”  Similar teaching can be found in the writings of Clement of Alexandria, the pseudonymous Apocalypse of Peter, Tertullian, Hippolytus, Cyprian, and Lactantius, which takes us up to the de-criminalization of Christianity by Constantine. The teaching of the Church on abortion has been clear from the start and continued to be clear well into the 20th century.   Only recently have some claiming the name of Christ accepted abortion as morally licit, or worse, have celebrated it. Christian opposition to abortion is based on precisely the same reasoning as Christian opposition to slavery. Every human being is made in the image of God and is crowned with glory and honor, a dignity we dare not ignore. The same dehumanizing and depersonalizing claim that undergirded the idea that slaves were less worthy as human beings, and further undergirded the horrific treatment of African Americans in the Jim Crow South, is also at work in pro-abortion thinking. And yet, the same liberating power of the imago dei that broke the chains of slavery demands that we see the dignity of preborn children and work to protect them.   Slavery and the subsequent dehumanizing treatment of African Americans was evil, and that the crusade to end both was (and is) God's work. May we also recognize that dehumanizing and killing the unborn is at least as evil, and rightly abhorred.