Podcasts about patron saints

  • 791PODCASTS
  • 1,707EPISODES
  • 56mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 31, 2023LATEST
patron saints

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about patron saints

Show all podcasts related to patron saints

Latest podcast episodes about patron saints

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of Readings[DAY TITLE]The Saint of the day is Saint John BoscoSaint John Bosco's Story John Bosco's theory of education could well be used in today's schools. It was a preventive system, rejecting corporal punishment and placing students in surroundings removed from the likelihood of committing sin. He advocated frequent reception of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. He combined catechetical training and fatherly guidance, seeking to unite the spiritual life with one's work, study and play. Encouraged during his youth in Turin to become a priest so he could work with young boys, John was ordained in 1841. His service to young people started when he met a poor orphan in Turin, and instructed him in preparation for receiving Holy Communion. He then gathered young apprentices and taught them catechism. After serving as chaplain in a hospice for working girls, Don Bosco opened the Oratory of St. Francis de Sales for boys. Several wealthy and powerful patrons contributed money, enabling him to provide two workshops for the boys, shoemaking and tailoring. By 1856, the institution had grown to 150 boys and had added a printing press for publication of religious and catechetical pamphlets. John's interest in vocational education and publishing justify him as patron of young apprentices and Catholic publishers. John's preaching fame spread and by 1850 he had trained his own helpers because of difficulties in retaining young priests. In 1854, he and his followers informally banded together, inspired by Saint Francis de Sales. With Pope Pius IX's encouragement, John gathered 17 men and founded the Salesians in 1859. Their activity concentrated on education and mission work. Later, he organized a group of Salesian Sisters to assist girls. Reflection John Bosco educated the whole person—body and soul united. He believed that Christ's love and our faith in that love should pervade everything we do—work, study, play. For John Bosco, being a Christian was a full-time effort, not a once-a-week, Mass-on-Sunday experience. It is searching and finding God and Jesus in everything we do, letting their love lead us. Yet, because John realized the importance of job-training and the self-worth and pride that come with talent and ability, he trained his students in the trade crafts, too. Saint John Bosco is a Patron Saint of: BoysEditorsEducators/TeachersYouth Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 28, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Priest and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 322The Saint of the day is Saint Thomas AquinasSaint Thomas Aquinas' Story By universal consent, Thomas Aquinas is the preeminent spokesman of the Catholic tradition of reason and of divine revelation. He is one of the great teachers of the medieval Catholic Church, honored with the titles Doctor of the Church and Angelic Doctor. At five he was given to the Benedictine monastery at Monte Cassino in his parents' hopes that he would choose that way of life and eventually became abbot. In 1239, he was sent to Naples to complete his studies. It was here that he was first attracted to Aristotle's philosophy. By 1243, Thomas abandoned his family's plans for him and joined the Dominicans, much to his mother's dismay. On her order, Thomas was captured by his brother and kept at home for over a year. Once free, he went to Paris and then to Cologne, where he finished his studies with Albert the Great. He held two professorships at Paris, lived at the court of Pope Urban IV, directed the Dominican schools at Rome and Viterbo, combated adversaries of the mendicants, as well as the Averroists, and argued with some Franciscans about Aristotelianism. His greatest contribution to the Catholic Church is his writings. The unity, harmony, and continuity of faith and reason, of revealed and natural human knowledge, pervades his writings. One might expect Thomas, as a man of the gospel, to be an ardent defender of revealed truth. But he was broad enough, deep enough, to see the whole natural order as coming from God the Creator, and to see reason as a divine gift to be highly cherished. The Summa Theologiae, his last and, unfortunately, uncompleted work, deals with the whole of Catholic theology. He stopped work on it after celebrating Mass on December 6, 1273. When asked why he stopped writing, he replied, “I cannot go on…. All that I have written seems to me like so much straw compared to what I have seen and what has been revealed to me.” He died March 7, 1274. Reflection We can look to Thomas Aquinas as a towering example of Catholicism in the sense of broadness, universality, and inclusiveness. We should be determined anew to exercise the divine gift of reason in us, our power to know, learn, and understand. At the same time we should thank God for the gift of his revelation, especially in Jesus Christ. Saint Thomas Aquinas is a Patron Saint of: Catholic Colleges and UniversitiesEducators/TeachersPhilosophers/TheologiansStudents Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, January 27, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Third Week of Ordinary Time Lectionary: 321The Saint of the day is Saint Angela MericiSaint Angela Merici's story Angela Merici has the double distinction of founding the first of what are now called “secular institutes” and the first teaching order of women in the Church. Born in Desenzano, Italy, she was orphaned in her teens. As a young woman, with her heart centered on Christ, Angela joined the Third Order of St. Francis and embraced austerity. In a visionary experience, she felt called to found a “company” of women. Angela was invited to become a live-in companion for a widow in the nearby town of Brescia. There she became the spiritual advisor of a group of men and women with ideals of spiritual renewal and service to those in need. While on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land in 1524, Angela was struck with blindness. She proceeded to visit the sacred shrines, seeing them with her spirit. On the way back while praying before a crucifix, Angela’s sight was restored. At age 60, Angela and 12 other women began the Company of St. Ursula, named for a patroness of medieval universities and venerated as a leader of women. This constituted a new way of life: single women consecrated to Christ and living in the world rather than in a monastery. With Angela as their “mother and mistress,” Company members did not live in community, wore no special clothing, and made no formal vows. Angela Merici died in Brescia, Italy, in 1540. Clothed in the habit of a Franciscan tertiary, her body was interred in Brescia’s Church of Saint’ Afra. Four years later the Company’s Rule that Angela had composed, prescribing the practices of chastity, poverty and obedience, was approved by the pope. In the early 1600s, Companies that had expanded into France were re-organized into the religious Order of St. Ursula, to teach girls. Angela's words continue to inspire the Ursuline nuns' mission of education, a mission that spread worldwide. The Company of St. Ursula also continued to exist and is federated worldwide today with members in 30 countries. Angela Merici was canonized by Pope Pius VII in 1807. Reflection As with so many saints, history is mostly concerned with their activities. But deep Christian faith and love sustain one whose courage lasts a lifetime, and who can take bold new steps when human need demands. Saint Angela Merici is a Patron Saint of: Educators/Teachers Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, January 26, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saints Timothy and Titus, bishops Lectionary: 520/320The Saint of the day is Saints Timothy and TitusSaints Timothy and Titus' Story What we know from the New Testament of Timothy's life makes it sound like that of a modern harried bishop. He had the honor of being a fellow apostle with Paul, both sharing the privilege of preaching the gospel and suffering for it. Timothy had a Greek father and a Jewish mother named Eunice. Being the product of a “mixed” marriage, he was considered illegitimate by the Jews. It was his grandmother, Lois, who first became Christian. Timothy was a convert of Paul around the year 47 and later joined him in his apostolic work. He was with Paul at the founding of the Church in Corinth. During the 15 years he worked with Paul, he became one of his most faithful and trusted friends. He was sent on difficult missions by Paul—often in the face of great disturbance in local churches which Paul had founded. Timothy was with Paul in Rome during the latter's house arrest. At some period Timothy himself was in prison (Hebrews 13:23). Paul installed him as his representative at the Church of Ephesus. Timothy was comparatively young for the work he was doing. Several references seem to indicate that he was timid. And one of Paul's most frequently quoted lines was addressed to him: “Stop drinking only water, but have a little wine for the sake of your stomach and your frequent illnesses” (1 Timothy 5:23). Titus has the distinction of being a close friend and disciple of Paul as well as a fellow missionary. He was Greek, apparently from Antioch. Even though Titus was a Gentile, Paul would not let him be forced to undergo circumcision at Jerusalem. Titus is seen as a peacemaker, administrator, great friend. Paul's second letter to Corinth affords an insight into the depth of his friendship with Titus, and the great fellowship they had in preaching the gospel. When Paul was having trouble with the community at Corinth, Titus was the bearer of Paul's severe letter and was successful in smoothing things out. Paul writes he was strengthened not only by the arrival of Titus but also “by the encouragement with which he was encouraged in regard to you, as he told us of your yearning, your lament, your zeal for me, so that I rejoiced even more…. And his heart goes out to you all the more, as he remembers the obedience of all of you, when you received him with fear and trembling” (2 Corinthians 7:7a, 15). The “Letter to Titus” addresses him as the administrator of the Christian community on the island of Crete, charged with organizing it, correcting abuses, and appointing presbyter-bishops. Reflection In Titus we get another glimpse of life in the early Church: great zeal in the apostolate, great communion in Christ, great friendship. Yet always there is the problem of human nature and the unglamorous details of daily life: the need for charity and patience in “quarrels with others, fears within myself,” as Paul says. Through it all, the love of Christ sustained them. At the end of the Letter to Titus, Paul says that when the temporary substitute comes, “hurry to me.” Saints Timothy and Titus are the Patron Saints of: Relief from Stomach Disorders Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Magick & Alchemy
Episode 89: Wednesday Addams: The Patron Saint of Outcasts

Magick & Alchemy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 30:08


On episode 89 of the Magick & Alchemy Podcast, hosts Kate Belew and Kristin Lisenby discuss the Patron Saint of Outcasts, Wednesday Addams. In this special pop-culture episode, Kristin and Kate contemplate the history of Wednesday's spooky family - including the Addams' appearance in print, sitcoms, movies, and the new Netflix series. They also contemplate the Addams' appeal (despite their refusal to conform), their relationship to witchcraft, and Wednesday as a queer icon. Created by Tamed Wild. Production by Julio Montero Music by Follow the Wind, Taizo Audio. Sources: The Cultural History of 'The Addams Family' | Arts & Culture| Smithsonian Magazine https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/cultural-history-addams-family-180973315/ 9 Wednesday Easter Eggs & Hidden Addams Family References You Missed | Teen Vogue https://www.teenvogue.com/story/netflix-wednesday-easter-eggs-and-hidden-addams-family-references-you-missed A Nursery Rhyme from the American Psychiatric Society | The New Yorker https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2000/09/18/a-nursery-rhyme-from-the-american-psychiatric-society#:~:text=%5BMonday%27s%20child%20is%20fair%20of,%2C%20and%20good%20and%20gay.%5D Who Is Wednesday Addams? Wednesday Addams, Explained| The Mary Sue https://www.themarysue.com/who-is-wednesday-addams-wednesday-addams-explained/ https://www.out.com/events/2022/11/10/drag-race-stars-explain-why-wednesday-addams-gay-icon https://gayety.co/jenna-ortega-dishes-on-why-wednesday-addams-is-a-gay-icon https://www.them.us/story/netflix-wednesday-addams-gay https://jezebel.com/maybe-wednesday-addams-is-gay-maybe-her-suitors-are-ju-1849843583 https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/a25243218/queer-meaning-definition/

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 24, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Francis de Sales, Bishop and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 318The Saint of the day is Saint Francis de SalesSaint Francis de Sales' Story Francis was destined by his father to be a lawyer so that the young man could eventually take his elder's place as a senator from the province of Savoy in France. For this reason Francis was sent to Padua to study law. After receiving his doctorate, he returned home and, in due time, told his parents he wished to enter the priesthood. His father strongly opposed Francis in this, and only after much patient persuasiveness on the part of the gentle Francis did his father finally consent. Francis was ordained and elected provost of the Diocese of Geneva, then a center for the Calvinists. Francis set out to convert them, especially in the district of Chablais. By preaching and distributing the little pamphlets he wrote to explain true Catholic doctrine, he had remarkable success. At 35, he became bishop of Geneva. While administering his diocese he continued to preach, hear confessions, and catechize the children. His gentle character was a great asset in winning souls. He practiced his own axiom, “A spoonful of honey attracts more flies than a barrelful of vinegar.” Besides his two well-known books, the Introduction to the Devout Life and A Treatise on the Love of God, he wrote many pamphlets and carried on a vast correspondence. For his writings, he has been named patron of the Catholic Press. His writings, filled with his characteristic gentle spirit, are addressed to lay people. He wants to make them understand that they too are called to be saints. As he wrote in The Introduction to the Devout Life: “It is an error, or rather a heresy, to say devotion is incompatible with the life of a soldier, a tradesman, a prince, or a married woman…. It has happened that many have lost perfection in the desert who had preserved it in the world.” In spite of his busy and comparatively short life, he had time to collaborate with another saint, Jane Frances de Chantal, in the work of establishing the Sisters of the Visitation. These women were to practice the virtues exemplified in Mary's visit to Elizabeth: humility, piety, and mutual charity. They at first engaged to a limited degree in works of mercy for the poor and the sick. Today, while some communities conduct schools, others live a strictly contemplative life. Reflection Francis de Sales took seriously the words of Christ, “Learn of me for I am meek and humble of heart.” As he said himself, it took him 20 years to conquer his quick temper, but no one ever suspected he had such a problem, so overflowing with good nature and kindness was his usual manner of acting. His perennial meekness and sunny disposition won for him the title of “Gentleman Saint.” Saint Francis de Sales is the Patron Saint of: AuthorsDeafnessJournalistsWriters Click here for more on Francis de Sales! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 21, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Agnes, Virgin and Martyr Lectionary: 316The Saint of the day is Saint AgnesSaint Agnes' Story Almost nothing is known of this saint except that she was very young—12 or 13—when she was martyred in the last half of the third century. Various modes of death have been suggested—beheading, burning, strangling. Legend has it that Agnes was a beautiful girl whom many young men wanted to marry. Among those she refused, one reported her to the authorities for being a Christian. She was arrested and confined to a house of prostitution. The legend continues that a man who looked upon her lustfully lost his sight and had it restored by her prayer. Agnes was condemned, executed, and buried near Rome in a catacomb that eventually was named after her. The daughter of Constantine built a basilica in her honor. Reflection Like that of Maria Goretti in the 20th century, the martyrdom of a virginal young girl made a deep impression on a society enslaved to a materialistic outlook. Also like Agatha, who died in similar circumstances, Agnes is a symbol that holiness does not depend on length of years, experience, or human effort. It is a gift God offers to all. Saint Agnes is the Patron Saint of: GirlsGirl Scouts Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, January 20, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Second Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 315The Saint of the day is Saint SebastianSaint Sebastian's Story Almost nothing is historically certain about Sebastian except that he was a Roman martyr, was venerated in Milan even in the time of Saint Ambrose and was buried on the Appian Way, probably near the present Basilica of St. Sebastian. Devotion to him spread rapidly, and he is mentioned in several martyrologies as early as 350. The legend of Saint Sebastian is important in art, and there is a vast iconography. Scholars now agree that a pious fable has Sebastian entering the Roman army because only there could he assist the martyrs without arousing suspicion. Finally he was found out, brought before Emperor Diocletian and delivered to Mauritanian archers to be shot to death. His body was pierced with arrows, and he was left for dead. But he was found still alive by those who came to bury him. He recovered, but refused to flee. One day he took up a position near where the emperor was to pass. He accosted the emperor, denouncing him for his cruelty to Christians. This time the sentence of death was carried out. Sebastian was beaten to death with clubs. He was buried on the Appian Way, close to the catacombs that bear his name. Reflection The fact that many of the early saints made such a tremendous impression on the Church—awakening widespread devotion and great praise from the greatest writers of the Church—is proof of the heroism of their lives. As has been said, legends may not be literally true. Yet they may express the very substance of the faith and courage evident in the lives of these heroes and heroines of Christ. Saint Sebastian is the Patron Saint of: Athletes Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

The Glen Gauer Podcast
Are Christians Called to live the American Dream? The Glen Gauer podcast.

The Glen Gauer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 45:13


In this Episode… Glen puts Dennis on the spot.  Are christians really living out christianity, or is the american dream what most people target?   How many people are intentionally living the gospel?  The stats say it's extremely low.   St. Augustine, a 4th century saint said “it is certain that few are saved”.  But a modern mystic named Blessed Anna Maria Taigi who died in the 1800's said:  “The greater number of Christians today are damned. The destiny of those dying on one day is that very few – not as many as ten – went straight to Heaven; many remained in Purgatory; and those cast into Hell were as numerous as snowflakes in mid-winter.” That is shocking, if true.   Here's one more, St. Louis De Montford (d. 1716), Patron Saint of Parish Priest's:   "The number of the elect is so small — so small — that, were we to know how small it is, we would faint away with grief: one here and there, scattered up and down the world!” In this show Glen provided 3 things every person can do to change this course and discern the “Father's Will”.  This show may be the best 45 minutes of your life.  

Ridiculous Crime
Patron Saint of Confidence Women: Cassie Chadwick

Ridiculous Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 52:43


She told fortunes. She faked documents. She changed her name. She crashed the economy of a major American city. Sorry, Cleveland.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, January 17, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Anthony, Abbott Lectionary: 312The Saint of the day is Saint Anthony of EgyptSaint Anthony of Egypt's Story The life of Anthony will remind many people of Saint Francis of Assisi. At 20, Anthony was so moved by the Gospel message, “Go, sell what you have, and give to [the] poor” (Mark 10:21b), that he actually did just that with his large inheritance. He is different from Francis in that most of Anthony's life was spent in solitude. He saw the world completely covered with snares, and gave the Church and the world the witness of solitary asceticism, great personal mortification and prayer. But no saint is antisocial, and Anthony drew many people to himself for spiritual healing and guidance. At 54, he responded to many requests and founded a sort of monastery of scattered cells. Again, like Francis, he had great fear of “stately buildings and well-laden tables.” At 60, he hoped to be a martyr in the renewed Roman persecution of 311, fearlessly exposing himself to danger while giving moral and material support to those in prison. At 88, he was fighting the Arian heresy, that massive trauma from which it took the Church centuries to recover. “The mule kicking over the altar” denied the divinity of Christ. Anthony is associated in art with a T-shaped cross, a pig and a book. The pig and the cross are symbols of his valiant warfare with the devil—the cross his constant means of power over evil spirits, the pig a symbol of the devil himself. The book recalls his preference for “the book of nature” over the printed word. Anthony died in solitude at age 105. Reflection In an age that smiles at the notion of devils and angels, a person known for having power over evil spirits must at least make us pause. And in a day when people speak of life as a “rat race,” one who devotes a whole life to solitude and prayer points to an essential of the Christian life in all ages. Anthony's hermit life reminds us of the absoluteness of our break with sin and the totality of our commitment to Christ. Even in God's good world, there is another world whose false values constantly tempt us. Saint Anthony of Egypt is the Patron Saint of: ButchersGravediggersSkin Diseases Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Desert Rain Community Radio
#86 - Vincent: The Patron Saint of Color

Desert Rain Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 48:40


David and Dorian discuss their moving experience at "Beyond Van Gogh: The Immersive Experience" and how it has stayed with them over the last 2 weeks. Tickets can be purchased here: https://beyondvangogh.com . We also mention a clip from Dr. Who and that can be seen here: https://youtu.be/ubTJI_UphPk

The Meaningfulistic Podcast
#8 - Patron Saints with Deacon Matt Rust

The Meaningfulistic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 59:19


Why do Catholics pray to saints? Deacon Matt Rust tells the amazing story of his special relationship with St. Padre Pio and the miracles that he has seen in his life through intercessory prayer. We talk about the vibrant community of faith with our heavenly brothers and sisters and how their prayers benefit us by virtue of their proximity to God. I ask him about how Christian men can pray to embrace more feminine qualities to be more complete. "We as the body of Christ are the bride of Christ, and so we as a whole take on these feminine, wifely attributes that make us submissive to Christ." "Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles." Hebrews 12:1 Padre Pio of Pietrelcina was an Italian Franciscan Capuchin friar, priest, stigmatist, and mystic. Books: The Interior Castle by St. Teresa of Avila The Life of St. Anthony the Great by Athanasius of Alexandria

Blue Ocean Faith Ann Arbor
08 Jan 2023 | Joseph, Patron Saint of Allies?

Blue Ocean Faith Ann Arbor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 20:28


On this Epiphany Sunday, we hone in on Jesus's dad, Joseph, and wonder about his role in being an ally to Mary both in her pregnancy and in facing the threat conveyed by the magi regarding Herod. Learn more about Blue Ocean Church at a2blue.org. You can watch recordings of past services, find out which Sundays we'll […]

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 7, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsChristmas Weekday Lectionary: 210The Saint of the day is Saint Raymond of PeafortSaint Raymond of Peñafort's Story Since Raymond lived into his hundredth year, he had a chance to do many things. As a member of the Spanish nobility, he had the resources and the education to get a good start in life. By the time he was 20, he was teaching philosophy. In his early 30s he earned a doctorate in both canon and civil law. At 41 he became a Dominican. Pope Gregory IX called him to Rome to work for him and to be his confessor. One of the things the pope asked him to do was to gather together all the decrees of popes and councils that had been made in 80 years since a similar collection by Gratian. Raymond compiled five books called the Decretals. They were looked upon as one of the best organized collections of Church law until the 1917 codification of canon law. Earlier, Raymond had written for confessors a book of cases. It was called Summa de Casibus Poenitentiae. More than simply a list of sins and penances, it discussed pertinent doctrines and laws of the Church that pertained to the problem or case brought to the confessor. At the age of 60, Raymond was appointed archbishop of Tarragona, the capital of Aragon. He didn't like the honor at all and ended up getting sick and resigning in two years. He didn't get to enjoy his peace long, however, because when he was 63 he was elected by his fellow Dominicans to be the head of the whole Order, the successor of Saint Dominic. Raymond worked hard, visited on foot all the Dominicans, reorganized their constitutions and managed to put through a provision that a master general be allowed to resign. When the new constitutions were accepted, Raymond, then 65, resigned. He still had 35 years to oppose heresy and work for the conversion of the Moors in Spain. He convinced Saint Thomas Aquinas to write his work Against the Gentiles. In his 100th year, the Lord let Raymond retire. Reflection Raymond was a lawyer, a canonist. Legalism can suck the life out of genuine religion if it becomes too great a preoccupation with the letter of the law to the neglect of the spirit and purpose of the law. The law can become an end in itself, so that the value the law was intended to promote is overlooked. But we must guard against going to the opposite extreme and seeing law as useless or something to be lightly regarded. Laws ideally state those things that are for the best interests of everyone and make sure the rights of all are safeguarded. From Raymond, we can learn a respect for law as a means of serving the common good. Saint Raymond of Peñafort is a Patron Saint of: Lawyers Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

InfluenceWatch Podcast
Episode 251: The Patron Saint of Bad Science: Paul Ehrlich

InfluenceWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 24:43


In 1968, Paul Ehrlich claimed that “the battle to feed all of humanity is over” and that mass starvation was imminent. He was completely, utterly, and totally wrong. But because Ehrlich is a leader of the environmentalist movement, just last week, “60 Minutes” brought him back to make more predictions of imminent doom unless we vastly reduce our quality of life. Joining me and my colleague Sarah Lee to discuss Ehrlich's life, work, and revival to aid the green agenda is Steve Milloy, Senior Legal Fellow at Energy and Environment Legal Institute. Links: The Books That Begat ‘Big Green': https://capitalresearch.org/app/uploads/GW1508-final-draft-150810.pdf A Darker Shade of Green: Apocalypse...Now?: https://capitalresearch.org/article/a-darker-shade-of-green-apocalypse-now/ WATCH: ‘60 Minutes' Gives Airtime to ‘Population Bomb' Fanatic to Prophesy Mass Extinction: https://www.newsbusters.org/blogs/business/joseph-vazquez/2023/01/03/watch-60-minutes-gives-airtime-population-bomb-fanatic Follow us on our socials: Twitter: @capitalresearch Instagram: @capitalresearchcenter Facebook: www.facebook.com/capitalresearchcenter YouTube: @capitalresearchcenter

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, January 5, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint John Neumann, Bishop Lectionary: 208The Saint of the day is Saint John NeumannSaint John Neumann's Story Perhaps because the United States got a later start in the history of the world, it has relatively few canonized saints, but their number is increasing. John Neumann was born in what is now the Czech Republic. After studying in Prague, he came to New York at 25 and was ordained a priest. He did missionary work in New York until he was 29, when he joined the Redemptorists and became its first member to profess vows in the United States. He continued missionary work in Maryland, Virginia and Ohio, where he became popular with the Germans. At 41, as bishop of Philadelphia, he organized the parochial school system into a diocesan one, increasing the number of pupils almost twentyfold within a short time. Gifted with outstanding organizing ability, he drew into the city many teaching communities of sisters and the Christian Brothers. During his brief assignment as vice provincial for the Redemptorists, he placed them in the forefront of the parochial movement. Well-known for his holiness and learning, spiritual writing and preaching, on October 13, 1963, John Neumann became the first American bishop to be beatified. Canonized in 1977, he is buried in St. Peter the Apostle Church in Philadelphia. Reflection Neumann took seriously our Lord's words, “Go and teach all nations.” From Christ he received his instructions and the power to carry them out. For Christ does not give a mission without supplying the means to accomplish it. The Father's gift in Christ to John Neumann was his exceptional organizing ability, which he used to spread the Good News. Today the Church is in dire need of men and women to continue in our times the teaching of the Good News. The obstacles and inconveniences are real and costly. Yet when Christians approach Christ, he supplies the necessary talents to answer today's needs. The Spirit of Christ continues his work through the instrumentality of generous Christians. Saint John Neumann is a Patron Saint of: Educators/Teachers Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, January 4, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Religious Lectionary: 207The Saint of the day is Saint Elizabeth Ann SetonSaint Elizabeth Ann Seton's Story Mother Seton is one of the keystones of the American Catholic Church. She founded the first American religious community for women, the Sisters of Charity. She opened the first American parish school and established the first American Catholic orphanage. All this she did in the span of 46 years while raising her five children. Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton is a true daughter of the American Revolution, born August 28, 1774, just two years before the Declaration of Independence. By birth and marriage, she was linked to the first families of New York and enjoyed the fruits of high society. Reared a staunch Episcopalian, she learned the value of prayer, Scripture and a nightly examination of conscience. Her father, Dr. Richard Bayley, did not have much use for churches but was a great humanitarian, teaching his daughter to love and serve others. The early deaths of her mother in 1777 and her baby sister in 1778 gave Elizabeth a feel for eternity and the temporariness of the pilgrim life on earth. Far from being brooding and sullen, she faced each new “holocaust,” as she put it, with hopeful cheerfulness. At 19, Elizabeth was the belle of New York and married a handsome, wealthy businessman, William Magee Seton. They had five children before his business failed and he died of tuberculosis. At 30, Elizabeth was widowed and penniless, with five small children to support. While in Italy with her dying husband, Elizabeth witnessed Catholicity in action through family friends. Three basic points led her to become a Catholic: belief in the Real Presence, devotion to the Blessed Mother and conviction that the Catholic Church led back to the apostles and to Christ. Many of her family and friends rejected her when she became a Catholic in March 1805. To support her children, she opened a school in Baltimore. From the beginning, her group followed the lines of a religious community, which was officially founded in 1809. The thousand or more letters of Mother Seton reveal the development of her spiritual life from ordinary goodness to heroic sanctity. She suffered great trials of sickness, misunderstanding, the death of loved ones (her husband and two young daughters) and the heartache of a wayward son. She died January 4, 1821, and became the first American-born citizen to be beatified (1963) and then canonized (1975). She is buried in Emmitsburg, Maryland. Reflection Elizabeth Ann Seton had no extraordinary gifts. She was not a mystic or stigmatic. She did not prophesy or speak in tongues. She had two great devotions: abandonment to the will of God and an ardent love for the Blessed Sacrament. She wrote to a friend, Julia Scott, that she would prefer to exchange the world for a “cave or a desert.” “But God has given me a great deal to do, and I have always and hope always to prefer his will to every wish of my own.” Her brand of sanctity is open to everyone if we love God and do his will. Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton is a Patron Saint of: Catholic SchoolsEducators/TeachersLoss of ParentsWidows Enjoy this meditation on St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, January 2, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saints Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen, Bishops and Doctors of the Church Lectionary: 205The Saint of the day is Saint Basil the GreatSaint Basil the Great's Story Basil was on his way to becoming a famous teacher when he decided to begin a religious life of gospel poverty. After studying various modes of religious life, he founded what was probably the first monastery in Asia Minor. He is to monks of the East what Saint Benedict is to the West, and Basil's principles influence Eastern monasticism today. He was ordained a priest, assisted the archbishop of Caesarea—now southeastern Turkey—and ultimately became archbishop himself, in spite of opposition from some of the bishops under him, probably because they foresaw coming reforms. Arianism, one of the most damaging heresies in the history of the Church which denied the divinity of Christ, was at its height. Emperor Valens persecuted orthodox believers, and put great pressure on Basil to remain silent and admit the heretics to communion. Basil remained firm, and Valens backed down. But trouble remained. When the great Saint Athanasius died, the mantle of defender of the faith against Arianism fell upon Basil. He strove mightily to unite and rally his fellow Catholics who were crushed by tyranny and torn by internal dissension. He was misunderstood, misrepresented, accused of heresy and ambition. Even appeals to the pope brought no response. “For my sins I seem to be unsuccessful in everything.” Basil was tireless in pastoral care. He preached twice a day to huge crowds, built a hospital that was called a wonder of the world—as a youth he had organized famine relief and worked in a soup kitchen himself—and fought the prostitution business. Basil was best known as an orator. Though not recognized greatly in his lifetime, his writings rightly place him among the great teachers of the Church. Seventy-two years after his death, the Council of Chalcedon described him as “the great Basil, minister of grace who has expounded the truth to the whole earth.” Reflection As the French say, “The more things change, the more they remain the same.” Basil faced the same problems as modern Christians. Sainthood meant trying to preserve the spirit of Christ in such perplexing and painful problems as reform, organization, fighting for the poor, maintaining balance and peace in misunderstanding. Saint Basil the Great is the Patron Saint of: Russia Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, December 29, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsThe Fifth Day in the Octave of Christmas Lectionary: 202The Saint of the day is Saint Thomas BecketSaint Thomas Becket's Story A strong man who wavered for a moment, but then learned one cannot come to terms with evil, and so became a strong churchman, a martyr, and a saint—that was Thomas Becket, archbishop of Canterbury, murdered in his cathedral on December 29, 1170. His career had been a stormy one. While archdeacon of Canterbury, he was made chancellor of England at the age of 36 by his friend King Henry II. When Henry felt it advantageous to make his chancellor the archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas gave him fair warning: he might not accept all of Henry's intrusions into Church affairs. Nevertheless, in 1162 he was made archbishop, resigned his chancellorship, and reformed his whole way of life! Troubles began. Henry insisted upon usurping Church rights. At one time, supposing some conciliatory action possible, Thomas came close to compromise. He momentarily approved the Constitutions of Clarendon, which would have denied the clergy the right of trial by a Church court and prevented them from making direct appeal to Rome. But Thomas rejected the Constitutions, fled to France for safety, and remained in exile for seven years. When he returned to England he suspected it would mean certain death. Because Thomas refused to remit censures he had placed upon bishops favored by the king, Henry cried out in a rage, “Will no one rid me of this troublesome priest!” Four knights, taking his words as his wish, slew Thomas in the Canterbury cathedral. Thomas Becket remains a hero-saint down to our own times. Reflection No one becomes a saint without struggle, especially with himself. Thomas knew he must stand firm in defense of truth and right, even at the cost of his life. We also must take a stand in the face of pressures—against dishonesty, deceit, destruction of life—at the cost of popularity, convenience, promotion, and even greater goods. Saint Thomas Becket is a Patron Saint of: Roman Catholic Diocesan Clergy Take a look at these seven books on saints! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, December 28, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of the Holy Innocents, martyrs Lectionary: 698The Saint of the day is Holy InnocentsThe Story of the Holy Innocents Herod “the Great,” king of Judea, was unpopular with his people because of his connections with the Romans and his religious indifference. Hence he was insecure and fearful of any threat to his throne. He was a master politician and a tyrant capable of extreme brutality. He killed his wife, his brother, and his sister's two husbands, to name only a few. Matthew 2:1-18 tells this story: Herod was “greatly troubled” when astrologers from the east came asking the whereabouts of “the newborn king of the Jews,” whose star they had seen. They were told that the Jewish Scriptures named Bethlehem as the place where the Messiah would be born. Herod cunningly told them to report back to him so that he could also “do him homage.” They found Jesus, offered him their gifts, and warned by an angel, avoided Herod on their way home. Jesus escaped to Egypt. Herod became furious and “ordered the massacre of all the boys in Bethlehem and its vicinity two years old and under.” The horror of the massacre and the devastation of the mothers and fathers led Matthew to quote Jeremiah: “A voice was heard in Ramah, sobbing and loud lamentation; Rachel weeping for her children…” (Matthew 2:18). Rachel was the wife of Jacob (Israel). She is pictured as weeping at the place where the Israelites were herded together by the conquering Assyrians for their march into captivity. Reflection The Holy Innocents are few in comparison to the genocide and abortion of our day. But even if there had been only one, we recognize the greatest treasure God put on the earth—a human person, destined for eternity, and graced by Jesus' death and resurrection. The Holy Innocents are the Patron Saints of: Babies Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, December 27, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saint John, Apostle and evangelist Lectionary: 697The Saint of the day is Saint John the EvangelistSaint John the Evangelist's Story It is God who calls; human beings answer. The vocation of John and his brother James is stated very simply in the Gospels, along with that of Peter and his brother Andrew: Jesus called them; they followed. The absoluteness of their response is indicated by the account. James and John “were in a boat, with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left their boat and their father and followed him” (Matthew 4:21b-22). For the three former fishermen—Peter, James and John—that faith was to be rewarded by a special friendship with Jesus. They alone were privileged to be present at the Transfiguration, the raising of the daughter of Jairus and the agony in Gethsemane. But John's friendship was even more special. Tradition assigns to him the Fourth Gospel, although most modern Scripture scholars think it unlikely that the apostle and the evangelist are the same person. John's own Gospel refers to him as “the disciple whom Jesus loved” (see John 13:23; 19:26; 20:2), the one who reclined next to Jesus at the Last Supper, and the one to whom Jesus gave the exquisite honor of caring for his mother, as John stood beneath the cross. “Woman, behold your son…. Behold, your mother” (John 19:26b, 27b). Because of the depth of his Gospel, John is usually thought of as the eagle of theology, soaring in high regions that other writers did not enter. But the ever-frank Gospels reveal some very human traits. Jesus gave James and John the nickname, “sons of thunder.” While it is difficult to know exactly what this meant, a clue is given in two incidents. In the first, as Matthew tells it, their mother asked that they might sit in the places of honor in Jesus' kingdom—one on his right hand, one on his left. When Jesus asked them if they could drink the cup he would drink and be baptized with his baptism of pain, they blithely answered, “We can!” Jesus said that they would indeed share his cup, but that sitting at his right hand was not his to give. It was for those to whom it had been reserved by the Father. The other apostles were indignant at the mistaken ambition of the brothers, and Jesus took the occasion to teach them the true nature of authority: “…[W]hoever wishes to be first among you shall be your slave. Just so, the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many” (Matthew 20:27-28). On another occasion, the “sons of thunder” asked Jesus if they should not call down fire from heaven upon the inhospitable Samaritans, who would not welcome Jesus because he was on his way to Jerusalem. But Jesus “turned and rebuked them” (see Luke 9:51-55). On the first Easter, Mary Magdalene “ran and went to Simon Peter and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, and told them, ‘They have taken the Lord from the tomb, and we don't know where they put him'” (John 20:2). John recalls, perhaps with a smile, that he and Peter ran side by side, but then “the other disciple ran faster than Peter and arrived at the tomb first” (John 20:4b). He did not enter, but waited for Peter and let him go in first. “Then the other disciple also went in, the one who had arrived at the tomb first, and he saw and believed” (John 20:8). John was with Peter when the first great miracle after the Resurrection took place—the cure of the man crippled from birth—which led to their spending the night in jail together. The mysterious experience of the Resurrection is perhaps best contained in the words of Acts: “Observing the boldness of Peter and John and perceiving them to be uneducated, ordinary men, they [the questioners] were amazed, and they recognized them as the companions of Jesus” (Acts 4:13). The Apostle John is traditionally considered the author also of three New Testament letters and the Book of Revelation. His Gospel is a very personal account. He sees the glorious and divine Jesus already in the incidents of his mortal life. At the Last Supper, John's Jesus speaks as if he were already in heaven. John's is the Gospel of Jesus' glory. Reflection It is a long way from being eager to sit on a throne of power or to call down fire from heaven to becoming the man who could write: “The way we came to know love was that he laid down his life for us; so we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers” (1 John 3:16). Saint John the Evangelist is the Patron Saint of: Turkey Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, December 26, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saint Stephen, first martyr Lectionary: 696The Saint of the day is Saint StephenSaint Stephen's Story “As the number of disciples continued to grow, the Greek-speaking Christians complained against the Hebrew-speaking Christians, saying that their widows were being neglected in the daily distribution. So the Twelve called together the community of the disciples and said, ‘It is not right for us to neglect the word of God to serve at table. Brothers, select from among you seven reputable men, filled with the Spirit and wisdom, whom we shall appoint to this task, whereas we shall devote ourselves to prayer and to the ministry of the word.' The proposal was acceptable to the whole community, so they chose Stephen, a man filled with faith and the Holy Spirit…” (Acts 6:1-5). Acts of the Apostles says that Stephen was a man filled with grace and power, who worked great wonders among the people. Certain Jews, members of the Synagogue of Roman Freedmen, debated with Stephen, but proved no match for the wisdom and spirit with which he spoke. They persuaded others to make the charge of blasphemy against him. He was seized and carried before the Sanhedrin. In his speech, Stephen recalled God's guidance through Israel's history, as well as Israel's idolatry and disobedience. He then claimed that his persecutors were showing this same spirit. “…you always oppose the holy Spirit; you are just like your ancestors” (Acts 7:51b). Stephen's speech brought anger from the crowd. “But he, filled with the holy Spirit, looked up intently to heaven and saw the glory of God and Jesus standing at the right hand of God, and he said, ‘Behold, I see the heavens opened and the Son of Man standing at the right hand of God.' …They threw him out of the city, and began to stone him. …As they were stoning Stephen, he called out, ‘Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.' …‘Lord, do not hold this sin against them'” (Acts 7:55-56, 58a, 59, 60b). Reflection Stephen died as Jesus did: falsely accused, brought to unjust condemnation because he spoke the truth fearlessly. He died with his eyes trustfully fixed on God, and with a prayer of forgiveness on his lips. A “happy” death is one that finds us in the same spirit, whether our dying is as quiet as Joseph's or as violent as Stephen's: dying with courage, total trust and forgiving love. Saint Stephen is a Patron Saint of: Deacons Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

DJStrickland Podcast
Episode 4 - David - the Patron Saint of Abusive Clergy

DJStrickland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 66:57


Guest - Michael ButtreyMichael Buttrey is a PhD candidate in Christian Ethics at the Universityof Toronto, where he studies moral improvement and corruption. In 2022he co-founded #ACCtoo, an advocacy group for survivors of sexual abusein the Anglican Church of Canada.A brilliant article on this -https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2022/july-web-only/rape-david-bathsheba-adultery-sexual-sin-prophet-nathan.htmlThe movement seeking reform in how the Anglican Church of Canada responds to survivors, co-founded by Michael Buttrey and Carolyn Mackie - https://www.acctoo.ca/One particularly helpful page on ACCToo is 'Before you report' which provides information and recommendations for those reporting abuse. 'These recommendations are not tailored for any specific diocese or institution. They are also not legal advice and no substitute for professional counsel or therapy' - https://www.acctoo.ca/resources/before-you-report/

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, December 21, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Fourth Week of Advent Lectionary: 197The Saint of the day is Saint Peter CanisiusSaint Peter Canisius' Story The energetic life of Peter Canisius should demolish any stereotypes we may have of the life of a saint as dull or routine. Peter lived his 76 years at a pace which must be considered heroic, even in our time of rapid change. A man blessed with many talents, Peter is an excellent example of the scriptural man who develops his talents for the sake of the Lord's work. Peter was one of the most important figures in the Catholic Reformation in Germany. He played such a key role that he has often been called the “second apostle of Germany,” in that his life parallels the earlier work of Boniface. Although Peter once accused himself of idleness in his youth, he could not have been idle too long, for at the age of 19 he received a master's degree from the university at Cologne. Soon afterwards he met Peter Faber, the first disciple of Ignatius of Loyola, who influenced Peter so much that he joined the recently formed Society of Jesus. At this early age Peter had already taken up a practice he continued throughout his life—a process of study, reflection, prayer, and writing. After his ordination in 1546, he became widely known for his editions of the writings of St. Cyril of Alexandria and St. Leo the Great. Besides this reflective literary bent, Peter had a zeal for the apostolate. He could often be found visiting the sick or imprisoned, even when his assigned duties in other areas were more than enough to keep most people fully occupied. In 1547, Peter attended several sessions of the Council of Trent, whose decrees he was later assigned to implement. After a brief teaching assignment at the Jesuit college at Messina, Peter was entrusted with the mission to Germany—from that point on his life's work. He taught in several universities and was instrumental in establishing many colleges and seminaries. He wrote a catechism that explained the Catholic faith in a way that common people could understand—a great need of that age. Renowned as a popular preacher, Peter packed churches with those eager to hear his eloquent proclamation of the gospel. He had great diplomatic ability, often serving as a reconciler between disputing factions. In his letters—filling eight volumes—one finds words of wisdom and counsel to people in all walks of life. At times he wrote unprecedented letters of criticism to leaders of the Church—yet always in the context of a loving, sympathetic concern. At 70, Peter suffered a paralytic seizure, but he continued to preach and write with the aid of a secretary, until his death in his hometown of Nijmegen, Netherlands, on December 21, 1597. Reflection Peter's untiring efforts are an apt example for those involved in the renewal of the Church or the growth of moral consciousness in business or government. He is regarded as one of the creators of the Catholic press, and can easily be a model for the Christian author or journalist. Teachers can see in his life a passion for the transmission of truth. Whether we have much to give, as Peter Canisius did, or whether we have only a little to give, as did the poor widow in the Gospel of Luke (see Luke 21:1–4), the important thing is to give our all. It is in this way that Peter is so exemplary for Christians in an age of rapid change when we are called to be in the world but not of the world. Saint Peter Canisius is a Patron Saint of: Germany Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

What Women and Other Wonderful Humans Want
Natalia Sadici: The Patron Saint of Debauchery

What Women and Other Wonderful Humans Want

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 67:45


The Patron Saint of Debauchery, Vixen Sadist & South Florida Dominatrix - the incredible Natalya Sadici joins @hitherecatsuit for a conversation that includes her amazing history in the community and the story of how they connected in a beautiful way through the podcast.

Curious Cat
Archangel Gabriel (is more than just a pretty face and shiny horn)

Curious Cat

Play Episode Play 39 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 26:35


If you've been listening to Curious Cat this season, then you know that this year I've been into angels. In fact, I've taken direction from my morning meditations as to which angel to research and feature next. Archangel Gabriel is one that takes my breath away, he is gloriously beautiful, dazzling, I can't look at him straight-on. There's a series of meditations I listen to that invoke the angels for protection and each time the narrator, Steve Noble, mentions Archangel Gabriel in the east I blush. I am working to feel worthy of his love, time, care, and assistance because it is definitely a ME thing, not a him thing.It is said that Gabriel is archangel of revelation because God chooses him time and time again to convey important messages. He is also archangel of the moon. When you encounter white or copper tinged light in your dreams, that's a sign Gabriel has been working with you while you sleep. He is also associated with the colors purple and light blue.He appears in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament of the Christian Bible, and the Quran. He appeared to the prophet Daniel to explain the visions he'd been having. He spoke to the parents of John the Baptist to share the news first that their son's birth would be rejoiced across the land. He came to Mary and Joseph to share the good news of their son, Jesus's birth. This is why many call him the Christmas Angel.If you wish to master your emotions without repressing them, then turn to Gabriel. In addition, he is associated with water magick and the chalice is his elemental tool.  Other attributes? He's sometimes depicted holding a lily, a trumpet, a shining lantern, a branch from Paradise, a scroll or a scepter. Archangel Gabriel might need a dufflebag to hold all that. The image of him holding a trumpet is one frequently seen in the form of classic Christmas tree topper angels and atop Mormon temples guilded in gold!The episode dives into Gabriel in many world religions and also pivots to a soul conversation when we turn to the work of author and podcaster, Julie Jancius. Made and shared with love.Show Sources and Materials:https://www.learnreligions.com/meet-archangel-gabriel-124077https://angelology.fandom.com/wiki/GabrielAll of Damien Echols' books: https://damienechols.com/books/ Julie Jancius' Angels and Awakening book: https://www.amazon.com/Angels-and-Awakening/dp/B08JJSK4XMCurious Cat and Crew on Socials:Curious Cat on TwitterCurious Cat on InstagramArt Director – Nora HotesAudio Engineer - Aidan Conners

Cool Kids Bible Study
EP 037 The Patron Saint of Frauds

Cool Kids Bible Study

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 67:14


On this week's episode, Cole introduces a troubling alter-ego before declaring himself a Saint in Training. Pastor George is plagued by cockroaches, as was foretold in the premonition of a forthright superintendent. This deep dive is all about Sainthood, which is really really neat and you should all check it out. Send questions and struggles to coolkidsbiblestudy@gmail.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/cool-kids-bible-study/message

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, December 14, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint John of the Cross, Priest and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 189The Saint of the day is Saint John of the CrossSaint John of the Cross' Story John is a saint because his life was a heroic effort to live up to his name: “of the Cross.” The folly of the cross came to full realization in time. “Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me” (Mark 8:34b) is the story of John's life. The Paschal Mystery—through death to life—strongly marks John as reformer, mystic-poet, and theologian-priest. Ordained a Carmelite priest in 1567 at age 25, John met Teresa of Avila and like her, vowed himself to the primitive Rule of the Carmelites. As partner with Teresa and in his own right, John engaged in the work of reform, and came to experience the price of reform: increasing opposition, misunderstanding, persecution, imprisonment. He came to know the cross acutely—to experience the dying of Jesus—as he sat month after month in his dark, damp, narrow cell with only his God. Yet, the paradox! In this dying of imprisonment John came to life, uttering poetry. In the darkness of the dungeon, John's spirit came into the Light. There are many mystics, many poets; John is unique as mystic-poet, expressing in his prison-cross the ecstasy of mystical union with God in the Spiritual Canticle. But as agony leads to ecstasy, so John had his Ascent to Mt. Carmel, as he named it in his prose masterpiece. As man-Christian-Carmelite, he experienced in himself this purifying ascent; as spiritual director, he sensed it in others; as psychologist-theologian, he described and analyzed it in his prose writings. His prose works are outstanding in underscoring the cost of discipleship, the path of union with God: rigorous discipline, abandonment, purification. Uniquely and strongly John underlines the gospel paradox: The cross leads to resurrection, agony to ecstasy, darkness to light, abandonment to possession, denial to self to union with God. If you want to save your life, you must lose it. John is truly “of the Cross.” He died at 49—a life short, but full. Reflection In his life and writings, John of the Cross has a crucial word for us today. We tend to be rich, soft, comfortable. We shrink even from words like self-denial, mortification, purification, asceticism, discipline. We run from the cross. John's message—like the gospel—is loud and clear: Don't—if you really want to live! Saint John of the Cross is the Patron Saint of: Mystics Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, December 13, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Lucy, Virgin and Martyr Lectionary: 188The Saint of the day is Saint LucySaint Lucy's Story Every little girl named Lucy must bite her tongue in disappointment when she first tries to find out what there is to know about her patron saint. The older books will have a lengthy paragraph detailing a small number of traditions. Newer books will have a lengthy paragraph showing that there is little basis in history for these traditions. The single fact survives that a disappointed suitor accused Lucy of being a Christian, and she was executed in Syracuse, Sicily, in the year 304. But it is also true that her name is mentioned in the First Eucharistic Prayer, geographical places are named after her, a popular song has her name as its title, and down through the centuries many thousands of little girls have been proud of the name Lucy. One can easily imagine what a young Christian woman had to contend with in pagan Sicily in the year 300. If you have trouble imagining, just glance at today's pleasure-at-all-costs world and the barriers it presents against leading a good Christian life. Her friends must have wondered aloud about this hero of Lucy's, an obscure itinerant preacher in a far-off captive nation that had been destroyed more than 200 years before. Once a carpenter, he had been crucified by the Romans after his own people turned him over to their authority. Lucy believed with her whole soul that this man had risen from the dead. Heaven had put a stamp on all he said and did. To give witness to her faith she had made a vow of virginity. What a hubbub this caused among her pagan friends! The kindlier ones just thought her a little strange. To be pure before marriage was an ancient Roman ideal, rarely found, but not to be condemned. To exclude marriage altogether, however, was too much. She must have something sinister to hide, the tongues wagged. Lucy knew of the heroism of earlier virgin martyrs. She remained faithful to their example and to the example of the carpenter, whom she knew to be the Son of God. She is the patroness of eyesight. Reflection If you are a little girl named Lucy, you need not bite your tongue in disappointment. Your patron is a genuine authentic heroine, first class, an abiding inspiration for you and for all Christians. The moral courage of the young Sicilian martyr shines forth as a guiding light, just as bright for today's youth as it was in A.D. 304. Saint Lucy is the Patron Saint of: The BlindEye Disorders Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, December 12, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Our Lady of Guadalupe Lectionary: 690AThe Saint of the day is Our Lady of GuadalupeThe Story of Our Lady of Guadalupe The feast in honor of Our Lady of Guadalupe goes back to the 16th century. Chronicles of that period tell us the story. A poor Indian named Cuauhtlatohuac was baptized and given the name Juan Diego. He was a 57-year-old widower, and lived in a small village near Mexico City. On Saturday morning December 9, 1531, he was on his way to a nearby barrio to attend Mass in honor of Our Lady. Juan was walking by a hill called Tepeyac when he heard beautiful music like the warbling of birds. A radiant cloud appeared, and within it stood an Indian maiden dressed like an Aztec princess. The lady spoke to him in his own language and sent him to the bishop of Mexico, a Franciscan named Juan de Zumarraga. The bishop was to build a chapel in the place where the lady appeared. Eventually the bishop told Juan to have the lady give him a sign. About this same time Juan's uncle became seriously ill. This led poor Juan to try to avoid the lady. Nevertheless the lady found Juan, assured him that his uncle would recover, and provided roses for Juan to carry to the bishop in his cape or tilma. On December 12, when Juan Diego opened his tilma in the bishop's presence, the roses fell to the ground, and the bishop sank to his knees. On the tilma where the roses had been appeared an image of Mary exactly as she had appeared at the hill of Tepeyac. Reflection Mary's appearance to Juan Diego as one of his people is a powerful reminder that Mary—and the God who sent her—accept all peoples. In the context of the sometimes rude and cruel treatment of the Indians by the Spaniards, the apparition was a rebuke to the Spaniards and an event of vast significance for the indigenous population. While a number of them had converted before this incident, they now came in droves. According to a contemporary chronicler, nine million Indians became Catholic in a very short time. In these days when we hear so much about God's preferential option for the poor, Our Lady of Guadalupe cries out to us that God's love for and identification with the poor is an age-old truth that stems from the Gospel itself. Our Lady of Guadalupe is the Patron Saint of: The AmericasMexico Click here for more on Our Lady of Guadalupe! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Saints & Feasts
December 10: Our Lady of Loreto

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 5:38


December 10: Our Lady of Loreto Optional Memorial; Liturgical color: white Patron Saint of air crews and builders Heaven will reinforce what we know of Christ and Mary When Jesus said, “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and acts on them will be like a wise man who built his house on rock” (Mt 7:24), He likely had a specific house in mind—His own house in Nazareth where He grew up. The footings of many of Nazareth's houses are lodged, even today, into the dense bed of rock that lies under much of the town. Ancient tradition holds that the Virgin Mary was raised in Nazareth, was visited by the Archangel Gabriel in her home there, and then lived in that same home with her husband, Joseph, and her son, Jesus. Jesus would leave Nazareth as an adult for the larger, more cosmopolitan town of Capernaum, about one day away by foot, but He was always identified with His hometown. The Holy Family's house in Nazareth has a complicated and obscure history. What is known is that the knights of the First Crusade took control of Galilee in 1099 and made Nazareth their capital. The Italian Angeli family began to reconstruct the Holy Family's house when a Muslim army won a key battle in 1187 near Nazareth, forcing all the Europeans to flee. The Angelis disassembled stones of the Holy Family's house and shipped them to Italy by way of modern-day Croatia. The stones were ultimately reconstructed in 1294–95 in their present location in Loreto, where the labors of the Angelis in bringing the stones by ship turned into the legend that “angels” had scooped up the home in Nazareth and transported it through the air to Loreto. In the succeeding centuries, the small stone house was enclosed within an elaborate marble structure within an ornate papal basilica, which became one of the most visited Marian shrines in the world. Our Lady of Loreto is the title of the statue of the blackened Virgin found in the Holy House. By the 1600s, a beautiful “Litany of Loreto” enumerating Mary's biblically rich and theologically evocative titles became a popular Catholic devotion. In October 2019, Pope Francis went on pilgrimage to Loreto and announced that December 10 would henceforward be the Optional Memorial of Our Lady of Loreto on the Church's universal calendar. The formal decree instituting the change states that the new feast "will help all people, especially families, youth and religious to imitate the virtues of the perfect disciple of the Gospel, the Virgin Mother, who, in conceiving the head of the church also accepted us as her own." The unwrapped gift of the Virgin Mary conceived the Lord amid her domestic concerns in the privacy of her family home in an insignificant hamlet. God did not spare Mary the demands He imposes on every human soul. The Christian God complicated Mary's life just as He complicates every life. God is not an electric blanket or a pacifier. In satisfying His demands, we find ourselves; in imposing demands on ourselves, we find fulfillment. For the Christian, the goal of life is not happiness but meaning. And meaning is found by acquiring virtues, by attaining holy goals, by maturing through adversity, and by self-knowledge gained through prayer, among many other pathways. The dysfunctions of modernity are often the results of fools' errands, of the search for deep meaning in hobbies, activities, clubs, sports, and occupations that, though worthy in themselves, are simply incapable of satisfying the most secret longings of the human soul. It is common to ask a pregnant woman, “What are you expecting?” Mary in the silence of her holy house was expecting the Savior, but she kept this immense secret locked inside the chamber of her heart. Perhaps Mary might ask us, with mirth, when we hopefully see her crowned in heaven, surrounded by a constellation of saints, “What were you expecting?” For the Catholic, heaven will be an intensification of what we already know. Our Lady of Loreto, we ask your intercession to intercede on behalf of all who have recourse to you. Grant us the grace to respond generously to all of God's invitations to holiness, though they may disrupt our domestic duties and life's plans.

Catholic Saints & Feasts
December 9: Saint Juan Diego, Hermit

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 5:55


December 9: Saint Juan Diego, Hermit 1474–1548 Optional Memorial; Liturgical color: white Patron Saint of indigenous people Mary said to Juan: "Am I not here, I who am your mother?" Good things happen to those who go to daily Mass. A very good thing happened to today's saint on his long trek to daily Mass, something so extraordinary that it permanently altered a continent. Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin (the “Talking Eagle”) was born near present-day Mexico City in the pre-Colombian Aztec Empire, though he belonged to the Chichimec, not the Aztec, people. At the age of fifty, Juan received baptism from a Franciscan priest, about five years after those path-breaking missionaries had first walked barefoot from coastal Veracruz into the Aztec heartland. Juan must have quickly fell in love with his newfound faith, because he visited God as one visits a sturdy friend, more than just once a week. On Saturday, December 9, 1531, Juan was walking to Mass and crossed over a small hill called Tepeyac. A mysterious woman appeared to him speaking Nahuatl, the local language. The woman quickly identified herself as the “Ever-Virgin Holy Mary, Mother of the true God” and asked Juan to approach the Bishop to petition that a shrine be built in her honor on that very hill. So the humble Juan went and knocked on the door of one of the most powerful men in the new Spanish dominion. The Bishop was solicitous but cautious and requested a sign to buttress Juan's credibility and his request. A series of events then transpired which culminated on Tuesday, December 12. On that day, Juan presented the Bishop with flowers, carefully cradled in his poncho, which Mary had directed him to collect. When Juan unfurled his poncho in the Bishop's presence, everyone saw then what everyone sees now in the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City—the young, pregnant Mary of Tepeyac emblazoned, in full color, on Juan's coarse poncho. An early document holds that, after 1531, Juan Diego, whose wife had died by then, spent the rest of his days living the life of a hermit near the chapel on Tepeyac housing the miraculous image. Juan likely welcomed the first waves of pilgrims who visited the primitive shrine to pay homage to Our Lady of Guadalupe. It is difficult to imagine anyone returning to his or her everyday existence after seeing, hearing, and conversing with God, Mary, or a saint. Some experiences are “before” and “after” events, their profundity divides life into halves or portions: a divorce, a dreadful medical diagnosis,  a financial collapse, a child's death, a crippling accident, or, on the positive side and much more rarely, a divine locution, an apparition, or an unmistakable spiritual intervention, all divert the straight line of a life's graph. The days between December 9 and the vigil of December 12 are a kind of Mexican Triduum, when that nation celebrates founding events which have nothing to do with legal documents. Nation-building requires more than just a constitution or the winning of a key battle. Building an enduring people requires a shared language, a common history, an undivided religious outlook, and a unity of cultural expression. If there is a source of Mexican unity, it is found in the vision of the humble servant Saint Juan Diego. Millions of pilgrims endlessly process, day after day, year after year, century after century, before the miraculous image in the most visited Marian shrine in the world. These citizens don't go to Mexico's national archives to search for words on a faded parchment, but to a shrine to gaze in wonder at a young woman imprinted vividly on rough cactus fibers. The faithful arrive on pilgrimage, often on foot, to bow their heads, to light a candle, and to pray before the permanent miracle that is a simple Indian's gift to the Church. They come to visit a person, not an idea, because a person can absorb our love and love us back. Saint Juan Diego, we ask your humble intercession in heaven to assist all those who doubt the power of God and His saints. May your example of fidelity and service inspire us to holiness as much as your miraculous tilma.

Irish and Celtic Music Podcast
Patron Saints of Celtic Music #584

Irish and Celtic Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 70:06


Patronage is incredibly important to creators, whether as a musician or as a podcaster. This is an all-request show from the Patrons of the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast #584. Runa, serious kitchen, Marc Gunn / Sam Gillogly, Gone Molly, Altan, Talisk, The Gatehouse Well, The Elders, The Killdares, Syr, Celtica Pipes Rock, Alexander James Adams GET CELTIC MUSIC NEWS IN YOUR INBOX The Celtic Music Magazine is a quick and easy way to plug yourself into more great Celtic culture. Subscribe and get 34 Celtic MP3s for Free. THIS WEEK IN CELTIC MUSIC 0:06 - Runa "Saints and Sinners" from Ten: The Errant Night 4:09 - WELCOME D Morse commented on your post: "I love some of the songs by Runa - Saints & Sinners or Dance in the Graveyard." John Sharkey White, II commented on your post: "Young Hunting by Serious Kitchen. Peggy Gordon by some guy who hosts a podcast…" 5:38 - serious kitchen "Young Hunting" from "Tig" Carol Baril commented on your post: "Hey Marc! Would love to hear the following: Hobbit Polka by you and Sam, Madness Never Leaves by Gatehouse Well and anything from the Syr Sentinel album! Thanks!!! I listen to the podcast while I work so it helps make the day more joyful and love hearing such talented artists!!! So much better than what's played on the radio today (mho)!" 13:58 - Marc Gunn / Sam Gillogly "Hobbit Polka" from Dancing With Hobbits Miranda Nelson wrote: "Follow by Gone Molly and Baobhan Sith by Syr. I usually listen to the podcast while I'm working on graphics...for the podcast. At the moment, I'm listening while creating the 2023 Irish & Celtic Music Podcast shirt/pin." 17:33 - Gone Molly "Follow" from Gone Molly 22:09 - FEEDBACK Sarah Fletcher commented on your post: "Hi Marc, I would love to hear Altan's "Bacach Shíl Andaí" from The Gap of Dreams. Thanks!" 24:12 - Altan "Bacach Shíl Andaí" from The Gap of Dreams Jim Whitfield commented on your post: "Hi Marc, You played Talisk once (show 400 I think) and I was impressed so much that I bought all their albums and saw them when they played nearby. So, how about replaying Talisk!" 28:45 - Talisk "Crooked Water Valley" from Beyond 34:01 - The Gatehouse Well "Madness Never Leaves" from Undone 38:20 - THANKS Joe Deyaeghere commented on your post: "would love to here Fly Away by the Elders, being a Kansas City boy :)" 40:49 - The Elders "Fly Away" from Well Alright Then Aaron Adair commented on your post: "I know they haven't recorded in a long minute, but the Killdares “Rose de Lay” is a big favorite of mine. Thanks, Marc!" 45:09 - The Killdares "Rose de Lay" from Secrets of the Day 53:17 - Syr "Baobhan Sith" from Sentinel Steven commented on your post: "Theme song to dead like me? Or something by Celtica pipes rock “druids march”?" 58:14 - Celtica Pipes Rock "The Druids Prophecy" from Legends And Visions 1:01:57 - CLOSING Michael Cavanaugh sent you a message: "If it's too late, no worries, but I always love Wintertide by Alexander James Adams. You actually got me into their music (both Heather's time and Alexander's time), ,and now I'm a Patreon supporter for him as well." 1:03:29 - Alexander James Adams "Wintertide" from Wintertide The Irish & Celtic Music Podcast was produced by Marc Gunn, The Celtfather. The show was edited by Mitchell Petersen with Graphics by Miranda Nelson Designs. The show is supported by our Patrons of the Podcast on Patreon. Subscribe to get bonus podcasts and vote in the Celtic Top 20. Visit our website to subscribe to the podcast. You'll find links to all of the artists played in this episode. You'll get access to our Best of this Year Playlist. You can subscribe to our Celtic Music Magazine and get 34 Celtic MP3s for Free plus, you'll get 7 weekly news items about what's happening with Celtic music and culture online. And best of all, you will connect with your Celtic heritage. Finally, please tell one friend about this podcast. Word of mouth is the absolute best way to support any creative endeavor. Promote Celtic culture through music at http://celticmusicpodcast.com/. WELCOME CELTOPHILE TO CELTIC MUSIC * Helping you celebrate Celtic culture through music. I am Marc Gunn. I'm an Atlanta - based musician and podcaster. This Podcast is here to build our diverse Celtic community and help the incredible artists who so generously share their music with you. If you hear music you love, please email artists to let them know you heard them on the Irish and Celtic Music Podcast. You can find a link to all of the artists in the shownotes, along with show times and chapters for each song when you visit our website at celticmusicpodcast.com. Do you have the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast app? It's 100% free. You can listen to hundreds of episodes of the podcast. Download it now. WHAT'S NEW IN IRISH & CELTIC MUSIC: BEST OF 2022 Two weeks after the episode is launched, I compile the latest Celtic Top 20 votes to update a playlist on Spotify, Amazon Music, and YouTube. These are the results of your voting. You can help these artists out by following the playlists and adding tracks you love to your playlists. Subscribe to our newsletter to find out who was added this week. Listen on Spotify, Amazon Music, and YouTube. THANK YOU PATRONS OF THE PODCAST! Because of Your kind and generous support, this show comes out at least four times a month. Your generosity funds the creation, promotion and production of the show. It allows us to attract new listeners and to help our community grow. As a patron, you hear episodes before regular listeners, vote in the Celtic Top 20, and a private feed to listen to the show.  All that for as little as $1 per episode. You can also get music-only episodes and free MP3s as a Song Henger. Larry J put a $50 tip in my Virtual Tip Jar and wrote: "Marc, OK, consider this my equivalent to the $1 per episode Patreon subscription. :)" Donate to the Podcast. A special thanks to our newest Patrons of the Podcast: Mark T. HERE IS YOUR THREE STEP PLAN TO SUPPORT THE PODCAST Go to our Patreon page. Decide how much you want to pledge every week, $1, $5, $10. Make sure to cap how much you want to spend per month. Keep listening to the Irish & Celtic Music Podcast to celebrate Celtic culture through music. You can become a generous Patron of the Podcast on Patreon at SongHenge.com. TRAVEL WITH CELTIC INVASION VACATIONS Every year, I take a small group of Celtic music fans on the relaxing adventure of a lifetime. We don't see everything. Instead, we stay in one area. We get to know the region through its culture, history, and legends. You can join us with an auditory and visual adventure through podcasts and videos. In 2023, we're going on a Celtic Invasion of County Mayo in Ireland. We're gonna explore the area and get to know Grace O'Malley, the Pirate Queen. Learn more about the invasion at http://celticinvasion.com/ #celticmusic #irishmusic #celticmusicpodcast I WANT YOUR FEEDBACK What are you doing today while listening to the podcast? You can send a written comment along with a picture of what you're doing while listening. Email a voicemail message to celticpodcast@gmail.com Dan C commented on your post: "Thank you Marc. Do you have any music from the Drowsy Lads? I've heard them on the main stage at the Dublin and Milwaukee Irish festivals and was curious if you could play some of their music." William & Mary commented on your post: "Thank you so much for the message! I don't know if it's possible, but I'd love to hear some Jean Redpath. Any song is fine. Suggestions include Lowlands and Riddles Wisely Expounded - but anything by Jean Redpath is incredible. (She's a legend!) Thank you!" Lawrence Carrington replied on Mastodon: "Listening to your podcast and happily surprised to hear you're on Mastodon" Jolena posted on Mastodon: "I want to tell you how much I enjoy your podcast. I've been listening for several months now and I love the music. Thanks for introducing me to some great celtic music." I asked her if she discovered any new music through the podcast: "Yes I have. I like Lunasa, Flook, the Gothard Sisters, ETC."

Divine Mercy Radio
John the Baptizer: Patron Saint of Advent

Divine Mercy Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 34:02


John the Baptizer: Patron Saint of Advent by DMR

Campfire Classics Podcast

Welcome to Campfire Classics, a Literary Comedy Podcast!! What do Insane Clown Posse, Surfing, and Kathy Bates have in common?  This podcast episode! Plus, Patron Saint of Campfire Classics, Dame Agatha Christie, is back with a story for us this week with none of her usual character. The fun facts have nothing to do with her, because we've covered her a lot.  Check out Episodes 1, 10, 20, 21, 22, and 23 for some interesting facts about her. Heather reads the story, and your hosts discuss bosoms, Juggalos, and biblical murder.  Oh, also , Heather has CoViD, so be nice to her. "The Wife of the Kenite" was published in 1923. Email us at 5050artsproduction@gmail.com. Remember to tell five friends to check out Campfire Classics. Like, subscribe, leave a review. Now sit back, light a fire (or even a candle), grab a drink, and enjoy.

Gotta Be Saints
How to Support a Loved One Who Struggles with Porn - Part Two

Gotta Be Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 33:55


On episode 104 of the Gotta Be Saints Podcast, I spoke with Steve Pokorny about ways to support loved ones struggling with pornography.Biography:Steve holds an MA in theology and a specialization in Catechetics from Franciscan University of Steubenville, as well as an MTS from the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family Studies in Washington D.C. Steve is a Certified Life Coach from the Life Coach Training Institute. Author of "Redeemed Vision: Setting the Blind Freed from the Pornified Culture," Steve also is an internationally-known speaker, speaking with a wide variety of audiences on many topics. He is married and lives with his family in San Antonio, Texas.For more information on Steve, check out his website here.Episode Breakdown::30 Summarizing Part One1:00 Sponsors - Good Catholic and The Catholic Company1:45 What the Catholic faith provides with those struggling with addiction6:20 The importance of being open and honest 12:00 Bartimaeus and Mark 1024:40 How the sacraments tie into finding healing28:30 Final thoughts30:25 Mt. Rushmore of Saints32:30 Patron Saint of...Our Sponsors: This is a Good Catholic Podcast.  Use code GOTTA for 20% your order.Check out  The Catholic Company for all your Catholic merchandise needs! Use code GBS20 for 20% off your next purchase!Use code GOTTAFREEDOM at Freedom Coaching for your first session free!If you enjoyed this episode, please provide a review and make sure to subscribe!

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, December 3, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Francis Xavier, Priest Lectionary: 180All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Francis XavierJesus asked, “What profit would there be for one to gain the whole world and forfeit his life?” (Matthew 16:26a). The words were repeated to a young teacher of philosophy who had a highly promising career in academics, with success and a life of prestige and honor before him. Francis Xavier, 24 at the time, and living and teaching in Paris, did not heed these words at once. They came from a good friend, Ignatius of Loyola, whose tireless persuasion finally won the young man to Christ. Francis then made the spiritual exercises under the direction of Ignatius, and in 1534, joined his little community, the infant Society of Jesus. Together at Montmartre they vowed poverty, chastity, obedience, and apostolic service according to the directions of the pope. From Venice, where he was ordained a priest in 1537, Xavier went on to Lisbon and from there sailed to the East Indies, landing at Goa, on the west coast of India. For the next 10 years he labored to bring the faith to such widely scattered peoples as the Hindus, the Malayans, and the Japanese. He spent much of that time in India, and served as provincial of the newly established Jesuit province of India. Wherever he went, Xavier lived with the poorest people, sharing their food and rough accommodations. He spent countless hours ministering to the sick and the poor, particularly to lepers. Very often he had no time to sleep or even to say his breviary but, as we know from his letters, he was filled always with joy. Xavier went through the islands of Malaysia, then up to Japan. He learned enough Japanese to preach to simple folk, to instruct, and to baptize, and to establish missions for those who were to follow him. From Japan he had dreams of going to China, but this plan was never realized. Before reaching the mainland, he died. His remains are enshrined in the Church of Good Jesus in Goa. He and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux were declared co-patrons of the missions in 1925. Reflection All of us are called to “go and preach to all nations—see Matthew 28:19. Our preaching is not necessarily on distant shores but to our families, our children, our husband or wife, our coworkers. And we are called to preach not with words, but by our everyday lives. Only by sacrifice, the giving up of all selfish gain, could Francis Xavier be free to bear the Good News to the world. Sacrifice is leaving yourself behind at times for a greater good, the good of prayer, the good of helping someone in need, the good of just listening to another. The greatest gift we have is our time. Francis Xavier gave his to others. Saint Francis Xavier is a Patron Saint of: Japan Jewelers Missions Sailors Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

The Mage's Well
Patron Saints of Witchcraft

The Mage's Well

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:06


The saints of Christianity have long been venerated, each one holding influence over different areas of life. But did you know saints are basically witches and magical users that are verified by the church? And did you also know that there are some saints who actually watch over witchcraft? From St. Cyprian to Simon the Sorcerer join me as we take a tour through the saints of the esoteric, the occult and of witchcraft.All my links are here. Get bonus content on PatreonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/themageswell. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/themageswell. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saint Andrew, Apostle Lectionary: 684All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint AndrewAndrew was Saint Peter's brother, and was called with him. “As [Jesus] was walking by the sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is now called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, ‘Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.' At once they left their nets and followed him” (Matthew 4:18-20). John the Evangelist presents Andrew as a disciple of John the Baptist. When Jesus walked by one day, John said, “Behold, the Lamb of God.” Andrew and another disciple followed Jesus. “Jesus turned and saw them following him and said to them, ‘What are you looking for?' They said to him, ‘Rabbi (which translated means Teacher), where are you staying?' He said to them, ‘Come, and you will see.' So they went and saw where he was staying, and they stayed with him that day” (John 1:38-39a). Little else is said about Andrew in the Gospels. Before the multiplication of the loaves, it was Andrew who spoke up about the boy who had the barley loaves and fishes. When the Gentiles went to see Jesus, they came to Philip, but Philip then had recourse to Andrew. Legend has it that Andrew preached the Good News in what is now modern Greece and Turkey and was crucified at Patras on an X-shaped cross. Reflection As in the case of all the apostles except Peter and John, the Gospels give us little about the holiness of Andrew. He was an apostle. That is enough. He was called personally by Jesus to proclaim the Good News, to heal with Jesus' power and to share his life and death. Holiness today is no different. It is a gift that includes a call to be concerned about the Kingdom, an outgoing attitude that wants nothing more than to share the riches of Christ with all people. Saint Andrew is the Patron Saint of: Fishermen Greece Russia Scotland Enjoy this recipe in honor of Saint Andrew! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

StudioTulsa
A conversation with the critically acclaimed writer of both fiction and nonfiction, Ann Patchett

StudioTulsa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 28:58


We chat with the gifted American author whose many books include "The Patron Saint of Liars," "The Magician's Assistant," "Bel Canto," and "The Dutch House."

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 29, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the First Week of Advent Lectionary: 176All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint ClementClement of Rome was the third successor of Saint Peter, reigning as pope during the last decade of the first century. He's known as one of the Church's five “Apostolic Fathers,” those who provided a direct link between the Apostles and later generations of Church Fathers. Clement's First Epistle to the Corinthians was preserved and widely read in the early Church. This letter from the bishop of Rome to the Church in Corinth concerns a split that alienated a large number of the laity from the clergy. Deploring the unauthorized and unjustifiable division in the Corinthian community, Clement urged charity to heal the rift. Reflection Today many in the Church experience polarization regarding worship, how we speak of God, and other issues. We'd do well to take to heart the exhortation from Clement's Epistle: “Charity unites us to God. It knows no schism, does not rebel, does all things in concord. In charity all the elect of God have been made perfect.” Rome's Basilica of St. Clement, one of the city's earliest parish churches, is probably built on the site of Clement's home. History tells us that Pope Clement was martyred either in the year 99 or in 101. His liturgical feast is celebrated on November 23. Saint Clement is the Patron Saint of: Marble Workers Mariners Tanners Check out these seven books on saints! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer
A Joyful Noise: Celebrating St. Cecilia's Feast Day with Singer Francesca LaRosa

Busted Halo Show w/Fr. Dave Dwyer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 20:51


St. Cecilia is the patron saint of musicians, and Team Busted Halo celebrated her feast day last week with a live performance from Catholic composer and singer-songwriter Francesca LaRosa.

Reduced Shakespeare Company Podcast
Saluting The Understudies

Reduced Shakespeare Company Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 19:43


“Stand-ins of the world, stand up!” (Tom Stoppard, The Real Inspector Hound) 2022 will be remembered as the Year of the Understudy – not only did the Patron Saint of the Understudy King Charles III finally step into the leading role after waiting in the wings for 74 years, but audiences began to fully appreciate how understudies keep theatre going during a global pandemic. Understudies come in a variety of flavors, from covers to swings to alternates, and actors Loren Jones and Cindy Gold talk about which flavor they are in the Goodman Theatre's 2022 production of A Christmas Carol. The conversation features lessons learned from the pandemic; how understudying can actually be a good paid gig; the difficulty of learning the lines without learning the moves; fast-tracking the understudies during rehearsal; the challenge of not just learning the role but the entire show; how old ways of doing things are changing; the identity of Scrooge's overstudy; and tales of understudying both glorious and horrendous. (Length 19:43)

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, November 25, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 507All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Catherine of AlexandriaAccording to the Legend of St. Catherine, this young woman converted to Christianity after receiving a vision. At the age of 18, she debated 50 pagan philosophers. Amazed at her wisdom and debating skills, they became Christians—as did about 200 soldiers and members of the emperor's family. All of them were martyred. Sentenced to be executed on a spiked wheel, Catherine touched the wheel and it shattered. She was beheaded. Centuries later, angels are said to have carried the body of Saint Catherine to a monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai. Devotion to her spread as a result of the Crusades. She was invoked as the patroness of students, teachers, librarians and lawyers. Catherine is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, venerated especially in Germany and Hungary. Reflection The pursuit of God's wisdom may not lead to riches or earthly honors. In Catherine's case, this pursuit contributed to her martyrdom. She was not, however, foolish in preferring to die for Jesus rather than live only by denying him. All the rewards that her tormentors offered her would rust, lose their beauty, or in some other way become a poor exchange for Catherine's honesty and integrity in following Jesus Christ. Saint Catherine of Alexandria is a Patron Saint of: Lawyers Librarians Philosophers Students Teachers Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

The Buck Sexton Show
Farewell to Awful, Lying Tyrant Smurf Fauci

The Buck Sexton Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 20:20


Dr. Fauci is leaving government "service" after being the absolute worst voice on COVID for 2 years. The Patron Saint of double masking and vaccine mandates took time at the White House today to remind everyone that he still wants them to live in fear and obey the lunatic measures that don't work. Plus the FTX crypto scammer was giving away mansions to staffers and his parents, some lib professor suggests the GRU hacked the Trump twitter poll, and Kari Lake says she's not done fighting. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 22, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Cecilia, Virgin and Martyr Lectionary: 504All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint CeciliaAlthough Cecilia is one of the most famous of the Roman martyrs, the familiar stories about her are apparently not founded on authentic material. There is no trace of honor being paid her in early times. A fragmentary inscription of the late fourth century refers to a church named after her, and her feast was celebrated at least in 545. According to legend, Cecilia was a young Christian of high rank betrothed to a Roman named Valerian. Through her influence, Valerian was converted, and was martyred along with his brother. The legend about Cecilia's death says that after being struck three times on the neck with a sword, she lived for three days, and asked the pope to convert her home into a church. Since the time of the Renaissance she has usually been portrayed with a viola or a small organ. Reflection Like any good Christian, Cecilia sang in her heart, and sometimes with her voice. She has become a symbol of the Church's conviction that good music is an integral part of the liturgy, of greater value to the Church than any other art. Saint Cecilia is the Patron Saint of: Musicians Meet seven unknown Catholic saints! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

American Dad!
Businessly Brunette

American Dad!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 36:37


We're fighting something... On this episode of the American Dad Podcast, we discuss our Roses and Thorns with "Businessly Brunette" - Season 15 Episode 17. Lou Babba Doo involves himself with what he knows best... Business, Jerry! Thank you to this episode's Patron Saint, BodaciousPeach! If you want to check out our very infrequently updated Instagram, it's @bestofamericandad. Support American Dad! by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/americandad Find out more at https://americandad.pinecast.co

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 17, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious Lectionary: 500All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Elizabeth of HungaryIn her short life, Elizabeth manifested such great love for the poor and suffering that she has become the patroness of Catholic charities and of the Secular Franciscan Order. The daughter of the King of Hungary, Elizabeth chose a life of penance and asceticism when a life of leisure and luxury could easily have been hers. This choice endeared her in the hearts of the common people throughout Europe. At the age of 14, Elizabeth was married to Louis of Thuringia, whom she deeply loved. She bore three children. Under the spiritual direction of a Franciscan friar, she led a life of prayer, sacrifice, and service to the poor and sick. Seeking to become one with the poor, she wore simple clothing. Daily she would take bread to hundreds of the poorest in the land who came to her gate. After six years of marriage, her husband died in the Crusades, and Elizabeth was grief-stricken. Her husband's family looked upon her as squandering the royal purse, and mistreated her, finally throwing her out of the palace. The return of her husband's allies from the Crusades resulted in her being reinstated, since her son was legal heir to the throne. In 1228, Elizabeth joined the Secular Franciscan Order, spending the remaining few years of her life caring for the poor in a hospital which she founded in honor of Saint Francis of Assisi. Elizabeth's health declined, and she died before her 24th birthday in 1231. Her great popularity resulted in her canonization four years later. Reflection Elizabeth understood well the lesson Jesus taught when he washed his disciples' feet at the Last Supper: The Christian must be one who serves the humblest needs of others, even if one serves from an exalted position. Of royal blood, Elizabeth could have lorded it over her subjects. Yet she served them with such a loving heart that her brief life won for her a special place in the hearts of many. Elizabeth is also an example to us in her following the guidance of a spiritual director. Growth in the spiritual life is a difficult process. We can play games very easily if we don't have someone to challenge us. Saint Elizabeth of Hungary is the Patron Saint of: Bakers Catholic Charities Secular Franciscan Order Get to know these 14 holy women! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media