Podcasts about fulltext

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 203PODCASTS
  • 1,361EPISODES
  • 27mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 30, 2021LATEST
fulltext

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about fulltext

Latest podcast episodes about fulltext

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saint Andrew, Apostle Lectionary: 684All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint AndrewAndrew was Saint Peter's brother, and was called with him. “As [Jesus] was walking by the sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is now called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, ‘Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.' At once they left their nets and followed him” (Matthew 4:18-20). John the Evangelist presents Andrew as a disciple of John the Baptist. When Jesus walked by one day, John said, “Behold, the Lamb of God.” Andrew and another disciple followed Jesus. “Jesus turned and saw them following him and said to them, ‘What are you looking for?' They said to him, ‘Rabbi (which translated means Teacher), where are you staying?' He said to them, ‘Come, and you will see.' So they went and saw where he was staying, and they stayed with him that day” (John 1:38-39a). Little else is said about Andrew in the Gospels. Before the multiplication of the loaves, it was Andrew who spoke up about the boy who had the barley loaves and fishes. When the Gentiles went to see Jesus, they came to Philip, but Philip then had recourse to Andrew. Legend has it that Andrew preached the Good News in what is now modern Greece and Turkey and was crucified at Patras on an X-shaped cross. Reflection As in the case of all the apostles except Peter and John, the Gospels give us little about the holiness of Andrew. He was an apostle. That is enough. He was called personally by Jesus to proclaim the Good News, to heal with Jesus' power and to share his life and death. Holiness today is no different. It is a gift that includes a call to be concerned about the Kingdom, an outgoing attitude that wants nothing more than to share the riches of Christ with all people. Saint Andrew is the Patron Saint of: Fishermen Greece Russia Scotland Click here for more about Saint Andrew! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, November 29, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the First Week of Advent Lectionary: 175All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint ClementClement of Rome was the third successor of Saint Peter, reigning as pope during the last decade of the first century. He's known as one of the Church's five “Apostolic Fathers,” those who provided a direct link between the Apostles and later generations of Church Fathers. Clement's First Epistle to the Corinthians was preserved and widely read in the early Church. This letter from the bishop of Rome to the Church in Corinth concerns a split that alienated a large number of the laity from the clergy. Deploring the unauthorized and unjustifiable division in the Corinthian community, Clement urged charity to heal the rift. Reflection Today many in the Church experience polarization regarding worship, how we speak of God, and other issues. We'd do well to take to heart the exhortation from Clement's Epistle: “Charity unites us to God. It knows no schism, does not rebel, does all things in concord. In charity all the elect of God have been made perfect.” Rome's Basilica of St. Clement, one of the city's earliest parish churches, is probably built on the site of Clement's home. History tells us that Pope Clement was martyred either in the year 99 or in 101. His liturgical feast is celebrated on November 23. Saint Clement is the Patron Saint of: Marble Workers Mariners Tanners Check out these seven books on saints! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, November 28, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFirst Sunday of Advent Lectionary: 3All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint James of the MarcheMeet one of the fathers of the modern pawnshop! James was born in the Marche of Ancona, in central Italy along the Adriatic Sea. After earning doctorates in canon and civil law at the University of Perugia, he joined the Friars Minor and began a very austere life. He fasted nine months of the year; he slept three hours a night. Saint Bernardine of Siena told him to moderate his penances. James studied theology with Saint John of Capistrano. Ordained in 1420, James began a preaching career that took him all over Italy and through 13 Central and Eastern European countries. This extremely popular preacher converted many people–250,000 at one estimate–and helped spread devotion to the Holy Name of Jesus. His sermons prompted numerous Catholics to reform their lives, and many men joined the Franciscans under his influence. With John of Capistrano, Albert of Sarteano, and Bernardine of Siena, James is considered one of the “four pillars” of the Observant movement among the Franciscans. These friars became known especially for their preaching. To combat extremely high interest rates, James established montes pietatis—literally, mountains of charity—nonprofit credit organizations that lent money on pawned objects at very low rates. Not everyone was happy with the work James did. Twice assassins lost their nerve when they came face to face with him. James died in 1476, and was canonized in 1726. Reflection James wanted the word of God to take root in the hearts of his listeners. His preaching was directed to preparing the soil, so to speak, by removing any rocks and softening up lives hardened by sin. God's intention is that his word take root in our lives, but for that we need both prayerful preachers and cooperative listeners. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, November 27, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 508All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Francesco Antonio FasaniBorn in Lucera, Francesco entered the Conventual Franciscans in 1695. After his ordination 10 years later, he taught philosophy to younger friars, served as guardian of his friary, and later became provincial minister. When his term of office ended, Francesco became master of novices and finally pastor in his hometown. In his various ministries, he was loving, devout, and penitential. He was a sought-after confessor and preacher. One witness at the canonical hearings regarding Francesco's holiness testified, “In his preaching he spoke in a familiar way, filled as he was with the love of God and neighbor; fired by the Spirit, he made use of the word and deed of holy Scripture, stirring his listeners and moving them to do penance.” Francesco showed himself a loyal friend of the poor, never hesitating to seek from benefactors what was needed. At his death in Lucera, children ran through the streets crying out, “The saint is dead! The saint is dead!” Francesco was canonized in 1986. Reflection Eventually we become what we choose. If we choose stinginess, we become stingy. If we choose compassion, we become compassionate. The holiness of Francesco Antonio Fasani resulted from his many small decisions to cooperate with God's grace. Click here to meet the Catholic saints of Advent! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, November 26, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 507All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint ColumbanColumban was the greatest of the Irish missionaries who worked on the European continent. As a young man who was greatly tormented by temptations of the flesh, he sought the advice of a religious woman who had lived a hermit's life for years. He saw in her answer a call to leave the world. He went first to a monk on an island in Lough Erne, then to the great monastic seat of learning at Bangor. After many years of seclusion and prayer, he traveled to Gaul with 12 companion missionaries. They won wide respect for the rigor of their discipline, their preaching, and their commitment to charity and religious life in a time characterized by clerical laxity and civil strife. Columban established several monasteries in Europe which became centers of religion and culture. His writings include a treatise on penance and against Arianism, sermons, poetry, and his monastic rule. Like all saints, he met opposition. Ultimately he had to appeal to the pope against complaints of Frankish bishops, for vindication of his orthodoxy and approval of Irish customs. He reproved the king for his licentious life, insisting that he marry. Since this threatened the power of the queen mother, Columban was deported back to Ireland. His ship ran aground in a storm, and he continued his work in Europe, ultimately arriving in Italy, where he found favor with the king of the Lombards. In his last years he established the famous monastery of Bobbio, where he died.  Saint Columban's liturgical feast is celebrated on November 23. Reflection Now that public sexual license is becoming extreme, we need the Church's memory of a young man as concerned about chastity as Columban. And now that the comfort-captured Western world stands in tragic contrast to starving millions, we need the challenge to austerity and discipline of a group of Irish monks. They were too strict, we say; they went too far. How far shall we go? Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 25, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 506, 943-947All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Catherine of AlexandriaAccording to the Legend of St. Catherine, this young woman converted to Christianity after receiving a vision. At the age of 18, she debated 50 pagan philosophers. Amazed at her wisdom and debating skills, they became Christians—as did about 200 soldiers and members of the emperor's family. All of them were martyred. Sentenced to be executed on a spiked wheel, Catherine touched the wheel and it shattered. She was beheaded. Centuries later, angels are said to have carried the body of Saint Catherine to a monastery at the foot of Mt. Sinai. Devotion to her spread as a result of the Crusades. She was invoked as the patroness of students, teachers, librarians and lawyers. Catherine is one of the 14 Holy Helpers, venerated especially in Germany and Hungary. Reflection The pursuit of God's wisdom may not lead to riches or earthly honors. In Catherine's case, this pursuit contributed to her martyrdom. She was not, however, foolish in preferring to die for Jesus rather than live only by denying him. All the rewards that her tormentors offered her would rust, lose their beauty, or in some other way become a poor exchange for Catherine's honesty and integrity in following Jesus Christ. Saint Catherine of Alexandria is a Patron Saint of: Lawyers Librarians Philosophers Students Teachers Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, November 24, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Andrew Dŭng-Ląc, Priest, and Companions, Martyrs Lectionary: 505All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Andrew Dung-Lac and CompanionsAndrew Dung-Lac, a Catholic convert ordained to the priesthood, was one of 117 people martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. Members of the companions group gave their lives for Christ in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, and received beatification during four different occasions between 1900 and 1951. All were canonized during the papacy of Saint John Paul II. Christianity came to Vietnam through the Portuguese. Jesuits opened the first permanent mission at Da Nang in 1615. They ministered to Japanese Catholics who had been driven from Japan. Severe persecutions were launched at least three times in the 19th century. During the six decades after 1820, between 100,000 and 300,000 Catholics were killed or subjected to great hardship. Foreign missionaries martyred in the first wave included priests of the Paris Mission Society, and Spanish Dominican priests and tertiaries. In 1832, Emperor Minh-Mang banned all foreign missionaries, and tried to make all Vietnamese deny their faith by trampling on a crucifix. Like the priest-holes in Ireland during English persecution, many hiding places were offered in homes of the faithful. Persecution broke out again in 1847, when the emperor suspected foreign missionaries and Vietnamese Christians of sympathizing with a rebellion led by of one of his sons. The last of the martyrs were 17 laypersons, one of them a 9-year-old, executed in 1862. That year a treaty with France guaranteed religious freedom to Catholics, but it did not stop all persecution. By 1954, there were over a million Catholics—about seven percent of the population—in the north. Buddhists represented about 60 percent. Persistent persecution forced some 670,000 Catholics to abandon lands, homes and possessions and flee to the south. In 1964, there were still 833,000 Catholics in the north, but many were in prison. In the south, Catholics were enjoying the first decade of religious freedom in centuries, their numbers swelled by refugees. During the Vietnamese war, Catholics again suffered in the north, and again moved to the south in great numbers. Now reunited, the entire country is under Communist rule. Reflection It may help a people who associate Vietnam only with a 20th-century war to realize that the cross has long been a part of the lives of the people of that country. Even as some people ask again the unanswered questions about United States involvement and disengagement, the faith rooted in Vietnam's soil proves hardier than the forces that willed to destroy it. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 23, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the Thirty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 504All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed Miguel Agustn Pro“¡Viva Cristo Rey!”—Long live Christ the King!—were the last words Pro uttered before he was executed for being a Catholic priest and serving his flock. Born into a prosperous, devout family in Guadalupe de Zacatecas, Mexico, Miguel entered the Jesuits in 1911, but three years later fled to Granada, Spain, because of religious persecution in Mexico. He was ordained in Belgium in 1925. Father Pro immediately returned to Mexico, where he served a Church forced to go “underground.” He celebrated the Eucharist clandestinely and ministered the other sacraments to small groups of Catholics. He and his brother Roberto were arrested on trumped-up charges of attempting to assassinate Mexico's president. Roberto was spared, but Miguel was sentenced to face a firing squad on November 23, 1927. His funeral became a public demonstration of faith. Miguel Pro was beatified in 1988. Reflection When Fr. Miguel Pro was executed in 1927, no one could have predicted that 52 years later the bishop of Rome would visit Mexico, be welcomed by its president, and celebrate open-air Masses before thousands of people. Pope John Paul II made additional trips to Mexico in 1990, 1993, 1999, and 2002. Those who outlawed the Catholic Church in Mexico did not count on the deeply rooted faith of its people, and the willingness of many of them, like Miguel Pro, to die as martyrs. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, November 22, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Cecilia, Virgin and Martyr Lectionary: 503All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed Miguel Agustn Pro“¡Viva Cristo Rey!”—Long live Christ the King!—were the last words Pro uttered before he was executed for being a Catholic priest and serving his flock. Born into a prosperous, devout family in Guadalupe de Zacatecas, Mexico, Miguel entered the Jesuits in 1911, but three years later fled to Granada, Spain, because of religious persecution in Mexico. He was ordained in Belgium in 1925. Father Pro immediately returned to Mexico, where he served a Church forced to go “underground.” He celebrated the Eucharist clandestinely and ministered the other sacraments to small groups of Catholics. He and his brother Roberto were arrested on trumped-up charges of attempting to assassinate Mexico's president. Roberto was spared, but Miguel was sentenced to face a firing squad on November 23, 1927. His funeral became a public demonstration of faith. Miguel Pro was beatified in 1988. Reflection When Fr. Miguel Pro was executed in 1927, no one could have predicted that 52 years later the bishop of Rome would visit Mexico, be welcomed by its president, and celebrate open-air Masses before thousands of people. Pope John Paul II made additional trips to Mexico in 1990, 1993, 1999, and 2002. Those who outlawed the Catholic Church in Mexico did not count on the deeply rooted faith of its people, and the willingness of many of them, like Miguel Pro, to die as martyrs. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

World on Drugs with Steve Furey
The Hawaiian Gardens Gang: One of The Most Dangerous Gangs in America PT. 2

World on Drugs with Steve Furey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 66:03


*ep starts at 23 mins PART 2 of 2 I'll be talking about the Varrio Hawaiian Gardens gang, and no they're not in Hawaii, they're from a small town just south of LA. They have a long history and played a key part in forming the Mexican Mafia prison gang. Through the 90s and 2000s they committed numerous hate crimes and have been classified as a “Hate Gang” for their deliberate targeting of African Americans. They stick to their territory and have never formed cliques outside of Hawaiian Gardens. GUEST is officer Gannon a LASD and OCSD Sheriff SOURCES Sources Corwin, M. (2008, Dec 15). Inside the mexican mafia. Los Angeles Times (1996-) Retrieved from https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fhistorical-newspapers%2Finside-mexican-mafia%2Fdocview%2F2231499605%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 Quinones, S. (2009, Jan 09). It's the heart of town; in hawaiian gardens, a landmark market reaches the end of a line. Los Angeles Times https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fnewspapers%2Fheart-town-hawaiian-gardens-landmark-market%2Fdocview%2F422282855%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 Hawaiian gardens churches join rally against gangs, drugs and violence: [home edition]. (1992, Jul 02). Los Angeles Times (Pre-1997 Fulltext) https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fnewspapers%2Fhawaiian-gardens-churches-join-rally-against%2Fdocview%2F281771984%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 EMILY ADAMS SPECIAL TO,THE TIMES. (1993, Mar 13). Hawaiian gardens rattled by series of hate crimes: Racism: Blacks accuse latinos of attacks. 'I used to feel safe here. now I just don't,' says a woman whose home was firebombed. Los Angeles Times (1923-1995) https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fhistorical-newspapers%2Fhawaiian-gardens-rattled-series-hate-crimes%2Fdocview%2F1833010288%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 Hong, P. Y. (2000, May 07). SPECIAL REPORT; many roots of hate; attacks on victims like martin hammonds, left, slain by a latino gang member in hawaiian gardens, may not fit the common image of hate crimes. but that community's deep-seated animosities are a window on the bigger picture of racially motivated violence in L.A. county.: [home edition]. Los Angeles Times https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fnewspapers%2Fspecial-report-many-roots-hate-attacks-on-victims%2Fdocview%2F421656553%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, November 21, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThe Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe Lectionary: 161All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Maryof the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary Mary's presentation was celebrated in Jerusalem in the sixth century. A church was built there in honor of this mystery. The Eastern Church was more interested in the feast, but it does appear in the West in the 11th century. Although the feast at times disappeared from the calendar, in the 16th century it became a feast of the universal Church. As with Mary's birth, we read of Mary's presentation in the temple only in apocryphal literature. In what is recognized as an unhistorical account, the Protoevangelium of James tells us that Anna and Joachim offered Mary to God in the Temple when she was 3 years old. This was to carry out a promise made to God when Anna was still childless. Though it cannot be proven historically, Mary's presentation has an important theological purpose. It continues the impact of the feasts of the Immaculate Conception and of the birth of Mary. It emphasizes that the holiness conferred on Mary from the beginning of her life on earth continued through her early childhood and beyond. Reflection It is sometimes difficult for modern Westerners to appreciate a feast like this. The Eastern Church, however, was quite open to this feast and even somewhat insistent about celebrating it. Even though the feast has no basis in history, it stresses an important truth about Mary: From the beginning of her life, she was dedicated to God. She herself became a greater temple than any made by hands. God came to dwell in her in a marvelous manner and sanctified her for her unique role in God's saving work. At the same time, the magnificence of Mary enriches her children. They—we—too are temples of God and sanctified in order that we might enjoy and share in God's saving work. Click here for more on Mary! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, November 20, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 502All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Rose Philippine DuchesneBorn in Grenoble, France, of a family that was among the new rich, Rose learned political skills from her father and a love of the poor from her mother. The dominant feature of her temperament was a strong and dauntless will, which became the material—and the battlefield—of her holiness. She entered the Visitation of Mary convent at 19, and remained despite family opposition. As the French Revolution broke, the convent was closed, and she began taking care of the poor and sick, opened a school for homeless children, and risked her life helping priests in the underground. When the situation cooled, Rose personally rented the former convent, now a shambles, and tried to revive its religious life. The spirit was gone, however, and soon there were only four nuns left. They joined the infant Society of the Sacred Heart, whose young superior, Mother Madeleine Sophie Barat, would be her lifelong friend. In a short time Rose was a superior and supervisor of the novitiate and a school. But since hearing tales of missionary work in Louisiana as a little girl, her ambition was to go to America and work among the Indians. At 49, she thought this would be her work. With four nuns, she spent 11 weeks at sea en route to New Orleans, and seven weeks more on the Mississippi to St. Louis. She then met one of the many disappointments of her life. The bishop had no place for them to live and work among Native Americans. Instead, he sent her to what she sadly called “the remotest village in the U.S.,” St. Charles, Missouri. With characteristic drive and courage, she founded the first free school for girls west of the Mississippi. Though Rose was as hardy as any of the pioneer women in the wagons rolling west, cold and hunger drove them out—to Florissant, Missouri, where she founded the first Catholic Indian school, adding others in the territory. “In her first decade in America, Mother Duchesne suffered practically every hardship the frontier had to offer, except the threat of Indian massacre—poor lodging, shortages of food, drinking water, fuel and money, forest fires and blazing chimneys, the vagaries of the Missouri climate, cramped living quarters and the privation of all privacy, and the crude manners of children reared in rough surroundings and with only the slightest training in courtesy” (Louise Callan, R.S.C.J., Philippine Duchesne). Finally at age 72, retired and in poor health, Rose got her lifelong wish. A mission was founded at Sugar Creek, Kansas, among the Potawatomi and she was taken along. Though she could not learn their language, they soon named her “Woman-Who-Prays-Always.” While others taught, she prayed. Legend has it that Native American children sneaked behind her as she knelt and sprinkled bits of paper on her habit, and came back hours later to find them undisturbed. Rose Duchesne died in 1852, at the age of 83, and was canonized in 1988. Her liturgical feast is celebrated on November 18. Reflection Divine grace channeled Mother Duchesne's iron will and determination into humility and selflessness, and to a desire not to be made superior. Still, even saints can get involved in silly situations. In an argument with her over a minor change in the sanctuary, a priest threatened to remove the tabernacle. She patiently let herself be criticized by younger nuns for not being progressive enough. For 31 years, she hewed to the line of a dauntless love and an unshakable observance of her religious vows. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, November 19, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 501All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Agnes of AssisiBorn Caterina Offreducia, Agnes was the younger sister of Saint Clare, and her first follower. When Caterina left home two weeks after Clare's departure, their family attempted to bring her back by force. They tried to drag her out of the monastery, but her body suddenly became so heavy that several knights could not budge it. Her uncle Monaldo tried to strike her but was temporarily paralyzed. The knights then left Caterina and Clare in peace. Saint Francis himself gave Clare's sister the name Agnes, because she was gentle like a young lamb. Agnes matched her sister in devotion to prayer and in willingness to endure the strict penances that characterized the Poor Ladies' lives at San Damiano. In 1221, a group of Benedictine nuns in Monticelli near Florence asked to become Poor Ladies. Saint Clare sent Agnes to become abbess of that monastery. Agnes soon wrote a rather sad letter about how much she missed Clare and the other nuns at San Damiano. After establishing other monasteries of Poor Ladies in northern Italy, Agnes was recalled to San Damiano in 1253, as Clare lay dying. Three months later Agnes followed Clare in death, and was canonized in 1753. Reflection God must love irony; the world is so full of it. In 1212, many in Assisi surely felt that Clare and Agnes were wasting their lives and were turning their backs on the world. In reality, their lives were tremendously life-giving, and the world has been enriched by the example of these poor contemplatives. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 18, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 500All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Dedication of Churches of Saints Peter and Paulof the Dedication of the Churches of Saints Peter and Paul St. Peter's is probably the most famous church in Christendom. Massive in scale and a veritable museum of art and architecture, it began on a much humbler scale. Vatican Hill was a simple cemetery where believers gathered at Saint Peter's tomb to pray. In 319, Constantine built a basilica on the site that stood for more than a thousand years until, despite numerous restorations, it threatened to collapse. In 1506, Pope Julius II ordered it razed and reconstructed, but the new basilica was not completed and dedicated for more than two centuries. St. Paul's Outside-the-Walls stands near the Abaazia delle Tre Fontane, where Saint Paul is believed to have been beheaded. The largest church in Rome until St. Peter's was rebuilt, the basilica also rises over the traditional site of its namesake's grave. The most recent edifice was constructed after a fire in 1823. The first basilica was also Constantine's doing. Constantine's building projects enticed the first of a centuries-long parade of pilgrims to Rome. From the time the basilicas were first built until the empire crumbled under “barbarian” invasions, the two churches, although miles apart, were linked by a roofed colonnade of marble columns. Reflection Peter, the rough fisherman whom Jesus named the rock on which the Church is built, and the educated Paul, reformed persecutor of Christians, Roman citizen, and missionary to the gentiles, are the original odd couple. The major similarity in their faith-journeys is the journey's end: both, according to tradition, died a martyr's death in Rome—Peter on a cross and Paul beneath the sword. Their combined gifts shaped the early Church and believers have prayed at their tombs from the earliest days. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, November 17, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious Lectionary: 499All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Elizabeth of HungaryIn her short life, Elizabeth manifested such great love for the poor and suffering that she has become the patroness of Catholic charities and of the Secular Franciscan Order. The daughter of the King of Hungary, Elizabeth chose a life of penance and asceticism when a life of leisure and luxury could easily have been hers. This choice endeared her in the hearts of the common people throughout Europe. At the age of 14, Elizabeth was married to Louis of Thuringia, whom she deeply loved. She bore three children. Under the spiritual direction of a Franciscan friar, she led a life of prayer, sacrifice, and service to the poor and sick. Seeking to become one with the poor, she wore simple clothing. Daily she would take bread to hundreds of the poorest in the land who came to her gate. After six years of marriage, her husband died in the Crusades, and Elizabeth was grief-stricken. Her husband's family looked upon her as squandering the royal purse, and mistreated her, finally throwing her out of the palace. The return of her husband's allies from the Crusades resulted in her being reinstated, since her son was legal heir to the throne. In 1228, Elizabeth joined the Secular Franciscan Order, spending the remaining few years of her life caring for the poor in a hospital which she founded in honor of Saint Francis of Assisi. Elizabeth's health declined, and she died before her 24th birthday in 1231. Her great popularity resulted in her canonization four years later. Reflection Elizabeth understood well the lesson Jesus taught when he washed his disciples' feet at the Last Supper: The Christian must be one who serves the humblest needs of others, even if one serves from an exalted position. Of royal blood, Elizabeth could have lorded it over her subjects. Yet she served them with such a loving heart that her brief life won for her a special place in the hearts of many. Elizabeth is also an example to us in her following the guidance of a spiritual director. Growth in the spiritual life is a difficult process. We can play games very easily if we don't have someone to challenge us. Saint Elizabeth of Hungary is the Patron Saint of: Bakers Catholic Charities Secular Franciscan Order Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Sinocism
Biden-Xi talk; Full text of the historical resolution

Sinocism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Today’s newsletter is focused on the Biden-Xi virtual meeting and the full text of the historical resolution and so is light on other topics. The expectations for the Biden-Xi video chat were low and they were met. The fact that they are talking is positive, and it sounds like the September call between the leaders created conditions with the PRC system for lower-level officials to start engaging more constructively on some issues. This latest meeting is likely to do the same.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 16, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 498All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Margaret of ScotlandMargaret of Scotland was a truly liberated woman in the sense that she was free to be herself. For her, that meant freedom to love God and serve others. Not Scottish by birth, Margaret was the daughter of Princess Agatha of Hungary and the Anglo-Saxon Prince Edward Atheling. She spent much of her youth in the court of her great-uncle, the English king, Edward the Confessor. Her family fled from William the Conqueror and was shipwrecked off the coast of Scotland. King Malcolm befriended them and was captivated by the beautiful, gracious Margaret. They were married at the castle of Dunfermline in 1070. Malcolm was good-hearted, but rough and uncultured, as was his country. Because of Malcolm's love for Margaret, she was able to soften his temper, polish his manners, and help him become a virtuous king. He left all domestic affairs to her, and often consulted her in state matters. Margaret tried to improve her adopted country by promoting the arts and education. For religious reform she encouraged synods and was present for the discussions which tried to correct religious abuses common among priests and laypeople, such as simony, usury, and incestuous marriages. With her husband, she founded several churches. Margaret was not only a queen, but a mother. She and Malcolm had six sons and two daughters. Margaret personally supervised their religious instruction and other studies. Although she was very much caught up in the affairs of the household and country, she remained detached from the world. Her private life was austere. She had certain times for prayer and reading Scripture. She ate sparingly and slept little in order to have time for devotions. She and Malcolm kept two Lents, one before Easter and one before Christmas. During these times she always rose at midnight for Mass. On the way home she would wash the feet of six poor persons and give them alms. She was always surrounded by beggars in public and never refused them. It is recorded that she never sat down to eat without first feeding nine orphans and 24 adults. In 1093, King William Rufus made a surprise attack on Alnwick castle. King Malcolm and his oldest son, Edward, were killed. Margaret, already on her deathbed, died four days after her husband. Reflection There are two ways to be charitable: the “clean way” and the “messy way.” The “clean way” is to give money or clothing to organizations that serve the poor. The “messy way” is dirtying your own hands in personal service to the poor. Margaret's outstanding virtue was her love of the poor. Although very generous with material gifts, Margaret also visited the sick and nursed them with her own hands. She and her husband served orphans and the poor on their knees during Advent and Lent. Like Christ, she was charitable the “messy way.” Click here for more on Saint Margaret of Scotland! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

World on Drugs with Steve Furey
The Hawaiian Gardens Gang: One of The Most Dangerous Gangs in America PT. 1

World on Drugs with Steve Furey

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 71:41


*ep starts at 14:30 seconds I'll be talking about the Varrio Hawaiian Gardens gang, and no they're not in Hawaii, they're from a small town just south of LA. They have a long history and played a key part in forming the Mexican Mafia prison gang. Through the 90s and 2000s they committed numerous hate crimes and have been classified as a “Hate Gang” for their deliberate targeting of African Americans. They stick to their territory and have never formed cliques outside of Hawaiian Gardens. GUEST is officer Gannon a LASD and OCSD Sheriff SOURCES Sources Corwin, M. (2008, Dec 15). Inside the mexican mafia. Los Angeles Times (1996-) Retrieved from https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fhistorical-newspapers%2Finside-mexican-mafia%2Fdocview%2F2231499605%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 Quinones, S. (2009, Jan 09). It's the heart of town; in hawaiian gardens, a landmark market reaches the end of a line. Los Angeles Times https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fnewspapers%2Fheart-town-hawaiian-gardens-landmark-market%2Fdocview%2F422282855%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 Hawaiian gardens churches join rally against gangs, drugs and violence: [home edition]. (1992, Jul 02). Los Angeles Times (Pre-1997 Fulltext) https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fnewspapers%2Fhawaiian-gardens-churches-join-rally-against%2Fdocview%2F281771984%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 EMILY ADAMS SPECIAL TO,THE TIMES. (1993, Mar 13). Hawaiian gardens rattled by series of hate crimes: Racism: Blacks accuse latinos of attacks. 'I used to feel safe here. now I just don't,' says a woman whose home was firebombed. Los Angeles Times (1923-1995) https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fhistorical-newspapers%2Fhawaiian-gardens-rattled-series-hate-crimes%2Fdocview%2F1833010288%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150 Hong, P. Y. (2000, May 07). SPECIAL REPORT; many roots of hate; attacks on victims like martin hammonds, left, slain by a latino gang member in hawaiian gardens, may not fit the common image of hate crimes. but that community's deep-seated animosities are a window on the bigger picture of racially motivated violence in L.A. county.: [home edition]. Los Angeles Times https://login.libsrv.wku.edu/login?qurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.proquest.com%2Fnewspapers%2Fspecial-report-many-roots-hate-attacks-on-victims%2Fdocview%2F421656553%2Fse-2%3Faccountid%3D15150

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, November 15, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 497All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Albert the GreatAlbert the Great was a 13th-century German Dominican who decisively influenced the Church's stance toward Aristotelian philosophy brought to Europe by the spread of Islam. Students of philosophy know him as the master of Thomas Aquinas. Albert's attempt to understand Aristotle's writings established the climate in which Thomas Aquinas developed his synthesis of Greek wisdom and Christian theology. But Albert deserves recognition on his own merits as a curious, honest, and diligent scholar. He was the eldest son of a powerful and wealthy German lord of military rank. He was educated in the liberal arts. Despite fierce family opposition, he entered the Dominican novitiate. His boundless interests prompted him to write a compendium of all knowledge: natural science, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, astronomy, ethics, economics, politics, and metaphysics. His explanation of learning took 20 years to complete. “Our intention,” he said, “is to make all the aforesaid parts of knowledge intelligible to the Latins.” He achieved his goal while serving as an educator at Paris and Cologne, as Dominican provincial, and even as bishop of Regensburg for a short time. He defended the mendicant orders and preached the Crusade in Germany and Bohemia. Albert, a Doctor of the Church, is the patron of scientists and philosophers. Reflection An information glut faces us Christians today in all branches of learning. One needs only to read current Catholic periodicals to experience the varied reactions to the findings of the social sciences, for example, in regard to Christian institutions, Christian life-styles, and Christian theology. Ultimately, in canonizing Albert, the Church seems to point to his openness to truth, wherever it may be found, as his claim to holiness. His characteristic curiosity prompted Albert to mine deeply for wisdom within a philosophy his Church warmed to with great difficulty. Saint Albert the Great is a Patron Saint of: Educators/Teachers Medical Technicians Philosophers Scientists Check out these seven books on saints! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, November 14, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 158All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Albert the GreatAlbert the Great was a 13th-century German Dominican who decisively influenced the Church's stance toward Aristotelian philosophy brought to Europe by the spread of Islam. Students of philosophy know him as the master of Thomas Aquinas. Albert's attempt to understand Aristotle's writings established the climate in which Thomas Aquinas developed his synthesis of Greek wisdom and Christian theology. But Albert deserves recognition on his own merits as a curious, honest, and diligent scholar. He was the eldest son of a powerful and wealthy German lord of military rank. He was educated in the liberal arts. Despite fierce family opposition, he entered the Dominican novitiate. His boundless interests prompted him to write a compendium of all knowledge: natural science, logic, rhetoric, mathematics, astronomy, ethics, economics, politics, and metaphysics. His explanation of learning took 20 years to complete. “Our intention,” he said, “is to make all the aforesaid parts of knowledge intelligible to the Latins.” He achieved his goal while serving as an educator at Paris and Cologne, as Dominican provincial, and even as bishop of Regensburg for a short time. He defended the mendicant orders and preached the Crusade in Germany and Bohemia. Albert, a Doctor of the Church, is the patron of scientists and philosophers. Reflection An information glut faces us Christians today in all branches of learning. One needs only to read current Catholic periodicals to experience the varied reactions to the findings of the social sciences, for example, in regard to Christian institutions, Christian life-styles, and Christian theology. Ultimately, in canonizing Albert, the Church seems to point to his openness to truth, wherever it may be found, as his claim to holiness. His characteristic curiosity prompted Albert to mine deeply for wisdom within a philosophy his Church warmed to with great difficulty. Saint Albert the Great is a Patron Saint of: Educators/Teachers Medical Technicians Philosophers Scientists Check out these seven books on saints! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, November 13, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini, Virgin Lectionary: 496All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Frances Xavier CabriniFrances Xavier Cabrini was the first United States citizen to be canonized. Her deep trust in the loving care of her God gave her the strength to be a valiant woman doing the work of Christ. Refused admission to the religious order which had educated her to be a teacher, she began charitable work at the House of Providence Orphanage in Cadogno, Italy. In September 1877, she made her vows there and took the religious habit. When the bishop closed the orphanage in 1880, he named Frances prioress of the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart. Seven young women from the orphanage joined her. Since her early childhood in Italy, Frances had wanted to be a missionary in China but, at the urging of Pope Leo XIII, Frances went west instead of east. She traveled with six sisters to New York City to work with the thousands of Italian immigrants living there. She found disappointment and difficulties with every step. When she arrived in New York, the house intended to be her first orphanage in the United States was not available. The archbishop advised her to return to Italy. But Frances, truly a valiant woman, departed from the archbishop's residence all the more determined to establish that orphanage. And she did. In 35 years, Frances Xavier Cabrini founded 67 institutions dedicated to caring for the poor, the abandoned, the uneducated and the sick. Seeing great need among Italian immigrants who were losing their faith, she organized schools and adult education classes. As a child, she was always frightened of water, unable to overcome her fear of drowning. Yet, despite this fear, she traveled across the Atlantic Ocean more than 30 times. She died of malaria in her own Columbus Hospital in Chicago. Reflection The compassion and dedication of Mother Cabrini is still seen in hundreds of thousands of her fellow citizens who care for the sick in hospitals, nursing homes, and state institutions. We complain of increased medical costs in an affluent society, but the daily news shows us millions who have little or no medical care, and who are calling for new Mother Cabrinis to become citizen-servants of their land. Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini is a Patron Saint of: Hospital Administrators Immigrants Impossible Causes Click here for more Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, November 12, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Josaphat, Bishop and Martyr Lectionary: 495All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint JosaphatIn 1595, the Orthodox bishop of Brest-Litovsk in present-day Belarus and five other bishops representing millions of Ruthenians, sought reunion with Rome. John Kunsevich—who took the name Josaphat in religious life—was to dedicate his life, and die for the same cause. Born in what is now Ukraine, he went to work in Wilno and was influenced by clergy adhering to the 1596 Union of Brest. He became a Basilian monk, then a priest, and soon was well known as a preacher and an ascetic. He became bishop of Vitebsk at a relatively young age, and faced a difficult situation. Most monks, fearing interference in liturgy and customs, did not want union with Rome. By synods, catechetical instruction, reform of the clergy, and personal example, however, Josaphat was successful in winning the greater part of the Orthodox in that area to the union. But the next year a dissident hierarchy was set up, and his opposite number spread the accusation that Josaphat had “gone Latin” and that all his people would have to do the same. He was not enthusiastically supported by the Latin bishops of Poland. Despite warnings, he went to Vitebsk, still a hotbed of trouble. Attempts were made to foment trouble and drive him from the diocese: A priest was sent to shout insults to him from his own courtyard. When Josaphat had him removed and shut up in his house, the opposition rang the town hall bell, and a mob assembled. The priest was released, but members of the mob broke into the bishop's home. Josaphat was struck with a halberd, then shot, and his body thrown into the river. It was later recovered and is now buried in St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. He was the first saint of the Eastern Church to be canonized by Rome. Josaphat's death brought a movement toward Catholicism and unity, but the controversy continued, and the dissidents, too, had their martyr. After the partition of Poland, the Russians forced most Ruthenians to join the Russian Orthodox Church. In 1964, newspaper photos of Pope Paul VI embracing Athenagoras I, the Orthodox patriarch of Constantinople, marked a significant step toward the healing of a division in Christendom that has spanned more than nine centuries. Reflection The seeds of separation were sown in the fourth century when the Roman Empire was divided into East and West. The actual split came over customs such as using unleavened bread, Saturday fasting, and celibacy. No doubt the political involvement of religious leaders on both sides was a large factor, and doctrinal disagreement was present. But no reason was enough to justify the present tragic division in Christendom, which is 64 percent Roman Catholic, 13 percent Eastern—mostly Orthodox—Churches, and 23 percent Protestant, and this when the 71 percent of the world that is not Christian should be experiencing unity and Christ-like charity from Christians! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 11, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Martin of Tours, Bishop Lectionary: 494All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Martin of ToursA conscientious objector who wanted to be a monk; a monk who was maneuvered into being a bishop; a bishop who fought paganism as well as pleaded for mercy to heretics—such was Martin of Tours, one of the most popular of saints and one of the first not to be a martyr. Born of pagan parents in what is now Hungary, and raised in Italy, this son of a veteran was forced at the age of 15 to serve in the army. Martin became a Christian catechumen and was baptized when he was 18. It was said that he lived more like a monk than a soldier. At 23, he refused a war bonus and told his commander: “I have served you as a soldier; now let me serve Christ. Give the bounty to those who are going to fight. But I am a soldier of Christ and it is not lawful for me to fight.” After great difficulties, he was discharged and went to be a disciple of Hilary of Poitiers. He was ordained an exorcist and worked with great zeal against the Arians. Martin became a monk, living first at Milan and later on a small island. When Hilary was restored to his see following his exile, Martin returned to France and established what may have been the first French monastery near Poitiers. He lived there for 10 years, forming his disciples and preaching throughout the countryside. The people of Tours demanded that he become their bishop. Martin was drawn to that city by a ruse—the need of a sick person—and was brought to the church, where he reluctantly allowed himself to be consecrated bishop. Some of the consecrating bishops thought his rumpled appearance and unkempt hair indicated that he was not dignified enough for the office. Along with Saint Ambrose, Martin rejected Bishop Ithacius's principle of putting heretics to death—as well as the intrusion of the emperor into such matters. He prevailed upon the emperor to spare the life of the heretic Priscillian. For his efforts, Martin was accused of the same heresy, and Priscillian was executed after all. Martin then pleaded for a cessation of the persecution of Priscillian's followers in Spain. He still felt he could cooperate with Ithacius in other areas, but afterwards his conscience troubled him about this decision. As death approached, Martin's followers begged him not to leave them. He prayed, “Lord, if your people still need me, I do not refuse the work. Your will be done.” Reflection Martin's worry about cooperation with evil reminds us that almost nothing is either all black or all white. The saints are not creatures of another world: They face the same perplexing decisions that we do. Any decision of conscience always involves some risk. If we choose to go north, we may never know what would have happened had we gone east, west, or south. A hyper-cautious withdrawal from all perplexing situations is not the virtue of prudence; it is in fact, a bad decision, for “not to decide is to decide.” Saint Martin of Tours is a Patron Saint of: Horses Soldiers South Africa Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Leo the Great, Pope and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 493All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Leo the GreatWith apparent strong conviction of the importance of the Bishop of Rome in the Church, and of the Church as the ongoing sign of Christ's presence in the world, Leo the Great displayed endless dedication as pope. Elected in 440, he worked tirelessly as “Peter's successor,” guiding his fellow bishops as “equals in the episcopacy and infirmities.” Leo is known as one of the best administrative popes of the ancient Church. His work branched into four main areas, indicative of his notion of the pope's total responsibility for the flock of Christ. He worked at length to control the heresies of Pelagianism—overemphasizing human freedom—Manichaeism—seeing everything material as evil—and others, placing demands on their followers so as to secure true Christian beliefs. A second major area of his concern was doctrinal controversy in the Church in the East, to which he responded with a classic letter setting down the Church's teaching on the two natures of Christ. With strong faith, he also led the defense of Rome against barbarian attack, taking the role of peacemaker. In these three areas, Leo's work has been highly regarded. His growth to sainthood has its basis in the spiritual depth with which he approached the pastoral care of his people, which was the fourth focus of his work. He is known for his spiritually profound sermons. An instrument of the call to holiness, well-versed in Scripture and ecclesiastical awareness, Leo had the ability to reach the everyday needs and interests of his people. One of his sermons is used in the Office of Readings on Christmas. It is said of Leo that his true significance rests in his doctrinal insistence on the mysteries of Christ and the Church and in the supernatural charisms of the spiritual life given to humanity in Christ and in his Body, the Church. Thus Leo held firmly that everything he did and said as pope for the administration of the Church represented Christ, the head of the Mystical Body, and Saint Peter, in whose place Leo acted. Reflection At a time when there is widespread criticism of Church structures, we also hear criticism that bishops and priests—indeed, all of us—are too preoccupied with administration of temporal matters. Pope Leo is an example of a great administrator who used his talents in areas where spirit and structure are inseparably combined: doctrine, peace, and pastoral care. He avoided an “angelism” that tries to live without the body, as well as the “practicality” that deals only in externals. Click here for quotes from Catholic saints! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, November 9, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome Lectionary: 671All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Dedication of Saint John Lateran Basilicaof the Dedication of St. John Lateran Most Catholics think of St. Peter's as the pope's main church, but they are wrong. St. John Lateran is the pope's church, the cathedral of the Diocese of Rome where the Bishop of Rome presides. The first basilica on the site was built in the fourth century when Constantine donated land he had received from the wealthy Lateran family. That structure and its successors suffered fire, earthquake, and the ravages of war, but the Lateran remained the church where popes were consecrated. In the 14th century when the papacy returned to Rome from Avignon, the church and the adjoining palace were found to be in ruins. Pope Innocent X commissioned the present structure in 1646. One of Rome's most imposing churches, the Lateran's towering facade is crowned with 15 colossal statues of Christ, John the Baptist, John the Evangelist, and 12 doctors of the Church. Beneath its high altar rest the remains of the small wooden table on which tradition holds Saint Peter himself celebrated Mass. Reflection Unlike the commemorations of other Roman churches, this anniversary is a feast. The dedication of a church is a feast for all its parishioners. In a sense, St. John Lateran is the parish church of all Catholics, because it is the pope's cathedral. This church is the spiritual home of the people who are the Church. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, November 8, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Thirty-second Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 491All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed John Duns ScotusA humble man, John Duns Scotus has been one of the most influential Franciscans through the centuries. Born at Duns in the county of Berwick, Scotland, John was descended from a wealthy farming family. In later years, he was identified as John Duns Scotus to indicate the land of his birth; Scotia is the Latin name for Scotland. John received the habit of the Friars Minor at Dumfries, where his uncle Elias Duns was superior. After novitiate, John studied at Oxford and Paris and was ordained in 1291. More studies in Paris followed until 1297, when he returned to lecture at Oxford and Cambridge. Four years later, he returned to Paris to teach and complete the requirements for the doctorate. In an age when many people adopted whole systems of thought without qualification, John pointed out the richness of the Augustinian-Franciscan tradition, appreciated the wisdom of Aquinas, Aristotle, and the Muslim philosophers—and still managed to be an independent thinker. That quality was proven in 1303, when King Philip the Fair tried to enlist the University of Paris on his side in a dispute with Pope Boniface VIII. John Duns Scotus dissented, and was given three days to leave France. In Scotus's time, some philosophers held that people are basically determined by forces outside themselves. Free will is an illusion, they argued. An ever-practical man, Scotus said that if he started beating someone who denied free will, the person would immediately tell him to stop. But if Scotus didn't really have a free will, how could he stop? John had a knack for finding illustrations his students could remember! After a short stay in Oxford, Scotus returned to Paris, where he received the doctorate in 1305. He continued teaching there and in 1307 so ably defended the Immaculate Conception of Mary that the university officially adopted his position. That same year the minister general assigned him to the Franciscan school in Cologne where John died in 1308. He is buried in the Franciscan church near the famous Cologne cathedral. Drawing on the work of John Duns Scotus, Pope Pius IX solemnly defined the Immaculate Conception of Mary in 1854. John Duns Scotus, the “Subtle Doctor,” was beatified in 1993. Reflection Father Charles Balic, O.F.M., the foremost 20th-century authority on Scotus, has written: “The whole of Scotus's theology is dominated by the notion of love. The characteristic note of this love is its absolute freedom. As love becomes more perfect and intense, freedom becomes more noble and integral both in God and in man” (New Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 1105). Click here for more on John Duns Scotus! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, November 7, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 155All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint DidacusDidacus is living proof that God “chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise; God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong.” As a young man in Spain, Didacus joined the Secular Franciscan Order and lived for some time as a hermit. After Didacus became a Franciscan brother, he developed a reputation for great insight into God's ways. His penances were heroic. He was so generous with the poor that the friars sometimes grew uneasy about his charity. Didacus volunteered for the missions in the Canary Islands and labored there energetically and profitably. He was also the superior of a friary there. In 1450, he was sent to Rome to attend the canonization of Saint Bernardine of Siena. When many of the friars gathered for that celebration fell ill, Didacus stayed in Rome for three months to nurse them. After he returned to Spain, he pursued a life of contemplation full-time. He showed the friars the wisdom of God's ways. As he was dying, Didacus looked at a crucifix and said: “O faithful wood, O precious nails! You have borne an exceedingly sweet burden, for you have been judged worthy to bear the Lord and King of heaven” (Marion A. Habig, OFM, The Franciscan Book of Saints, p. 834). San Diego, California, is named for this Franciscan, who was canonized in 1588. Reflection We cannot be neutral about genuinely holy people. We either admire them or we consider them foolish. Didacus is a saint because he used his life to serve God and God's people. Can we say the same for ourselves? Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, November 6, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 490All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Nicholas Tavelic and CompanionsNicholas and his three companions are among the 158 Franciscans who have been martyred in the Holy Land since the friars became custodians of the shrines in 1335. Nicholas was born in 1340 to a wealthy and noble family in Croatia. He joined the Franciscans, and was sent with Deodat of Rodez to preach in Bosnia. In 1384, they volunteered for the Holy Land missions and were sent there. They looked after the holy places, cared for the Christian pilgrims, and studied Arabic. In 1391, Nicholas, Deodat, Peter of Narbonne, and Stephen of Cuneo decided to take a direct approach to converting the Muslims. On November 11, they went to the huge Mosque of Omar in Jerusalem and asked to see the Qadix—Muslim official. Reading from a prepared statement, they said that all people must accept the gospel of Jesus. When they were ordered to retract their statement, they refused. After beatings and imprisonment, they were beheaded before a large crowd. Nicholas and his companions were canonized in 1970. They are the only Franciscans martyred in the Holy Land to be canonized. Their liturgical feast is celebrated on November 14. Reflection Francis presented two missionary approaches for his friars. Nicholas and his companions followed the first approach—live quietly and give witness to Christ—for several years. Then they felt called to take the second approach of preaching openly. Their Franciscan confréres in the Holy Land are still working by example to make Jesus better known. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, November 5, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 489All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Peter ChrysologusA man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter ” of the Golden Words,” as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these Peter was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine, and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. Some time before his death around A.D. 450, Peter returned to his birthplace of Imola, in northern Italy. His liturgical feast is celebrated on July 30. Reflection Quite likely, it was Saint Peter Chrysologus' attitude toward learning that gave substance to his exhortations. Next to virtue, learning, in his view, was the greatest improvement to the human mind and the support of true religion. Ignorance is not a virtue, nor is anti-intellectualism. Knowledge is neither more nor less a source of pride than physical, administrative, or financial prowess. To be fully human is to expand our knowledge—whether sacred or secular—according to our talent and opportunity. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, November 4, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Charles Borromeo, Bishop Lectionary: 488All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Charles BorromeoThe name of Charles Borromeo is associated with reform. He lived during the time of the Protestant Reformation, and had a hand in the reform of the whole Church during the final years of the Council of Trent. Although he belonged to the Milanese nobility and was related to the powerful Medici family, Charles desired to devote himself to the Church. In 1559, when his uncle, Cardinal de Medici was elected Pope Pius IV, he made Charles cardinal-deacon and administrator of the Archdiocese of Milan. At the time Charles was still a layman and a young student. Because of his intellectual qualities Charles was entrusted with several important offices connected with the Vatican, and later appointed secretary of state with responsibility for the papal states. The untimely death of his elder brother brought Charles to a definite decision to be ordained a priest, despite his relatives' insistence that he marry. Soon after being ordained a priest at age 25, Borromeo was consecrated bishop of Milan. Working behind the scenes, Saint Charles deserves the credit for keeping the Council of Trent in session when at several points it was on the verge of breaking up. Borromeo encouraged the pope to renew the Council in 1562, after it had been suspended for 10 years. He took upon himself the task of the entire correspondence during the final phase. Because of his work at the Council, Borromeo was unable to take up residence in Milan until the Council concluded. Eventually, Borromeo was allowed to devote his time to the Archdiocese of Milan, where the religious and moral picture was far from bright. The reform needed in every phase of Catholic life among both clergy and laity was initiated at a provincial council of all the bishops under him. Specific regulations were drawn up for bishops and other clergy: If the people were to be converted to a better life, Borromeo had to be the first to give a good example and renew their apostolic spirit. Charles took the initiative in giving a good example. He allotted most of his income to charity, forbade himself all luxury, and imposed severe penances upon himself. He sacrificed wealth, high honors, esteem, and influence to become poor. During the plague and famine of 1576, Borromeo tried to feed 60,000 to 70,000 people daily. To do this he borrowed large sums of money that required years to repay. Whereas the civil authorities fled at the height of the plague, he stayed in the city, where he ministered to the sick and the dying, helping those in want. Work and the heavy burdens of his high office began to affect Archbishop Borromeo's health, leading to his death at the age of 46. Reflection Saint Charles Borromeo made his own the words of Christ: “…I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me” (Matthew 25:35-36). Borromeo saw Christ in his neighbor, and knew that charity done for the least of his flock was charity done for Christ. Saint Charles Borromeo is a Patron Saint of: Catechists Catechumens Seminarians Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, November 3, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 487All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Charles BorromeoThe name of Charles Borromeo is associated with reform. He lived during the time of the Protestant Reformation, and had a hand in the reform of the whole Church during the final years of the Council of Trent. Although he belonged to the Milanese nobility and was related to the powerful Medici family, Charles desired to devote himself to the Church. In 1559, when his uncle, Cardinal de Medici was elected Pope Pius IV, he made Charles cardinal-deacon and administrator of the Archdiocese of Milan. At the time Charles was still a layman and a young student. Because of his intellectual qualities Charles was entrusted with several important offices connected with the Vatican, and later appointed secretary of state with responsibility for the papal states. The untimely death of his elder brother brought Charles to a definite decision to be ordained a priest, despite his relatives' insistence that he marry. Soon after being ordained a priest at age 25, Borromeo was consecrated bishop of Milan. Working behind the scenes, Saint Charles deserves the credit for keeping the Council of Trent in session when at several points it was on the verge of breaking up. Borromeo encouraged the pope to renew the Council in 1562, after it had been suspended for 10 years. He took upon himself the task of the entire correspondence during the final phase. Because of his work at the Council, Borromeo was unable to take up residence in Milan until the Council concluded. Eventually, Borromeo was allowed to devote his time to the Archdiocese of Milan, where the religious and moral picture was far from bright. The reform needed in every phase of Catholic life among both clergy and laity was initiated at a provincial council of all the bishops under him. Specific regulations were drawn up for bishops and other clergy: If the people were to be converted to a better life, Borromeo had to be the first to give a good example and renew their apostolic spirit. Charles took the initiative in giving a good example. He allotted most of his income to charity, forbade himself all luxury, and imposed severe penances upon himself. He sacrificed wealth, high honors, esteem, and influence to become poor. During the plague and famine of 1576, Borromeo tried to feed 60,000 to 70,000 people daily. To do this he borrowed large sums of money that required years to repay. Whereas the civil authorities fled at the height of the plague, he stayed in the city, where he ministered to the sick and the dying, helping those in want. Work and the heavy burdens of his high office began to affect Archbishop Borromeo's health, leading to his death at the age of 46. Reflection Saint Charles Borromeo made his own the words of Christ: “…I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me” (Matthew 25:35-36). Borromeo saw Christ in his neighbor, and knew that charity done for the least of his flock was charity done for Christ. Saint Charles Borromeo is a Patron Saint of: Catechists Catechumens Seminarians Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, November 1, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSolemnity of All Saints Lectionary: 667All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Solemnity of All Saintsof the Solemnity of All Saints The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of “all the martyrs.” In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagon-loads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended “that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons” (On the Calculation of Time). But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost. How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century. Reflection This feast first honored martyrs. Later, when Christians were free to worship according to their consciences, the Church acknowledged other paths to sanctity. In the early centuries the only criterion was popular acclaim, even when the bishop's approval became the final step in placing a commemoration on the calendar. The first papal canonization occurred in 993; the lengthy process now required to prove extraordinary sanctity took form in the last 500 years. Today's feast honors the obscure as well as the famous—the saints each of us have known. Click here for more on the Feast of All Saints! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, October 31, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 152All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Wolfgang of RegensburgWolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg, near Munich. Wolfgang immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. In 994, Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. Reflection Wolfgang could be depicted as a man with rolled-up sleeves. He even tried retiring to solitary prayer, but taking his responsibilities seriously led him back into the service of his diocese. Doing what had to be done was his path to holiness—and ours. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, October 30, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 484All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Alphonsus RodriguezTragedy and challenge beset today's saint early in life, but Alphonsus Rodriguez found happiness and contentment through simple service and prayer. Born in Spain in 1533, Alphonsus inherited the family textile business at 23. Within the space of three years, his wife, daughter, and mother died; meanwhile, business was poor. Alphonsus stepped back and reassessed his life. He sold the business, and with his young son, moved into his sister's home. There he learned the discipline of prayer and meditation. At the death of his son years later, Alphonsus, almost 40 by then, sought to join the Jesuits. He was not helped by his poor education. He applied twice before being admitted. For 45 years he served as doorkeeper at the Jesuits' college in Majorca. When not at his post, he was almost always at prayer, though he often encountered difficulties and temptations. His holiness and prayerfulness attracted many to him, including Saint Peter Claver, then a Jesuit seminarian. Alphonsus' life as doorkeeper may have been humdrum, but centuries later he caught the attention of poet and fellow-Jesuit Gerard Manley Hopkins, who made him the subject of one of his poems. Alphonsus died in 1617. He is the patron saint of Majorca. Reflection We like to think that God rewards the good, even in this life. But Alphonsus knew business losses, painful bereavement, and periods when God seemed very distant. None of his suffering made him withdraw into a shell of self-pity or bitterness. Rather, he reached out to others who lived with pain, including enslaved Africans. Among the many notables at his funeral were the sick and poor people whose lives he had touched. May they find such a friend in us! Saint Alphonsus Rodriguez is the Patron Saint of: Majorca Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, October 29, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 483All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Narcissus of JerusalemLife in second- and third-century Jerusalem couldn't have been easy, but Saint Narcissus managed to live well beyond 100. Some even speculate he lived to 160. Details of his life are sketchy, but there are many reports of his miracles. The miracle for which Narcissus is most remembered was turning water into oil for use in the church lamps on Holy Saturday when the deacons had forgotten to provide any. We do know that Narcissus became bishop of Jerusalem in the late second century. He was known for his holiness, but there are hints that many people found him harsh and rigid in his efforts to impose Church discipline. One of his many detractors accused Narcissus of a serious crime at one point. Though the charges against him did not hold up, he used the occasion to retire from his role as bishop and live in solitude. His disappearance was so sudden and convincing that many people assumed he had actually died. Several successors were appointed during his years in isolation. Finally, Narcissus reappeared in Jerusalem and was persuaded to resume his duties. By then he had reached an advanced age, so a younger bishop was brought in to assist him until his death. Reflection As our life spans increase and we face the bodily problems of aging, we might keep Saint Narcissus in mind and ask him to help us face our developing issues. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, October 28, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saints Simon and Jude, Apostles Lectionary: 666All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saints Simon and JudeJude is so named by Luke and Acts. Matthew and Mark call him Thaddeus. He is not mentioned elsewhere in the Gospels, except of course where all the apostles are mentioned. Scholars hold that he is not the author of the Letter of Jude. Actually, Jude had the same name as Judas Iscariot. Evidently because of the disgrace of that name, it was shortened to “Jude” in English. Simon is mentioned on all four lists of the apostles. On two of them he is called “the Zealot.” The Zealots were a Jewish sect that represented an extreme of Jewish nationalism. For them, the messianic promise of the Old Testament meant that the Jews were to be a free and independent nation. God alone was their king, and any payment of taxes to the Romans—the very domination of the Romans—was a blasphemy against God. No doubt some of the Zealots were the spiritual heirs of the Maccabees, carrying on their ideals of religion and independence. But many were the counterparts of modern terrorists. They raided and killed, attacking both foreigners and “collaborating” Jews. They were chiefly responsible for the rebellion against Rome which ended in the destruction of Jerusalem in A.D. 70. Reflection As in the case of all the apostles except for Peter, James and John, we are faced with men who are really unknown, and we are struck by the fact that their holiness is simply taken to be a gift of Christ. He chose some unlikely people: a former Zealot, a former (crooked) tax collector, an impetuous fisherman, two “sons of thunder,” and a man named Judas Iscariot. It is a reminder that we cannot receive too often. Holiness does not depend on human merit, culture, personality, effort, or achievement. It is entirely God's creation and gift. God needs no Zealots to bring about the kingdom by force. Jude, like all the saints, is the saint of the impossible: Only God can create his divine life in human beings. And God wills to do so, for all of us. Saint Jude is the Patron Saint of: Desperate Situations Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, October 27, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 481All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Blessed Bartholomew of VicenzaDominicans honor one of their own today, Blessed Bartholomew of Vicenza. This was a man who used his skills as a preacher to challenge the heresies of his day. Bartholomew was born in Vicenza around 1200. At 20, he entered the Dominicans. Following his ordination, he served in various leadership positions. As a young priest, he founded a military order whose purpose was to keep civil peace in towns throughout Italy. In 1248, Bartholomew was appointed a bishop. For most men, such an appointment is an honor and a tribute to their holiness and their demonstrated leadership skills. But for Bartholomew, it was a form of exile that had been urged by an antipapal group that was only too happy to see him leave for Cyprus. Not many years later, however, Bartholomew was transferred back to Vicenza. Despite the antipapal feelings that were still evident, he worked diligently—especially through his preaching—to rebuild his diocese and strengthen the people's loyalty to Rome. During his years as bishop in Cyprus, Bartholomew befriended King Louis IX of France, who is said to have given the holy bishop a relic of Christ's Crown of Thorns. Bartholomew died in 1271, and was beatified in 1793. Reflection Despite oppositions and obstacles, Bartholomew remained faithful to his ministry to God's People. We face daily challenges to our faithfulness and duties as well. Perhaps Bartholomew could serve as an inspiration in our darker moments. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, October 26, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsTuesday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 480All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Peter of AlcantaraPeter was a contemporary of well-known 16th-century Spanish saints, including Ignatius of Loyola and John of the Cross. He served as confessor to Saint Teresa of Avila. Church reform was a major issue in Peter's day, and he directed most of his energies toward that end. His death came one year before the Council of Trent ended. Born into a noble family—his father was the governor of Alcantara in Spain—Peter studied law at Salamanca University, and at 16 he joined the so-called Observant Franciscans, also known as the discalced friars. While he practiced many penances, he also demonstrated abilities which were soon recognized. He was named the superior of a new house even before his ordination as a priest, was elected provincial at the age of 39, and he was a very successful preacher. Still, he was not above washing dishes and cutting wood for the friars. He did not seek attention; indeed, he preferred solitude. Peter's penitential side was evident when it came to food and clothing. It is said that he slept only 90 minutes each night. While others talked about Church reform, Peter's reform began with himself. His patience was so great that a proverb arose: “To bear such an insult one must have the patience of Peter of Alcantara.” In 1554, Peter received permission to form a group of Franciscans who followed the Rule of St. Francis with even greater rigor. These friars were known as Alcantarines. Some of the Spanish friars who came to North and South America in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries were members of this group. At the end of the 19th century, the Alcantarines were joined with other Observant friars to form the Order of Friars Minor. As spiritual director to Saint Teresa, Peter encouraged her in promoting the Carmelite reform. His preaching brought many people to religious life, especially to the Secular Franciscan Order, the friars, and the Poor Clares. Peter of Alcantara was canonized in 1669. His liturgical feast is celebrated on September 22. Reflection Poverty was a means and not an end for Peter. The goal was following Christ in ever greater purity of heart. Whatever obstructed that path could be eliminated with no real loss. The philosophy of our consumer age—you are worth what you own—may find Peter of Alcantara's approach severe. Ultimately, his approach is life-giving while consumerism is deadly. Click here for quotes from Catholic saints! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, October 25, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 479All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Antnio de SantAnna GalvoGod's plan in a person's life often takes unexpected turns which become life-giving through cooperation with God's grace. Born in Guarantingueta near São Paulo, Antônio attended the Jesuit seminary in Belem, but later decided to become a Franciscan friar. Invested in 1760, he made final profession the following year and was ordained in 1762. In São Paulo, he served as preacher, confessor, and porter. Within a few years, Antônio was appointed confessor to the Recollects of Saint Teresa, a group of nuns in that city. He and Sister Helena Maria of the Holy Spirit founded a new community of sisters under the patronage of Our Lady of the Conception of Divine Providence. Sister Helena Maria's premature death the next year left Father Antônio responsible for the new congregation, especially for building a convent and church adequate for their growing numbers. He served as novice master for the friars in Macacu and as guardian of St. Francis Friary in São Paulo. He founded St. Clare Friary in Sorocaba. With the permission of his provincial and the bishop, Antônio spent his last days at the Recolhimento de Nossa Senhora da Luz, the convent of the sisters' congregation he had helped establish. Antônio de Sant'Anna Galvão was beatified in Rome on October 25, 1998, and canonized in 2007. Reflection Holy women and men cannot help calling our attention to God, to God's creation, and to all the people whom God loves. The lives of holy people are so oriented toward God that this has become their definition of “normal.” Do people see my life or yours as a living sign of God's steadfast love? What might have to change for that to happen? Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, October 24, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 149All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Anthony Mary ClaretThe “spiritual father of Cuba” was a missionary, religious founder, social reformer, queen's chaplain, writer and publisher, archbishop, and refugee. He was a Spaniard whose work took him to the Canary Islands, Cuba, Madrid, Paris, and to the First Vatican Council. In his spare time as weaver and designer in the textile mills of Barcelona, Anthony learned Latin and printing: The future priest and publisher was preparing. Ordained at 28, he was prevented by ill health from entering religious life as a Carthusian or as a Jesuit, but went on to become one of Spain's most popular preachers. Anthony spent 10 years giving popular missions and retreats, always placing great emphasis on the Eucharist and devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. It was said that his rosary was never out of his hand. At age 42, he founded a religious institute of missionaries beginning with five young priests, known today as the Claretians. Anthony was appointed to head the much-neglected archdiocese of Santiago in Cuba. He began its reform by almost ceaseless preaching and hearing of confessions, and suffered bitter opposition mainly for opposing concubinage and giving instruction to black slaves. A hired assassin—whose release from prison Anthony had obtained—slashed open his face and wrist. Anthony succeeded in getting the would-be assassin's death sentence commuted to a prison term. His solution for the misery of Cubans was family-owned farms producing a variety of foods for the family's own needs and for the market. This invited the enmity of the vested interests who wanted everyone to work on a single cash crop—sugar. Besides all his religious writings are two books he wrote in Cuba: Reflections on Agriculture and Country Delights. He was recalled to Spain for a job he did not relish—being chaplain for the queen. Anthony went on three conditions: He would reside away from the palace; he would come only to hear the queen's confession and instruct the children; and he would be exempt from court functions. In the revolution of 1868, he fled to Paris with the queen's party, where he preached to the Spanish colony. All his life Anthony was interested in the Catholic press. He founded the Religious Publishing House, a major Catholic publishing venture in Spain, and wrote or published 200 books and pamphlets. At Vatican I, where he was a staunch defender of the doctrine of infallibility, Anthony won the admiration of his fellow bishops. Cardinal Gibbons of Baltimore remarked of him, “There goes a true saint.” At the age of 63, he died in exile near the border of Spain. Reflection Jesus foretold that those who are truly his representatives would suffer the same persecution as he did. Besides 14 attempts on his life, Anthony had to undergo such a barrage of the ugliest slander that the very name Claret became a byword for humiliation and misfortune. The powers of evil do not easily give up their prey. No one needs to go looking for persecution. All we need to do is be sure we suffer because of our genuine faith in Christ, not for our own whims and lack of prudence. Saint Anthony Mary Claret is a Patron Saint of: Weavers Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, October 23, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 478All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint John of CapistranoIt has been said the Christian saints are the world's greatest optimists. Not blind to the existence and consequences of evil, they base their confidence on the power of Christ's redemption. The power of conversion through Christ extends not only to sinful people but also to calamitous events. Imagine being born in the 14th century. One-third of the population and nearly 40 percent of the clergy were wiped out by the bubonic plague. The Western Schism split the Church with two or three claimants to the Holy See at one time. England and France were at war. The city-states of Italy were constantly in conflict. No wonder that gloom dominated the spirit of the culture and the times. John Capistrano was born in 1386. His education was thorough. His talents and success were great. When he was 26 he was made governor of Perugia. Imprisoned after a battle against the Malatestas, he resolved to change his way of life completely. At the age of 30 he entered the Franciscan novitiate and was ordained a priest four years later. John's preaching attracted great throngs at a time of religious apathy and confusion. He and 12 Franciscan brethren were received in the countries of central Europe as angels of God. They were instrumental in reviving a dying faith and devotion. The Franciscan Order itself was in turmoil over the interpretation and observance of the Rule of St. Francis. Through John's tireless efforts and his expertise in law, the heretical Fraticelli were suppressed and the “Spirituals” were freed from interference in their stricter observance. John of Capistrano helped bring about a brief reunion with the Greek and Armenian Churches. When the Turks captured Constantinople in 1453, John was commissioned to preach a crusade for the defense of Europe. Gaining little response in Bavaria and Austria, he decided to concentrate his efforts in Hungary. He led the army to Belgrade. Under the great General John Hunyadi, they gained an overwhelming victory, and the siege of Belgrade was lifted. Worn out by his superhuman efforts, Capistrano was an easy prey to an infection after the battle. He died on October 23, 1456. Reflection John Hofer, a biographer of John Capistrano, recalls a Brussels organization named after the saint. Seeking to solve life problems in a fully Christian spirit, its motto was: “Initiative, Organization, Activity.” These three words characterized John's life. He was not one to sit around. His deep Christian optimism drove him to battle problems at all levels with the confidence engendered by a deep faith in Christ. Saint John of Capistrano is Patron Saint of: Judges Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, October 22, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 477All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint John Paul II“Open wide the doors to Christ,” urged John Paul II during the homily at the Mass where he was installed as pope in 1978. Born in Wadowice, Poland, Karol Jozef Wojtyla had lost his mother, father, and older brother before his 21st birthday. Karol's promising academic career at Krakow's Jagiellonian University was cut short by the outbreak of World War II. While working in a quarry and a chemical factory, he enrolled in an “underground” seminary in Kraków. Ordained in 1946, he was immediately sent to Rome where he earned a doctorate in theology. Back in Poland, a short assignment as assistant pastor in a rural parish preceded his very fruitful chaplaincy for university students. Soon Fr. Wojtyla earned a doctorate in philosophy and began teaching that subject at Poland's University of Lublin. Communist officials allowed Wojtyla to be appointed auxiliary bishop of Kraków in 1958, considering him a relatively harmless intellectual. They could not have been more wrong! Bishop Wojtyla attended all four sessions of Vatican II and contributed especially to its Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World. Appointed as archbishop of Kraków in 1964, he was named a cardinal three years later. Elected pope in October 1978, he took the name of his short-lived, immediate predecessor. Pope John Paul II was the first non-Italian pope in 455 years. In time, he made pastoral visits to 124 countries, including several with small Christian populations. John Paul II promoted ecumenical and interfaith initiatives, especially the 1986 Day of Prayer for World Peace in Assisi. He visited Rome's main synagogue and the Western Wall in Jerusalem; he also established diplomatic relations between the Holy See and Israel. He improved Catholic-Muslim relations, and in 2001 visited a mosque in Damascus, Syria. The Great Jubilee of the Year 2000, a key event in John Paul's ministry, was marked by special celebrations in Rome and elsewhere for Catholics and other Christians. Relations with the Orthodox Churches improved considerably during his papacy. “Christ is the center of the universe and of human history” was the opening line of John Paul II's 1979 encyclical, Redeemer of the Human Race. In 1995, he described himself to the United Nations General Assembly as “a witness to hope.” His 1979 visit to Poland encouraged the growth of the Solidarity movement there and the collapse of communism in central and eastern Europe 10 years later. John Paul II began World Youth Day and traveled to several countries for those celebrations. He very much wanted to visit China and the Soviet Union, but the governments in those countries prevented that. One of the most well-remembered photos of John Paul II's pontificate was his one-on-one conversation in 1983, with Mehmet Ali Agca, who had attempted to assassinate him two years earlier. In his 27 years of papal ministry, John Paul II wrote 14 encyclicals and five books, canonized 482 saints and beatified 1,338 people. In the last years of his life, he suffered from Parkinson's disease and was forced to cut back on some of his activities. Pope Benedict XVI beatified John Paul II in 2011, and Pope Francis canonized him in 2014. Reflection Before John Paul II's funeral Mass in St. Peter's Square, hundreds of thousands of people had waited patiently for a brief moment to pray before his body, which lay in state inside St. Peter's for several days. The media coverage of his funeral was unprecedented. Presiding at the funeral Mass, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger—then dean of the College of Cardinals and later Pope Benedict XVI—concluded his homily by saying: “None of us can ever forget how, in that last Easter Sunday of his life, the Holy Father, marked by suffering, came once more to the window of the Apostolic Palace and one last time gave his blessing urbi et orbi (‘to the city and to the world'). “We can be sure that our beloved pope is standing today at the window of the Father's house, that sees us and blesses us. Yes, bless us, Holy Father. We entrust your dear soul to the Mother of God, your Mother, who guided you each day and who will guide you now to the glory of her Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.” Click here for more on St. John Paul II! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Thursday, October 21, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsThursday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 476All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint HilarionDespite his best efforts to live in prayer and solitude, today's saint found it difficult to achieve his deepest desire. People were naturally drawn to Hilarion as a source of spiritual wisdom and peace. He had reached such fame by the time of his death that his body had to be secretly removed so that a shrine would not be built in his honor. Instead, he was buried in his home village. Saint Hilarion the Great, as he is sometimes called, was born in Palestine. After his conversion to Christianity, he spent some time with Saint Anthony of Egypt, another holy man drawn to solitude. Hilarion lived a life of hardship and simplicity in the desert, where he also experienced spiritual dryness that included temptations to despair. At the same time, miracles were attributed to him. As his fame grew, a small group of disciples wanted to follow Hilarion. He began a series of journeys to find a place where he could live away from the world. He finally settled on Cyprus, where he died in 371 at about age 80. Hilarion is celebrated as the founder of monasticism in Palestine. Much of his fame flows from the biography of him written by Saint Jerome. Reflection We can learn the value of solitude from Saint Hilarion. Unlike loneliness, solitude is a positive condition in which we are alone with God. In today's busy and noisy world, we could all use a little solitude. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 475All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Paul of the CrossBorn in northern Italy in 1694, Paul Daneo lived at a time when many regarded Jesus as a great moral teacher but no more. After a brief time as a soldier, he turned to solitary prayer, developing a devotion to Christ's passion. Paul saw in the Lord's passion a demonstration of God's love for all people. In turn that devotion nurtured his compassion and supported a preaching ministry that touched the hearts of many listeners. He was known as one of the most popular preachers of his day, both for his words and for his generous acts of mercy. In 1720, Paul founded the Congregation of the Passion, whose members combined devotion to Christ's passion with preaching to the poor, and rigorous penances. Known as the Passionists, they add a fourth vow to the traditional three of poverty, chastity, and obedience, to spread the memory of Christ's passion among the faithful. Paul was elected superior general of the Congregation in 1747, spending the remainder of his life in Rome. Paul of the Cross died in 1775, and was canonized in 1867. Over 2,000 of his letters and several of his short writings have survived. Reflection Paul's devotion to Christ's passion must have seemed eccentric if not bizarre to many people. Yet it was that devotion that nurtured Paul's compassion and supported a preaching ministry that touched the hearts of many listeners. He was one of the most popular preachers of his day, known for both his words and his generous acts of mercy. Saint Paul of the Cross is the Patron Saint of: Hungary Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saints John de Brébeuf and Isaac Jogues, Priests, and Companions, Martyrs Lectionary: 474All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saints Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brbeuf, and CompanionsIsaac Jogues and his companions were the first martyrs of the North American continent officially recognized by the Church. As a young Jesuit, Isaac Jogues, a man of learning and culture, taught literature in France. He gave up that career to work among the Huron Indians in the New World, and in 1636, he and his companions, under the leadership of Jean de Brébeuf, arrived in Quebec. The Hurons were constantly warred upon by the Iroquois, and in a few years Father Jogues was captured by the Iroquois and imprisoned for 13 months. His letters and journals tell how he and his companions were led from village to village, how they were beaten, tortured, and forced to watch as their Huron converts were mangled and killed. An unexpected chance for escape came to Isaac Jogues through the Dutch, and he returned to France, bearing the marks of his sufferings. Several fingers had been cut, chewed, or burnt off. Pope Urban VIII gave him permission to offer Mass with his mutilated hands: “It would be shameful that a martyr of Christ not be allowed to drink the Blood of Christ.” Welcomed home as a hero, Father Jogues might have sat back, thanked God for his safe return, and died peacefully in his homeland. But his zeal led him back once more to the fulfillment of his dreams. In a few months he sailed for his missions among the Hurons. In 1646, he and Jean de Lalande, who had offered his services to the missioners, set out for Iroquois country in the belief that a recently signed peace treaty would be observed. They were captured by a Mohawk war party, and on October 18, Father Jogues was tomahawked and beheaded. Jean de Lalande was killed the next day at Ossernenon, a village near Albany, New York. The first of the Jesuit missionaries to be martyred was René Goupil who with Lalande, had offered his services as an oblate. He was tortured along with Isaac Jogues in 1642, and was tomahawked for having made the sign of the cross on the brow of some children. Father Anthony Daniel, working among Hurons who were gradually becoming Christian, was killed by Iroquois on July 4, 1648. His body was thrown into his chapel, which was set on fire. Jean de Brébeuf was a French Jesuit who came to Canada at the age of 32 and labored there for 24 years. He went back to France when the English captured Quebec in 1629 and expelled the Jesuits, but returned to his missions four years later. Although medicine men blamed the Jesuits for a smallpox epidemic among the Hurons, Jean remained with them. He composed catechisms and a dictionary in Huron, and saw 7,000 converted before his death in 1649. Having been captured by the Iroquois at Sainte Marie, near Georgian Bay, Canada, Father Brébeuf died after four hours of extreme torture. Gabriel Lalemant had taken a fourth vow—to sacrifice his life for the Native Americans. He was horribly tortured to death along with Father Brébeuf. Father Charles Garnier was shot to death in 1649 as he baptized children and catechumens during an Iroquois attack. Father Noel Chabanel also was killed in 1649, before he could answer his recall to France. He had found it exceedingly hard to adapt to mission life. He could not learn the language, and the food and life of the Indians revolted him, plus he suffered spiritual dryness during his whole stay in Canada. Yet he made a vow to remain in his mission until death. These eight Jesuit martyrs of North America were canonized in 1930. Reflection Faith and heroism planted belief in Christ's cross deep in our land. The Church in North America sprang from the blood of martyrs, as has been true in so many places. The ministry and sacrifices of these saints challenges each of us, causing us to ask just how deep is our faith and how strong our desire to serve even in the face of death. Saints Isaac Jogues, Jean de Brébeuf, and Companions are the Patron Saints of: North America Norway Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, October 18, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saint Luke, evangelist Lectionary: 661All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint LukeLuke wrote one of the major portions of the New Testament, a two-volume work comprising the third Gospel and Acts of the Apostles. In the two books he shows the parallel between the life of Christ and that of the Church. He is the only Gentile Christian among the Gospel writers. Tradition holds him to be a native of Antioch, and Paul calls him “our beloved physician.” His Gospel was probably written between 70 and 85 A.D. Luke appears in Acts during Paul's second journey, remains at Philippi for several years until Paul returns from his third journey, accompanies Paul to Jerusalem, and remains near him when he is imprisoned in Caesarea. During these two years, Luke had time to seek information and interview persons who had known Jesus. He accompanied Paul on the dangerous journey to Rome where he was a faithful companion. Luke's unique character may best be seen by the emphases of his Gospel, which has been given a number of subtitles: 1) The Gospel of Mercy 2) The Gospel of Universal Salvation 3) The Gospel of the Poor 4) The Gospel of Absolute Renunciation 5) The Gospel of Prayer and the Holy Spirit 6) The Gospel of Joy Reflection Luke wrote as a Gentile for Gentile Christians. His Gospel and Acts of the Apostles reveal his expertise in classic Greek style as well as his knowledge of Jewish sources. There is a warmth to Luke's writing that sets it apart from that of the other synoptic Gospels, and yet it beautifully complements those works. The treasure of the Scriptures is a true gift of the Holy Spirit to the Church. Saint Luke is the Patron Saint of: Artists/Painters Brewers Butchers Notaries Physicians/Surgeons Click here for more on Saint Luke! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, October 17, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsTwenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 146All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Ignatius of AntiochBorn in Syria, Ignatius converted to Christianity and eventually became bishop of Antioch. In the year 107, Emperor Trajan visited Antioch and forced the Christians there to choose between death and apostasy. Ignatius would not deny Christ and thus was condemned to be put to death in Rome. Ignatius is well known for the seven letters he wrote on the long journey from Antioch to Rome. Five of these letters are to churches in Asia Minor; they urge the Christians there to remain faithful to God and to obey their superiors. He warns them against heretical doctrines, providing them with the solid truths of the Christian faith. The sixth letter was to Polycarp, bishop of Smyrna, who was later martyred for the faith. The final letter begs the Christians in Rome not to try to stop his martyrdom. “The only thing I ask of you is to allow me to offer the libation of my blood to God. I am the wheat of the Lord; may I be ground by the teeth of the beasts to become the immaculate bread of Christ.” Ignatius bravely met the lions in the Circus Maximus. Reflection Ignatius' great concern was for the unity and order of the Church. Even greater was his willingness to suffer martyrdom rather than deny Christ. He did not draw attention to his own suffering, but to the love of God which strengthened him. He knew the price of commitment and would not deny Christ, even to save his own life. Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, October 16, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the Twenty-eighth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 472All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Margaret Mary AlacoqueMargaret Mary was chosen by Christ to arouse the Church to a realization of the love of God symbolized by the heart of Jesus. Her early years were marked by sickness and a painful home situation. “The heaviest of my crosses was that I could do nothing to lighten the cross my mother was suffering.” After considering marriage for some time, Margaret Mary entered the Order of the Visitation nuns at the age of 24. A Visitation nun was “not to be extraordinary except by being ordinary,” but the young nun was not to enjoy this anonymity. A fellow novice termed Margaret Mary humble, simple, and frank, but above all, kind and patient under sharp criticism and correction. She could not meditate in the formal way expected, though she tried her best to give up her “prayer of simplicity.” Slow, quiet, and clumsy, she was assigned to help an infirmarian who was a bundle of energy. On December 21, 1674, three years a nun, she received the first of her revelations. She felt “invested” with the presence of God, though always afraid of deceiving herself in such matters. The request of Christ was that his love for humankind be made evident through her. During the next 13 months, Christ appeared to her at intervals. His human heart was to be the symbol of his divine-human love. By her own love Margaret Mary was to make up for the coldness and ingratitude of the world—by frequent and loving Holy Communion, especially on the first Friday of each month, and by an hour's vigil of prayer every Thursday night in memory of his agony and isolation in Gethsemane. He also asked that a feast of reparation be instituted. Like all saints, Margaret Mary had to pay for her gift of holiness. Some of her own sisters were hostile. Theologians who were called in declared her visions delusions and suggested that she eat more heartily. Later, parents of children she taught called her an impostor, an unorthodox innovator. A new confessor, the Jesuit Claude de la Colombière, recognized her genuineness and supported her. Against her great resistance, Christ called her to be a sacrificial victim for the shortcomings of her own sisters, and to make this known. After serving as novice mistress and assistant superior, Margaret Mary died at the age of 43, while being anointed. She said: “I need nothing but God, and to lose myself in the heart of Jesus.” Reflection Our scientific-materialistic age cannot “prove” private revelations. Theologians, if pressed, admit that we do not have to believe in them. But it is impossible to deny the message Margaret Mary heralded: that God loves us with a passionate love. Her insistence on reparation and prayer and the reminder of final judgment should be sufficient to ward off superstition and superficiality in devotion to the Sacred Heart while preserving its deep Christian meaning. Click here for prayers to the Sacred Heart! Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

The Tailored Life Podcast
Ep. 660 - [Series] Program Design Pt.4: Periodization, Tempo, and Rest Periods.

The Tailored Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:50


Today's podcast is the final part of the 4 part series on Program Design! Cody continues to dive into what "evidence based program design" is all about. This episode will cover periodization and progression models, tempo, rest periods, programming methods like supersetting, and the practical application of all the above. ---- Join The Tailored Trainer (TCM's Membership Site) to gain full access to daily programming and a private coaching forum for guidance. Get a 7 Day FREE Trial HERE ASK CODY YOUR QUESTION HERE Check Out Free Guides and E-Books HERE Head over to http://buylegion.com/boomboom enter code boom boom at checkout to save 20%, start earning loyalty points, and supplementing with the top supplement company on the market. For training equipment, visit www.giantlifting.com and use promo code: TCM5 to save 5% on purchases. ---- Shownotes: Periodization Plan and Progression ModelStrength: Block or DUPThis may matter more in the bench than the squat, based on research. My guess as to why and how this applies elsewhere is that since the ceiling for squat load is higher - it might take longer before getting to the point of required periodization. So for lifts that plateau sooner due to strength capacities, periodization may be needed sooner. Hypertrophy: Double Progression ModelPeriodization style doesn't seem to matter based on all the literature done on this, so what's important is the model of progression that you feel good with and continuing to plan your training accordingly, in order to see continued progress AND a sustained high level of effort (RPE). https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0765159717302137 Concurrent: DUP or WUPBetter for intermediate and advanced lifters More evidence to support DUP than WUP What are the finer details of programming:Tempo, Rest, Super Setting, Cardio, etc. Why These Come Last Tempo Terms and DefinitionsNegative - eccentric Positive - concentric 3-2-1-2  Pauses Segmented reps Partials What Science Says: Tempo:Doesn't matter when volume is equated, however it may be more effective for hypertrophy as long as it does not compromise total volume (https://www.termedia.pl/Effect-of-different-eccentric-tempos-on-hypertrophy-and-strength-of-the-lower-limbs,78,43851,0,1.html). However, for strength the purpose is to maximize the concentric - therefore tempos may prevent strength gains due to less load being performed per rep, dropping the CNS drive to develop strength. Another study showed no significant difference in quad growth when rep cadence (eccentric and concentric) was controlled (3 sec, 3 sec) vs. a group that did not control tempo and just performed the lift. There was slightly more growth on the rectus femoris in the group not controlling tempo, which my guess would be because you don't need an exaggerated negative to fully stretch that portion of the muscle. But looking into this little detail is also somewhat splitting hairs (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33306588/). Best bet here is to practice a full ROM whenever possible as that plays the largest role. Overloaded eccentrics were said to build muscle due to more muscle damage… but studios show otherwise (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30113915)  Practical Application of Tempo:Use them to build motor control, movement quality, rehab, avoid injury, or as an intensification technique, primarily for motivation and enjoyment. Rest Periods: What Science SaysIntuition is best (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=30866743) Longer is better for hypertrophy:30, 60, or 120 seconds - all showed similar results with lactate, because lactate levels take a long time to decrease, but worst results with performance in the shorter rest period intervals, which makes sense as well because ATP resynthesis and pH restoration tend to happen at a faster rate. The study showed exactly why longer rest intervals tend to be better with hypertrophy, because with shorter rest periods volume and load drop off quicker and therefore we're unable to do as much work, AND metabolic stress placed on the muscle didn't change between 30 seconds to 2 minutes between sets.  Practical Implementation3-5 Min on Compounds 1-3 Min on Accessories 1-2 Minutes on Isolation 0-30 Seconds Between Antagonistic Supersets Super-Sets, Definitions and Variations (Super, Tri, Giant, EMOM, EDT)Super-Sets Tri-SetsUpper Lower Full Giant Sets EMOM EOMOM EDT vs. AMRAP Aerobic Training ImportanceBENEFITS:Caloric Expenditure Cardiovascular Health Longevity Improve Oxidative System Increase Recovery-Abilities Work Capacity (Ability To Maintain High Outputs, For Longer) Balance Intensities Throughout The Training Week Mitochondrial Adaptations (Helps Energy Production) Energy System & Metabolism Enhancement Immune Strength ---- Apply for our World Renowned Coaching Program, RIGHT HERE. Remember to join our private FB community, RIGHT HERE. As Featured on: Huffington Post, Bodybuilding.com, The PTDC, Dr. John Rusin, Muscle For Life, HLHL, iN3, OPEX Fitness and More… ---- EXTRA RESOURCES:  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28497285/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15673040/ https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28848690/ https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0765159717302137 https://journals.lww.com/nsca jscr/Fulltext/2015/04000/Systematic_Review_and_Meta_analysis_of_Linear_and.35.aspx http://article.sapub.org/10.5923.j.sports.20160606.04.html#Sec3 ---- Apply For Coaching: bit.ly/Coaching-App Get Your Free Copy of The Nutrition Hierarchy, HERE Learn How We Coach: Read This Case Study Article Top 4 Episodes: - Nutritional Periodization - Nutrition FAQ - Training FAQ - My Story ---- You can get access to ALL of our content in one place, now: www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/links/ Check out all of our e-books by visiting www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/products/ Tailored Coaching Method Coaching Info: www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/online-coaching/ ---- Social Links: Blog – http://www.tailoredcoachingmethod.com/blog
 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/tailoredcoachingmethod
 Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/tailoredcoachingmethod/ YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/TailoredCoachingMethod Podcast Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX9qbTBGTioX8tZLCmE6TIQ Email – info@tailoredcoachingmethod.com

The Psychology of Copywriting
055: Inception Series | How To Overcome Imposter Syndrome

The Psychology of Copywriting

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:29


In today's episode – which concludes our INCEPTION Series – we discuss the feeling of imposter syndrome as copywriters. The study we dive into reveals how imposter syndrome in doctors and healthcare professionals negatively impacts their career trajectory. As copywriters, we may also experience imposter syndrome which can be a self-fulfilling prophecy that leads us to produce work of reduced quality. Listen in to hear my own experiences with imposter syndrome and my tips on how to overcome this feeling.    What To Look For In This Episode: 4 tips on how to overcome imposter syndrome. My personal experiences with imposter syndrome. How you can use the ACTION framework in your copy.    Journal Article: “Rising to the Level of Your Incompetence”: What Physicians' Self-Assessment of Their Performance Reveals About the Imposter Syndrome in Medicine. https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Fulltext/2018/05000/_Rising_to_the_Level_of_Your_Incompetence___What.41.aspx   LaDonna, K. A., Ginsburg, S., & Watling, C. (2018). "Rising to the Level of Your Incompetence": What Physicians' Self-Assessment of Their Performance Reveals About the Imposter Syndrome in Medicine. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 93(5), 763–768. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000002046   Resources:   Sign-up for the Inception Training Webinar and download the Inception series Resources (FREE) – geoffkullman.com/inception     Got a question you want answered on the podcast? Awesome! Go to geoffkullman.com/questions   Connect with Geoff: Instagram: instagram.com/geoffkullman Twitter: twitter.com/geoffkullman Inquiries: geoffkullman.com    Subscribe To The Podcast Here: Do you have friends, colleagues, or clients who would find The Psychology of Copywriting podcast valuable? Spread the word!