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Roman general and dictator

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    GENERATION RIPE
    The Eighty-Ninth One… and Jacob Soule

    GENERATION RIPE

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 23:47


    Episode 89 and Wendi and Dfernando's guest interview is botanist, exotic plants expert and TikTok sensation Jacob Soule.When people ask Jacob Soule what he did during the COVID pandemic, he has a more interesting answer than most: he became TikTok famous. His @theplantprodigy account has almost 1 million followers and his short, entertaining, and informative videos about all things plants have over 26 million likes.  And it all started by sibling rivalry. “My brother told me that he was in a viral video that a friend had made. It got half a million views,” Soule said. “He was joking about being TikTok famous. I tried to get big on TikTok to prove him wrong. I didn't have success at first, but after December 2021, I got the ball rolling.” Soule, who has autism, has long been interested in plants. He can remember picking daisies with his grandmother. When he was in second grade he read a book that piqued his interest in carnivorous plants and he bought his first one. “I got a Venus flytrap and a pitcher plant, but they all died,” he said. “They're not that tricky if you know what you're doing and I didn't know what I was doing when I was 9 or 10 years old.” Like some plant species, his interest in plants went dormant in about 2015. But, it sprang back to life in 2017 when his current collection began to grow. He currently has over 100 plants ranging from philodendron micans to desert roses and hoya to several carnivorous pitcher plants, which he now grows quite successfully. TikTok was not his first foray into social media. He has always been interested in influencer culture and he first launched a YouTube Channel after being inspired by one of his favorite YouTubers. He created his Instagram in 2019. In his videos, he documents his own adventures as a plant owner, while also answering questions from plant parents who share videos of their droopy or browning plants. Some of the videos offer plant-related humor, such as when he stops his aunt from tossing the dregs of her wine glass into a plant pot or when he reacts with horror to atrocities such as people giving their Venus flytrap toothpaste. He'll occasionally address issues such as negative comments about his voice or his lack of knowledge about some things with a disarming honesty, saying that his voice makes him unique and he's proud of having room to grow and learn more. He hopes to parlay his TikTok popularity into a business of some sort, perhaps starting an Etsy plant shop. He is currently attending Kalamazoo Valley Community College with hopes of eventually earning a Horticulture Degree from Michigan State University. “Plants were popular before COVID. They exploded after the lockdown,” Soule said. “Why do people like plants? That's hard to answer. Maybe it's because of the idea of being responsible and taking care of something without having to put an animal or child's life at risk. And many studies show that plants can help benefit mental health. Personally, I just like the idea of growing all kinds of unique plants.”Here are the plants Wendi references in the interview: Gymnarnphora, Trusmadiensis, Miranda, Robcantleyi, and Caesar.Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their Team GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram:Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE… and guest Jacob Soule, his TikTok, and his Twitter.  Remember to subscribe to GENERATION RIPEAnd rate & leave us a review by clicking HERE!Visit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

    Five Games for Doomsday

    SPOILER ALERT-In this free episode of the Battle Report, Steve destroys Ben and it descends into a chat about losing in games! Get on it!

    The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast
    Betting with Bobby presented by Caesar's Racebook - August 12, 2022

    The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 116:52


    Betting with Bobby presented by Caesar's Racebook.    

    Bradham & Emery in the Morning
    August 10th, 2022

    Bradham & Emery in the Morning

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 63:10


    On today's episode Marques and Justin do NOT recap Better Call Saul because Marques didn't watch it yet, Phillies RED HOT, Pete Rose is a foul human being, Justin wears Caesar dressing, and Eagles training camp updates.   Get all your Bradham & Emery gear at www.bradhamemeryshow.com! Follow the show on social media: @BradhamEmeryPod   This episode is sponsored by: - Van Jewelers

    Ancient History Fangirl
    ALL IN ONE PLACE: Julius Caesar: Parts 1 and 2

    Ancient History Fangirl

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 129:30


    We're on hiatus until September 22. Until then, enjoy this long, binge-able episode on Julius Caesar's early life. Most accounts of Caesar's life start later on--such as during his time in Gaul or crossing the Rubicon. But his early life was just as fascinating; maybe even more so. This is the Caesar who stood up to Sulla and refused to divorce his wife. The Caesar who made an early career of prosecuting corrupt governors to cement his cred as a populist--even as it made him powerful enemies. The Caesar who, when kidnapped by pirates, demanded they raise his ransom and spent his time in captivity hanging out on the beach and reading them bad poetry. It's a fun, lighthearted introduction to Caesar's life before it takes its dark turn. We hope you enjoy. Get ad-free episodes here: https://www.patreon.com/ancienthistoryfangirl Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Second Unit
    Second Unit #344 – Planet der Affen: Revolution

    Second Unit

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 152:05


    Der zweite Teil unserer Affen-Trilogie ist da! Wieder mit Maria aka Die Filmguckerin, aber dieses Mal zu Planet der Affen: Revolution (Amazon-Link*). [YouTube Direktlink] Regie führte hier erstmals Matt Reeves, der in Zusammenarbeit mit Mark Bomback auch am Drehbuch arbeitete und erst jetzt so richtig die Reihe prägen wird. Die beiden knüpfen an die Arbeit von Rick Jaffa, Amanda Silver und die allgemeine Buchvorlage von Pierre Boulle an. Die Hauptrolle spielt erneut Andy Serkis als Caesar. Auch dabei sind Jason Clarke als Malcolm, Gary Oldman als Dreyfus, Keri Russell als Ellie, Toby Kebbell als Koba, Judy Greer als Cornelia und Karin Konoval als Maurice. Dieses Mal kommen wir aus der Motiv-Besprechung kaum heraus. Der Film ist aber auch rappelvoll mit starken Themen: Es geht um eine Pandemie, es geht um das Elternsein, der Krieg zwischen Menschen und Affen und untereinander ist ein großes Thema sowie schlussendlich die Beobachtungen, dass die Filmreihe hier endlich frei drehen darf und was das alles vielleicht mit Matt Reeves zu tun hat. In der nächsten Ausgabe schließen wir mit Planet der Affen: Survival (Amazon-Link*). Denkt aber auch an unseren Steady-exklusiven Podcast zu Planet der Affen [1968] (Amazon-Link*), den ihr als Teil unseres Steady-Abos bekommen könnt. Sponsor: Diese Ausgabe der Second Unit wird präsentiert von Yorck On Demand. Das Streaming-Angebot der Berliner Yorck Kinogruppe bietet eine kuratierte Auswahl an Filmen, die alle ohne Abo und im Original mit Untertiteln angeboten werden. Die Auswahl wird vom Programmteam der Kinos handverlesen vorgenommen. Viele Filme, über die wir im Podcast sprechen, versanden im Streamingdschungel oft, Yorck On Demand bietet ihnen ein Zuhause. Hier gibt es auch eine eigene Sektion zum Deutschen Film und den wunderbaren Film LARA, den wir in Ausgabe #337 ausführlich besprochen haben. Falls ihr also den Film und unseren Podcast nachholen wollt, dann schaut mal bei Yorck On Demand vorbei. [podlove-episode-web-player] [podlove-episode-contributor-list] [Second Unit Plus: Livestream | Premium Podcast | Mitmachen | Produzent*in werden] [Unterstützen: Steady | PayPal | Überweisung | Shop] [Abonnieren: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | YouTube | RSS-Feed] [Folgen: Twitter | Instagram | Letterboxd | Discord] [Teaser-Bild: “Matt Reeves” by Gage Skidmore is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0] *Amazon-Partner-Links: Über diese Links gekaufte Artikel werfen einen kleinen Obolus für uns ab. Für euch ändert sich nichts, schon gar nicht der Kaufpreis. Wir bedanken uns im Namen unserer Kaffee-Kasse.

    Today's Catholic Mass Readings
    Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, August 10, 2022

    Today's Catholic Mass Readings

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022


    Full Text of ReadingsFeast of Saint Lawrence, Deacon and Martyr Lectionary: 618All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint LawrenceThe esteem in which the Church holds Lawrence is seen in the fact that today's celebration ranks as a feast. We know very little about his life. He is one of those whose martyrdom made a deep and lasting impression on the early Church. Celebration of his feast day spread rapidly. He was a Roman deacon under Pope Saint Sixtus II. Four days after this pope was put to death, Lawrence and four clerics suffered martyrdom, probably during the persecution of the Emperor Valerian. Legendary details of Lawrence's death were known to Damasus, Prudentius, Ambrose, and Augustine. The church built over his tomb became one of the seven principal churches in Rome and a favorite place for Roman pilgrimages. A well-known legend has persisted from earliest times. As deacon in Rome, Lawrence was charged with the responsibility for the material goods of the Church, and the distribution of alms to the poor. When Lawrence knew he would be arrested like the pope, he sought out the poor, widows, and orphans of Rome and gave them all the money he had on hand, selling even the sacred vessels of the altar to increase the sum. When the prefect of Rome heard of this, he imagined that the Christians must have considerable treasure. He sent for Lawrence and said, “You Christians say we are cruel to you, but that is not what I have in mind. I am told that your priests offer in gold, that the sacred blood is received in silver cups, that you have golden candlesticks at your evening services. Now, your doctrine says you must render to Caesar what is his. Bring these treasures—the emperor needs them to maintain his forces. God does not cause money to be counted: He brought none of it into the world with him—only words. Give me the money, therefore, and be rich in words.” Lawrence replied that the Church was indeed rich. “I will show you a valuable part. But give me time to set everything in order and make an inventory.” After three days he gathered a great number of blind, lame, maimed, leprous, orphaned, and widowed persons and put them in rows. When the prefect arrived, Lawrence simply said, “These are the treasure of the Church.” The prefect was so angry he told Lawrence that he would indeed have his wish to die—but it would be by inches. He had a great gridiron prepared with coals beneath it, and had Lawrence's body placed on it. After the martyr had suffered the pain for a long time, the legend concludes, he made his famous cheerful remark, “It is well done. Turn me over!” Reflection Once again we have a saint about whom almost nothing is known, yet one who has received extraordinary honor in the Church since the fourth century. Almost nothing—yet the greatest fact of his life is certain: He died for Christ. We who are hungry for details about the lives of the saints are again reminded that their holiness was after all, a total response to Christ, expressed perfectly by a death like this. Saint Lawrence is a Patron Saint of: Cooks Deacons Poor Click here for quotes from Catholic saints! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

    NBA Today
    Durant Latest, Over/Unders, and Napheesa Collier joins

    NBA Today

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 52:47


    Coming up on NBA Today: The domino that has yet to fall.—we have new outlook on the Kevin Durant Trade saga and how it impacts the rest of the league.  Plus, our high-rollers roll the dice on some of Caesar's win-loss totals for next season. Which teams are poised to surpass projected totals?  And WNBA All-Star Napheesa Collier joins the show. She'll breakdown what it means to be back on the court less than 3 months after giving birth, and how the Lynx can sneak in the playoffs... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    The Jump
    Durant Latest, Over/Unders, and Napheesa Collier joins

    The Jump

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 52:47


    Coming up on NBA Today: The domino that has yet to fall.—we have new outlook on the Kevin Durant Trade saga and how it impacts the rest of the league.  Plus, our high-rollers roll the dice on some of Caesar's win-loss totals for next season. Which teams are poised to surpass projected totals?  And WNBA All-Star Napheesa Collier joins the show. She'll breakdown what it means to be back on the court less than 3 months after giving birth, and how the Lynx can sneak in the playoffs... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
    August 10: Ruth 3–4; Acts 28; Psalms 11–12; Jeremiah 38

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 16:54


    With family: Ruth 3–4; Acts 28 Ruth 3–4 (Listen) Ruth and Boaz at the Threshing Floor 3 Then Naomi her mother-in-law said to her, “My daughter, should I not seek rest for you, that it may be well with you? 2 Is not Boaz our relative, with whose young women you were? See, he is winnowing barley tonight at the threshing floor. 3 Wash therefore and anoint yourself, and put on your cloak and go down to the threshing floor, but do not make yourself known to the man until he has finished eating and drinking. 4 But when he lies down, observe the place where he lies. Then go and uncover his feet and lie down, and he will tell you what to do.” 5 And she replied, “All that you say I will do.” 6 So she went down to the threshing floor and did just as her mother-in-law had commanded her. 7 And when Boaz had eaten and drunk, and his heart was merry, he went to lie down at the end of the heap of grain. Then she came softly and uncovered his feet and lay down. 8 At midnight the man was startled and turned over, and behold, a woman lay at his feet! 9 He said, “Who are you?” And she answered, “I am Ruth, your servant. Spread your wings1 over your servant, for you are a redeemer.” 10 And he said, “May you be blessed by the LORD, my daughter. You have made this last kindness greater than the first in that you have not gone after young men, whether poor or rich. 11 And now, my daughter, do not fear. I will do for you all that you ask, for all my fellow townsmen know that you are a worthy woman. 12 And now it is true that I am a redeemer. Yet there is a redeemer nearer than I. 13 Remain tonight, and in the morning, if he will redeem you, good; let him do it. But if he is not willing to redeem you, then, as the LORD lives, I will redeem you. Lie down until the morning.” 14 So she lay at his feet until the morning, but arose before one could recognize another. And he said, “Let it not be known that the woman came to the threshing floor.” 15 And he said, “Bring the garment you are wearing and hold it out.” So she held it, and he measured out six measures of barley and put it on her. Then she went into the city. 16 And when she came to her mother-in-law, she said, “How did you fare, my daughter?” Then she told her all that the man had done for her, 17 saying, “These six measures of barley he gave to me, for he said to me, ‘You must not go back empty-handed to your mother-in-law.'” 18 She replied, “Wait, my daughter, until you learn how the matter turns out, for the man will not rest but will settle the matter today.” Boaz Redeems Ruth 4 Now Boaz had gone up to the gate and sat down there. And behold, the redeemer, of whom Boaz had spoken, came by. So Boaz said, “Turn aside, friend; sit down here.” And he turned aside and sat down. 2 And he took ten men of the elders of the city and said, “Sit down here.” So they sat down. 3 Then he said to the redeemer, “Naomi, who has come back from the country of Moab, is selling the parcel of land that belonged to our relative Elimelech. 4 So I thought I would tell you of it and say, ‘Buy it in the presence of those sitting here and in the presence of the elders of my people.' If you will redeem it, redeem it. But if you2 will not, tell me, that I may know, for there is no one besides you to redeem it, and I come after you.” And he said, “I will redeem it.” 5 Then Boaz said, “The day you buy the field from the hand of Naomi, you also acquire Ruth3 the Moabite, the widow of the dead, in order to perpetuate the name of the dead in his inheritance.” 6 Then the redeemer said, “I cannot redeem it for myself, lest I impair my own inheritance. Take my right of redemption yourself, for I cannot redeem it.” 7 Now this was the custom in former times in Israel concerning redeeming and exchanging: to confirm a transaction, the one drew off his sandal and gave it to the other, and this was the manner of attesting in Israel. 8 So when the redeemer said to Boaz, “Buy it for yourself,” he drew off his sandal. 9 Then Boaz said to the elders and all the people, “You are witnesses this day that I have bought from the hand of Naomi all that belonged to Elimelech and all that belonged to Chilion and to Mahlon. 10 Also Ruth the Moabite, the widow of Mahlon, I have bought to be my wife, to perpetuate the name of the dead in his inheritance, that the name of the dead may not be cut off from among his brothers and from the gate of his native place. You are witnesses this day.” 11 Then all the people who were at the gate and the elders said, “We are witnesses. May the LORD make the woman, who is coming into your house, like Rachel and Leah, who together built up the house of Israel. May you act worthily in Ephrathah and be renowned in Bethlehem, 12 and may your house be like the house of Perez, whom Tamar bore to Judah, because of the offspring that the LORD will give you by this young woman.” Ruth and Boaz Marry 13 So Boaz took Ruth, and she became his wife. And he went in to her, and the LORD gave her conception, and she bore a son. 14 Then the women said to Naomi, “Blessed be the LORD, who has not left you this day without a redeemer, and may his name be renowned in Israel! 15 He shall be to you a restorer of life and a nourisher of your old age, for your daughter-in-law who loves you, who is more to you than seven sons, has given birth to him.” 16 Then Naomi took the child and laid him on her lap and became his nurse. 17 And the women of the neighborhood gave him a name, saying, “A son has been born to Naomi.” They named him Obed. He was the father of Jesse, the father of David. The Genealogy of David 18 Now these are the generations of Perez: Perez fathered Hezron, 19 Hezron fathered Ram, Ram fathered Amminadab, 20 Amminadab fathered Nahshon, Nahshon fathered Salmon, 21 Salmon fathered Boaz, Boaz fathered Obed, 22 Obed fathered Jesse, and Jesse fathered David. Footnotes [1] 3:9 Compare 2:12; the word for wings can also mean corners of a garment [2] 4:4 Hebrew he [3] 4:5 Masoretic Text you also buy it from Ruth (ESV) Acts 28 (Listen) Paul on Malta 28 After we were brought safely through, we then learned that the island was called Malta. 2 The native people1 showed us unusual kindness, for they kindled a fire and welcomed us all, because it had begun to rain and was cold. 3 When Paul had gathered a bundle of sticks and put them on the fire, a viper came out because of the heat and fastened on his hand. 4 When the native people saw the creature hanging from his hand, they said to one another, “No doubt this man is a murderer. Though he has escaped from the sea, Justice2 has not allowed him to live.” 5 He, however, shook off the creature into the fire and suffered no harm. 6 They were waiting for him to swell up or suddenly fall down dead. But when they had waited a long time and saw no misfortune come to him, they changed their minds and said that he was a god. 7 Now in the neighborhood of that place were lands belonging to the chief man of the island, named Publius, who received us and entertained us hospitably for three days. 8 It happened that the father of Publius lay sick with fever and dysentery. And Paul visited him and prayed, and putting his hands on him, healed him. 9 And when this had taken place, the rest of the people on the island who had diseases also came and were cured. 10 They also honored us greatly,3 and when we were about to sail, they put on board whatever we needed. Paul Arrives at Rome 11 After three months we set sail in a ship that had wintered in the island, a ship of Alexandria, with the twin gods4 as a figurehead. 12 Putting in at Syracuse, we stayed there for three days. 13 And from there we made a circuit and arrived at Rhegium. And after one day a south wind sprang up, and on the second day we came to Puteoli. 14 There we found brothers5 and were invited to stay with them for seven days. And so we came to Rome. 15 And the brothers there, when they heard about us, came as far as the Forum of Appius and Three Taverns to meet us. On seeing them, Paul thanked God and took courage. 16 And when we came into Rome, Paul was allowed to stay by himself, with the soldier who guarded him. Paul in Rome 17 After three days he called together the local leaders of the Jews, and when they had gathered, he said to them, “Brothers, though I had done nothing against our people or the customs of our fathers, yet I was delivered as a prisoner from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans. 18 When they had examined me, they wished to set me at liberty, because there was no reason for the death penalty in my case. 19 But because the Jews objected, I was compelled to appeal to Caesar—though I had no charge to bring against my nation. 20 For this reason, therefore, I have asked to see you and speak with you, since it is because of the hope of Israel that I am wearing this chain.” 21 And they said to him, “We have received no letters from Judea about you, and none of the brothers coming here has reported or spoken any evil about you. 22 But we desire to hear from you what your views are, for with regard to this sect we know that everywhere it is spoken against.” 23 When they had appointed a day for him, they came to him at his lodging in greater numbers. From morning till evening he expounded to them, testifying to the kingdom of God and trying to convince them about Jesus both from the Law of Moses and from the Prophets. 24 And some were convinced by what he said, but others disbelieved. 25 And disagreeing among themselves, they departed after Paul had made one statement: “The Holy Spirit was right in saying to your fathers through Isaiah the prophet: 26   “‘Go to this people, and say,  “You will indeed hear but never understand,    and you will indeed see but never perceive.”27   For this people's heart has grown dull,    and with their ears they can barely hear,    and their eyes they have closed;  lest they should see with their eyes    and hear with their ears  and understand with their heart    and turn, and I would heal them.' 28 Therefore let it be known to you that this salvation of God has been sent to the Gentiles; they will listen.”6 30 He lived there two whole years at his own expense,7 and welcomed all who came to him, 31 proclaiming the kingdom of God and teaching about the Lord Jesus Christ with all boldness and without hindrance. Footnotes [1] 28:2 Greek barbaroi (that is, non–Greek speakers); also verse 4 [2] 28:4 Or justice [3] 28:10 Greek honored us with many honors [4] 28:11 That is, the Greek gods Castor and Pollux [5] 28:14 Or brothers and sisters; also verses 15, 21 [6] 28:28 Some manuscripts add verse 29: And when he had said these words, the Jews departed, having much dispute among themselves [7] 28:30 Or in his own hired dwelling (ESV) In private: Psalms 11–12; Jeremiah 38 Psalms 11–12 (Listen) The Lord Is in His Holy Temple To the choirmaster. Of David. 11   In the LORD I take refuge;  how can you say to my soul,    “Flee like a bird to your mountain,2   for behold, the wicked bend the bow;    they have fitted their arrow to the string    to shoot in the dark at the upright in heart;3   if the foundations are destroyed,    what can the righteous do?”1 4   The LORD is in his holy temple;    the LORD's throne is in heaven;    his eyes see, his eyelids test the children of man.5   The LORD tests the righteous,    but his soul hates the wicked and the one who loves violence.6   Let him rain coals on the wicked;    fire and sulfur and a scorching wind shall be the portion of their cup.7   For the LORD is righteous;  he loves righteous deeds;    the upright shall behold his face. The Faithful Have Vanished To the choirmaster: according to The Sheminith.2 A Psalm of David. 12   Save, O LORD, for the godly one is gone;    for the faithful have vanished from among the children of man.2   Everyone utters lies to his neighbor;    with flattering lips and a double heart they speak. 3   May the LORD cut off all flattering lips,    the tongue that makes great boasts,4   those who say, “With our tongue we will prevail,    our lips are with us; who is master over us?” 5   “Because the poor are plundered, because the needy groan,    I will now arise,” says the LORD;    “I will place him in the safety for which he longs.”6   The words of the LORD are pure words,    like silver refined in a furnace on the ground,    purified seven times. 7   You, O LORD, will keep them;    you will guard us3 from this generation forever.8   On every side the wicked prowl,    as vileness is exalted among the children of man. Footnotes [1] 11:3 Or for the foundations will be destroyed; what has the righteous done? [2] 12:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [3] 12:7 Or guard him (ESV) Jeremiah 38 (Listen) Jeremiah Cast into the Cistern 38 Now Shephatiah the son of Mattan, Gedaliah the son of Pashhur, Jucal the son of Shelemiah, and Pashhur the son of Malchiah heard the words that Jeremiah was saying to all the people: 2 “Thus says the LORD: He who stays in this city shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence, but he who goes out to the Chaldeans shall live. He shall have his life as a prize of war, and live. 3 Thus says the LORD: This city shall surely be given into the hand of the army of the king of Babylon and be taken.” 4 Then the officials said to the king, “Let this man be put to death, for he is weakening the hands of the soldiers who are left in this city, and the hands of all the people, by speaking such words to them. For this man is not seeking the welfare of this people, but their harm.” 5 King Zedekiah said, “Behold, he is in your hands, for the king can do nothing against you.” 6 So they took Jeremiah and cast him into the cistern of Malchiah, the king's son, which was in the court of the guard, letting Jeremiah down by ropes. And there was no water in the cistern, but only mud, and Jeremiah sank in the mud. Jeremiah Rescued from the Cistern 7 When Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, a eunuch who was in the king's house, heard that they had put Jeremiah into the cistern—the king was sitting in the Benjamin Gate—8 Ebed-melech went from the king's house and said to the king, 9 “My lord the king, these men have done evil in all that they did to Jeremiah the prophet by casting him into the cistern, and he will die there of hunger, for there is no bread left in the city.” 10 Then the king commanded Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, “Take thirty men with you from here, and lift Jeremiah the prophet out of the cistern before he dies.” 11 So Ebed-melech took the men with him and went to the house of the king, to a wardrobe in the storehouse, and took from there old rags and worn-out clothes, which he let down to Jeremiah in the cistern by ropes. 12 Then Ebed-melech the Ethiopian said to Jeremiah, “Put the rags and clothes between your armpits and the ropes.” Jeremiah did so. 13 Then they drew Jeremiah up with ropes and lifted him out of the cistern. And Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard. Jeremiah Warns Zedekiah Again 14 King Zedekiah sent for Jeremiah the prophet and received him at the third entrance of the temple of the LORD. The king said to Jeremiah, “I will ask you a question; hide nothing from me.” 15 Jeremiah said to Zedekiah, “If I tell you, will you not surely put me to death? And if I give you counsel, you will not listen to me.” 16 Then King Zedekiah swore secretly to Jeremiah, “As the LORD lives, who made our souls, I will not put you to death or deliver you into the hand of these men who seek your life.” 17 Then Jeremiah said to Zedekiah, “Thus says the LORD, the God of hosts, the God of Israel: If you will surrender to the officials of the king of Babylon, then your life shall be spared, and this city shall not be burned with fire, and you and your house shall live. 18 But if you do not surrender to the officials of the king of Babylon, then this city shall be given into the hand of the Chaldeans, and they shall burn it with fire, and you shall not escape from their hand.” 19 King Zedekiah said to Jeremiah, “I am afraid of the Judeans who have deserted to the Chaldeans, lest I be handed over to them and they deal cruelly with me.” 20 Jeremiah said, “You shall not be given to them. Obey now the voice of the LORD in what I say to you, and it shall be well with you, and your life shall be spared. 21 But if you refuse to surrender, this is the vision which the LORD has shown to me: 22 Behold, all the women left in the house of the king of Judah were being led out to the officials of the king of Babylon and were saying,   “‘Your trusted friends have deceived you    and prevailed against you;  now that your feet are sunk in the mud,    they turn away from you.' 23 All your wives and your sons shall be led out to the Chaldeans, and you yourself shall not escape from their hand, but shall be seized by the king of Babylon, and this city shall be burned with fire.” 24 Then Zedekiah said to Jeremiah, “Let no one know of these words, and you shall not die. 25 If the officials hear that I have spoken with you and come to you and say to you, ‘Tell us what you said to the king and what the king said to you; hide nothing from us and we will not put you to death,' 26 then you shall say to them, ‘I made a humble plea to the king that he would not send me back to the house of Jonathan to die there.'” 27 Then all the officials came to Jeremiah and asked him, and he answered them as the king had instructed him. So they stopped speaking with him, for the conversation had not been overheard. 28 And Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard until the day that Jerusalem was taken. (ESV)

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
    August 9: Ruth 2; Acts 27; Psalm 10; Jeremiah 37

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 14:47


    With family: Ruth 2; Acts 27 Ruth 2 (Listen) Ruth Meets Boaz 2 Now Naomi had a relative of her husband's, a worthy man of the clan of Elimelech, whose name was Boaz. 2 And Ruth the Moabite said to Naomi, “Let me go to the field and glean among the ears of grain after him in whose sight I shall find favor.” And she said to her, “Go, my daughter.” 3 So she set out and went and gleaned in the field after the reapers, and she happened to come to the part of the field belonging to Boaz, who was of the clan of Elimelech. 4 And behold, Boaz came from Bethlehem. And he said to the reapers, “The LORD be with you!” And they answered, “The LORD bless you.” 5 Then Boaz said to his young man who was in charge of the reapers, “Whose young woman is this?” 6 And the servant who was in charge of the reapers answered, “She is the young Moabite woman, who came back with Naomi from the country of Moab. 7 She said, ‘Please let me glean and gather among the sheaves after the reapers.' So she came, and she has continued from early morning until now, except for a short rest.”1 8 Then Boaz said to Ruth, “Now, listen, my daughter, do not go to glean in another field or leave this one, but keep close to my young women. 9 Let your eyes be on the field that they are reaping, and go after them. Have I not charged the young men not to touch you? And when you are thirsty, go to the vessels and drink what the young men have drawn.” 10 Then she fell on her face, bowing to the ground, and said to him, “Why have I found favor in your eyes, that you should take notice of me, since I am a foreigner?” 11 But Boaz answered her, “All that you have done for your mother-in-law since the death of your husband has been fully told to me, and how you left your father and mother and your native land and came to a people that you did not know before. 12 The LORD repay you for what you have done, and a full reward be given you by the LORD, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge!” 13 Then she said, “I have found favor in your eyes, my lord, for you have comforted me and spoken kindly to your servant, though I am not one of your servants.” 14 And at mealtime Boaz said to her, “Come here and eat some bread and dip your morsel in the wine.” So she sat beside the reapers, and he passed to her roasted grain. And she ate until she was satisfied, and she had some left over. 15 When she rose to glean, Boaz instructed his young men, saying, “Let her glean even among the sheaves, and do not reproach her. 16 And also pull out some from the bundles for her and leave it for her to glean, and do not rebuke her.” 17 So she gleaned in the field until evening. Then she beat out what she had gleaned, and it was about an ephah2 of barley. 18 And she took it up and went into the city. Her mother-in-law saw what she had gleaned. She also brought out and gave her what food she had left over after being satisfied. 19 And her mother-in-law said to her, “Where did you glean today? And where have you worked? Blessed be the man who took notice of you.” So she told her mother-in-law with whom she had worked and said, “The man's name with whom I worked today is Boaz.” 20 And Naomi said to her daughter-in-law, “May he be blessed by the LORD, whose kindness has not forsaken the living or the dead!” Naomi also said to her, “The man is a close relative of ours, one of our redeemers.” 21 And Ruth the Moabite said, “Besides, he said to me, ‘You shall keep close by my young men until they have finished all my harvest.'” 22 And Naomi said to Ruth, her daughter-in-law, “It is good, my daughter, that you go out with his young women, lest in another field you be assaulted.” 23 So she kept close to the young women of Boaz, gleaning until the end of the barley and wheat harvests. And she lived with her mother-in-law. Footnotes [1] 2:7 Compare Septuagint, Vulgate; the meaning of the Hebrew phrase is uncertain [2] 2:17 An ephah was about 3/5 bushel or 22 liters (ESV) Acts 27 (Listen) Paul Sails for Rome 27 And when it was decided that we should sail for Italy, they delivered Paul and some other prisoners to a centurion of the Augustan Cohort named Julius. 2 And embarking in a ship of Adramyttium, which was about to sail to the ports along the coast of Asia, we put to sea, accompanied by Aristarchus, a Macedonian from Thessalonica. 3 The next day we put in at Sidon. And Julius treated Paul kindly and gave him leave to go to his friends and be cared for. 4 And putting out to sea from there we sailed under the lee of Cyprus, because the winds were against us. 5 And when we had sailed across the open sea along the coast of Cilicia and Pamphylia, we came to Myra in Lycia. 6 There the centurion found a ship of Alexandria sailing for Italy and put us on board. 7 We sailed slowly for a number of days and arrived with difficulty off Cnidus, and as the wind did not allow us to go farther, we sailed under the lee of Crete off Salmone. 8 Coasting along it with difficulty, we came to a place called Fair Havens, near which was the city of Lasea. 9 Since much time had passed, and the voyage was now dangerous because even the Fast1 was already over, Paul advised them, 10 saying, “Sirs, I perceive that the voyage will be with injury and much loss, not only of the cargo and the ship, but also of our lives.” 11 But the centurion paid more attention to the pilot and to the owner of the ship than to what Paul said. 12 And because the harbor was not suitable to spend the winter in, the majority decided to put out to sea from there, on the chance that somehow they could reach Phoenix, a harbor of Crete, facing both southwest and northwest, and spend the winter there. The Storm at Sea 13 Now when the south wind blew gently, supposing that they had obtained their purpose, they weighed anchor and sailed along Crete, close to the shore. 14 But soon a tempestuous wind, called the northeaster, struck down from the land. 15 And when the ship was caught and could not face the wind, we gave way to it and were driven along. 16 Running under the lee of a small island called Cauda,2 we managed with difficulty to secure the ship's boat. 17 After hoisting it up, they used supports to undergird the ship. Then, fearing that they would run aground on the Syrtis, they lowered the gear,3 and thus they were driven along. 18 Since we were violently storm-tossed, they began the next day to jettison the cargo. 19 And on the third day they threw the ship's tackle overboard with their own hands. 20 When neither sun nor stars appeared for many days, and no small tempest lay on us, all hope of our being saved was at last abandoned. 21 Since they had been without food for a long time, Paul stood up among them and said, “Men, you should have listened to me and not have set sail from Crete and incurred this injury and loss. 22 Yet now I urge you to take heart, for there will be no loss of life among you, but only of the ship. 23 For this very night there stood before me an angel of the God to whom I belong and whom I worship, 24 and he said, ‘Do not be afraid, Paul; you must stand before Caesar. And behold, God has granted you all those who sail with you.' 25 So take heart, men, for I have faith in God that it will be exactly as I have been told. 26 But we must run aground on some island.” 27 When the fourteenth night had come, as we were being driven across the Adriatic Sea, about midnight the sailors suspected that they were nearing land. 28 So they took a sounding and found twenty fathoms.4 A little farther on they took a sounding again and found fifteen fathoms.5 29 And fearing that we might run on the rocks, they let down four anchors from the stern and prayed for day to come. 30 And as the sailors were seeking to escape from the ship, and had lowered the ship's boat into the sea under pretense of laying out anchors from the bow, 31 Paul said to the centurion and the soldiers, “Unless these men stay in the ship, you cannot be saved.” 32 Then the soldiers cut away the ropes of the ship's boat and let it go. 33 As day was about to dawn, Paul urged them all to take some food, saying, “Today is the fourteenth day that you have continued in suspense and without food, having taken nothing. 34 Therefore I urge you to take some food. For it will give you strength,6 for not a hair is to perish from the head of any of you.” 35 And when he had said these things, he took bread, and giving thanks to God in the presence of all he broke it and began to eat. 36 Then they all were encouraged and ate some food themselves. 37 (We were in all 2767 persons in the ship.) 38 And when they had eaten enough, they lightened the ship, throwing out the wheat into the sea. The Shipwreck 39 Now when it was day, they did not recognize the land, but they noticed a bay with a beach, on which they planned if possible to run the ship ashore. 40 So they cast off the anchors and left them in the sea, at the same time loosening the ropes that tied the rudders. Then hoisting the foresail to the wind they made for the beach. 41 But striking a reef,8 they ran the vessel aground. The bow stuck and remained immovable, and the stern was being broken up by the surf. 42 The soldiers' plan was to kill the prisoners, lest any should swim away and escape. 43 But the centurion, wishing to save Paul, kept them from carrying out their plan. He ordered those who could swim to jump overboard first and make for the land, 44 and the rest on planks or on pieces of the ship. And so it was that all were brought safely to land. Footnotes [1] 27:9 That is, the Day of Atonement [2] 27:16 Some manuscripts Clauda [3] 27:17 That is, the sea-anchor (or possibly the mainsail) [4] 27:28 About 120 feet; a fathom (Greek orguia) was about 6 feet or 2 meters [5] 27:28 About 90 feet (see previous note) [6] 27:34 Or For it is for your deliverance [7] 27:37 Some manuscripts seventy-six, or about seventy-six [8] 27:41 Or sandbank, or crosscurrent; Greek place between two seas (ESV) In private: Psalm 10; Jeremiah 37 Psalm 10 (Listen) Why Do You Hide Yourself? 10   Why, O LORD, do you stand far away?    Why do you hide yourself in times of trouble? 2   In arrogance the wicked hotly pursue the poor;    let them be caught in the schemes that they have devised.3   For the wicked boasts of the desires of his soul,    and the one greedy for gain curses1 and renounces the LORD.4   In the pride of his face2 the wicked does not seek him;3    all his thoughts are, “There is no God.”5   His ways prosper at all times;    your judgments are on high, out of his sight;    as for all his foes, he puffs at them.6   He says in his heart, “I shall not be moved;    throughout all generations I shall not meet adversity.”7   His mouth is filled with cursing and deceit and oppression;    under his tongue are mischief and iniquity.8   He sits in ambush in the villages;    in hiding places he murders the innocent.  His eyes stealthily watch for the helpless;9     he lurks in ambush like a lion in his thicket;  he lurks that he may seize the poor;    he seizes the poor when he draws him into his net.10   The helpless are crushed, sink down,    and fall by his might.11   He says in his heart, “God has forgotten,    he has hidden his face, he will never see it.” 12   Arise, O LORD; O God, lift up your hand;    forget not the afflicted.13   Why does the wicked renounce God    and say in his heart, “You will not call to account”?14   But you do see, for you note mischief and vexation,    that you may take it into your hands;  to you the helpless commits himself;    you have been the helper of the fatherless.15   Break the arm of the wicked and evildoer;    call his wickedness to account till you find none. 16   The LORD is king forever and ever;    the nations perish from his land.17   O LORD, you hear the desire of the afflicted;    you will strengthen their heart; you will incline your ear18   to do justice to the fatherless and the oppressed,    so that man who is of the earth may strike terror no more. Footnotes [1] 10:3 Or and he blesses the one greedy for gain [2] 10:4 Or of his anger [3] 10:4 Or the wicked says, “He will not call to account” (ESV) Jeremiah 37 (Listen) Jeremiah Warns Zedekiah 37 Zedekiah the son of Josiah, whom Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made king in the land of Judah, reigned instead of Coniah the son of Jehoiakim. 2 But neither he nor his servants nor the people of the land listened to the words of the LORD that he spoke through Jeremiah the prophet. 3 King Zedekiah sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah, and Zephaniah the priest, the son of Maaseiah, to Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “Please pray for us to the LORD our God.” 4 Now Jeremiah was still going in and out among the people, for he had not yet been put in prison. 5 The army of Pharaoh had come out of Egypt. And when the Chaldeans who were besieging Jerusalem heard news about them, they withdrew from Jerusalem. 6 Then the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah the prophet: 7 “Thus says the LORD, God of Israel: Thus shall you say to the king of Judah who sent you to me to inquire of me, ‘Behold, Pharaoh's army that came to help you is about to return to Egypt, to its own land. 8 And the Chaldeans shall come back and fight against this city. They shall capture it and burn it with fire. 9 Thus says the LORD, Do not deceive yourselves, saying, “The Chaldeans will surely go away from us,” for they will not go away. 10 For even if you should defeat the whole army of Chaldeans who are fighting against you, and there remained of them only wounded men, every man in his tent, they would rise up and burn this city with fire.'” Jeremiah Imprisoned 11 Now when the Chaldean army had withdrawn from Jerusalem at the approach of Pharaoh's army, 12 Jeremiah set out from Jerusalem to go to the land of Benjamin to receive his portion there among the people. 13 When he was at the Benjamin Gate, a sentry there named Irijah the son of Shelemiah, son of Hananiah, seized Jeremiah the prophet, saying, “You are deserting to the Chaldeans.” 14 And Jeremiah said, “It is a lie; I am not deserting to the Chaldeans.” But Irijah would not listen to him, and seized Jeremiah and brought him to the officials. 15 And the officials were enraged at Jeremiah, and they beat him and imprisoned him in the house of Jonathan the secretary, for it had been made a prison. 16 When Jeremiah had come to the dungeon cells and remained there many days, 17 King Zedekiah sent for him and received him. The king questioned him secretly in his house and said, “Is there any word from the LORD?” Jeremiah said, “There is.” Then he said, “You shall be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon.” 18 Jeremiah also said to King Zedekiah, “What wrong have I done to you or your servants or this people, that you have put me in prison? 19 Where are your prophets who prophesied to you, saying, ‘The king of Babylon will not come against you and against this land'? 20 Now hear, please, O my lord the king: let my humble plea come before you and do not send me back to the house of Jonathan the secretary, lest I die there.” 21 So King Zedekiah gave orders, and they committed Jeremiah to the court of the guard. And a loaf of bread was given him daily from the bakers' street, until all the bread of the city was gone. So Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard. (ESV)

    Recipe of the Day
    The BEST Caesar Salad Dressing and Dip

    Recipe of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 5:38


    Today's recipe is The BEST Caesar Salad Dressing and Dip.Here are the links to some of the items I talked about in this episode: #adNinja Blender/Food ProcessorMeasuring CupMeasuring SpoonsChef's KnifeCutting BoardHere's the Recipe Of The Day page with all of our recipe links.If you want to make sure that you always find out what today's recipe is, do one or all of the following:Subscribe to the Podcast,Text the word Dinner to 1-833-413-1352,Join the ROTD Facebook Group here  (this is a brand new group! You'll be a founding member!),Subscribe to get emails here.Have a great day! -Christine xo 

    I.E In Friends
    Ep. 74 - Do You Owe Him Cheeks For Getting Flown Out?! Back To School Hacks & More!

    I.E In Friends

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 123:32


    Hello Friends! Today we go over finding motivation in yourself, do you owe the man who flew you out anything, back to school hacks and more! Hope you enjoy! Follow I.E In Friends here:https://linktr.ee/IEinFriends Get 25% OFF + Free shipping with promo code IEINFRIENDS at liquid-iv.com Get 20% OFF @manscaped + Free Shipping with promo code IEFRIENDS at MANSCAPED.com! Take The Mic!https://forms.gle/nSf7f2YKqSgxRBur8 Subscribe to us Patreon for exclusive episodes!https://www.patreon.com/ieinfriends Saul V GomezInstagram -  https://www.instagram.com/saulvgomez/Twitter - https://twitter.com/Saulvgomez_ Cesar SoteloInstagram -  https://www.instagram.com/iknowcesarTwitter - https://twitter.com/Caesar__0 Aaron CaraveoInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/airball_10/twitter - https://twitter.com/aaron_caraveo Time Stamps!00:00:00 - Intro00:02:33 - Aarons a runner00:06:56 - Manscaped00:09:18 - A new found motivation00:21:41 - False confidence00:23:50 - Get rejected 10 times00:27:52 - Monkeypox00:29:02 - she didn't give up the cheeks00:35:52 - WNBA00:38:28 - National GFs day00:39:40 - back to school day hacks00:46:10 - Meeting people your senior year00:47:29 - Calling people nerds00:49:00 - No one knows you on your first day of school  00:51:25 - Elvis Microphone fetish00:54:45 - Bad Bunny cheated?00:57:44 - Tesla drivers01:05:00 - Take the mic01:38:56 - Join the Discord!01:49:14 - Meeting influencers01:57:21 - Patreon shout outs

    The Listener's Commentary
    Mark 12:13-27

    The Listener's Commentary

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 18:10


    Mark 12:13-27   13 Then they *sent some of the Pharisees and Herodians to Him in order to trap Him in a statement. 14 They came and *said to Him, “Teacher, we know that You are truthful and do not care what anyone thinks; for You are not partial to anyone, but You teach the way of God in truth. Is it permissible to pay a poll-tax to Caesar, or not? 15 Are we to pay, or not pay?” But He, knowing their hypocrisy, said to them, “Why are you testing Me? Bring Me a denarius to look at.” 16 And they brought one. And He *said to them, “Whose image and inscription is this?” And they said to Him, “Caesar's.” 17 And Jesus said to them, “Pay to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's.” And they were utterly amazed at Him. 18 Some Sadducees (who say that there is no resurrection) *came to Jesus, and began questioning Him, saying, 19 “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man's brother dies and leaves behind a wife and does not leave a child, his brother is to marry the wife and raise up children for his brother. 20 There were seven brothers; and the first took a wife, and died leaving no children. 21 The second one married her, and died leaving behind no children; and the third likewise; 22 and so the seven together left no children. Last of all the woman also died. 23 In the resurrection, which one's wife will she be? For each of the seven had her as his wife.” 24 Jesus said to them, “Is this not the reason you are mistaken, that you do not understand the Scriptures nor the power of God? 25 For when they rise from the dead, they neither marry nor are given in marriage, but are like angels in heaven. 26 But regarding the fact that the dead rise, have you not read in the book of Moses, in the passage aboutthe burning bush, how God spoke to him, saying, ‘I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob'? 27 He is not the God of the dead, but of the living; you are greatly mistaken.” GIVE -  The Listener's Commentary is a listener supported Bible teaching ministry made possible by the generosity of people like you. Thank you! Give here:  https://www.listenerscommentary.com/give      STUDY HUB - Want more than the audio? Join the study hub to access articles, maps, charts, pictures, and links to other resources to help you study the Bible for yourself. https://www.listenerscommentary.com/members-sign-up   FREE EBOOK - Get the free eBook, Bible in Life, to help you learn how to read and apply the Bible well: https://www.listenerscommentary.com     MORE TEACHING - For more resources and Bible teaching from John visit https://www.johnwhittaker.net  

    Fr. Ted Talk
    For where your treasure is, there also will your heart be - With Fr. Caesar

    Fr. Ted Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 15:38


    Twin City Bible Church
    Is Caesar Your Friend

    Twin City Bible Church

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 46:00


    Helping organisations thrive with Julian Roberts
    #106 Lisa Gable | How to successfully turn around a failing company

    Helping organisations thrive with Julian Roberts

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 28:40


    Lisa Gable has been helping companies return from the brink for 30 years. She is a US advisor to Fortune 500 companies, a Wall Street journalist and USA Today bestseller. In this podcast Lisa explains how to spot the telltale signs of failure; how to navigate the challenges of restructuring a company; and most importantly, how to identify and focus on exactly what needs to be done. If you could wave a magic wand what would you want your company to look like? Lisa talks about how to conceptually burn your company to the ground and then build it back up again, to achieve that perfect vision of the future. Auditing and ranking current activities helps you to maintain a clear focus in order for your company to be successful, thriving and competitive. Lisa works with companies in very transparent and specific ways, consistently communicating and acknowledging any changes that may be making people feel uncomfortable. She takes lessons from Roman history - Caesar was known to regularly talk to his troops and listen to what they were saying; and the first President George HW Bush sent handwritten notes to staff to praise and acknowledge. Lisa has to make very tough and often unpopular decisions when working with companies, but ensures she consistently listens to and values her staff, in order to maintain relationships even with those who leave the company. This podcast will inform, challenge and inspire you in leading your team to build an even better version of your organisation.   Watch the full episode on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMC8Jd5JE1E   Connect with Lisa: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lisagable/ Website: http://www.lisagable.com/ Email: lisa@gable.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/lisagable     Helping SME's build resilient, high performing teams and businesses, quickly, so they can innovate, deliver, and thrive.   The SME's I work with typically struggle/suffer/ with one or more of these challenges: - no clear strategy - dysfunctional team dynamics - not knowing their vision or mission - feeling stuck and procrastinating - business not growing - leadership challenges   If you want support in helping your organisation thrive, do get in contact with me: https://www.julianrobertsconsulting.com

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
    August 8: Ruth 1; Acts 26; Psalm 9; Jeremiah 36; Jeremiah 45

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 16:19


    With family: Ruth 1; Acts 26 Ruth 1 (Listen) Naomi Widowed 1 In the days when the judges ruled there was a famine in the land, and a man of Bethlehem in Judah went to sojourn in the country of Moab, he and his wife and his two sons. 2 The name of the man was Elimelech and the name of his wife Naomi, and the names of his two sons were Mahlon and Chilion. They were Ephrathites from Bethlehem in Judah. They went into the country of Moab and remained there. 3 But Elimelech, the husband of Naomi, died, and she was left with her two sons. 4 These took Moabite wives; the name of the one was Orpah and the name of the other Ruth. They lived there about ten years, 5 and both Mahlon and Chilion died, so that the woman was left without her two sons and her husband. Ruth's Loyalty to Naomi 6 Then she arose with her daughters-in-law to return from the country of Moab, for she had heard in the fields of Moab that the LORD had visited his people and given them food. 7 So she set out from the place where she was with her two daughters-in-law, and they went on the way to return to the land of Judah. 8 But Naomi said to her two daughters-in-law, “Go, return each of you to her mother's house. May the LORD deal kindly with you, as you have dealt with the dead and with me. 9 The LORD grant that you may find rest, each of you in the house of her husband!” Then she kissed them, and they lifted up their voices and wept. 10 And they said to her, “No, we will return with you to your people.” 11 But Naomi said, “Turn back, my daughters; why will you go with me? Have I yet sons in my womb that they may become your husbands? 12 Turn back, my daughters; go your way, for I am too old to have a husband. If I should say I have hope, even if I should have a husband this night and should bear sons, 13 would you therefore wait till they were grown? Would you therefore refrain from marrying? No, my daughters, for it is exceedingly bitter to me for your sake that the hand of the LORD has gone out against me.” 14 Then they lifted up their voices and wept again. And Orpah kissed her mother-in-law, but Ruth clung to her. 15 And she said, “See, your sister-in-law has gone back to her people and to her gods; return after your sister-in-law.” 16 But Ruth said, “Do not urge me to leave you or to return from following you. For where you go I will go, and where you lodge I will lodge. Your people shall be my people, and your God my God. 17 Where you die I will die, and there will I be buried. May the LORD do so to me and more also if anything but death parts me from you.” 18 And when Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she said no more. Naomi and Ruth Return 19 So the two of them went on until they came to Bethlehem. And when they came to Bethlehem, the whole town was stirred because of them. And the women said, “Is this Naomi?” 20 She said to them, “Do not call me Naomi;1 call me Mara,2 for the Almighty has dealt very bitterly with me. 21 I went away full, and the LORD has brought me back empty. Why call me Naomi, when the LORD has testified against me and the Almighty has brought calamity upon me?” 22 So Naomi returned, and Ruth the Moabite her daughter-in-law with her, who returned from the country of Moab. And they came to Bethlehem at the beginning of barley harvest. Footnotes [1] 1:20 Naomi means pleasant [2] 1:20 Mara means bitter (ESV) Acts 26 (Listen) Paul's Defense Before Agrippa 26 So Agrippa said to Paul, “You have permission to speak for yourself.” Then Paul stretched out his hand and made his defense: 2 “I consider myself fortunate that it is before you, King Agrippa, I am going to make my defense today against all the accusations of the Jews, 3 especially because you are familiar with all the customs and controversies of the Jews. Therefore I beg you to listen to me patiently. 4 “My manner of life from my youth, spent from the beginning among my own nation and in Jerusalem, is known by all the Jews. 5 They have known for a long time, if they are willing to testify, that according to the strictest party of our religion I have lived as a Pharisee. 6 And now I stand here on trial because of my hope in the promise made by God to our fathers, 7 to which our twelve tribes hope to attain, as they earnestly worship night and day. And for this hope I am accused by Jews, O king! 8 Why is it thought incredible by any of you that God raises the dead? 9 “I myself was convinced that I ought to do many things in opposing the name of Jesus of Nazareth. 10 And I did so in Jerusalem. I not only locked up many of the saints in prison after receiving authority from the chief priests, but when they were put to death I cast my vote against them. 11 And I punished them often in all the synagogues and tried to make them blaspheme, and in raging fury against them I persecuted them even to foreign cities. Paul Tells of His Conversion 12 “In this connection I journeyed to Damascus with the authority and commission of the chief priests. 13 At midday, O king, I saw on the way a light from heaven, brighter than the sun, that shone around me and those who journeyed with me. 14 And when we had all fallen to the ground, I heard a voice saying to me in the Hebrew language,1 ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.' 15 And I said, ‘Who are you, Lord?' And the Lord said, ‘I am Jesus whom you are persecuting. 16 But rise and stand upon your feet, for I have appeared to you for this purpose, to appoint you as a servant and witness to the things in which you have seen me and to those in which I will appear to you, 17 delivering you from your people and from the Gentiles—to whom I am sending you 18 to open their eyes, so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and a place among those who are sanctified by faith in me.' 19 “Therefore, O King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision, 20 but declared first to those in Damascus, then in Jerusalem and throughout all the region of Judea, and also to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, performing deeds in keeping with their repentance. 21 For this reason the Jews seized me in the temple and tried to kill me. 22 To this day I have had the help that comes from God, and so I stand here testifying both to small and great, saying nothing but what the prophets and Moses said would come to pass: 23 that the Christ must suffer and that, by being the first to rise from the dead, he would proclaim light both to our people and to the Gentiles.” 24 And as he was saying these things in his defense, Festus said with a loud voice, “Paul, you are out of your mind; your great learning is driving you out of your mind.” 25 But Paul said, “I am not out of my mind, most excellent Festus, but I am speaking true and rational words. 26 For the king knows about these things, and to him I speak boldly. For I am persuaded that none of these things has escaped his notice, for this has not been done in a corner. 27 King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know that you believe.” 28 And Agrippa said to Paul, “In a short time would you persuade me to be a Christian?”2 29 And Paul said, “Whether short or long, I would to God that not only you but also all who hear me this day might become such as I am—except for these chains.” 30 Then the king rose, and the governor and Bernice and those who were sitting with them. 31 And when they had withdrawn, they said to one another, “This man is doing nothing to deserve death or imprisonment.” 32 And Agrippa said to Festus, “This man could have been set free if he had not appealed to Caesar.” Footnotes [1] 26:14 Or the Hebrew dialect (probably Aramaic) [2] 26:28 Or In a short time you would persuade me to act like a Christian! (ESV) In private: Psalm 9; Jeremiah 36; Jeremiah 45 Psalm 9 (Listen) I Will Recount Your Wonderful Deeds 1 To the choirmaster: according to Muth-labben.2 A Psalm of David. 9   I will give thanks to the LORD with my whole heart;    I will recount all of your wonderful deeds.2   I will be glad and exult in you;    I will sing praise to your name, O Most High. 3   When my enemies turn back,    they stumble and perish before3 your presence.4   For you have maintained my just cause;    you have sat on the throne, giving righteous judgment. 5   You have rebuked the nations; you have made the wicked perish;    you have blotted out their name forever and ever.6   The enemy came to an end in everlasting ruins;    their cities you rooted out;    the very memory of them has perished. 7   But the LORD sits enthroned forever;    he has established his throne for justice,8   and he judges the world with righteousness;    he judges the peoples with uprightness. 9   The LORD is a stronghold for the oppressed,    a stronghold in times of trouble.10   And those who know your name put their trust in you,    for you, O LORD, have not forsaken those who seek you. 11   Sing praises to the LORD, who sits enthroned in Zion!    Tell among the peoples his deeds!12   For he who avenges blood is mindful of them;    he does not forget the cry of the afflicted. 13   Be gracious to me, O LORD!    See my affliction from those who hate me,    O you who lift me up from the gates of death,14   that I may recount all your praises,    that in the gates of the daughter of Zion    I may rejoice in your salvation. 15   The nations have sunk in the pit that they made;    in the net that they hid, their own foot has been caught.16   The LORD has made himself known; he has executed judgment;    the wicked are snared in the work of their own hands. Higgaion.4 Selah 17   The wicked shall return to Sheol,    all the nations that forget God. 18   For the needy shall not always be forgotten,    and the hope of the poor shall not perish forever. 19   Arise, O LORD! Let not man prevail;    let the nations be judged before you!20   Put them in fear, O LORD!    Let the nations know that they are but men! Selah Footnotes [1] 9:1 Psalms 9 and 10 together follow an acrostic pattern, each stanza beginning with the successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet. In the Septuagint they form one psalm [2] 9:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [3] 9:3 Or because of [4] 9:16 Probably a musical or liturgical term (ESV) Jeremiah 36 (Listen) Jehoiakim Burns Jeremiah's Scroll 36 In the fourth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah, this word came to Jeremiah from the LORD: 2 “Take a scroll and write on it all the words that I have spoken to you against Israel and Judah and all the nations, from the day I spoke to you, from the days of Josiah until today. 3 It may be that the house of Judah will hear all the disaster that I intend to do to them, so that every one may turn from his evil way, and that I may forgive their iniquity and their sin.” 4 Then Jeremiah called Baruch the son of Neriah, and Baruch wrote on a scroll at the dictation of Jeremiah all the words of the LORD that he had spoken to him. 5 And Jeremiah ordered Baruch, saying, “I am banned from going to the house of the LORD, 6 so you are to go, and on a day of fasting in the hearing of all the people in the LORD's house you shall read the words of the LORD from the scroll that you have written at my dictation. You shall read them also in the hearing of all the men of Judah who come out of their cities. 7 It may be that their plea for mercy will come before the LORD, and that every one will turn from his evil way, for great is the anger and wrath that the LORD has pronounced against this people.” 8 And Baruch the son of Neriah did all that Jeremiah the prophet ordered him about reading from the scroll the words of the LORD in the LORD's house. 9 In the fifth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah, in the ninth month, all the people in Jerusalem and all the people who came from the cities of Judah to Jerusalem proclaimed a fast before the LORD. 10 Then, in the hearing of all the people, Baruch read the words of Jeremiah from the scroll, in the house of the LORD, in the chamber of Gemariah the son of Shaphan the secretary, which was in the upper court, at the entry of the New Gate of the LORD's house. 11 When Micaiah the son of Gemariah, son of Shaphan, heard all the words of the LORD from the scroll, 12 he went down to the king's house, into the secretary's chamber, and all the officials were sitting there: Elishama the secretary, Delaiah the son of Shemaiah, Elnathan the son of Achbor, Gemariah the son of Shaphan, Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, and all the officials. 13 And Micaiah told them all the words that he had heard, when Baruch read the scroll in the hearing of the people. 14 Then all the officials sent Jehudi the son of Nethaniah, son of Shelemiah, son of Cushi, to say to Baruch, “Take in your hand the scroll that you read in the hearing of the people, and come.” So Baruch the son of Neriah took the scroll in his hand and came to them. 15 And they said to him, “Sit down and read it.” So Baruch read it to them. 16 When they heard all the words, they turned one to another in fear. And they said to Baruch, “We must report all these words to the king.” 17 Then they asked Baruch, “Tell us, please, how did you write all these words? Was it at his dictation?” 18 Baruch answered them, “He dictated all these words to me, while I wrote them with ink on the scroll.” 19 Then the officials said to Baruch, “Go and hide, you and Jeremiah, and let no one know where you are.” 20 So they went into the court to the king, having put the scroll in the chamber of Elishama the secretary, and they reported all the words to the king. 21 Then the king sent Jehudi to get the scroll, and he took it from the chamber of Elishama the secretary. And Jehudi read it to the king and all the officials who stood beside the king. 22 It was the ninth month, and the king was sitting in the winter house, and there was a fire burning in the fire pot before him. 23 As Jehudi read three or four columns, the king would cut them off with a knife and throw them into the fire in the fire pot, until the entire scroll was consumed in the fire that was in the fire pot. 24 Yet neither the king nor any of his servants who heard all these words was afraid, nor did they tear their garments. 25 Even when Elnathan and Delaiah and Gemariah urged the king not to burn the scroll, he would not listen to them. 26 And the king commanded Jerahmeel the king's son and Seraiah the son of Azriel and Shelemiah the son of Abdeel to seize Baruch the secretary and Jeremiah the prophet, but the LORD hid them. 27 Now after the king had burned the scroll with the words that Baruch wrote at Jeremiah's dictation, the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah: 28 “Take another scroll and write on it all the former words that were in the first scroll, which Jehoiakim the king of Judah has burned. 29 And concerning Jehoiakim king of Judah you shall say, ‘Thus says the LORD, You have burned this scroll, saying, “Why have you written in it that the king of Babylon will certainly come and destroy this land, and will cut off from it man and beast?” 30 Therefore thus says the LORD concerning Jehoiakim king of Judah: He shall have none to sit on the throne of David, and his dead body shall be cast out to the heat by day and the frost by night. 31 And I will punish him and his offspring and his servants for their iniquity. I will bring upon them and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem and upon the people of Judah all the disaster that I have pronounced against them, but they would not hear.'” 32 Then Jeremiah took another scroll and gave it to Baruch the scribe, the son of Neriah, who wrote on it at the dictation of Jeremiah all the words of the scroll that Jehoiakim king of Judah had burned in the fire. And many similar words were added to them. (ESV) Jeremiah 45 (Listen) Message to Baruch 45 The word that Jeremiah the prophet spoke to Baruch the son of Neriah, when he wrote these words in a book at the dictation of Jeremiah, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah: 2 “Thus says the LORD, the God of Israel, to you, O Baruch: 3 You said, ‘Woe is me! For the LORD has added sorrow to my pain. I am weary with my groaning, and I find no rest.' 4 Thus shall you say to him, Thus says the LORD: Behold, what I have built I am breaking down, and what I have planted I am plucking up—that is, the whole land. 5 And do you seek great things for yourself? Seek them not, for behold, I am bringing disaster upon all flesh, declares the LORD. But I will give you your life as a prize of war in all places to which you may go.” (ESV)

    The Tim Dillon Show
    310 - The Acid Story with Curtis Yarvin

    The Tim Dillon Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 157:16 Very Popular


    Tim has on Curtis Yarvin (aka Mencius Moldbug, executive producer of the film "Alex's War", Gray Mirror on Substack) is a software engineer, internet entrepreneur, and blogger. They discuss taking acid as a precocious young man, the historical inaccuracies from Caesar to the American Revolution, the early days of the internet, what tech people really want, the three types of government, and the actual deep state. His substack: https://graymirror.substack.com/ The movie he exec produced: https://twitter.com/alexswarmovie SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS: HELIX BED ▶▶ https://www.helixsleep.com/timd for 200 dollars off Mattress orders and two free pillows WATCHES ▶▶ for 20% off go to https://www.vincerocollective.com/timdillon

    INDIEstructable Gaming & More Podcast
    Episode 64: Game Review of Gladihaters

    INDIEstructable Gaming & More Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 40:39


    Mr_K and Musketshot enter the Gladiator arena this episode.  I swear we've done this before.  Well, this time it is different, the arena is a dystopian prison.  You are a prison warden who has one year to improve his prison or be fired.  One of the ways to improve the prison is by earning money at the gladiator fights with your clones.  Your clone fighters are Joan of Arc, Caesar, Queen Victoria, and Abraham Lincoln.  What a motley bunch!!  Have them fight with fists or use weapons to get the win and earn you money and fame.Support the show

    Living Words
    Before the Throne

    Living Words

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022


    Before the Throne Revelation 20:7-15 by William Klock Last year we planted some daylilies that someone down the street was kind enough to be giving away.  I've spent the last two months trying to destroy these deceptively beautiful, but noxious weeds.  I'm beginning to suspect they've sunk roots all the way to the abyss.  The devil may be bound there, but he's keeping himself occupied fertilizing my daylilies!  We planted one little clump and it promptly took over the entire flowerbed, choking out everything else.  Then it put out shoots and daylilies started popping up in the lawn.  Then some of them went to seed and more daylilies started appearing in the lawn forty and fifty feet away.  At first the outliers were easy enough to snap off at the ground, but that didn't stop them at all.  I tried mowing them down with the lawnmower blade set right to ground level.  I think I actually heard them laughing at me even as I scalped them.  They came back and taunted me, so I dug down a bit, yanked them out, and buried them.  Surely smothering them would do the trick.  I could hear their cackles rising through the earth until they broke through again.  It finally came to digging up the whole flowerbed.  I dug and dug and dug—half a metre down—to get those wicked roots.  They even entwined around my perimeter drain pipe.  As I was packing them into my yard waste bin someone walked by on the path behind our house.  “You aren't putting daylilies in your yard waste?” he asked in horror.  “Of course I am,” I said.  But, no, apparently you can't do that.  The seeds survive the composting process and my problem will become who knows how many other people's problem.  “Burn ‘em,” he said.  “Don't let the seeds get anywhere.  Sift the soil.  Gather up every last scrap of root and tuber.  And burn them with fire!”  Well, in the City of Courtenay, burning my yard waste isn't an option, but point taken.  It's been about three weeks.  I keep checking.  Yesterday I went out to water and found half a dozen little shoots just breaking through the ground. I've been thinking about those daylilies as I've been studying Revelation 20.  There was that little blurb in verse 6 at the end of our passage two weeks ago where John wrote that at the end of the millennium, the satan must be released for a little while.  What's with that?  Why?  It goes right along with all those other questions we ask about how God deals with evil.  “If God is good, why does he permit evil.”  “Why me?” we ask when bad things happen to us.  God could spare us from evil, he could spare us from so much pain and suffering—he's God, he can do anything.  So why doesn't he?  Why, when John has shown us Jesus chaining up the devil and confining him to the abyss, when he's shown us the church riding out triumphantly into the world, conquering the nations by the proclamation of the gospel, when we know that our mission will be successful, because it's backed by the power and authority of both God's word and God's Spirit, why in the world would he let the satan go just when it seems the victory has been won? Because, like the daylilies, to be dealt with once and for all, evil has to expose itself.  If it were up to us, evil would be like those daylilies.  I plucked them off and they grew back.  I mowed them down and they grew back.  I even dug them up—but not deep enough—and they grew back.  I was careless with the seeds, and they spread.  God's got a better strategy—one that not only ends evil forever, but sees the redemptive work of Jesus making all things new in the process.  Let's look at the rest of Revelation 20, beginning with verse 7. And when the thousand years are ended, Satan will be released from his prison… The first decisive blow the Lord delivered to the devil was that first Easter morning when Jesus rose victorious over death.  And it only worked, because God had permitted evil to rise to its full height, to be concentrated all in one place, and to do its absolute worst at the cross.  And it's like we see ripples of that victory again: first as we saw God's judgement on rebellious Jerusalem.  Forty years he gave the Jews to repent and to turn to Jesus the Messiah—and, at the same time, forty years for them to make their rebellion clear and obvious, so that when the Lord's judgement fell on them, there would be no question about the justness of it.  Then again, another ripple, as we saw judgement fall on the pagan world of the Greeks and Romans.  And now, here at the end, another ripple of God's justice against evil—the last.  This time it'll be the end of evil, once and for all. So for a thousand years the Church will proclaim the good news about Jesus to the nations.  It's not literally a thousand years—it's already been almost two thousand already.  As I said before, it's a symbolic number.  It's a long time and it's just long enough for Jesus, the word, and for the Spirit to do their work through the Church.  The satan is bound—Jesus bound him in his ministry and the proclamation of the gospel keeps him bound wherever it goes.  It doesn't mean he has no power.  It means he cannot and will not prevail.  Jesus and the gospel will win because they already have, and the whole world will increasingly know what new creation is like, even if it hasn't fully happened.  But as much as the gospel will bring the nations to Jesus and will transform the world, not everyone will believe.  How many will refuse the gospel we don't know.  But there will be some.  Sin and death will still be present.  I trust that by the time this happens, whether that's a thousand years from now or a hundred thousand years from now, the Church will be much refined, but still not perfect.  Sin and death are the last enemies to be put under Jesus' feet.  And so, when the time is right, evil incarnate will be released from his chains.  Continuing with verse 8: [He] will come out to deceive the nations that are at the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, to gather them for battle; their number is like the sand of the sea.  And they marched up over the broad plain of the earth and surrounded the camp of the saints and the beloved city, but fire came down from heaven and consumed them, and the devil who had deceived them was thrown into the lake of fire and sulfur where the beast and the false prophet were, and they will be tormented day and night forever and ever.  (Revelation 20:8-10) John is looking back here to Ezekiel as he so often does in Revelation.  You'll remember that famous vision of Ezekiel about the valley of dry bones—the knee bone connected to the leg bone and all of that as the song goes.  Ezekiel saw dry bones—Israel, dead in her sins—restored to life by the proclamation of God's word.  Israel cleansed from her sins and brought home from her exile.  You'd think everything would be fine from there on out, but it's not.  Because Ezekiel then sees Gog, the king of the land of Magog, descending on the newly restored Israel.  Magog was a semi-mythical land to the north—somewhere almost off the map.  By the First Century, Gog and Magog had become two nations in Jewish thought.  They represented the nations of which the Psalmist asks in Psalm 2, “Why do the nations rage?”  And yet, in Ezekiel, this raging nation descend on Israel not as punishment or judgement for her sins, but after peace and justice have been restored.  And the point for John, as I think it was for Ezekiel, is that Gog and Magog remind us of the problem of evil.  No matter what humans may accomplish, no matter how far the gospel reaches, until Jesus finally and fully consummates his work of new creation, evil will be present.  Like my daylilies, evil has deep roots.  Its seeds spread.  Stamp it out here and it pops up over there.  Gog and Magog remind us that even as the gospel transforms the world, we still await the day when Jesus will really and truly make all things new—when we and all of creation will know for ourselves the power of resurrection. So, when the time is right the satan will be released.  He will marshal his forces.  I can't say how literally John intends for us to take this.  He gives us a picture of forces literally staged for an actual war.  On the opposing side is the “camp of the saints” and “the beloved city”.  It's a two-fold image of the Church.  We are a camp—an image drawn from Exodus.  No matter how far the gospel progresses, no matter how it transforms this world, the Church remains a people on a pilgrimage through the wilderness.  But, too, John compares us to the beloved city.  This is really interesting, because the only city Jewish believers would think of as “beloved” is Jerusalem.  And in the next chapter—to get ahead of ourselves—we see the New Jerusalem—an amazing city that is, at the same time, not just a city, but a temple, and John says, also the bride.  It's both a city and a people.  And while it doesn't descend in all its glory until the next chapter, it's already present here and now in the present age.  This was the inspiration for St. Augustine's famous book, The City of God.  The Church is God's city, the New Jerusalem, but not just some day in the future when that amazing city of gold and jewels descends from heaven.  Brothers and Sisters, the Church—you and I and all the other saints—are that city here and now.  In Augustine's language, we are, even now, the heavenly city confronting the earthly city of Caesar and the satan with the good news that Jesus is Lord.  We are the people who pray, “On earth as in heaven,” and who live in such a way as to witness and to manifest God's kingdom here and now. So John sees the Church—both the city of God and a pilgrim people in the wilderness—surrounded finally by evil.  Once again, evil gathers itself together all in one place to rise to its full height.  It looks bad.  And yet the last battle took place in Chapter 19.  Jesus rode out on his white horse, the sword of the gospel coming from his mouth, and his bride rode out with him to conquer the nations.  The devil will, finally muster his forces, but there will be no battle, because the battle was already won.  In a vision that reminds us of Elijah, fire falls from heaven and consumes the enemies of Jesus' people.  Finally, the satan himself is cast into the lake of fire—that place of final destruction—never to return, never again to exert his influence.  The daylilies have been rooted up and every last bit of root and seed burned with fire.  Gone forever. With the forces that corrupted his creation gone forever, the Lord can now deal with Creation itself.  Look at verse 11:   Then I saw a great white throne and him who was seated on it.  From his presence earth and sky fled away, and no place was found for them.   I think we need to be careful not to over-interpret the details here.  John sees “earth and heaven” flee away.  The ESV, I think reading in too much and trying to avoid a difficult reading, translates it “sky” instead of the more natural reading, “heaven”.  Earth and heaven flee away.  Is this the destruction of the old order of creation?  Maybe, but I don't think so.  If Jesus' resurrection is the model for our own and for the renewal of creation itself, then there's continuity between the old and the new.  Jesus' wasn't given a completely new body while his old body lay in the tomb forever.  His old body was raised and made new.  We expect the same for our own bodies.  And I think that model fits what will happen with heaven and earth.  The old creation, corrupted by sin, will be made new.  John's purpose here is to show us literally everything fading into the background so that our attention is put on the one thing—and the one person left: God seated on his throne.  The heavenly court, the angels, the elders, the four living creatures, even the martyrs who were already resurrected to reign beside Jesus for the thousand years—they and everything else fades out of view as the supreme judge now takes his throne.  In the full light of his glory, everything else become irrelevant.  He commands our full attention.  John goes on in verses 12 and 13: And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and books were opened.  Then another book was opened, which is the book of life.  And the dead were judged by what was written in the books, according to what they had done.  And the sea gave up the dead who were in it, Death and Hades gave up the dead who were in them, and they were judged, each one of them, according to what they had done.   And now John sees the dead assembled before the judge.  Again, I think we have to be careful how literally we take this, lest we turn this scene into a heavenly DMV with a line billions of people long, waiting an eternity to stand before a sort of heavenly bureaucratic magistrate to be assigned our final destination.  John's attention is on the judge—and on his glory—as he deals with evil and sets his corrupted creation to rights.  The ultimate source of evil has been cast from creation for good, but each of us, every human that has ever lived, has taken part in some way in that evil.  Every one of us has had a hand—great or small—in creation's corruption and human misery.  And so the books are opened and, the judge prepared, death and hades and the sea give up their dead.  Where are the living?  They're not the focus of this scene.  The enemies of the people of God in the satan's last putsch were consumed by fire—so they're presumably amongst this crowd.  The rest were the saints, alive at the end—maybe they'll be judged here too, but they may be passed over, because their faithfulness to Jesus has already been vindicated. So, again, the Lord casts no man or woman into oblivion without it being clear that his judgement is just.  Death and hades give up their dead.  Greek-speaking Jews borrowed hades, the Greek's mythical abode of the dead, to translate the Hebrew word sheol—the grave.  The graves of history are turned out and their occupants stand before the Judge.  The sea, too, gives up all those lost to it.  And by the books we each condemn ourselves.  If God is to set his creation to rights, not a single one of us deserves to be a part of it.  The satan—the root of the problem of evil—may be gone, but each of us would carry that evil into the new creation and make a mess of it all over again.  Praise God that the book containing our sins is not the only one that will be opened on that day.  The second book is the book of life—an image that goes all the way back to Moses—the book containing the names of the Lord's covenant people. John first wrote of this book of life in his exhortation to the Church in Sardis: “Yet you have still a few names in Sardis, people who have not soiled their garments, and they will walk with me in white, for they are worthy.  The one who conquers will be clothed in white garments, and I will never blot his name out of the book of life.  I will confess his name before my Father and before his angels” (Revelation 3:4-6).  Repeatedly, throughout Revelation, John writes of those who stand firm for Jesus, those who refuse to submit to the beast, those who overcome—their names are written in this book of life that belongs to the lamb.  These are the names of those who are in Jesus.  They are the ones who have recognized that in his resurrection he has begun the work of new creation—of restoring this broken world and setting it to rights.  They are the ones who have not only acknowledge him as Lord, but who have given their allegiance to him and to his kingdom.  They're the ones who, despite continuing sometimes to sin and to fall short of the mark, are nevertheless committed to him.  They have forsaken Caesar.  And they have forsaken the false gods of this world: Aphrodite, Mars, Mammon, and all the rest.  They're the people who have pulled up their stakes in the systems of the old kings and gods and have planted them firmly in the kingdom of Jesus.  These are the “on earth as in heaven” people.  And that means that, because of their faith and their union with Jesus, these are the people in whom God's work of recreation has already begun.  These are the people who have been filled with his own Spirit and have their hearts and their hopes set on the age to come.  These are the ones ready to follow their king into his kingdom—ready to be renewed as he was—to finally be an Easter people in all the fullness of what that means.  They—we—just like everyone else—stand condemned by the other books, the record of our sins, the record of our wrongs against God and against each other.  But by his merciful grace, Jesus has also written our names in his book, he claims us as his own, he covers our sins by the sacrifice of his own blood, and when our deeds condemn us, he confesses us before his Father: “These belong to me.  These are the ones I've made new.  These are they whom I've prepared to take up Adam's vocation: to my priests, the stewards of my temple.” The rest have no share in God's new creation.  John goes on in verses 14 and 15: Then Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. This is the second death, the lake of fire.  And if anyone's name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire.   Finally, the end of sin and death.  Death and the grave are cast into the lake of fire—that place of ultimate destruction.  Jesus has conquered it and those written in his book have been delivered from it forever.  And those not written in the book of life, those whose sins and lack of allegiance to Jesus—in contrast to the redeemed, these are the “my will on earth” people—those who would only carry the curse of sin into the new creation.  Like Adam and Eve, they cannot live in the presence of God or share in the life he gives, and so having been condemned by the record of their own deeds against God, they too are cast into the lake of fire.  I think it's worth noting that whereas John writes that the lake of fire is a place of eternal torment for the satan and his angels, he does not say the same of these men and women.  The same goes for the beast and his prophet.  And I think the reason for that is that the satan and his angels are eternal beings.  Humans are not.  In Genesis we read that we were created from dust.  Whether that's meant literally or not, the point is that we are, by our nature, mortal.  Adam and Eve could have lived forever had they remained in the presence of God.  The tree of life there and as we'll see in the next chapter of Revelation is symbolic of that life of God.  But away from his presence we die and eventually return to the dust.  As St. Paul writes in Romans 6, “The wages of sin is death.”  Because apart from the presence of God we are simply dust graciously animated by his breath until we die and his breath returns to him and we return to the dust of which we were made.  I know that's a minority opinion in Evangelical theology, but the more I study and try to read Scripture in context and apart from the tendency we've had for many centuries to read it through the lens of pagan Greek philosophy, that's the conclusion I keep coming to.  That said, John doesn't seem overly concerned with whether the unredeemed are consigned to oblivion or eternal torment.  The real point here is that God is about to consummate the work of new creation begun in the resurrection of Jesus.  The world will be set to rights, tears will be wiped away, all things will be made new and the only people for whom there is a place in this new world are those who have already committed themselves to Jesus and to this new world and in whom he and the Spirit have already begun this work of new creation.  God's majesty and glory are revealed at the throne as every last bit of evil is exposed, rooted out, gathered up, and cast into the fire never to trouble his creation again.  And his glory shines forth in Jesus, the lamb who was slain, who stands before him with his own books, calling out the names of those who have known his amazing grace by faith. Brothers and Sisters, the end follows naturally from the rest of the story of God and his people.  Even if Jesus hadn't revealed these visions to John, we know that the God who reveals himself in the Scriptures—whose holy fire burns against sin, but who is also patient and loving, full of grace and mercy—he will not let evil go unchecked forever.  He will restore that which he so lovingly made.  He so loved the world that he gave his son so that all those who believe—who trust in him, who acknowledge his lordship over all, who give their allegiance to him and to his kingdom—might know the life of the age to come.  In light of all that—even without John—we could be sure that what God has begun in Jesus he will surely finish.  He will deal with sin and death and he will consummate his project of new creation.  But, again, we see his graciousness towards us here.  Like Paul did, we could figure this all out for ourselves, but Jesus knew that his people, beleaguered by the forces of unbelieving Jerusalem and pagan Rome, with persecution and martyrdom around the corner, needed and exhortation to persevere in the face of tribulation.  And so in his grace, he loving gave them this vision of the kingdom—and with it assurance.  God is king.  Jesus is lord.  The gospel will win.  The church will be vindicated and reunited with her lord.  All things will be made new.  Every tear will be wiped away. Those persecuted Christians rejoiced at the words of Jesus and we know they did, indeed, persevere.  Those who survived—and even the pagan historians—wrote of their faithful courage.  May we, too, be exhorted to faithful courage by John's vision—giving our allegiance to Jesus and to his kingdom—sure and certain of his faithfulness to us.  Christ has died.  Christ is risen.  Christ will come again. Let's pray: Heavenly Father, strengthen us we pray that we might always be faithful to you and to your kingdom.  As we struggle with evil in this world, hold the cross before us that we might always remember that you are dealing with it.  As we face opposition, hold the cross before us that we might always remember you will finish what you have begun.  And as we see the cross before us, may we be faithful in proclaiming the gospel that the nations might have a share in your kingdom.  Through Jesus we pray. Amen.

    Denver Presbyterian Sermons
    Render to Caesar

    Denver Presbyterian Sermons

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 36:33


    Mark 12:13-17

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
    August 7: Judges 21; Acts 25; Psalms 7–8; Jeremiah 35

    ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 13:45


    With family: Judges 21; Acts 25 Judges 21 (Listen) Wives Provided for the Tribe of Benjamin 21 Now the men of Israel had sworn at Mizpah, “No one of us shall give his daughter in marriage to Benjamin.” 2 And the people came to Bethel and sat there till evening before God, and they lifted up their voices and wept bitterly. 3 And they said, “O LORD, the God of Israel, why has this happened in Israel, that today there should be one tribe lacking in Israel?” 4 And the next day the people rose early and built there an altar and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. 5 And the people of Israel said, “Which of all the tribes of Israel did not come up in the assembly to the LORD?” For they had taken a great oath concerning him who did not come up to the LORD to Mizpah, saying, “He shall surely be put to death.” 6 And the people of Israel had compassion for Benjamin their brother and said, “One tribe is cut off from Israel this day. 7 What shall we do for wives for those who are left, since we have sworn by the LORD that we will not give them any of our daughters for wives?” 8 And they said, “What one is there of the tribes of Israel that did not come up to the LORD to Mizpah?” And behold, no one had come to the camp from Jabesh-gilead, to the assembly. 9 For when the people were mustered, behold, not one of the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead was there. 10 So the congregation sent 12,000 of their bravest men there and commanded them, “Go and strike the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead with the edge of the sword; also the women and the little ones. 11 This is what you shall do: every male and every woman that has lain with a male you shall devote to destruction.” 12 And they found among the inhabitants of Jabesh-gilead 400 young virgins who had not known a man by lying with him, and they brought them to the camp at Shiloh, which is in the land of Canaan. 13 Then the whole congregation sent word to the people of Benjamin who were at the rock of Rimmon and proclaimed peace to them. 14 And Benjamin returned at that time. And they gave them the women whom they had saved alive of the women of Jabesh-gilead, but they were not enough for them. 15 And the people had compassion on Benjamin because the LORD had made a breach in the tribes of Israel. 16 Then the elders of the congregation said, “What shall we do for wives for those who are left, since the women are destroyed out of Benjamin?” 17 And they said, “There must be an inheritance for the survivors of Benjamin, that a tribe not be blotted out from Israel. 18 Yet we cannot give them wives from our daughters.” For the people of Israel had sworn, “Cursed be he who gives a wife to Benjamin.” 19 So they said, “Behold, there is the yearly feast of the LORD at Shiloh, which is north of Bethel, on the east of the highway that goes up from Bethel to Shechem, and south of Lebonah.” 20 And they commanded the people of Benjamin, saying, “Go and lie in ambush in the vineyards 21 and watch. If the daughters of Shiloh come out to dance in the dances, then come out of the vineyards and snatch each man his wife from the daughters of Shiloh, and go to the land of Benjamin. 22 And when their fathers or their brothers come to complain to us, we will say to them, ‘Grant them graciously to us, because we did not take for each man of them his wife in battle, neither did you give them to them, else you would now be guilty.'” 23 And the people of Benjamin did so and took their wives, according to their number, from the dancers whom they carried off. Then they went and returned to their inheritance and rebuilt the towns and lived in them. 24 And the people of Israel departed from there at that time, every man to his tribe and family, and they went out from there every man to his inheritance. 25 In those days there was no king in Israel. Everyone did what was right in his own eyes. (ESV) Acts 25 (Listen) Paul Appeals to Caesar 25 Now three days after Festus had arrived in the province, he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea. 2 And the chief priests and the principal men of the Jews laid out their case against Paul, and they urged him, 3 asking as a favor against Paul1 that he summon him to Jerusalem—because they were planning an ambush to kill him on the way. 4 Festus replied that Paul was being kept at Caesarea and that he himself intended to go there shortly. 5 “So,” said he, “let the men of authority among you go down with me, and if there is anything wrong about the man, let them bring charges against him.” 6 After he stayed among them not more than eight or ten days, he went down to Caesarea. And the next day he took his seat on the tribunal and ordered Paul to be brought. 7 When he had arrived, the Jews who had come down from Jerusalem stood around him, bringing many and serious charges against him that they could not prove. 8 Paul argued in his defense, “Neither against the law of the Jews, nor against the temple, nor against Caesar have I committed any offense.” 9 But Festus, wishing to do the Jews a favor, said to Paul, “Do you wish to go up to Jerusalem and there be tried on these charges before me?” 10 But Paul said, “I am standing before Caesar's tribunal, where I ought to be tried. To the Jews I have done no wrong, as you yourself know very well. 11 If then I am a wrongdoer and have committed anything for which I deserve to die, I do not seek to escape death. But if there is nothing to their charges against me, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar.” 12 Then Festus, when he had conferred with his council, answered, “To Caesar you have appealed; to Caesar you shall go.” Paul Before Agrippa and Bernice 13 Now when some days had passed, Agrippa the king and Bernice arrived at Caesarea and greeted Festus. 14 And as they stayed there many days, Festus laid Paul's case before the king, saying, “There is a man left prisoner by Felix, 15 and when I was at Jerusalem, the chief priests and the elders of the Jews laid out their case against him, asking for a sentence of condemnation against him. 16 I answered them that it was not the custom of the Romans to give up anyone before the accused met the accusers face to face and had opportunity to make his defense concerning the charge laid against him. 17 So when they came together here, I made no delay, but on the next day took my seat on the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought. 18 When the accusers stood up, they brought no charge in his case of such evils as I supposed. 19 Rather they had certain points of dispute with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus, who was dead, but whom Paul asserted to be alive. 20 Being at a loss how to investigate these questions, I asked whether he wanted to go to Jerusalem and be tried there regarding them. 21 But when Paul had appealed to be kept in custody for the decision of the emperor, I ordered him to be held until I could send him to Caesar.” 22 Then Agrippa said to Festus, “I would like to hear the man myself.” “Tomorrow,” said he, “you will hear him.” 23 So on the next day Agrippa and Bernice came with great pomp, and they entered the audience hall with the military tribunes and the prominent men of the city. Then, at the command of Festus, Paul was brought in. 24 And Festus said, “King Agrippa and all who are present with us, you see this man about whom the whole Jewish people petitioned me, both in Jerusalem and here, shouting that he ought not to live any longer. 25 But I found that he had done nothing deserving death. And as he himself appealed to the emperor, I decided to go ahead and send him. 26 But I have nothing definite to write to my lord about him. Therefore I have brought him before you all, and especially before you, King Agrippa, so that, after we have examined him, I may have something to write. 27 For it seems to me unreasonable, in sending a prisoner, not to indicate the charges against him.” Footnotes [1] 25:3 Greek him (ESV) In private: Psalms 7–8; Jeremiah 35 Psalms 7–8 (Listen) In You Do I Take Refuge A Shiggaion1 of David, which he sang to the LORD concerning the words of Cush, a Benjaminite. 7   O LORD my God, in you do I take refuge;    save me from all my pursuers and deliver me,2   lest like a lion they tear my soul apart,    rending it in pieces, with none to deliver. 3   O LORD my God, if I have done this,    if there is wrong in my hands,4   if I have repaid my friend2 with evil    or plundered my enemy without cause,5   let the enemy pursue my soul and overtake it,    and let him trample my life to the ground    and lay my glory in the dust. Selah 6   Arise, O LORD, in your anger;    lift yourself up against the fury of my enemies;    awake for me; you have appointed a judgment.7   Let the assembly of the peoples be gathered about you;    over it return on high. 8   The LORD judges the peoples;    judge me, O LORD, according to my righteousness    and according to the integrity that is in me.9   Oh, let the evil of the wicked come to an end,    and may you establish the righteous—  you who test the minds and hearts,3    O righteous God!10   My shield is with God,    who saves the upright in heart.11   God is a righteous judge,    and a God who feels indignation every day. 12   If a man4 does not repent, God5 will whet his sword;    he has bent and readied his bow;13   he has prepared for him his deadly weapons,    making his arrows fiery shafts.14   Behold, the wicked man conceives evil    and is pregnant with mischief    and gives birth to lies.15   He makes a pit, digging it out,    and falls into the hole that he has made.16   His mischief returns upon his own head,    and on his own skull his violence descends. 17   I will give to the LORD the thanks due to his righteousness,    and I will sing praise to the name of the LORD, the Most High. How Majestic Is Your Name To the choirmaster: according to The Gittith.6 A Psalm of David. 8   O LORD, our Lord,    how majestic is your name in all the earth!  You have set your glory above the heavens.2     Out of the mouth of babies and infants,  you have established strength because of your foes,    to still the enemy and the avenger. 3   When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers,    the moon and the stars, which you have set in place,4   what is man that you are mindful of him,    and the son of man that you care for him? 5   Yet you have made him a little lower than the heavenly beings7    and crowned him with glory and honor.6   You have given him dominion over the works of your hands;    you have put all things under his feet,7   all sheep and oxen,    and also the beasts of the field,8   the birds of the heavens, and the fish of the sea,    whatever passes along the paths of the seas. 9   O LORD, our Lord,    how majestic is your name in all the earth! Footnotes [1] 7:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [2] 7:4 Hebrew the one at peace with me [3] 7:9 Hebrew the hearts and kidneys [4] 7:12 Hebrew he [5] 7:12 Hebrew he [6] 8:1 Probably a musical or liturgical term [7] 8:5 Or than God; Septuagint than the angels (ESV) Jeremiah 35 (Listen) The Obedience of the Rechabites 35 The word that came to Jeremiah from the LORD in the days of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah: 2 “Go to the house of the Rechabites and speak with them and bring them to the house of the LORD, into one of the chambers; then offer them wine to drink.” 3 So I took Jaazaniah the son of Jeremiah, son of Habazziniah and his brothers and all his sons and the whole house of the Rechabites. 4 I brought them to the house of the LORD into the chamber of the sons of Hanan the son of Igdaliah, the man of God, which was near the chamber of the officials, above the chamber of Maaseiah the son of Shallum, keeper of the threshold. 5 Then I set before the Rechabites pitchers full of wine, and cups, and I said to them, “Drink wine.” 6 But they answered, “We will drink no wine, for Jonadab the son of Rechab, our father, commanded us, ‘You shall not drink wine, neither you nor your sons forever. 7 You shall not build a house; you shall not sow seed; you shall not plant or have a vineyard; but you shall live in tents all your days, that you may live many days in the land where you sojourn.' 8 We have obeyed the voice of Jonadab the son of Rechab, our father, in all that he commanded us, to drink no wine all our days, ourselves, our wives, our sons, or our daughters, 9 and not to build houses to dwell in. We have no vineyard or field or seed, 10 but we have lived in tents and have obeyed and done all that Jonadab our father commanded us. 11 But when Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up against the land, we said, ‘Come, and let us go to Jerusalem for fear of the army of the Chaldeans and the army of the Syrians.' So we are living in Jerusalem.” 12 Then the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah: 13 “Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Go and say to the people of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem, Will you not receive instruction and listen to my words? declares the LORD. 14 The command that Jonadab the son of Rechab gave to his sons, to drink no wine, has been kept, and they drink none to this day, for they have obeyed their father's command. I have spoken to you persistently, but you have not listened to me. 15 I have sent to you all my servants the prophets, sending them persistently, saying, ‘Turn now every one of you from his evil way, and amend your deeds, and do not go after other gods to serve them, and then you shall dwell in the land that I gave to you and your fathers.' But you did not incline your ear or listen to me. 16 The sons of Jonadab the son of Rechab have kept the command that their father gave them, but this people has not obeyed me. 17 Therefore, thus says the LORD, the God of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I am bringing upon Judah and all the inhabitants of Jerusalem all the disaster that I have pronounced against them, because I have spoken to them and they have not listened, I have called to them and they have not answered.” 18 But to the house of the Rechabites Jeremiah said, “Thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Because you have obeyed the command of Jonadab your father and kept all his precepts and done all that he commanded you, 19 therefore thus says the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel: Jonadab the son of Rechab shall never lack a man to stand before me.” (ESV)

    The Thinking Traveller
    Roman Women

    The Thinking Traveller

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 32:56


    When we think of Ancient Rome, we automatically think of the strong male characters – figures such as Caesar, Pompey or Augustus – but what about the women of Ancient Rome? Recent study is emphasising the agency that Roman women enjoyed. To help us understand what this newly researched area examines, we are joined on our latest podcast by Dr Kathryn Welch.

    ESV: Through the Bible in a Year
    August 6: Nehemiah 1; Psalm 33; Mark 12

    ESV: Through the Bible in a Year

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 9:54


    Old Testament: Nehemiah 1 Nehemiah 1 (Listen) Report from Jerusalem 1 The words of Nehemiah the son of Hacaliah. Now it happened in the month of Chislev, in the twentieth year, as I was in Susa the citadel, 2 that Hanani, one of my brothers, came with certain men from Judah. And I asked them concerning the Jews who escaped, who had survived the exile, and concerning Jerusalem. 3 And they said to me, “The remnant there in the province who had survived the exile is in great trouble and shame. The wall of Jerusalem is broken down, and its gates are destroyed by fire.” Nehemiah's Prayer 4 As soon as I heard these words I sat down and wept and mourned for days, and I continued fasting and praying before the God of heaven. 5 And I said, “O LORD God of heaven, the great and awesome God who keeps covenant and steadfast love with those who love him and keep his commandments, 6 let your ear be attentive and your eyes open, to hear the prayer of your servant that I now pray before you day and night for the people of Israel your servants, confessing the sins of the people of Israel, which we have sinned against you. Even I and my father's house have sinned. 7 We have acted very corruptly against you and have not kept the commandments, the statutes, and the rules that you commanded your servant Moses. 8 Remember the word that you commanded your servant Moses, saying, ‘If you are unfaithful, I will scatter you among the peoples, 9 but if you return to me and keep my commandments and do them, though your outcasts are in the uttermost parts of heaven, from there I will gather them and bring them to the place that I have chosen, to make my name dwell there.' 10 They are your servants and your people, whom you have redeemed by your great power and by your strong hand. 11 O Lord, let your ear be attentive to the prayer of your servant, and to the prayer of your servants who delight to fear your name, and give success to your servant today, and grant him mercy in the sight of this man.” Now I was cupbearer to the king. (ESV) Psalm: Psalm 33 Psalm 33 (Listen) The Steadfast Love of the Lord 33   Shout for joy in the LORD, O you righteous!    Praise befits the upright.2   Give thanks to the LORD with the lyre;    make melody to him with the harp of ten strings!3   Sing to him a new song;    play skillfully on the strings, with loud shouts. 4   For the word of the LORD is upright,    and all his work is done in faithfulness.5   He loves righteousness and justice;    the earth is full of the steadfast love of the LORD. 6   By the word of the LORD the heavens were made,    and by the breath of his mouth all their host.7   He gathers the waters of the sea as a heap;    he puts the deeps in storehouses. 8   Let all the earth fear the LORD;    let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him!9   For he spoke, and it came to be;    he commanded, and it stood firm. 10   The LORD brings the counsel of the nations to nothing;    he frustrates the plans of the peoples.11   The counsel of the LORD stands forever,    the plans of his heart to all generations.12   Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD,    the people whom he has chosen as his heritage! 13   The LORD looks down from heaven;    he sees all the children of man;14   from where he sits enthroned he looks out    on all the inhabitants of the earth,15   he who fashions the hearts of them all    and observes all their deeds.16   The king is not saved by his great army;    a warrior is not delivered by his great strength.17   The war horse is a false hope for salvation,    and by its great might it cannot rescue. 18   Behold, the eye of the LORD is on those who fear him,    on those who hope in his steadfast love,19   that he may deliver their soul from death    and keep them alive in famine. 20   Our soul waits for the LORD;    he is our help and our shield.21   For our heart is glad in him,    because we trust in his holy name.22   Let your steadfast love, O LORD, be upon us,    even as we hope in you. (ESV) New Testament: Mark 12 Mark 12 (Listen) The Parable of the Tenants 12 And he began to speak to them in parables. “A man planted a vineyard and put a fence around it and dug a pit for the winepress and built a tower, and leased it to tenants and went into another country. 2 When the season came, he sent a servant1 to the tenants to get from them some of the fruit of the vineyard. 3 And they took him and beat him and sent him away empty-handed. 4 Again he sent to them another servant, and they struck him on the head and treated him shamefully. 5 And he sent another, and him they killed. And so with many others: some they beat, and some they killed. 6 He had still one other, a beloved son. Finally he sent him to them, saying, ‘They will respect my son.' 7 But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.' 8 And they took him and killed him and threw him out of the vineyard. 9 What will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come and destroy the tenants and give the vineyard to others. 10 Have you not read this Scripture:   “‘The stone that the builders rejected    has become the cornerstone;211   this was the Lord's doing,    and it is marvelous in our eyes'?” 12 And they were seeking to arrest him but feared the people, for they perceived that he had told the parable against them. So they left him and went away. Paying Taxes to Caesar 13 And they sent to him some of the Pharisees and some of the Herodians, to trap him in his talk. 14 And they came and said to him, “Teacher, we know that you are true and do not care about anyone's opinion. For you are not swayed by appearances,3 but truly teach the way of God. Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? Should we pay them, or should we not?” 15 But, knowing their hypocrisy, he said to them, “Why put me to the test? Bring me a denarius4 and let me look at it.” 16 And they brought one. And he said to them, “Whose likeness and inscription is this?” They said to him, “Caesar's.” 17 Jesus said to them, “Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's.” And they marveled at him. The Sadducees Ask About the Resurrection 18 And Sadducees came to him, who say that there is no resurrection. And they asked him a question, saying, 19 “Teacher, Moses wrote for us that if a man's brother dies and leaves a wife, but leaves no child, the man5 must take the widow and raise up offspring for his brother. 20 There were seven brothers; the first took a wife, and when he died left no offspring. 21 And the second took her, and died, leaving no offspring. And the third likewise. 22 And the seven left no offspring. Last of all the woman also died. 23 In the resurrection, when they rise again, whose wife will she be? For the seven had her as wife.” 24 Jesus said to them, “Is this not the reason you are wrong, because you know neither the Scriptures nor the power of God? 25 For when they rise from the dead, they neither marry nor are given in marriage, but are like angels in heaven. 26 And as for the dead being raised, have you not read in the book of Moses, in the passage about the bush, how God spoke to him, saying, ‘I am the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob'? 27 He is not God of the dead, but of the living. You are quite wrong.” The Great Commandment 28 And one of the scribes came up and heard them disputing with one another, and seeing that he answered them well, asked him, “Which commandment is the most important of all?” 29 Jesus answered, “The most important is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.' 31 The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no other commandment greater than these.” 32 And the scribe said to him, “You are right, Teacher. You have truly said that he is one, and there is no other besides him. 33 And to love him with all the heart and with all the understanding and with all the strength, and to love one's neighbor as oneself, is much more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.” 34 And when Jesus saw that he answered wisely, he said to him, “You are not far from the kingdom of God.” And after that no one dared to ask him any more questions. Whose Son Is the Christ? 35 And as Jesus taught in the temple, he said, “How can the scribes say that the Christ is the son of David? 36 David himself, in the Holy Spirit, declared,   “‘The Lord said to my Lord,  “Sit at my right hand,    until I put your enemies under your feet.”' 37 David himself calls him Lord. So how is he his son?” And the great throng heard him gladly. Beware of the Scribes 38 And in his teaching he said, “Beware of the scribes, who like to walk around in long robes and like greetings in the marketplaces 39 and have the best seats in the synagogues and the places of honor at feasts, 40 who devour widows' houses and for a pretense make long prayers. They will receive the greater condemnation.” The Widow's Offering 41 And he sat down opposite the treasury and watched the people putting money into the offering box. Many rich people put in large sums. 42 And a poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which make a penny.6 43 And he called his disciples to him and said to them, “Truly, I say to you, this poor widow has put in more than all those who are contributing to the offering box. 44 For they all contributed out of their abundance, but she out of her poverty has put in everything she had, all she had to live on.” Footnotes [1] 12:2 Or bondservant; also verse 4 [2] 12:10 Greek the head of the corner [3] 12:14 Greek you do not look at people's faces [4] 12:15 A denarius was a day's wage for a laborer [5] 12:19 Greek his brother [6] 12:42 Greek two lepta, which make a kodrantes; a kodrantes (Latin quadrans) was a Roman copper coin worth about 1/64 of a denarius (which was a day's wage for a laborer) (ESV)

    The Culture Soup Podcast®️
    Ep 171: Multicultural is still the new mass market...and they're BIG mad w/ Adriana Waterston

    The Culture Soup Podcast®️

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022


    Today's show begins with a special message from me from the #NABJNAHJ22 Convention as I prepare for my booksigning this afternoon at Caesar's Palace. Then we dive deep on a topic that seems to have some people in their feelings. That topic is the browning of America.Let's face it, some people just despise the thought that our country is changing, but the numbers don't lie, so what does that mean for media and the way people consume it? That is shifting too. But with today's touchy environment, how has it impacted how this message is being received in the corporate realm?I talk to my friend, media and marketing insights expert Adriana Waterston . She discusses how the temperature has shifted even in the corporate towers. While there has absolutely been a desire to do more with their content as it pertains to inclusion, some have resisted what's real—and that's the data.The data doesn't lie.We also learn what these multicultural audiences are saying about the content they are seeing and how it impacts their feelings. It's from some research that you will learn more about in my upcoming book, Yes, Please! 7 Ways to Say I'm Entitled to the C-Suite: Secrets Women of Color Need to Know Now to Find Their Happy and Thrive in an Exclusive Corporate Culture, as we look at the power of positive emotion to impact one's success.  

    The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast
    Betting with Bobby presented by Caesar's Racebook - August5, 2022

    The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 116:44


    Betting with Bobby presented by Caesar's Racebook.

    The Whole Word Podcast
    [Summer Recording Break: Re-Broadcast] Luke 20 - Are There Any Marriages in Heaven?

    The Whole Word Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 12:59


    Summer Recording Break (Re-Broadcast)Luke 20The Authority of Jesus Questioned (v 1-8)The Parable of the Tenants (v 9-19)Paying Taxes to Caesar (v 20-26)The Resurrection and Marriage (v 27-40)Whose Son Is the Messiah? (v 41-44)Warning Against the Teachers of the Law (v 45-47)**********Scriptures taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version ®, NIV ® Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved worldwide.The “NIV”, “New International Version”, “Biblica”, “International Bible Society” and the Biblica Logo are trademarks registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Biblica, Inc.  Used with permission.BIBLICA, THE INTERNATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY, provides God's Word to people through Bible translation & Bible publishing, and Bible engagement in Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East, and North America. Through its worldwide reach, Biblica engages people with God's Word so that their lives are transformed through a relationship with Jesus Christ.Support the show

    Sermons from Zion Lutheran Church
    AUDIO: Readings and Sermon - Wednesday August 3, 2022

    Sermons from Zion Lutheran Church