Podcasts about Ignatius

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Best podcasts about Ignatius

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Latest podcast episodes about Ignatius

The Catholic Wire
Septuagesima Sunday - On the Vineyard and the Good Shepherds.

The Catholic Wire

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 5, 2023 20:10


We speak of the meaning behind this parable, and the examples of Good Shepherds in the Church. One of them being St. Ignatius of Antioch.

Hackberry House of Chosun
The Persecuted Church

Hackberry House of Chosun

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2023 8:00


Whether second century or our own twenty-first, God's people are under attack. Hear about Ignatius and a Cuban pastor who share Christ's cross.

Stateside Madness Official
Stateside Madness podcast, episode 63: “The Benevolence of Sister Mary Ignatius”

Stateside Madness Official

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2023 50:46


This week we continue our series of episodes on Madness-adjacent bands with The Lee Thompson Ska Orchestra and their 2013 debut album, “The Benevolence of Sister Mary Ignatius.” Join us as we do a track-by-track deep dive into this classic of ska and discuss the history behind each track.

Humor en la Cadena SER
Segunda Acepción | 004 | TIEMPO

Humor en la Cadena SER

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 29:22


Quizás Ignatius y Maltorres sean unos adelantados para su TIEMPO con tanto saber de las palabras. Puede que sencillamente se lo tomen para descubrir que todo lo que decimos no es una payasada, sino una reflexión con más fondo que el que alberga el Titanic. O quizás todo esto sea una BOMBÁSTIC pérdida de tiempo. 

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Monday, January 30, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMonday of the Fourth Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 323The Saint of the day is Blessed Mary Angela TruszkowskaBlessed Mary Angela Truszkowska's Story Today we honor a woman who submitted to God's will throughout her life—a life filled with pain and suffering. Born in 1825 in central Poland and baptized Sophia, she contracted tuberculosis as a young girl. The forced period of convalescence gave her ample time for reflection. Sophia felt called to serve God by working with the poor, including street children and the elderly homeless in Warsaw's slums. In time, her cousin joined her in the work. In 1855, the two women made private vows and consecrated themselves to the Blessed Mother. New followers joined them. Within two years, they formed a new congregation, which came to be known as the Felician Sisters. As their numbers grew, so did their work, and so did the pressures on Mother Angela (the new name Sophia took in religious life). Mother Angela served as superior for many years until ill health forced her to resign at the age of 44. She watched the order grow and expand, including missions to the United States among the sons and daughters of Polish immigrants. Pope John Paul II beatified Mother Angela in 1993. Her liturgical feast is celebrated on October 10. Reflection Like Saints Francis of Assisi and Ignatius of Loyola, Blessed Mary Angela experienced a conversion while convalescing from an illness. The Lord can use sickness as well as other situations to speak to the heart of an individual. This does not imply that God caused the illness; just that he used the opportunity to speak to Mother Angela's heart. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

I Might Believe in Faeries
A Catholic, a Protestant, and a Fool Walk Into a Bar... (ft. Jane Clark Scharl)

I Might Believe in Faeries

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 75:02


*This episode contains content that may not be suitable for children. Essayist, poet, and playwright, Jane Clark Scharl joins the show on this episode of I Might Believe in Faeries. Her new play, Sonnez Les Matines, features Ignatius of Loyola, John (Jean) Calvin, and François Rabelais in 1520s Paris who are all embroiled in a gruesome murder. We also discuss one of her future projects for an epic poetry cycle of the life of St. Joan of Arc. I mispronounce many things because I am from Minnesota. Tune in for this and much more!  Jane Clark Scharl website: https://jcscharl.com/ Buy the play from Wiseblood Books: https://www.wisebloodbooks.com/store/p127/Pre-Order_Sonnez_Les_Matines%2C_a_Verse_Play_by_J.C._Scharl.html Showings: Debut - February 21, 2023 in New York: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sonnez-les-matines-tickets-502988902347?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete March 1, 2023 in New York: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sonnez-les-matines-march-1st-tickets-508236598347?aff=ebdshpsearchautocomplete  ************************************************************************************************************* Follow me on Twitter @AaronIrber Donate to my Patreon - I Might Believe in Faeries https://www.patreon.com/imightbelieveinfaeries Like my Facebook page - I Might Believe in Faeries Battle Of The Creek by Alexander Nakarada | https://www.serpentsoundstudios.com Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Logo Art by Linnea Kisby *************************************************************************************************************

Catholic Saints
St. Ignatius of Antioch

Catholic Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 19:23


A Father of the early Church, St. Ignatius of Antioch is an incredible model of Christian discipleship. He is also one of Dr. Ben Akers' favorite saints. Sit down with Dr. Ben Akers and Taylor Kemp as they discuss this remarkable bishop, who died a martyr for his fidelity to Christ.

Be Good Broadcast
Polycarp - Epistle - Ignatius Letter - Life and Martyrdom - Information Compilation

Be Good Broadcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 50:22


Who was Polycarp? The Epistle of Polycarp. The Epistle of Ignatius to Polycarp - The Martyrdom of Polycarp. Taken from the following sources. 00:00 - Who was Polycarp - Theology Academy 07:07 - The Epistle of Polycarp - GodismyJudge 25:29 - The Epistle of Ignatius to Polycarp - 2000christian 34:29 - The Martyrdom of Polycarp - Alexander McConnell ~~~~~~~ From Me: Be Good Broadcast I just rebroadcast those spreading The Word Propagate it. Share it. Contact Me My Twitter Please RATE or REVIEW anywhere you can. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/begoodbroadcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/begoodbroadcast/support

Crash Course Catholicism
44 - The Eighth Commandment: Lies!

Crash Course Catholicism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 29, 2023 30:30


"You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor."Is it ever okay to lie? Can gossip be a mortal sin? Is it okay to publicly call someone out for doing the wrong thing? In this episode we continue our discussion of the eighth commandment. This episode covers Part Three, Section Two, Chapter Two, Article Eight of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (pts 2475-2491).Contact the podcast: crashcoursecatholicism@gmail.com.Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/crashcoursecatholicism/....References and further reading/listening/viewing:John Chapter 8Jimmy Akin, "Psst! . . . Did You Hear?"St. Ignatius of Loyola, Spiritual Exercises, 22.Catholic Answers, "Is Lying Ever Right?"The Catholic Encyclopedia, "Detraction""Calumny""Perjury""Lying"St Augustine, On LyingMarilynne Robinson, HomePints With Aquinas, "Morality, The Lord of the Rings, and Awkward Jokes w/ Dr Peter Kreeft"Jon Ronson, So You've Been Publicly Shamed.

Cuerpos especiales
Los mejores momentos de Cuerpos especiales de la semana (23-27 enero 2023)

Cuerpos especiales

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 41:23


Disfruta de un resumen de los mejores momentos de la semana en Cuerpos especiales, de la mano de Eva Soriano e Iggy Rubín. Escucha de nuevo las entrevistas a Chino Darín, Ignatius, Jordi Cruz, José Yélamo y La Pegatina. No te pierdas la llamada de Shakira en la que revela las estrofas eliminadas de su sesión con Bizarrap y la presentación del tema NONONONO de 30s40s50s. ¡Dale al play y revive estos momentazos! 

St. Joseph Evangelization Network Podcast
Life of St. Ignatius & Its Consequences

St. Joseph Evangelization Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023


Speaker: Fr. Anthony Wieck, SJ / The Life of St. Ignatius & Its Practical Consequences / 2022.11.21 - Fr. Anthony Wieck - Monday, November 21, 2022

The Catholic Herald Podcast: Merely Catholic with Gavin Ashenden

This week Dr Gavin Ashenden talks to Steve Ray, the acclaimed American author of Crossing The Tiber and Upon This Rock, among other titles, and a man hailed as one of the most effective Catholic apologists of the present generation. In this 34th episode of the Merely Catholic podcast series for the Catholic Herald, Mr Ray recalls how he left the Baptist faith of his youth to become a dedicated and highly-motivated Catholic after, like St John Henry Newman, he studied the writings of such Fathers as Ss Irenaeus of Lyon, Ignatius of Antioch and Polycarp of Smyrna and recognised that their sub-Apostolic faith was the same as that professed by the Church. Mr Ray also offers some insight into new and emerging contemporary crises in the history of the Church and shares some opinions about what the future may hold.

Power & Witness
Ignatian Discernment & Prayer (Guest: Fr. Timothy Gallagher, OMV)

Power & Witness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 61:37


Fr. Timothy Gallagher helps us understand St. Ignatius of Loyola's Rules for Discernment and how their insights are invaluable for our spiritual growth today. He also discusses the Exam Prayer as well as Spiritual Consolation/Desolation.

A vivir que son dos días
Punto Crítico | De tigre a tigre, o lo que es lo mismo, de Ignatius a Maldonado

A vivir que son dos días

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 18:34


Doctores eméritos y licenciados en estudios varios, nuestros catedráticos prometen no tener piedad en sus críticas periodísticas y cinematográficas. Las opiniones más sagaces y sin compasión corren a cuenta de Ignatius Farray y Miguel Maldonado. De la teoría de los seis grados en los titulares de prensa a la película Mantícora de Carlos Vermut.

REFLECTING LIGHT
Hope is the Middle

REFLECTING LIGHT

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 16:30


If, like Ignatius of Antioch said, "Faith the beginning and love the end," how to go from faith to love?  The answer is Hope.  In Hebrew, the word for hope is "tikvah" and means a cord.  Join Mandy as she uses the wisdom of the past to explore how we can hold on to hope to make it through the storms and tests of life.  

Catholic Saints & Feasts
January 22: Saint Vincent, Deacon and Martyr

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 5:14


January 22: Saint Vincent, Deacon and Martyr Late Third Century–c. 304Memorial; Liturgical Color: Red Patron Saint of vintners, brickmakers, and sailorsA Deacon's bloody witness impresses the Christian worldThere are a few famous saints who bear the name Vincent. Today's saint is the first Vincent. He was a deacon from the town of Zaragoza, Spain. Zaragoza hosts a famous shrine to Our Lady of the Pillar based on an appearance of the Virgin Mary there so ancient that it is more precisely described as a bilocation. Saint Vincent certainly knew of this devotion in his hometown. So although Saint Vincent is an early saint, he was from a city that, in 300 A.D., already boasted of a mature Christian tradition.As with so many martyrs whose names are known to us, Vincent died in the persecution of Diocletian, the last gasps of a dying paganism. Vincent and his bishop were imprisoned around 303 and taken in chains to Valencia on Spain's Mediterranean coast. The bishop was exiled, but Vincent was subjected to such cruel and varied tortures that he died of his wounds. Tradition says that the faithful came to his cell during his sufferings seeking relics, even dipping cloths into his bloody wounds.Although pious oral traditions led medieval authors to embroider some of the details of the Church's early saints and martyrs, the core facts of these narratives almost always have support. In Vincent's case, no less an authority than Saint Augustine gave homilies on Saint Vincent which have been preserved. In these, Augustine states that he has the official acts recounting Vincent's martyrdom right in front of him as he is speaking. That interesting anecdote, a kind of live shot of Augustine preaching, is a wonderful proof of how widespread devotion to Vincent was in the early Church, even far from where he died.Ordained permanent deacons disappeared from the life of the church for many centuries, only to be reintroduced in the decades after the Second Vatican Council. Yet deacons' key roles in preaching, serving the poor, evangelizing, and acting as delegates of their bishops are clear from the Acts of the Apostles and Saint Paul's letters. As early as the second century after Christ, the three Orders constituting the Sacrament of Holy Orders were already clearly identified and theologically developed, especially in the letters of Saint Ignatius of Antioch. Ignatius saw each Order as participating, in a different way, in the one priesthood of the High Priest Jesus Christ.It must be remembered that Vincent was a deacon and was imprisoned along with the bishop who ordained him. He must have understood the harmony and interdependence that God intended to exist among deacons, priests, and bishops. This emphasis on Sacramental Orders underlines the fact that, although early Christians may have experienced more astounding gifts of the Holy Spirit than later Christians, it was still a living connection to an Apostle, not a personal charism, that authenticated and guaranteed one's participation in the true body of Christ. Gifts were personal and private. They came and went. They could not be verified or even shared. But each bishop was linked to an Apostolic See, and bishops publicly ordained priests and deacons to share the duty to teach, govern, and sanctify the baptized. There was nothing private about any of that. Early Christianity was not a haphazard grouping of people who loved Jesus. It received a hierarchical structure from Christ Himself and immediately perpetuated, and built upon, Jewish forms of religious community life. The Church's hierarchical community life continues today. Saint Vincent undoubtedly saw his ordination as a form of service, not power. He was undoubtedly a man of great importance to his bishop. He likely gave generous witness to the Faith before he offered up his earthly life for a richer life beyond the grave.Saint Vincent, help all deacons to know, love, and serve God with all their heart, soul, and mind. Few people are called to be tortured for the faith as you were, but suffering may come in more subtle ways. Help us to persevere in the face of all challenges so that we deepen our trust in God.

Transfigured
Michael Bird - The Divinity of Jesus in Early Christianity

Transfigured

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 54:16


Dr. Michael Bird is Academic Dean and lecturer at Ridley College and an Anglican Priest. He is the author of multiple books and a well know research in early christianity and the New Testament. We talk about his new book "Jesus Among the gods". We also mention Troels Engberg-Pederson, Bart Ehrman, Andrew Perriman, Richard Bauckham, NT Wright, Larry Hurtado, Jeremiah Coogan, David Litwa, Justin Martyr, Athenagoras, Philo of Alexandria, Plato, Tertullian, Ignatius of Antioch, John Calvin, Marcellus of Ancyra, Athanasius of Alexandria, Paul of Samosata, Theodotus of Byzantium, and many more. Dr. Bird's book "Jesus Among the gods": https://www.amazon.com/Jesus-among-gods-Christology-Greco-Roman/dp/1481316753 Dr. Bird's twitter: https://twitter.com/mbird12 Dr. Bird's substack: https://michaelfbird.substack.com/ Dr. Bird's youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC21I7qYVHPsOzL9ujxiRWZA

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
How Ignatian Spirituality Can Make This Year Great with Jim Manney

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 42:29


If you've spent much time reading about Ignatian spirituality, there's a good chance you've come across the work of Jim Manney. He has a great book on the Examen called “A Simple, Life-Changing Prayer” that often serves as introduction for many to this all-important part of Ignatian spirituality. Jim has this way of boiling down his vast—and it is vast!—array of Ignatian knowledge in a way that is accessible, powerful and practical. His writing stays with you. And so, his newest book, which essentially is an exercise in making Ignatian spirituality accessible and practical, is pretty exciting. It's called “What Matters Most and Why: Living the Spirituality of St. Ignatius of Loyola.” In the book are 365 daily reflections—each less than a page. Jim is today's guest, and he walks us through his own life story, how he became so enamored with the spirituality of Ignatius, how he goes about sharing it with others and why he thinks it's important to do so. Learn more about Jim's work by visiting: jimmanneybooks.com.

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki
Until now you have asked for nothing in My Name

Go(o)d Mornings with CurlyNikki

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 10:07


Until now you were sleep walking.   Sleep praying.  But it's a new dawn. Welcome to the GoOD life, to your life in God,in His Name, in the Sun.  You're remembering-- 1. that you don't need anything you Have2.  that hearing the Name, (t)His Silence, or this Divine Tone in the Silence, IS praying3.  that hearing It while 'asking' is Alchemy4. that you don't even have to 'ask', because at all times, you're hearing what He's giving5. that there's no hearing outside of This. 6. that there's no living outside of This.7. that Love's always on.Oh, It's on.

The Rural Woman Podcast
Investing in Your Ideas with Megan Callahan

The Rural Woman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 37:36


On this week's episode of The Rural Woman Podcast™, you'll meet Megan Callahan.She is the Jill of all trades at the Lazy D C Bar Ranch. Megan has lots of irons in the fire. From Raw milk to riding lessons, mule breeding, donkey rescue, Mom & Foster Parent, hay sales, a pumpkin patch and Glamping tents in the near future! The many avenues for revenue prepare her for if certain markets take a hit.Megan lives in one of the most incredible towns between Missoula and Kalispell on the Flathead reservation. St. Ignatius has a wonderful community, along with breathtaking views. An agriculture prominent area helps for a relaxing vacation spot and a good place to raise a family.Mules, donkeys, and horses are her first passion, along with educating on the differences between them and their varying needs.During pumpkin patch season, you can usually find Megan at the pony rides or wandering around, connecting with the community. Attendance has doubled every year, and they are just wrapping up their 4th year.From time in the tractor to teaching, she loves it all! (Ok, maybe not changing hand-line irrigation.) For full show notes, including links mentioned in the show, head over to wildrosefarmer.com/165 . . .This week's episode is brought to you byCanada's Agriculture Day . . .Links to this week's discussions:[06:30] All About Breeding and Raising Mules & Donkeys[13:07] Equine Training and Horseman [20:35] Having Those Hard Conversations with Family[25:35] Challenges Introducing New Revenue Streams[30:43] Rapid Fire Questions. . .Let's get SocialFollow The Rural Woman Podcast on Social MediaInstagram | FacebookSign up to get email updatesJoin our private Facebook group, The Rural Woman Podcast Community Connect with Katelyn on Instagram | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest. . .Support the ShowPatreon | Merch | PayPal | Become a Show SponsorShop our Show SponsorsLeave a Review on Apple Podcasts | Take the Listener SurveyScreenshot this...

A vivir que son dos días
Punto Crítico | La guarida de Ignatius y Maldonado

A vivir que son dos días

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 17:05


El doctor en investigación aplicada a los medios de comunicación por la Universidad Apostólica del Bar Cartagena, Miguel Maldonado; y el crítico de la dialéctica cinematográfica y fiel conocedor de las teorías narrativas filmográfica por la Mojo Picón University, Ignatius Farray analizan la practica periodística de la semana enfocados en Risto Mejide y la serie de moda: Hacks. 

Restore The Glory Podcast
Spiritual Discernment & Deliverance with Fr. Timothy Gallagher

Restore The Glory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 68:01


Jake & Bob are joined by Fr. Timothy Gallagher for a discussion on how discernment and healing go hand in hand. Fr. Tim is the author of the incredible book “The Discernment of Spirits” that teaches us how to utilize St. Ignatius' rules of discernment. He shares the process of discernment while Jake & Bob combine his knowledge with their expertise on healing. The process of healing and discerning God's will for us work beautifully together. Key Points Discerning what is from the voice of the Holy Spirit and what is from the voice of the evil one. The rules of St. Ignatius are an invitation to hope. “The more healing that can happen on both the physical and psychological levels, the harder the enemy's task becomes.” -Fr. Tim  The first step in discernment is to notice any movements, thoughts or stirrings of the heart. Identify whether it is from the good spirit or the bad spirit and then take the appropriate action. If it is from the good spirit, take it in and be guided by it. If it is from the enemy, reject it. The discernment process happens repeatedly throughout the healing process. It is continual and helps you know how to move forward. Our parents/guardians are the first representatives of God to us. We may often hear God's voice as our parent's voices which can either be positive or negative. If we believe lies about ourselves from our parents, we need to work through those so that we don't hear those lies coming from God's voice in our hearts. We need to invite Jesus' to speak His truth in our hearts. In times of desolation, never make a change. Renouncement prayer is a way to practically renounce lies and accept the opposing truths. Resources Fr. Tim's book “The Discernment of Spirits” Fr. Tim's Discerning Hearts Podcast Free Discerning Hearts App Fr. Tim's website Connect with Restore the Glory: Instagram: @restoretheglorypodcast  Twitter: @RestoreGloryPod Facebook: Restore the Glory Podcast Never miss out on an episode by hitting the subscribe button right now! Help other people find the show and grow in holiness by sharing this podcast with them individually or on your social media. Thanks! Audio editing by Forte Catholic  

Boo Crew Case Files
The Return to St. Ignatius Hospital - Part 1

Boo Crew Case Files

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 34:50


Join Bri and her friend, Vel, as they return to St. Ignatius Hospital. It's been 6 years since the two did a 5 hour investigation inside St. Ignatius. Join them on this special two part episode as they return to talk about the evidence captured. If you hear anything in the audio, have a story or information on a former patient or employee of St. Ignatius Hospital - please email boocrew.pnw@gmail.com. Purchase tickets to St. Ignatius Hospital in Colfax, WA at https://www.colfaxhauntedhospital.com/. Evidence Reference: Shadow Unexplained Figure --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/boocrewcasefiles/support

The Strategy Skills Podcast: Management Consulting | Strategy, Operations & Implementation | Critical Thinking

Welcome to Strategy Skills episode 307, an episode with the Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Business Review Group, Adi Ignatius. In this episode with Adi Ignatius, we discussed timeless pieces from the Harvard Business Review, deep-dived into the business ideas and concepts within, and discussed how its perspective on business ideas helps us prepare for the future. Adi shared how HBR's mission changed from the time it was founded and how it is improving for readers. Adi Ignatius oversees the editorial activities of Harvard Business Review, hbr.org, and HBR's book-publishing unit. Prior to joining HBR in 2009, Mr. Ignatius was the No. 2 editor at TIME. He is the editor of two books: President Obama: The Path to the White House and Prisoner of the State: The Secret Diaries of Premier Zhao Ziyang. Both made the New York Times Bestseller List. Adi lived and worked overseas for nearly 20 years. He was Editor of Time's Asian edition and served as Beijing Bureau Chief and Moscow Bureau Chief for the Wall Street Journal. He is also host of the HBR Channel. Enjoying this episode? Get access to sample advanced training episodes here: www.firmsconsulting.com/promo

HBR IdeaCast
LinkedIn’s CEO on Hiring Strategies and the Skills That Matter Most (from The New World of Work)

HBR IdeaCast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 29:49


In The New World of Work video series, host and HBR Editor in Chief Adi Ignatius explores how top-tier executives see the future and how their companies are trying to set themselves up for success. Each week, he interviews a top leader live on LinkedIn, and in this special IdeaCast episode, he speaks with LinkedIn CEO Ryan Roslansky on how his company adapted during the pandemic (and after) and how he approaches growth, talent management, and more. You can browse previous episodes of The New World of Work on the HBR YouTube channel and follow HBR on LinkedIn to stay up-to-date on future live interviews. Ignatius also shares an inside look at these conversations —and solicits questions for future discussions — in a newsletter just for HBR subscribers. If you're a subscriber, you can sign up here.

The Practice Room
Episode 28 - The Practice of Examen 2022

The Practice Room

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 33:07


In this episode we dive into the ancient spiritual practice of examen, looking back over 2022, noticing where God showed up in our daily lives.   For the worksheet click here. For the Months worksheet click here. Music: www.scottbuckley.com.au/library 

The Gaudium et Spes Podcast
Episode 39 - Gaudium et Spes: a teaching from Bishop Wack on Leaving the Past Behind and Looking Forward to What Lies Ahead

The Gaudium et Spes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 30:04


As the year comes to a close, Bishop Wack talks about using St. Ignatius's Examen to leave the past behind and look forward to what lies ahead in the new calendar year.

Will Wright Catholic
The Effects of Christ's Incarnation

Will Wright Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 34:15


IntroductionToday, we are diving deeper into the miracle of the Incarnation. What were the effects of the Incarnation on Christ and on us? How did the world fundamentally shift 2,000 years ago?! If you have not yet listened to part 1 of this two-parter, I highly recommend beginning there. I went over some fairly deep theology of what the Incarnation means and what the Hypostatic Union of the divine and human natures of Christ in one Divine Person is.The Fittingness of the Incarnation According to AquinasSt. Thomas Aquinas asks a series of really cool questions about the Incarnation in question 1 of the third part of the Summa. In this section, he focuses entirely on what he calls the “fittingness” of the Incarnation. When Aquinas speaks of fittingness, he is juxtaposing this term with necessity. In other words, is an event or action in theology strictly necessary or simply fitting? In the first two questions, he explores this query..Is it fitting for God to become incarnate?First, Aquinas asks: “Is it fitting for God to become incarnate?” We know that God is good; this is one the realities of His essence. God exists and He is the truth, the good, the beautiful, and the ground of being itself. Aquinas argues that because of His great and perfect goodness, He desired to share His goodness in the highest manner possible to His creature. So, St. Thomas concludes that it is “manifest that it was fitting that God should become incarnate (ST III, q. 1, a. 1, co.)” Was it necessary for the restoration of the human race?Even though it is a tremendous mystery that God would condescend to become one of us, it was fitting because of His great goodness. But what about necessary? “Was it necessary for the restoration of the human race?” asks Aquinas. He answers that:“What frees the human race from perdition is necessary for the salvation of man. But the mystery of Incarnation is such; according to John 3:16: ‘God so loved the world as to give His only-begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him may not perish, but may have life everlasting.' Therefore it was necessary for man's salvation that God should become incarnate (ST III, q. 1, a. 2, s.c.).”So, because of the sin of Adam and Eve, it was necessary that God should become incarnate. As God, He can reconcile us to Himself; as Man, He can do so on our behalf!If there had been no sin, would God have become incarnate?This leads to St. Thomas' next question: “If there had been no sin, would God have become incarnate?” This question is one of my favorites to contemplate. It was actually the topic of a great conversation for me and my coworkers at lunch a couple weeks ago. In Romans, St. Paul shows us that all men were made sinners through the disobedience of Adam and it was through the one Man, Jesus Christ, that many will be made righteous. In the first letter to the Corinthians, St. Paul says: “For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive (1 Cor. 15:22).” Jesus Christ is, thus, the “new Adam” or the “second Adam.” As St. John Henry Newman wrote in his hymn “Praise to the Holiest in the height”:“O loving wisdom of our God!When all was sin and shame,A second Adam to the fightAnd to the rescue came.”It is clear that Scripture teaches that the reason for the Incarnation is the sin of Adam. So, how does Aquinas answer this question: “If there had been no sin, would God have become incarnate?” He says,“... the word of Incarnation was ordained by God as a remedy for sin; so that, had sin had not existed, Incarnation would not have been. And yet the power of God is not limited to this; even had sin not existed, God could have become incarnate (ST III, q. 1, a. 3, co.).”Whether God became incarnate in order to take away actual sin, rather than to take away original sin?God could have become incarnate, even in the absence of human sin. But, as it is, Adam did sin and the incarnation allowed for the stain of original sin to be washed away. But what about personal sin, or as the Church calls it: “actual sin.” St. Thomas asks: “Whether God became incarnate in order to take away actual sin, rather than to take away original sin?”He answers directly that the principle reason for the incarnation was to take away original sin. But he adds:“It is certain that Christ came into this world not only to take away that sin which is handed on originally to posterity, but also in order to take away all sins subsequently added to it; not that all are taken away (ST III, q. 1, a. 4, co.).”Whether it was fitting that God should become incarnate in the beginning of the human race?On the next question: “Whether it was fitting that God should become incarnate in the beginning of the human race?” Aquinas has a lot to say, but we can summarize it thusly:“... God became incarnate at the most fitting time; and it was not fitting that God should become incarnate at the beginning of the human race (ST III, q. 1, a. 5, s.c.).” Whether Incarnation ought to have been put off till the end of the world?In God's timing, the incarnation was unfitting to happen right after the sin of Adam and Eve, but St. Thomas asks “Whether Incarnation ought to have been put off till the end of the world?” He answers:“It is written (Habakkuk 3:2): ‘In the midst of the years Thou shalt make it known.' Therefore the mystery of Incarnation which was made known to the world ought not to have been put off till the end of the world (ST III, q. 1, a. 6, s.c.).”Put simply: the incarnation happened exactly when and where was best, in God's Providence and with His perfect knowledge and planning.The Effects of the Incarnation on Christ HimselfThe Incarnation of Christ was fitting and necessary for the salvation of man. But what were the effects on Christ Himself? First, we can think of our own body and soul. We are limited and finite. We have inclinations to sin and imperfections. We are sinful and sorrowful. We are intrinsically good and capable of wonderful things, by God's grace. But we are also capable of great evil. As we discussed last time, the human nature of Jesus Christ is perfect and perfectly subordinate to His Divinity. He is incapable of sin and acts in the perfection for which mankind was originally made. What does that look like? Perfection. Living in accord with the Will of the Father, perfectly. What is possible? The great St. Athanasius, discussing the Incarnation, says this: “And, in a word, the achievements of the Saviour, resulting from His becoming man, are of such kind and number, that if one should wish to enumerate them, he may be compared to men who gaze at the expanse of the sea and wish to count its waves. For as one cannot take in the whole of the waves with his eyes, for those which are coming on baffle the sense of him that attempts it; so for him that would take in all the achievements of Christ in the body, it is impossible to take in the whole, even by reckoning them up, as those which go beyond his thought are more than those he thinks he has taken in. Better is it, then, not to aim at speaking of the whole, where one cannot do justice even to a part, but, after mentioning one more, to leave the whole for you to marvel at. For all alike are marvelous, and wherever a man turns his glance, he may behold on that side the divinity of the Word, and be struck with exceeding great awe (Athanasius, On the Incarnation, 54.4-5).” The Incarnation is a Miracle and our Blessed Lord is the perfect Man. He shows us what God intended from the beginning for mankind. So, let us take a moment to zoom in: what effects did the Incarnation have on the human body and human soul of Christ?On the Body of ChristJesus Christ had a human body, as we do. He knows our human limitations and is like us. In Hebrews 4:15, we hear: “We have not a high priest, who cannot have compassion on our infirmities: but one tempted in all things like as we are, without sin.” Before His Resurrection from the dead, the Body of Christ was subject to all the bodily weaknesses caused by original sin, which we are all subject: He experienced hunger, thirst, pain, fatigue, and death. These are all natural results of human nature which He assumed. There are a couple of things in the body, however, which Christ did not necessarily experience. It is possible that He had no bodily deformities (until His Passion) and never got sick. St. Athanasius persuasively argues this by saying that it would be “unbecoming that He should heal others who was Himself not healed (P.G., XX, 133).”On the Human Soul of ChristWhen speaking of the human soul of Christ, there are a few areas worth mentioning: His intellect, will, sanctity, and likes and dislikes. In the WillJesus was entirely sinless. Thomists following after St. Thomas Aquinas, as well as Francisco Suarez, and the Society of Jesus all argue that sin is incompatible with the Hypostatic Union. It is safe to assume that this is the case simply on the merits of Dominicans and Jesuits being in agreement (just a joke). Those following the teaching of Duns Scotus say that the sinlessness of Christ is not due to the Hypostatic Union but due to a special Divine Providence similar to the way that it is impossible for the blessed in Heaven to sin.No matter which theological avenue you take, it is an article of faith, to be held definitively, taught at the Council of Ephesus, that Christ never sinned. Jesus Christ is a Divine Person and God cannot turn away from Himself.We also want to take great care to acknowledge the total liberty of Christ, in His human will. After the Incarnation, the will of Christ remained. If this were not the case, then in the matter of death, Christ could not have merited nor satisfied the justice of God for us. St. Thomas Aquinas not only believed in the total liberty of the human will of Christ, but he also provided seventeen different explanations for why this is true!In the IntellectLet us now turn to the human intellect of Christ. Every time the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord comes around, I brace for the incredibly ridiculous homilies in which the deacon or priest (or God, help us, bishops) explain that it was at this moment that Christ realized His mission. They hold that it was at the Baptism of the Lord, when the Spirit descends like a dove, that Christ receives His anointing, grace, and His mission. I want to say unequivocally that this is heretical and nonsensical garbage. The soul of Christ was endowed with the Beatific Vision from the beginning of its existence. For the first moment in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary, when the Hypostatic Union came into being, the human soul of Christ beheld the Godhead in its fullness.Like Adam and Eve, Christ had infused knowledge. God the Father revealed many things to Jesus in His humanity all at once, as needed. He also acquired human knowledge through His senses and imagination. The human soul of Christ had a beginning and is not, therefore, infinite as God is infinite. But by the grace of union, His human soul (intellect and will) was most perfect and embraced the widest range possible. Sanctity of Christ From the first moment, in the Hypostatic Union, Jesus Christ enjoyed the grace of union. As St. Augustine teaches:“When the Word was made Flesh then, indeed, He sanctified Himself in Himself, that is, Himself as Man in Himself as Word; for that Christ is One Person, both Word and Man, and renders His human nature holy in the holiness of the Divine nature (Augustine, In Johan. tract. 108, n. 5, in P.L., XXXV, 1916).”St. John also tells us in the prologue of His Gospel that the Word was “full of grace (Jn. 1:14).” And, so, in the human soul of Christ, there was a fullness of sanctifying grace. This is the same grace of the sacraments that we receive at our Baptism and in each of the seven sacraments. Likes and Dislikes In the Hypostatic Union, Jesus Christ is fully God and fully man. This glorious union, however, does not deprive the human soul of Christ of the human reality of likes and dislikes. There were certain foods that Jesus preferred. He likely had a favorite game or sport, a favorite joke or turn of phrase, a favorite way to recline at a table that He found most comfortable, and the list goes on. We see in the Gospels that Christ was angry, fearful, sad, happy, and experienced the sensible affections of hope, desire, and joy. After all, He is like us in all things but sin. His likes and dislikes, however, were under complete control by His human will subordinated perfectly to His divine will. The God-Man and the “Communication of Idioms”How we speak about Christ matters, if we are to avoid error. Our words will never fully penetrate the deep mysteries of the Person of Jesus Christ, but there are certain ways of phrasing things that are just plain wrong. In the last part of this two-parter, we discussed a few different Christological heresies that can serve as an illustration of this.How then can we speak about the interaction of deity and humanity in the Divine Person of Jesus Christ? The Church gives us the concept of the communicatio idiomatum (Latin: communication of properties or communication of idioms). There are difficulties that require such a convention. What properties belong to Jesus in His human nature? What properties belong to His divine nature? Is it possible that these properties are shared or mingled between the two natures?Jesus did many things physically which are attributed to His divine power. For example, He healed the sick, forgave sins, walked on water, changed water into wine, and rose from the dead. Though Jesus Christ, the God-man did all of these things, because of the communicatio idiomatum, we can safely say that God did all these things. God healed the sick. God walked on water. God changed water into wine. We are not saying that the properties of Christ's divinity become the properties of His humanity, or vice versa; they are already deeply united by grace. But we rightly say these things because Jesus Christ, even in His humanity, is a Divine Person. So, whatever is affirmed of the Divine Person, the Son of God, the Word made Flesh, Jesus Christ, after the incarnation, in His human or divine natures is attributed to the one Person. This is why St. Ignatius of Antioch referred to the “blood of God” and the “suffering of God.” God the Father has no blood nor did God the Spirit suffer, but the Eternal Word of God, God the Son, assumed Flesh. This is why we can rightly say that Mary is the Theotokos (the God-bearer) rather than merely the Christotokos (the Christ-bearer).There is an excellent summary of the “rules” of the communicatio idiomatum on encyclopedia.com, of all places. You can check that our here, if you are interested in reading further.  The Adoration of the Humanity of ChristThe Greek word dulia refers to veneration. This is the type of respect that is due to the saints and angels on account of their holiness and closeness to God. The next step up is hyperdulia; this is the preeminent veneration and devotion due to the Blessed Virgin Mary as Queen of Heaven. Finally, we arrive at true worship and adoration, in Greek: latria. Latria is due to God alone. In fact, giving latria to anyone other than God would be the grave sin of blasphemy. The Catholic Encyclopedia explains:“The human nature of Christ, united hypostatically with the Divine nature, is adored with the same worship as the Divine nature. We adore the Word when we adore Christ the Man; but the Word is God. The human nature of Christ is not at all the reason of our adoration of Him; that reason is only the Divine nature (CE).”We do not worship the human nature of Jesus Christ. Yet, we affirm that because of the Hypostatic Union, the divinity and humanity of Christ cannot be separated. And, most importantly, there is only one Person in Jesus Christ, which is the Divine Word of God. So, according to the whole Person rather than the parts, we truly adore Jesus Christ, the God-man, with all the devotion, love, and worship due to Almighty God! Effects of the Incarnation on UsFinally, we come to the big question, for us: why did the Word of God become Flesh? How did the Incarnation affect us? In Order to Save UsFirst, as we acclaim in the Nicene Creed: “For us men and for our salvation he came down from heaven; by the power of the Holy Spirit, he came incarnate of the Virgin Mary, and was made man.” The Word became Flesh for us “in order to save us by reconciling us with God (CCC 456).” Jesus Christ atoned for the sins of the world, both original and personal, though He Himself was without sin. He did this in our place as the Son of Man and He did this perfectly as the Son of God.St. Gregory of Nyssa, one of the Eastern Church Fathers, explains:“Sick, our nature demanded to be healed; fallen, to be raised up; dead, to rise again. We had lost the possession of the good; it was necessary for it to be given back to us. Closed in the darkness, it was necessary to bring us the light; captives, we awaited a Savior; prisoners, help; slaves, a liberator. Are these things minor or insignificant? Did they not move God to descend to human nature and visit it, since humanity was in so miserable and unhappy a state (St. Gregory of Nyssa, Orat. catech 15: PG 45, 48B.)?”That We Might Know God's LoveSecond, the Son of God incarnated that we might know God's love. As St. Thomas Aquinas taught, it was fitting that God should become man in order to show us the depths of His love and the heights of His goodness. The Incarnation is a tremendous miracle and mystery. The fact that Almighty God, containing all things and yet uncontained Himself, became a baby. He depended on the love and care of His Holy Mother and St. Joseph. In His unfathomable humility, the Lord shows us the lengths God was willing to go to in order to bring us back from sin and death. Of course, we see His loving action on full display, bearing the Cross for our sakes. “Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends (John 15:13).”To Be Our Model for HolinessThird, Jesus Christ, the Word made Flesh, shows us the model for holiness. By His holy example, we can follow Him in all things, Who is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. There is an old blessing that speaks of discipleship: “May you be covered in the dust of the Master.” By following so near to Jesus, we are covered in the dust which His holy feet kick up as He leads us. If we listen to His holy words and holy example, we will be beckoned closer to sharing eternal life with Him in Heaven. To Make Us Partakers of the Divine NatureSt. Peter begins his second letter in this way:“His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence, by which he has granted to us his precious and very great promises, so that through them you may become partakers of the divine nature, having escaped from the corruption that is in the world because of sinful desire (2 Peter 1:3-4).”The chief of the Apostles reveals to us another reason why the Word became Flesh. He came to make us “partakers of the divine nature.” As St. Irenaeus said,“For this is why the Word became man, and the Son of God became the Son of man: so that man, by entering into communion with the Word and thus receiving divine sonship, might become a son of God (St. Irenaeus, Adv. haeres. 3, 19, 1: PG 7/1, 939.).”The great St. Athanasius put it even more succinctly: “For the Son of God became man so that we might become God (St. Athanasius, De inc. 54, 3: PG 25, 192B.).” And lest we think that this notion is peculiar to the first millennium, St. Thomas Aquinas said, “The only-begotten Son of God, wanting to make us sharers in his divinity, assumed our nature, so that he, made man, might make men gods (St. Thomas Aquinas, Opusc. 57, 1-4.).”Receiving Sanctifying GraceThe primary means of receiving sanctifying grace in our soul and sharing in the divine nature is through the Sacrament of Baptism. We enter the sacramental life through the door of Baptism and God comes to dwell within us as in a Temple. We receive an infusion of the divine life and have the theological virtues of faith, hope, and charity operative in our soul. This initiation, begun in Baptism, is perfected and strengthened in the Sacrament of Confirmation. Our initiation is complete when we receive the Lord's own Body and Blood in the Holy Eucharist, the Sacrament of sacraments. The same Flesh born of Mary, the Word of God Incarnate, comes to us under the veil of a sacrament at Holy Mass in what looks like bread and looks like wine. But this is no ordinary food. It is the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Jesus Christ who desires to make Himself our supersubstantial bread and come into intimate communion with us. This foretaste of Heaven leads us as a pledge of future glory to our eternal home. The Incarnation goes beyond the cave in Bethlehem, beyond the home in Nazareth, beyond the Temple in Jerusalem, beyond the wood of the Cross, and beyond the empty grave. In the Sacraments, especially the Holy Eucharist, the Incarnation is extended. Just as we are body and soul, the Lord commanded that His Church should be visible and invisible. Our invisible God has taken on visible Flesh. So too, the Church celebrates in sensible signs the invisible wonders of God's overwhelming grace. The most amazing part of all of this is that He invites us to respond and take part in these saving mysteries and realities. Praise be to God for such a gift!I will end with the words of Pope St. Leo the Great:Christian, remember your dignity, and now that you share in God's own nature, do not return by sin to your former base condition. Bear in mind who is your head and of whose body you are a member. Do not forget that you have been rescued from the power of darkness and brought into the light of God's kingdom.If you have enjoyed this post in the slightest, please consider sharing it with your friends and family on social media, text, or email! Thank you! This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit willwrightcatholic.substack.com

Ignatius Press Podcast
Should Catholics embrace Critical Race Theory? Edward Feser on racism and CRT

Ignatius Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 31:45


Was the Catholic Church slow to condemn racism? Can Catholic teaching be used to justify slavery? How should Catholics engage with Critical Race Theory, in its popular or academic forms?   In this episode, philosopher Edward Feser discusses these and other questions with Catholic World Report editor Carl E. Olson. Feser is the author of the new book “All One in Christ: A Catholic Critique of Racism and Critical Race Theory,” in which he examines what the Church has said and done historically on issues of race, and takes a close look at the origins—and recent bestselling popularizations—of Critical Race Theory.   Feser and Olson talk about the genesis of the book, common misconceptions about the Catholic Church and race, the inherent limitations of CRT, and more.   Find “All One in Christ” at Ignatius.com: http://bit.ly/3VZ0OWl   You can read more from Edward Feser on his blog: http://edwardfeser.blogspot.com/   Feser was interviewed at Catholic World Report about “All One in Christ”: https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2022/09/08/the-churchs-teachings-about-racism-and-the-truth-about-critical-race-theory/   “Countering disinformation about Critical Race Theory” by Edward Feser | Catholic World Report, 8/22/22: https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2022/08/22/countering-disinformation-about-critical-race-theory/

Kolbecast
134: For Tinkerers of All Ages

Kolbecast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 54:34


AMDG. Most people listen to podcasts like ours on their cell phones or other portable electronics, but how many of us actually know and appreciate how the devices in our pockets work?  Today, Kolbe dad and ham radio operator Chris Ranck joins Bonnie and Steven to talk about the geography, cross-generational communication, math, science, abstract concepts, and practical applications involved in the ham radio medium.  He highlights St. Max Kolbe's engagement with media developments of his time, shares his own experience of how hobbies provide a way to explore learning as a family, and touches on the importance of mastering communication media rather than being mastered by them. To learn more about ham radio, Chris tells us the best place to start is the ARRL website.  He also recommends checking out Maximilian Kolbe Net Young Amateurs Communication Ham Team Youth on the Air Long Island CW (morse code) Club Relevant Kolbecast episodes: 100 In the Beginning with Mrs. Dianne Muth, one of Kolbe Academy's founders, and a post-script about St. Maximilian Kolbe and St. Ignatius of Loyola 42 Let Them Tinker with Kolbe mom Louise Deal 105 Not Just for Special Occasions with Kolbe mom Rebecca Czarnecki of Tea with Mrs. B 126 Digital Citizens Kolbecast episodes cover a range of topics relating to school at home, the life of faith, and Catholic education. Using the filters on our website, you can sort the episodes to find just what you're looking for. If you listen to the Kolbecast via a podcast app/player, we'd be so grateful to you for leaving a rating and review. That helps us reach more listeners. However you listen, please spread the word about the Kolbecast! What questions do you have about homeschooling, the life of faith, or the intersection of the two? Send your questions to podcast@kolbe.org and stay tuned for answers. You may hear them answered in an upcoming Kolbecast episode! Interested in Kolbe Academy's offerings? Visit kolbe.org

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Wednesday, December 21, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsWednesday of the Fourth Week of Advent Lectionary: 197The Saint of the day is Saint Peter CanisiusSaint Peter Canisius' Story The energetic life of Peter Canisius should demolish any stereotypes we may have of the life of a saint as dull or routine. Peter lived his 76 years at a pace which must be considered heroic, even in our time of rapid change. A man blessed with many talents, Peter is an excellent example of the scriptural man who develops his talents for the sake of the Lord's work. Peter was one of the most important figures in the Catholic Reformation in Germany. He played such a key role that he has often been called the “second apostle of Germany,” in that his life parallels the earlier work of Boniface. Although Peter once accused himself of idleness in his youth, he could not have been idle too long, for at the age of 19 he received a master's degree from the university at Cologne. Soon afterwards he met Peter Faber, the first disciple of Ignatius of Loyola, who influenced Peter so much that he joined the recently formed Society of Jesus. At this early age Peter had already taken up a practice he continued throughout his life—a process of study, reflection, prayer, and writing. After his ordination in 1546, he became widely known for his editions of the writings of St. Cyril of Alexandria and St. Leo the Great. Besides this reflective literary bent, Peter had a zeal for the apostolate. He could often be found visiting the sick or imprisoned, even when his assigned duties in other areas were more than enough to keep most people fully occupied. In 1547, Peter attended several sessions of the Council of Trent, whose decrees he was later assigned to implement. After a brief teaching assignment at the Jesuit college at Messina, Peter was entrusted with the mission to Germany—from that point on his life's work. He taught in several universities and was instrumental in establishing many colleges and seminaries. He wrote a catechism that explained the Catholic faith in a way that common people could understand—a great need of that age. Renowned as a popular preacher, Peter packed churches with those eager to hear his eloquent proclamation of the gospel. He had great diplomatic ability, often serving as a reconciler between disputing factions. In his letters—filling eight volumes—one finds words of wisdom and counsel to people in all walks of life. At times he wrote unprecedented letters of criticism to leaders of the Church—yet always in the context of a loving, sympathetic concern. At 70, Peter suffered a paralytic seizure, but he continued to preach and write with the aid of a secretary, until his death in his hometown of Nijmegen, Netherlands, on December 21, 1597. Reflection Peter's untiring efforts are an apt example for those involved in the renewal of the Church or the growth of moral consciousness in business or government. He is regarded as one of the creators of the Catholic press, and can easily be a model for the Christian author or journalist. Teachers can see in his life a passion for the transmission of truth. Whether we have much to give, as Peter Canisius did, or whether we have only a little to give, as did the poor widow in the Gospel of Luke (see Luke 21:1–4), the important thing is to give our all. It is in this way that Peter is so exemplary for Christians in an age of rapid change when we are called to be in the world but not of the world. Saint Peter Canisius is a Patron Saint of: Germany Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Saint of the Day
Holy Hieromartyr Ignatius the God-bearer, Bishop of Antioch (107)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 3:36


There is a tradition that it was the young boy Ignatius whom Christ took upon his knee to explain to His followers that they must become as children to enter the Kingdom. He knew the holy Apostles personally and, with St Polycarp (February 25) was a disciple of St John the Evangelist. He succeeded Evodus as second Bishop of Antioch, the capital of Syria and at that time one of the largest cities in the world. Here, during the persecutions of Domitian, he strengthened the faithful, brought many pagans to Christ, and prayed that he himself would be granted the crown of martyrdom. His flock called him the Godbearer, a title that he did not refuse, for he said that all Christians after their Baptism are truly Bearers of Christ, clothed in the Holy Spirit.   When peace was restored to the Church for awhile, the holy Bishop devoted himself to organizing the young Church on strong foundations at a time when the last of the Apostles had only recently passed away. He established the principle that the Grace imparted to the Apostles at Pentecost was handed down to the bishops appointed by them, and so on through the generations: the Apostolic Succession.   The Emperor Trajan, passing through Syria to make war in Armenia, spent some time in Antioch and initiated a persecution of Christians. Rejoicing that the time of martyrdom had at last arrived, Ignatius presented himself before the Emperor and eloquently declared his faith in Christ.   "So you are a disciple of the one crucified under Pontius Pilate?" asked the Emperor.   "I am the disciple of Him who has nailed my sin to the Cross, and has trodden the Devil and his devices underfoot."   "Why do you call yourself the Godbearer?"   "Because I carry the living Christ within me!"   "Therefore, let the bearer of the Crucified One be taken in chains to Rome, there to be fed to the lions for the amusement of the people."   And so it was. During the long and difficult journey to Rome, cruelly mistreated by his guards, the Saint wrote a series of letters to the young churches which remain one of the treasures of the Church. In Smyrna, he was able to meet with his fellow-disciple Polycarp and entrust to him the care of the churches whose shepherd he had been. As Trajan had ordered, in Rome he was taken to the amphitheater and, as the Synaxarion says, "entered the arena as though approaching the holy altar to serve his last Liturgy in the presence of the faithful, who were crowded among pagans on the steps of the amphitheatre." In a few moments he was completely devoured by the lions, save for a few bones. These were gathered by the faithful and returned to Antioch.   In his Letter to the Romans, the holy Bishop wrote to some who wished to rescue him from his martyrdom: "I am the wheat of God, and am ground by the teeth of the wild beasts, that I may be found to be the pure bread of God."

On The Record on WYPR
Ringing in the new year with blessings and gratitude!

On The Record on WYPR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 11:43


How do you ring in the New Year? Dinner with friends? A movie? Fireworks? Creating a list of resolutions? For thirty years, hundreds of people in Baltimore have begun their evening festivities at St. Ignatius Catholic Church at ‘The New Year's Eve Interfaith Prayer Celebration.' Guests are welcomed at 8:00 pm with a prelude from the St. Ignatius Choir and instrumentalists, led by Paul Teie. Then the service at 8:30: an hour full of gratitude and blessings that are voiced by civic, political, arts and education leaders, as well as by clergy of many faiths. We heard from organizer, congregant and Interfaith Committee co-chair Donna Price and Rev. William J. Watters, S.J., assisting priest at St. Ignatius. Links: St. Ignatius Catholic Church at ‘The New Year's Eve Interfaith Prayer Celebration.'See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Radio Crystal Blue
Radio Crystal Blue 12/10/22 part 1

Radio Crystal Blue

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 133:44


Opening: I recited Jack Kerouac's short story "Home For Christmas" Ron Whitehead "Mama" Kentucky: Poems Stories Songs www.tappingmyownphone.com Sarah Elizabeth Burkey "Cherry Tree Carol" Kentucky: Poems Stories Songs www.barefootsongbird.com Jethro Tull "Pass The Bottle (A Christmas Song)" - The String Quartets Greg Lake "I Believe In Father Christmas" Fleetwood Mac "Why" & "The Way I Feel" - Mystery To Me *************** MJ Hibbett & The Validators "Roy Wood In The Blue Note" www.mjhibbett.co.uk Wizzard "I Wish It Could Be Christmas Everyday" Jackson and Clarke "It's Christmas Time Again" https://www.facebook.com/groups/lizclareofficialfanpage The New Bardots "Never Too Much Christmas" - Singles Night https://www.facebook.com/TheNEWBardots/ ****************** Hillsome South "Someday" - Be My Guest www.hillsomesouth.com Surrender Hill "Dusty Horse" - Just Another Honky Tonk In A Quiet Western Town www.surrenderhill.com Jay Stott "One Drink Two Drink" - Wreckage Of Now www.jgstott.com Some Sprouts "Green Feather" www.somesprouts.com *********************** Halley DeVestern "Glow In The Dark Baby Jesus" - Superhero Killer www.halleydevestern.com Wormburner "The Bells Of St. Ignatius" www.wormburner.com Holding Poison "This Is Christmas" https://www.facebook.com/HoldingPoisonOfficial/ Rodney Cromwell "Cold Christmas" www.happyrobots.co.uk ******************* Hymn For Her "Human Condition" - Pop-N-Downers www.hymnforher.com Castle Black "Radio Queen" - Get Up, Dancer www.castleblackmusoc Sugartin "Immer" - Dance https://www.facebook.com/sugartin We Are Parasols "We Are So Fragile" (Larvae remix) www.happyrobots.co.uk --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiocblue/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/radiocblue/support

For College Catholics
90 St. Ignatius of Loyola and the Conversion of Heart

For College Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 17:51


In this episode I talk about the conversion of St. Ignatius of Loyola, together with how he did his confession and penance. I discuss the “acts of the penitent” (contrition, confession, and satisfaction [or reparation]), the acts of the priest (hearing the confession and the sacramental absolution), and I suggest some tips to do a good confession. - More info on this can be found in the Catechism of the Catholic Church #1427 – 1467. - For further reading: Encyclical of John Paul II “Reconciliatio et Paenitentia” on the Sacrament of Confession: https://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/apost_exhortations/documents/hf_jp-ii_exh_02121984_reconciliatio-et-paenitentia.html ; and John Paul II's Motu Proprio “Misericordia Dei” on some important aspects on the Sacrament of Confession: https://www.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/motu_proprio/documents/hf_jp-ii_motu-proprio_20020502_misericordia-dei.html - Biblical quotations: Mark 1:14-15 (“repent and believe in the Gospel”); 2 Cor 4:7 (we carry God's grace in “earthen vessels”); Lk 19:8 (Zacchaeus and his “reparation” for fraud); 1 Jn 1:8 (“we deceive ourselves if we say we have no sin”); Jn 20:22-23 (Christ gives the power to forgive sins to his apostles); Proverbs 24:16 (“a just man falls seven times”). - Fr. Patrick Wainwright is a priest of Miles Christi, a Catholic Religious Order. - Visit the Miles Christi Religious Order website: https://www.mileschristi.org - This Podcast's Website: https://www.forcollegecatholics.org - To learn about the Spiritual Exercises (silent weekend retreat) preached by the Priests of Miles Christi, visit: https://www.mileschristi.org/spiritual-exercises/ - Recorded at our Family Center in South Lyon, Michigan. - Planning, recording, editing and publishing by Fr. Patrick Wainwright, MC. - Gear: Shure MV7 USB dynamic microphone. - Intro music from pond5.com

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, December 3, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Francis Xavier, Priest Lectionary: 180All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Francis XavierJesus asked, “What profit would there be for one to gain the whole world and forfeit his life?” (Matthew 16:26a). The words were repeated to a young teacher of philosophy who had a highly promising career in academics, with success and a life of prestige and honor before him. Francis Xavier, 24 at the time, and living and teaching in Paris, did not heed these words at once. They came from a good friend, Ignatius of Loyola, whose tireless persuasion finally won the young man to Christ. Francis then made the spiritual exercises under the direction of Ignatius, and in 1534, joined his little community, the infant Society of Jesus. Together at Montmartre they vowed poverty, chastity, obedience, and apostolic service according to the directions of the pope. From Venice, where he was ordained a priest in 1537, Xavier went on to Lisbon and from there sailed to the East Indies, landing at Goa, on the west coast of India. For the next 10 years he labored to bring the faith to such widely scattered peoples as the Hindus, the Malayans, and the Japanese. He spent much of that time in India, and served as provincial of the newly established Jesuit province of India. Wherever he went, Xavier lived with the poorest people, sharing their food and rough accommodations. He spent countless hours ministering to the sick and the poor, particularly to lepers. Very often he had no time to sleep or even to say his breviary but, as we know from his letters, he was filled always with joy. Xavier went through the islands of Malaysia, then up to Japan. He learned enough Japanese to preach to simple folk, to instruct, and to baptize, and to establish missions for those who were to follow him. From Japan he had dreams of going to China, but this plan was never realized. Before reaching the mainland, he died. His remains are enshrined in the Church of Good Jesus in Goa. He and Saint Thérèse of Lisieux were declared co-patrons of the missions in 1925. Reflection All of us are called to “go and preach to all nations—see Matthew 28:19. Our preaching is not necessarily on distant shores but to our families, our children, our husband or wife, our coworkers. And we are called to preach not with words, but by our everyday lives. Only by sacrifice, the giving up of all selfish gain, could Francis Xavier be free to bear the Good News to the world. Sacrifice is leaving yourself behind at times for a greater good, the good of prayer, the good of helping someone in need, the good of just listening to another. The greatest gift we have is our time. Francis Xavier gave his to others. Saint Francis Xavier is a Patron Saint of: Japan Jewelers Missions Sailors Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Daybreak
Daybreak for December 3, 2022

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 59:59


Saturday of the First Week of Advent Memorial of St. Francis Xavier, 1506-1552; brought to Christ by Ignatius of Loyola, and joined the Jesuits; spent 10 years at Goa, India, bringing the faith to Hindus, Malayans, and Japanese; wanted to go to China, but died before reaching the mainland Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for 12/3/22 Gospel: Matthew 9:35-10:1, 5-8

Daily Rosary
December 3, 2022, Memorial of St. Francis Xavier, Holy Rosary (Joyful Mysteries)

Daily Rosary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 32:23


Friends of the Rosary: Today, we honor St. Francis Xavier, the greatest missionary after St. Paul the Apostle. Born in Navarre, Spain, in 1506, to a noble Basque family, he gave his life to bring the Good News to people who had never known Christ, mostly in western India, the coast of China, Malaysia, the Island of Mindanao, Japan, and other parts of Asia. He loved the poor, and the sick, and showed great joy in service. He was known for his long hours of hard work. Some days, he baptized so many that at night he could not raise his arm from fatigue. In Paris, he became one of the seven founding members of the Jesuits, along with his friend St. Ignatius of Loyola, also born in the Kingdom of Navarre. He died ill of a fever, praying with his eyes fixed on his crucifix. He was buried in a shallow grave and his body was covered with quicklime, but when exhumed three months later it was found fresh and incorrupt. It was taken to Goa where it is still enshrined. Ave Maria! Jesus, I Trust In You! St. Francis Xavier, Pray for Us! + Mikel A. | RosaryNetwork.com, New York • December 3, 2021, Today's Rosary on YouTube | Daily broadcast at 7:30 pm ET

Catholic Saints & Feasts
December 3: Saint Francis Xavier, Priest

Catholic Saints & Feasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 6:08


December 3: Saint Francis Xavier, Priest 1506–1552 Memorial; Liturgical Color: White Patron Saint of foreign missions A missionary blazes a path for Christ in India and Japan Today's great missionary knelt on the floor next to Saint Ignatius Loyola and five other men in a church on Montmartre overlooking Paris in 1534 and took private vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience to the Pope. It was the start of the Jesuits. Francis Xavier would be ordained a priest three years later in Venice and, in 1540, would sail from Lisbon, Portugal, to India, never to return.  The thirteen-month sea journey was brutal, but Francis was as tough as bark. He held his own with all the sailors, slaves, and criminals on board who were seeking to start anew for reasons noble and otherwise. When Francis arrived in Goa, India, he and his two confreres found a Portuguese settlement about thirty years old. As was sadly typical, the greatest hindrance to the success of Spanish, Portuguese, and French missionaries was their own countrymen. Slave traders, merchants, pirates, nobles, and crown officials gave a contrary Christian witness, which undercut the priests' own teaching and example. It was said that when the Portuguese whipped their servants, they counted the lashes on their rosary beads. Francis' first goal was to evangelize the settlers. He preached, taught, heard confessions, and encouraged the Portuguese to live their faith if they harbored any hope of winning India for Christ. After working among his own for a few years establishing the basic structures of a church, including a seminary, Francis went on the first of his incessant voyages, the sub-missions inside of his greater mission to Asia. Among the people of the islands near modern-day Sri Lanka, Francis slept on the dirt like they did. He ate rice and drank water like they did. He put the Our Father and Hail Mary to music and so made these prayers easier to remember. He became a father to a humble people and baptized so many thousands that helpers had to hold up his arm to continue his sacramental work. That very arm is found today in a reliquary in the Jesuit's mother church in Rome, the Gesù, near the tomb of St. Ignatius Loyola. Francis used Goa as his base as he departed on one missionary journey after another among the islands off of Southeast Asia. He wrote letters to Ignatius and to the King of Portugal describing his labors and plans, bemoaning the lack of priests and the unethical behavior of his fellow Europeans. On one journey, he heard of an archipelago that no European had yet entered. It was Japan. Francis started to plan and, in 1549, he was the first missionary to plant his foot into the soil of the Land of the Rising Sun. The work was difficult. As so many Europeans noted, Japanese culture was fundamentally unlike other Asian cultures. The Japanese were intellectually sophisticated, sensitive to slights, honorable, open to reason, and naturally inquisitive. But the language was impenetrable, the leaders often hostile, and the monks welcoming only until they realized that Francis' religion was a rival to their own. An expert missionary, Francis had to create a neologism adapted from Latin—Deusu—to convey the Christian concept of the word God. No equivalent existed in Japanese. After little visible success in Japan, Francis had further adventures on land and sea before he embarked on a plan to enter the vast and forbidden territory of China. But it was not to be. On December 2, 1552, Francis Xavier died of fever at the age of forty-six on a small island a few miles distant from the shores of mainland China. Like Moses, he died seeing the promised land but never entered it. Francis was buried in a shallow grave in the sand as four people looked on. His body was covered with lime in case anyone wanted to recover it later. They did. This Apostle to the Indies and Japan was canonized in 1622 and is considered the Church's greatest missionary after Saint Paul. His body is largely incorrupt and rests in a glass coffin in a church in Goa, India. Saint Francis Xavier, your indefatigable journeying to spread the Gospel inspired generations of missionaries. May your legacy of generosity and vigor continue in us as we convert others through our own witness of virtue, work, and charity for all.

He Leadeth Me
The Retreat Every Disciple Should Make

He Leadeth Me

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 24:24


In this episode, Jess sits down with FOCUS Senior National Chaplain Fr. Kevin Dyer to talk about Ignatian retreats and their power to transform a person's spiritual life. Jess and Fr. Kevin discuss:What is an Ignatian retreat and how is it different than other retreats?Why St. Ignatius of Loyola named his retreat the Spiritual ExercisesThe role of silence on Ignatian retreatsHow to prepare before making an Ignatian retreatFr. Kevin Dyer, S.J., is a priest in the Society of Jesus and serves FOCUS as Senior National Chaplain. Fr. Dyer completed studies at Saint Louis University and Boston College and was ordained in 2010. In 2019, he became a part-time FOCUS National Chaplain, and in 2022 he stepped into the role of Senior National Chaplain. Fr. Dyer resides in Denver, Colorado.

Ignatius Press Podcast
Diogenes Unveiled: Fr. Fessio and Phil Lawler remember Fr. Paul Mankowski, SJ

Ignatius Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 17:57


When Fr. Paul Mankowski, SJ died in September 2020, friends, colleagues, and long-time readers mourned the loss of the biting wit and keen insight that characterized his writing, much of which was published under the pseudonym “Diogenes.”   In this episode, two men who knew and admired Fr. Mankowski—his fellow Jesuit, Fr. Joseph Fessio, and his editor at Catholic World Report and later Catholic World News, Philip F. Lawler—remember their friend, whose writing spanned decades and covered Church news, art and culture, politics, and more.   A sampling of Fr. Mankowski's writings, most of which he published as Diogenes, has been collected in the new book, “Diogenes Unveiled: A Paul Mankowski Collection,” edited by Lawler and available at Ignatius.com: http://bit.ly/3X6UuNR   You can read more essays by Mankowski in the book “Jesuit at Large,” edited by George Weigel: https://ignatius.com/jesuit-at-large-jlerp/   You can find Philip F. Lawler's writing at CatholicCulture.org: https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/authors.cfm?authorid=3   And you can follow him on Twitter, @PhilLawler.

Way of the Heart Podcast
BONUS EPISODE: Ignatian Discernment with Fr. Timothy Gallagher

Way of the Heart Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 77:09


Have you ever wondered which of your every day thoughts are from God, and which are not? Or have you ever contemplated, “What's God's will?” when faced with a decision, big or small? A series of simple principles called the Ignatian Rules of Discernment can bring clarity to these questions and more. They are a 500-year-old playbook to understanding the spiritual movements of our everyday lives and in this bonus guest episode, Jake and Brett unpack the Fourteen Rules of Discernment with the modern master of discernment, Fr. Timothy Gallagher. Fr. Timothy has written countless books on St. Ignatius's teachings and hosts a podcast to bring these foundational spiritual principles to a modern audience. Though they are simple, they are transformational for growth in the spiritual life. Discussion Questions What stood out to you in this episode? Before listening to this episode, had you heard of discernment? What did you think it was? How has your understanding of discernment changed after listening to this episode? Resources The Discernment of Spirits: An Ignatian Guide for Everyday Living, Fr. Timothy Gallagher (book) The Discernment of Spirits in Marriage, Fr. Timothy Gallagher (book) Discerning the Will of God: An Ignatian Guide to Christian Decision Making, Fr. Timothy Gallagher (book) The Examen Prayer, Fr. Timothy Gallagher (book) Discerning Hearts - The Discernment of Spirits (podcast) frtimothygallagher.org (website) Connect with Way of the Heart: Facebook: @wayoftheheartpodcast Instagram: @wayoftheheartpodcast Website: www.wayoftheheartpodcast.com Never miss out on an episode by hitting the subscribe button right now! Help other people find the show and grow as holy men by sharing this podcast with them individually or on your social media. Thanks! Audio editing by Forte Catholic

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
Arrests made in fatal shooting of 12-year-old girl heading home from birthday party

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 6:13


Also in the news: Families of St. Ignatius hockey players injured in recent bus crash sue truck driver; Bullet found near 2 Indiana teens' bodies came from suspect, records show; Record number of reports of mismanagement, ethics violations filed in 2022, according to inspector general and more.

All Things Catholic by Edward Sri
My iPhone, My Precious

All Things Catholic by Edward Sri

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 25:54


How much does your phone have control over you? We might not realize it, but the devices we use can have great control over our minds and hearts. In this week's episode, Dr. Sri uses a prayer from St. Ignatius of Loyola as a roadmap to keep us focused on the world around us instead of the digital world. Snippet from the Show We feel the pull to engage with our devices. Why don't we also feel the pull to engage with God or with those around us? _ _ For full shownotes, visit Ascensionpress.com/Allthingscatholic, or text ALLTHINGSCATHOLIC to 33-777 for weekly shownotes sent to your inbox.

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Did Humanity Destroy the Church? (11-23-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 92:46


Topics: The Church, Ecclesia, Church History, Bishops, Elders, Priests, Pastors, Ignatius of Antioch, Cyprian of Carthage, Constantine, Catholic History, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Pulpits, Puritans, Revivalists, The Rock, Matthew 16Support the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

His Beloved Catholic Podcast
61. "Discernment of Spirits" with Theresa Stephens

His Beloved Catholic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 66:16


Hello friends! Welcome back to our "Find Your Fire" series. On this episode we go deeper into how we hear the voice of God and discuss the first 5 rules of St. Ignatius' Discernment of Spirits.  Theresa Stephens joins Megan on this episode. She will be the speaker at our next Women's Adoration Night on December 2nd. Just for two days November 18th and 19th we will have a two day flash sale. Tickets for Awake My Soul are $20 if you use the code FLASHSALE. Get your tickets fast.  Also, college students can get tickets for only $15 using the code COLLEGE22 at checkout.  Visit our website for tickets www.hisbelovedoftexas.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hisbelovedoftexas/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hisbelovedoftexas/support

Potter's Inn Soul Care Conversations
Seeking God with Trevor Hudson, Part 2

Potter's Inn Soul Care Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 37:34


SUPPORT THE PODCAST It takes a lot to create our podcast episodes! Please consider a gift to support this vital ministry. We have a few ways to make it easy for you: Use our Donation Page on our Website Donate using our new App Send by mail (Potter's Inn, PO Box 35, Divide, Colorado 80814 - make sure you make note that your gift is for the podcast)   SHOW NOTES Jesus promised, “Seek and you will find!” Today we are continuing the conversation with Trevor Hudson on Seeking God. The conversation takes us over to the deep side of the boat where many fish are swimming. They talk about Dallas Willard, Ignatius of Loyola and the deeper journey to see God in all things! Please join us! ABOUT OUR GUEST Trevor Hudson has been part of the Methodist movement for over 40 years. Serving primarily around Johannesburg, he is deeply committed to the work of spiritual formation within local congregational contexts. A significant part of his weekly work presently consists of leading people through the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius and offering spiritual direction. Besides his local commitments, Trevor travels widely, preaching and teaching. He lectures at Fuller Seminary, the Renovaré Institute, the Dallas Willard Center for Christian Spiritual Formation, and the Jesuit Institute in South Africa. He is the author of 22 books including Discovering Your Spiritual Identity (IVP) and Beyond Loneliness (Upper Room). His most recent book is Seeking God-Finding Another Kind of Life with St. Ignatius and Dallas Willard.   RESOURCES MENTIONED IN PODCAST Episode 10: Discernment: The Journey to Discover God's Will Episode 12: Cultivating Daily Shalom: Using the Daily Examen Dallas Willard    MUSIC USED IN PODCAST Music Break at 22:50: Mellow Celtic Style Acoustic Duet - Envato Elements Music Break at 37:49: Beautiful Choir Requiem – Blue Sky Audio FIND US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM Facebook Soul Care Conversations Group Page Potter's Inn Main FB Page Instagram   CONTACT US podcast@pottersinn.com INTERESTED IN MORE SOUL CARE RESOURCES? Check out our recommended reading, books on spiritual growth, and our soul care blog. Want to experience soul care in person? Learn more about our soul care intensives and retreats.   

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen
Where Did Pastors Come From? (11-9-22)

Walk Talks With Matt McMillen

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 36:35


Topics: Pastors, Elders, Bishop, Ignatius of Antioch, Church History, Poimenas, Presbuteros, Episkopon, Shepherd, Overseer, Elder, Matthew 19-20, 2 Corinthians 3, Romans 12, Hebrews 13, Church Leaders, Church Offices, The Good Shepherd, Jesus GPS: God. People. Stories.God works in people's lives in amazing ways every day. Listen to some of those stories...Listen on: Apple Podcasts SpotifySupport the showSign up for Matt's free daily devotional! https://mattmcmillen.com/newsletter

Issues, Etc.
2872. Second Century Bishop and Martyr, Ignatius of Antioch – Dr. Joel Elowsky, 10/14/22

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 15:48


Dr. Joel Elowsky of Concordia Seminary-St. Louis

Dan Snow's History Hit
Charles Ignatius Sancho: From Slavery to High Society

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 20:22


Please note that this episode contains discussion of racist language.Charles Ignatius Sancho was born on a slave ship crossing the Atlantic Ocean, in what was known as the Middle Passage. He was soon orphaned and then brought to England, where he was enslaved in Greenwich, London, by three sisters who opposed any attempt at education. So how did Charles Ignatius Sancho later go on to meet the King, write and play highly acclaimed music, become the first Black person to vote in Britain and lead the fight to end slavery?Paterson Joseph is an actor and writer. Paterson joins Dan on the podcast to share Sancho's extraordinary story— ​​one that begins on a tempestuous Atlantic Ocean, and ends at the very centre of London life.This episode was produced by Hannah Ward, the audio editor was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store.Complete the survey and you'll be entered into a prize draw to win 5 Historical Non-Fiction Books- including a signed copy of Dan Snow's 'On This Day in History'. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.