Podcast appearances and mentions of sarah collins rudolph

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Best podcasts about sarah collins rudolph

Latest podcast episodes about sarah collins rudolph

Hardball with Chris Matthews
Newsom beat the recall effort because the pandemic was voters' number one issue

Hardball with Chris Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 45:12


Joy Reid begins this episode of The ReidOut discussing why in part Gov. Gavin Newsom was able to beat the recall effort. According to exit polls, the most important issue for voters was the pandemic. Joy and her panel discuss the apparent GOP miscalculation that they can win big with an anti-vaccine, anti-mask platform. Meanwhile, in Pennsylvania, state Republicans -- in a breathtaking breech of privacy -- voted on Wednesday to subpoena Gov. Tom Wolf's administration for detailed records of every registered voter in the state, including personal information like the last four digits of their Social Security numbers. Joy's expert guests give their analysis. Next, we discuss the climate collapse that looms closer every day -- unless our politicians decide to do something about it. And, 58 years ago, on the morning of Sunday, September 15th, four young girls preparing for a ‘youth day' service at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama were killed by a bomb planted by White supremacists. The only surviving victim, Sarah Collins Rudolph, tells Joy Reid how this tragic event -- which also galvanized the Civil Right Movement -- left her with trauma that has impacted her entire life. All this and more in this edition of The ReidOut on MSNBC.

Resource Global: Upnext with Tommy Lee
Interview with Sarah Collins Rudolph

Resource Global: Upnext with Tommy Lee

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2021 20:36


In this episode of Resource Global's UpNext our guest host William Adjei sits down with Sarah Collins Rudolph, survivor of the 1963 Alabama church bombing that killed her sister and three other girls. They talked about life in 1963, the trauma from the bombing, and the state of racism in today's country.

Post Reports
The 1963 Birmingham bombing’s ‘Fifth Girl’

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2020 26:29


Sarah Collins Rudolph survived the Birmingham bombing 57 years ago today. Now, she wants restitution. And, an update on the criminal case in the death of George Floyd.Read more:The story of Sarah Collins Rudolph, who survived the 1963 Birmingham church bombing. The explosion killed her sister and three other girls. Now, she wants restitution and an apology. “She wants justice for herself,” explains enterprise reporter Sydney Trent. “She feels like she has been overlooked.”The police officers charged in George Floyd’s killing are turning on each other, according to national political reporter Holly Bailey.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer

Witness History: Witness Black History
The 16th Street church bombing

Witness History: Witness Black History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 8:58


Four young black girls were killed in a racist attack on a church in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. The 16th Street Baptist Church was a centre for civil rights activists in the city. One of the girls who died was Addie Mae Collins, her sister, Sarah Collins Rudolph was badly injured but survived. In 2013 she spoke to Eddie Botsio about the bombing. Photo: men carrying the coffin of Addie Mae Collins at her funeral. Copyright: BBC

Witness History
The 16th Street church bombing

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2020 8:58


Four young black girls were killed in a racist attack on a church in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. The 16th Street Baptist Church was a centre for civil rights activists in the city. One of the girls who died was Addie Mae Collins, her sister, Sarah Collins Rudolph was badly injured but survived. In 2013 she spoke to Eddie Botsio about the bombing. Photo: men carrying the coffin of Addie Mae Collins at her funeral. Copyright: BBC

Dear White Women
31: Special 3-Part Series: Domestic Terrorism: Then and Now Part 1

Dear White Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2019 23:25


Join Sara and Misasha as they take a look back in time. This is the first part of a special three-part series, starting with the church bombings in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1963. Just two months before President Kennedy’s assassination, the Birmingham church bombings occurred, and four young girls lost their lives. That long-ago act of terrorism has implications in what has gone on in more recent years.  What do moments like this in history do to our psyche? Listen in to find out more. Show Highlights: September 15, 2019, marked 56 years since these four young girls were murdered at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The Ku Klux Klan was trying to intimidate Civil Rights activists who used the predominantly African-American church as a rallying point and an organizing hub. The KKK members planted a bomb under the building’s steps and detonated at 10:22 AM on Youth Sunday, which was a day dedicated to the church’s young members. These girls were getting ready for the service in a basement lounge. Sarah Collins Rudolph was a survivor of the bombing and often called “The Fifth Girl”. Sara recounts Ms. Rudolph’s memory of that day and its lasting effects. Addie Mae Collins, 14; Denise McNair, 11; Carole Robertson, 14; and Cynthia Wesley, 14, were killed by this bomb, and 20 others were injured.  Dr. Martin Luther King gave the eulogy at the funerals and called the attack “One of the most vicious and tragic crimes ever perpetrated against humanity.”  He sent a telegram to then-Alabama Governor George Wallace, who was known as the state’s top segregationist, telling him that “the blood of our little children is on your hands”. The reason for this is that ten days before the bombing, Wallace had railed against the Civil Rights Movement to the New York Times, saying, “What this country needs is a few first-class funerals.” About 100 years before the Birmingham church bombings, there was the Dred Scott Decision. Misasha provides an overview of Dred Scott, the slave whose owner had lived in a free state and territory. When his owner died, Mr. Scott filed suit on behalf of himself and his wife to gain their freedom. The court decision said that he was not free based on his residence because he was not considered a person, but property, under the U.S. Constitution. One person who was publicly upset over the Dred Scott decision was Abraham Lincoln, a rising figure in the newly-formed Republican party. Misasha points out that this Republican party is not the same one that exists today. In 1858, the Dred Scott case became a focal point of the famous debate between Lincoln and Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. These debates are otherwise known as the Lincoln-Douglas debates. This decision made the Republican party a national force and led to the division of what used to be called the Democratic party in the 1860 Presidential elections. This growing power of the Republicans, who received a lot of support from the north, directly led to fears in the south that slavery would be ended. Those fears snowballed and started the movement towards what would become the Civil War. Dred Scott died in 1858, about a year after he and his family had gained their freedom. His owner, under pressure from her husband, sent the Scotts back to their original owners who promptly set him free.  Charles Sumner, a leading radical Republican at the time, said, “I declare that the opinion of the Chief Justice in the case of Dred Scott was more thoroughly abominable than anything of the kind in the history of the courts. Judicial-baseness  reached its lowest point on that occasion.” Charles Sumner had been brutally beaten and almost killed on the Senate floor in 1856 when he made anti-slavery remarks. After the Civil War, the 13th Amendment and the 14th Amendment to the Constitution effectively overturned the Dred Scott Decision.  Eighteen years post-Dred Scott, Black Americans would not only have citizenship but would be guaranteed the right to vote and equal access to transportation, housing, and other facilities by the Civil Rights Act of 1875.  This was short-lived, as in 1883, the Civil Rights Act of 1875 was found unconstitutional and in 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson established the Separate but Equal Doctrine. This whole rollback and the struggle that ensued from that led to the Civil Rights Movement almost 100 years later. Birmingham was dubbed “Bombingham” because violent attacks on the Civil Rights Movement in the city were common.  J. Edgar Hoover was FBI Director at the time and he blocked prosecution of the case, and the FBI failed to turn over thousands of files to prosecutors including audio surveillance tapes. It wasn’t until 1977 that the first of four Klansmen behind the crime was brought to trial by the State Attorney General and convicted. In the mid-1990s two others were convicted by Federal prosecutors. The fourth person died before being charged. The last surviving Klansmen is still in prison and one of the two convicted in the mid-1990s. Thomas Edwin Blanton is 79 and has been up for parole twice. He has not expressed any remorse nor accepted any responsibility. Misasha explains how money matters eventually brought down the KKK and how the Birmingham church bombings galvanized the nation and pushed the movement forward, whereby ten months after the bombing Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which outlawed segregation in public accommodations. Today, a memorial named “Four Spirits” stands across the street from the church where the bombing happened, with the description, “Love Forgives”, which was the title of the pastor’s undelivered sermon the date of the bombing. Dr. King eulogy included these words, “This afternoon, in a real sense, the four girls have something to say to each of us in their death. They have something to say to every minister of the gospel who has remained silent behind the safe security of stained-glass windows. They have something to say to every politician who has fed his constituents with the stale bread of hatred, and the spoiled meat of racism. They say to each of us, black and white alike, that we must substitute courage for caution. They say to us that we must be concerned not merely about who murdered them but about the system, the way of life, the philosophy which produced the murderers. Hate is nothing new, we’ve known this for centuries, and many of us have experienced it firsthand. But it is on the rise, we are seeing a surge of white nationalism and racist violence across the country. This violence can mix anybody up into the fray. We have to all be thinking about this.” Next week in PART TWO of this 3-part series, Sara and Misasha will discuss one of the key instances that led into this modern wave of terrorism, which is the Charleston bombing in 2015, Dylann Roof, and the internet. Resources / Links: Website: https://www.dearwhitewomen.com Podcast: https://www.dearwhitewomen.com/listen  PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW US! Email: hello@dearwhitewomen.com Like us on Facebook! Instagram Follow Us! Twitter Follow Us! Suggested Podcast Episode #11 - Hate in America, Pt.1: The History of the Ku Klux Klan https://www.dearwhitewomen.com/episodes/hate-in-america Suggested Movie RBG https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7689964/

Live at America's Town Hall
Civil Rights and Constitutional Change

Live at America's Town Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2019 62:35


In celebration of Martin Luther King Day, we’re sharing the program “Remembering Birmingham: Civil Rights and Constitutional Change” held here at the National Constitution Center in 2017 and moderated by Jeffrey Rosen. This conversation features Sarah Collins Rudolph, a survivor of the September 1963 bombing of the 16th street Baptist church in Birmingham, Alabama, carried out by white supremacists, that took the lives of four young girls including Rudolph’s sister. Rudolph is joined by Steven Levingston, author of Kennedy and King and Hannibal Lokumbe, composer in residence at the Philadelphia Orchestra. Hannibal begins by playing a moving piece that he composed on the trumpet in honor of Rudolph and the other victims of the bombing. The panel then explores the tragedy's lasting impact on the civil rights movement and the African American community. Questions or comments about the podcast? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

We The People
Civil Rights And Constitutional Change

We The People

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2017 68:44


National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen moderates a special discussion about the 1963 Birmingham Church bombing and how it impacted the meaning of equality in America. In this event, held on June 16 in Philadelphia, bombing survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, Washington Post editor and author of Kennedy and King Steven Levingston, and Philadelphia Orchestra composer-in-residence Hannibal Lokumbe spoke with Rosen about the bombing’s legacy could also bring about constitutional change.

We the People
Civil Rights And Constitutional Change

We the People

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2017 68:44


National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen moderates a special discussion about the 1963 Birmingham Church bombing and how it impacted the meaning of equality in America. In this event, held on June 16 in Philadelphia, bombing survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, Washington Post editor and author of Kennedy and King Steven Levingston, and Philadelphia Orchestra composer-in-residence Hannibal Lokumbe spoke with Rosen about the bombing’s legacy could also bring about constitutional change.

Witness History: Witness Black History
16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

Witness History: Witness Black History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2013 8:54


On September 15 1963, four young black girls were killed in a racist bomb attack against a church in Birmingham, Alabama in the US. The Baptist church at 16th Street had been a centre for civil rights activities in the city. Sarah Collins Rudolph was badly injured in the attack, and her sister, Addie Mae was one of those who died. Listen to her story. Photo: BBC Copyright.

Witness History: Archive 2013
16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

Witness History: Archive 2013

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2013 8:54


On September 15 1963, four young black girls were killed in a racist bomb attack against a church in Birmingham, Alabama in the US. The Baptist church at 16th Street had been a centre for civil rights activities in the city. Sarah Collins Rudolph was badly injured in the attack, and her sister, Addie Mae was one of those who died. Listen to her story. Photo: BBC Copyright.

Religion Unplugged
Sarah Collins Rudolph, The Fifth Girl

Religion Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 1970 19:00


On Sept. 15, 1963, the 16th Street Baptist Church was attacked by White supremacist domestic terrorists in a dynamite explosion which left four children dead and dozens of others wounded including The Fifth Girl, Sarah Collins Rudolph. Mattie Townson spoke with Rudolph to hear her story about the bombing, the legacy of her and her sister who died in the attack and for her thoughts on whether real progress has been made in civil rights between then and now.