Podcasts about black americans

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Racial or ethnic group in the United States with African ancestry

  • 2,572PODCASTS
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  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about black americans

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Latest podcast episodes about black americans

The United States of Anxiety
A History of Voter Suppression

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 23:48


As recent voting rights legislation struggles to even get a vote in the Senate, we revisit a conversation with historian Dr. Carol Anderson about how American voters, particularly Black Americans, had fought and continue to fight for their right to participate in the democratic process - safely and with certainty that their votes will count. Dr. Anderson is a Charles Howard Candler Professor of African American Studies at Emory University and author of several books including White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation's Divide (2016). Companion listening for this episode:The Short Life and Early Death of Voting Rights (7/12/2021)Birth, August 1965. Death, July 2021. So now what for multiracial democracy? “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.    We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

The Retirement Wisdom Podcast
Retirement Planning & The Racial Wealth Gap – Rodney Brooks

The Retirement Wisdom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 31:25


Planning for retirement is complex and challenging. My guest today, Rodney Brooks, shares his insights on retirement and we discuss his new book Fixing the Racial Wealth Gap: Racism & Discrimination Put Us Here, But This is How We Save Future Generations on the challenges African Americans face in retirement planning. We discuss: How he first become interested in writing about personal finance and retirement After writing about retirement, how his life in "retirement" is going What likely surprises people should be prepared for in retirement The benefits of working longer What regrets people have shared with him about their retirements His new book Fixing the Racial Wealth Gap: Racism & Discrimination Put Us Here, But This is How We Save Future Generations The size and scope of the wealth gap and the health gap The unique challenges African Americans face in planning for retirement – and Black women in particular His views on the most important things people need to do to plan for a successful retirement How people can learn more Rodney Brooks joins us from Maryland. __________________________ Bio Rodney Brooks is a veteran journalist, writer and author specializing in  retirement planning and other personal finance issues.  He's written for many national publications, including USA TODAY and The Washington Post, His columns currently run in U.S. News & World Report and AARP's Senior Planet. Brooks is a contributor for National Geographic, Next Avenue, and many others. He has also written about professional athletes and their finances for the Undefeated, an ESPN website. He is author of the book Fixing the Racial Wealth Gap:what has put us here, but how we can save future generations. He is co-author of Retirement Planning Essentials: A Guide to Living Well Without Running out of Money. He is also the author of Is One Million Dollars Enough: A Guide to Planning for and Living Through a Successful Retirement.. Prior to retiring in 2015 after 30 years, Brooks was Deputy Managing Editor for Personal Finance and retirement columnist for USA TODAY, where he coordinated all personal finance on all platforms for USA TODAY. __________________________ For More on Rodney Brooks Fixing the Racial Wealth Gap:what has put us here, but how we can save future generations. Website: rodneyabrooks.com Cornell Alumni profile Follow on Twitter @Perfiguy __________________________ Wise Quotes On Retirement Today "I don't really consider myself retired because retirement has changed and retired people people do many things in retirement. They don't sit home or watch westerns on TV like our daddies did. People keep busy and that's hard for a lot of people. My son-in-law asked: So, when are you really gonna retire?  I said I don't really anticipate it because what would I do." "People aren't really prepared for figuring out what to do, if they don't have things planned out yet. I had a friend,  a good friend, who called me up and said Rodney, there's nothing to do! Well, think about that before you retire. I always tell people make sure you have a plan for how you're going to spend your time. If you're not going to work, have a plan to do something. Volunteer. You'll get real tired if you play golf every day or do all those home projects you thought you would get to [one day]. You'll run through those, but get bored really quickly." On the Health Gap "African Americans suffer disproportionately from 8 of the top 13 leading causes of death in the United States,  for a bunch of reasons. Black Americans have higher rates of heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes, and  you have to add murder in there. But, many people don't realize that Alzheimer's is is twice as likely to happen to a Black woman than a white American. I did a story on Blacks and Alzheimer's and I was shocked at the numbers. I really didn't really know that there was a racial component there.

First Name Basis Podcast
5.4 Black Lives Matter: How Will You Respond?

First Name Basis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 49:52


In the summer of 2020, author Veronica Chambers had what she calls an “aha moment.”   Born in Panama and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Veronica's Afro-Latina heritage has always been very important to her, and she worked hard to make sure her then-12-year-old daughter felt the power of her “Black girl magic.”   But when protests were happening across the country and in their own city, Veronica realized she needed to be able to teach her daughter more about race, systemic racism and the role of protests.   Veronica's recently published book, “Call and Response: The Story of Black Lives Matter,” was born out of this desire to teach her own daughter.    “Call and Response” is just one of many projects Veronica has produced during her prolific writing career. She is the editor of Narrative Projects for The New York Times, a public speaker, and author and editor of more than a dozen books — which span a spectrum in subject from several about food to books for kids to helping influential people with their memoirs and more.   Veronica was gracious enough to join me for an interview for this week's podcast — Season 5 Episode 4: “Blake Lives Matter: How Will You Respond?” In this interview, Veronica shares:   Thoughts on how to talk to kids — all kids, not just Black children — about police What protesting looks like for different people and finding what it looks like for you and your family. Insights on how to avoid burnout. Using your skills and what you love to do to make a difference.   It was truly an honor to read “Call and Response:The Story of Black Lives Matter” and to have Veronica share her time and thoughts with me. I sure learned a lot and know you will too!   Bite-sized Black History  Bite-sized Black History is a program that empowers you to teach the little ones you love about brilliant Black Americans who have been largely overlooked by our history books. We featured 12 different people in Season 1 of the program and will feature 12 all new Black Americans in Season 2. And, if you missed Season 1, both seasons will be available for purchase. Click here to be the first to receive the coupon code on Feb 1st when the program launches! Articles, Studies, & Podcasts Referenced in the Episode   Books edited or written by Veronica Chambers   New York Times Learning Network “Lesson of the Day: ‘Black Surfers Reclaim Their Place on the Waves'”   For info about Bakers Against Racism, read this newsletter by Veronica Chambers   “13th” documentary available on Netflix   Veronica Chambers' Instagram @vvchambers   Visit Veronica's website for additional information, including booking her for speaking events.   “The End of Policing” by Alex S. Vitale   “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents” by Isabel Wilkerson    Song Credit: “Sleeper” by Steve Adams” and “Dive Down” by VYEN  

Lexicon Valley
RIP: Sidney Poitier, Lani Guinier, Max Julien

Lexicon Valley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 43:43


Listen now | John draws linguistic lessons from the surnames of three Black Americans. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.booksmartstudios.org/subscribe

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker
The Racist Offensive - Time to Fight Back!

The Socialist Program with Brian Becker

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 75:56


On today's In the News roundtable, Brian Becker, Esther Iverem and Nicole Roussell discuss how the right-wing U.S. Supreme Court has decided to help spread Covid, how Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema are joining with the Supreme Court and the Republican Party to destroy voting rights, especially for Black Americans, how people nationwide remembered Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the streets yesterday and how the U.S. war machine continues its escalation of threats against Russia at the Ukrainian-Russian border. Please make an urgently-needed contribution to The Socialist Program by joining our Patreon community at patreon.com/thesocialistprogram. We rely on the generous support of our listeners to keep bringing you consistent, high-quality shows. All Patreon donors of $5 a month or more are invited to join the monthly Q&A seminar with Brian.

The Electorette Podcast
Intergenerational Poverty and the Pandemic, with Alison Moore & Fardosa Hussein of Comic Relief US

The Electorette Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 37:27


The economic fallout following the pandemic will affect certain segments of the population harder than others; women, people of color, Black Americans, and other marginalized groups will have a tougher professional and economic road ahead of them once the pandemic ends. The effects of the pandemic on groups who are burdened by intergenerational poverty will be even deeper. Alison Moore, the CEO of Comic Relief US, and Fardosa Hussein, a documentary photographer, and a member of Comic Relief's Youth Advisory Council, join me to discuss the impact of the pandemic on intergenerational poverty, and what steps we need to take to address it. Listen to All Electorette Episodes https://www.electorette.com/podcast Support the Electorette Rate & Review on iTunes: https://apple.co/2GsfQj4 Also, if you enjoy the Electorette, please subscribe and leave a 5-star review on iTunes. Also, please spread the word by telling your friends, family and colleagues about The Electorette! WANT MORE ELECTORETTE? Follow the Electorette on social media. Electorette Facebook Electorette Instagram Electorette Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times
Nikole Hannah-Jones on her triumphs and trolls

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 19:47


Two years ago, Nikole Hannah-Jones launched “The 1619 Project,” a collection of New York Times Magazine articles, photography and podcasts. That project became a launching point to talk about Black people's roles in shaping the United States. Hannah-Jones has been praised and vilified for her work ever since.Today, we share highlights from a L.A. Times Book Club chat between Hannah-Jones and L.A. Times executive editor Kevin Merida. They talked about how Black people can be patriotic despite centuries of mistreatment … and about using mountains of research to get back at haters. More reading:Nikole Hannah-Jones dives into the origins and language of ‘The 1619 Project'Nikole Hannah-Jones became a political target. What she's learned from the ‘hurtful' attacksHoward-bound Nikole Hannah-Jones plans to ‘even the playing field' for HBCUs. Here's how 

First Name Basis Podcast
5.3 Stop Using MLK to Justify Racism

First Name Basis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 43:09


Martin Luther King Jr. Day is less than a week away, and I couldn't let this important day pass without another episode.   It's actually my THIRD episode about Martin Luther King Jr., and I feel like this episode shows our journey as a community and my journey as an anti-racist (both personally and as an educator).   With each episode, the content has gotten more and more radical — just like the journey that Dr. Cornel West takes us on in the incredible book “The Radical King.”   The first episode — Season 3, Episode 10: “The Untold Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” — was about nonviolence and loving accountability.   The second episode —  Season 3, Episode 11: “The One Thing I Wish You Knew About Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” — was about the fact that racism and Dr. King's assassination have more to do with money and power than skin color.   And in this third episode — “Stop Using MLK to Justify Racism” — we are going to dispel 3 myths that people have perpetuated about Dr. King to justify their racism.   Those 3 myths are: Dr. King would have been against riots Dr. King would have been anti-Critical Race Theory Dr. King's dream has already been achieved   I hope by the end of this episode you feel like you have a better understanding of what this incredible man really felt about each of these issues, and I hope you feel inspired to learn more about his teachings yourself.  Bite-sized Black History  Bite-sized Black History is a program that empowers you to teach the little ones you love about brilliant Black Americans who have been largely overlooked by our history books. We featured 12 different people in Season 1 of the program and will feature 12 all new Black Americans in Season 2. And, if you missed Season 1, both seasons will be available for purchase. Click here to be the first to get the coupon code when Bite-sized Black History is released on Feb 1st! Articles, Studies, & Podcasts Referenced in the Episode   First Name Basis Podcast Season 3, Episode 10: “The Untold Story of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.”   First Name Basis Podcast Season 3, Episode 11: “The One Thing I Wish You Knew About Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.”   First Name Basis Podcast Season 3, Episode 29: “Critical Race Theory in Schools”   “The Radical King,” by Martin Luther King Jr., edited and introduced by Cornel West   “​​93% of Black Lives Matter Protests Have Been Peaceful, New Report Finds,” by Sanya Mansoor, TIME   “Nonviolence and Social Change,” by Martin Luther King Jr.   “Ron DeSantis Introduced the ‘Stop W.O.K.E. Act'—and Name-Dropped MLK,” by Paul Blest, Vice   Bernice King's response to Ron DeSantis on Twitter   Sylvia Duckworth's CRT definition, which she worked with Dr. Angel Jones and Dr. Kate Slater to create   “After Desegregation — What” by Martin Luther King Jr.   “Where Do We Go From Here?” by Martin Luther King Jr.   Francheska's Instagram account @cheskatanglao   Bernice King's response on Twitter to people claiming her father “didn't offend people”   Song Credit: “Sleeper” by Steve Adams” and “Dive Down” by VYEN  

Rebel Wisdom
John McWhorter, 'Woke Racism' Q&A

Rebel Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 56:44


John McWhorter is one of America's most incisive, outspoken heterodox commentators on race. His latest book, 'Woke Racism', is a full frontal attack on what he considers to be a new hidden racism, coming from the left. In Woke Racism, McWhorter outlines the workings of what he believes is a new religion, from the original sin of “white privilege” and the weaponization of cancel culture to ban heretics, to the evangelical fervor of the “woke mob.” He shows how this religion that claims to “dismantle racist structures” is actually harming his fellow Black Americans by infantilizing Black people, setting Black students up for failure, and passing policies that disproportionately damage Black communities. The new religion might be called “antiracism,” but it features a racial essentialism that's barely distinguishable from racist arguments of the past. This was a conversation in Rebel Wisdom's Digital Campfire, to join conversations like this, sign up as a Rebel Wisdom member: https://www.patreon.com/rebelwisdom

History Unplugged Podcast
Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Winding Path to Emancipation

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 54:38


In a little-noted eulogy delivered shortly after Abraham Lincoln's assassination, Frederick Douglass called the martyred president “emphatically the Black man's president,” and the “first to show any respect for their rights as men.” To justify his description, Douglass pointed not just to Lincoln's official acts and utterances, like the Emancipation Proclamation or the Second Inaugural Address, but also to the president's own personal experiences with Black people. Referring to one of his White House visits, Douglass said: “In daring to invite a Negro to an audience at the White House, Mr. Lincoln was saying to the country: I am President of the Black people as well as the white, and I mean to respect their rights and feelings as men and as citizens.”But Lincoln's description as “the Black man's president” rests on more than his relationship with Douglass or on his official words and deeds. Lincoln interacted with many other Black Americans during his presidency. His unfailing cordiality to them, his willingness to meet with them in the White House, to honor their requests, to invite them to consult on public policy, to treat them with respect whether they were kitchen servants or abolitionist leaders, to invite them to attend receptions, to sing and pray with them in their neighborhoods – all were manifestations of an egalitarian spirit noted by Frederick Douglass and other prominent African Americans like Sojourner Truth, who said: “I never was treated by any one with more kindness and cordiality than were shown to me by that great and good man, Abraham Lincoln.” To discuss this issue is today's guest Michael Burlingame, author of the book The Black Man's President: Abraham Lincoln, African Americans, and the Pursuit of Racial Equality. We focus on Lincoln's personal interchange with Black Americans over the course his career, whichreveals a side of the sixteenth president that, until now, has not been fully explored.

Next in Foreign Policy
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in NatSec with Alexandria Maloney

Next in Foreign Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 38:32


This week Grant and Zoe are joined by Alexandria Maloney, an international affairs officer at US CENTCOM with the US Department of Defense and the President of Black Professionals in International Affairs. Alexandria discusses the fight for diversity and inclusion in national security, what hurdles Black Americans and other People of Color face in the field, and what allies can do to support them. In the final segment, Grant talks about Station Eleven, Zoe is following the end of Elizabeth Holmes trial, and Alexandria wants people to pay their taxes. If you are under 40 and interested in being featured on the podcast, be sure to fill out this form: https://airtable.com/shr5IpK32opINN5e9

Hidden Brain
Changing Behavior, Not Beliefs

Hidden Brain

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 48:55


The rift between police and Black Americans can feel impossible to bridge. But in his work with police departments across the U.S., Yale psychologist Phillip Atiba Goff has found novel ways to address the problem.If you like this show, please check out our new podcast, My Unsung Hero! And if you'd like to support our work, you can do so at support.hiddenbrain.org. 

The Dirt Podcast
Race and Biological Anthropology with Dr. Rachel Watkins (131) - Ep 171

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 57:06


Recently, Anna and Amber sat down with Rachel Watkins, a biological anthropologist and scholar-activist whose research centers on social and biological histories of Black Americans in the 19th and 20th centuries. Learn about the social history of biological anthropology, the exemplary case studies with which Dr. Watkins has worked, why you shouldn't discount the creepy things small children sometimes do, and so much more! Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code DIRT. Click this message for more information. Links Rachel Watkins Faculty Profile (American University) Rachel J. Watkins on ResearchGate The Mismeasure of Man (WW Norton) The Cobb Collection (W. Montague Cobb Research Laboratory) Watch Now! African Diasporic Activist Scholarship: Beyond the Enlightenment, Toward the Democratization of Science (Wenner-Gren Blog) Science and Freedom (Washington History) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

This American Life
758: Talking While Black

This American Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 62:01


Think back to two summers ago, the summer of 2020, when a series of violent, highly-publicized killings of Black Americans sparked outrage and a national movement to eradicate racism and its evils. That movement gave way to a newer, reactionary one, a backlash that is playing out in schools and school board meetings across America. Host Emanuele Berry shares stories about Black people who got tangled up in this current backlash in both extreme and very personal ways. 

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine
REVOLUTION IN OUR TIME by Kekla Magoon, read by Tyla Collier

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 7:48


Tyla Collier delivers Kekla Magoon's narrative of how centuries of abuse to Black Americans led to deep unrest and the founding of the Black Panther Party. Host Jo Reed and AudioFile's Michele Cobb discuss this National Book Award finalist for Youth literature. The Black Panthers' “power to the people” was less about militancy and more about gaining equity in education, health care, justice, and politics and seeking gender equality. Listeners young and old alike will be affected by the audiobook's emotive tone, tragic events, and parallels to recent events. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile's website. Published by Listening Library. Sign up for a live talk with narrators about REVOLUTION IN OUR TIME and more excellent nonfiction audiobooks on January 25th. Register for Hearing History with Black Voices on Zoom. Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.com Support for Behind the Mic comes from Oasis Family Media, the home of Oasis Audio, Enclave Audio, Paperback Classics, and Hollywoodland audio books. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Dana Recaps Her Wu Flu Experience

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 16:15


Dana recaps her experience with COVID and how impossible it was to get a test, meanwhile nine Black American climbers attempted to scale Mount Everest to tackle the peak's “intentional lack of access for black people”. Jon Stewart picks a fight with J.K. Rowling and loses.Please visit our great sponsors:Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world.Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT.Tommy John https://tommyjohn.com/danaFight the cold with cozy and 20% off. See site for details.Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comStart your day a new way and receive a 30-day supply of SuperBeets Heart Chews with your first purchase.

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch
Absurd Truth: Dana Recaps Her Wu Flu Experience

The Dana Show with Dana Loesch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 16:15


Dana recaps her experience with COVID and how impossible it was to get a test, meanwhile nine Black American climbers attempted to scale Mount Everest to tackle the peak's “intentional lack of access for black people”. Jon Stewart picks a fight with J.K. Rowling and loses.Please visit our great sponsors:Kel-Techttps://KelTecWeapons.comKelTec: Creating Innovative, Quality Firearms to help secure your world.Patriot Mobile https://PatriotMobile.com/DanaFree Activation with promo code DANA. Patriotmobile.com/dana or call 972-PATRIOT.Tommy John https://tommyjohn.com/danaFight the cold with cozy and 20% off. See site for details.Legacy Precious Metalshttps://legacypminvestments.comPick up your free guide to precious metal investments today.Superbeetshttps://DanasBeets.comStart your day a new way and receive a 30-day supply of SuperBeets Heart Chews with your first purchase.

KPFA - Behind the News
Reparations for Black Americans

KPFA - Behind the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 59:58


The Washington Times Front Page

On today's Front Page: Senate Democratic leadership is stressing that Build Back Better isn't dead yet, firearm purchases by a record number of Black Americans have accelerated a surge in gun sales, and more.

Racism White Privilege In America
The War Over Teaching Racism

Racism White Privilege In America

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 12:27


Most students in America are only taught about a handful of important Black Americans in history class. Here's a look at why schools should teach students about race and why certain parents are opposed to that shift.

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine
LOOK FOR ME AND I'LL BE GONE by John Edgar Wideman, read by Dion Graham, Janina Edwards

Behind the Mic with AudioFile Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 7:19


Narrator Dion Graham delivers John Edgar Wideman's discursive stream-of-consciousness stories in a powerful, resonant style. Host Jo Reed and AudioFile's Alan Minskoff discuss Wideman's compelling combination of memoir, fiction, and essays, told sometimes in a stream-of-consciousness style that gives listeners insights into life as a Black American. Janina Edwards contributes to the narration as well, helping to bring these semi-autobiographical fictions luminously to life. Read the full review of the audiobook on AudioFile's website. Published by Simon & Schuster Audio. Find more audiobook recommendations at audiofilemagazine.com Support for Behind the Mic comes from Oasis Audio, publisher of Heavenly Mortal, a suspenseful story of the battle between light and darkness by Jack Cavanaugh. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tribe Archipelago Podcast
Episode 39 - Quintavius Oliver Interview

Tribe Archipelago Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 37:10


Quintavius Oliver is an Atlanta based fine art and documentary photographer who uses his engaging portraits as a means of self exploration and sensitive storytelling. He acquired his first camera at the age of six from his grandmother and immediately began to document his ever expanding world without a second thought. Completely self-taught and ready to take on the world with his camera while raising his daughter as a single father, Quintavius spent much of his twenties documenting community uprisings against police brutality towards Black Americans and exploring his own generational traumas as a young black man through his lens. Occasionally, he would get a break to travel to places like India or Cuba to explore and experience places that he was told he would never live long enough to see because of the stereotypes that surround young black men. Now, still with a camera in hand, Quintavius has made it his mission to see and photograph people honestly and wholly as he creates a safe space for self-expression and vulnerability through his passion for photography. Website: https://www.qoliverphoto.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/the_film_god Foundation: https://foundation.app/@film-god Brought to you by Archipelago Presets https://archipelagopresets.com/ Use the code PODCAST20 to save 20% on your next purchase.

Suave
The Journey Begins, From 'We Imagine...Us: The Way Long Way Around'

Suave

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 27:23


The Suave team presents an episode from We Imagine...Us, a new project by Futuro Unidad Hinojosa, the newest editorial division of Futuro Media. Starring Emmy award-winning actress Karrueche Tran, We Imagine…Us: The Long Way Around is Futuro's first-ever fiction podcast series. It tells the story of a Black American father and his Black Vietnamese American daughter who set out across the United States in hope of rebuilding their lives. Offering a clear-eyed look at real-world struggles many communities in our country face today, its core message is that through solidarity we can make change. In this episode, Albert "Bumpy" Watkins, after serving three years in prison, is released into a post-Covid America, where he has to navigate his new status as a formerly incarcerated person and his new role as a single parent to teenager Mercy Watkins. Subscribe here to enjoy the full series as well as the companion series Re-Imagination Nation with Maria Hinojosa featuring interviews with John Legend, Ava DuVernay, Michelle Alexander, Heather McGhee, Linda Sarsour, Saru Jamarayan and others.

KUCI: Film School
The Cannons / Film School Radio interview with Co-directors Steven Hoffner & AJ Messier

KUCI: Film School

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021


THE CANNONS is an immersive feature documentary following the day-to-day lives of Coach Neal Henderson and his team of young African American hockey players in the longest serving minority hockey program in North America, the Fort Dupont Hockey Cannons in Washington DC. The goal of the Cannons is to provide educational purpose and teach young people discipline, via sports activities, to establish self-esteem, a sense of purpose, and to offer an incentive to excel academically. THE CANNONS chronicles one pivotal hockey season, following the lives of two Black teenage hockey players and one legendary coach, in one of America's toughest neighborhoods: Southeast, Washington DC. Part coming of age story, part social-political commentary on the Black American experience, the film chronicles the Fort Dupont Cannons, one of America's only predominately Black hockey teams, as they must overcome the challenges of life on and off the ice. THE CANNONS is a story about hope; the power of sport; and the pursuit of the American Dream. Co-directors Steven Hoffner and AJ Messier join us for a conversation on the different paths that led them into the lives of Neal Henderson and the remarkable extended family of Cannons' players, parents, supporters and alums. For news and screenings go to: thecannonsdocumentary.com

Stateside from Michigan Radio
Alice Randall's Up South Roots

Stateside from Michigan Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 19:24


For a long time, if you asked Alice Randall where she was from, she'd say Detroit-Alabama. The Detroit-born writer grew up surrounded by relatives who had come north from Alabama. She wrote about that experience recently for the Oxford American. On today's episode, you'll hear Randall talk about her experience “Up South” and the profound cultural mark the northern migration of Black Americans made on the city of Detroit. GUEST:  Alice Randall, songwriter and author of Black Bottom Saints, The Wind Done Gone, and many other books. Looking for more conversations from Stateside? Right this way. If you like what you hear on the pod, consider supporting our work. Stateside's theme music is by 14KT. Additional music by Blue Dot Sessions. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Conversations from the Diaspora with Love
Lives In Me: Could This Be The Great Reconciliation?

Conversations from the Diaspora with Love

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 95:00


In this panel discussion to kick off Kwanzaa, we aimed to address some of the deep rooted issues within the Black American and continental African communities and tried to find ways forward. We opened up with who lives in us, before going into past hurts and misperceptions, discovered similarities between both groups, and shared our admirations of each other. Could this be the great reconciliation? Donate to Motherland travel fund for African ancestry winner: https://bit.ly/3pwYIiZ Join the #livesinmechallenge on Instagram using this link: https://bit.ly/3erXqiU Donate to Conversations from the Diaspora: paypal.me/bldgafricasfuture --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bldgafricasfuture/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bldgafricasfuture/support

UUMAN Unitarian Universalist Metro Atlanta North Church
I Dream of Black Rest: Kwanzaa, Black Excellence, and the UU Experience

UUMAN Unitarian Universalist Metro Atlanta North Church

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 40:27


UUism is seriously lacking Black folx. And the ones that this faith attracts and retains tend to be the embodiment of Black Excellence. Black UUs can burn brightly as dedicated volunteers, board presidents, church leaders, and the heads of UU organizations but can face equally dramatic burn out. This is both a spiritual and a justice issue. Can a Black American centered holiday be part of the solution? Together we'll explore what Kwanzaa is, beyond what you can find on a simple Google search, what makes it so soul quenching, and what it can do for UUism. Original music composed and performed by Alex Pietsch, copyright 2021. Intro background music by Tim Moor at Pixabay. UUMAN is a welcoming congregation and we thank you for taking the time to get to know us a bit better. You can learn more about us by visiting our website at www.UUMAN.org Unitarian Universalism is a religion based on seven moral principles which promote the inherent worth of all people and each individual's search for truth and meaning. Learn more at uua.org UUMAN is a 501(c)3 organization under the Internal Revenue Code. Your contribution is deductible to the full extent provided by law. https://www.uuman.org/donate/ UUMAN - Unitarian Universalist Metro Atlanta North 11420 Crabapple Rd, Roswell, GA 30075 (770) 992-3949 YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcRwJlKGVhksTvxKeCXhxeQFacebook https://www.facebook.com/UUMAN.ATL Twitter https://twitter.com/UUMAN_ATL #UUMAN #Unitarian #Universalist #Universalism #UU

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Marcia Chatelain, Elizabeth Hinton, Michael Moss and more

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 164:55


Today on Boston Public Radio we're on tape, bringing you some of our favorite conversations from recent months: Sebastian Junger speaks about his latest book, “Freedom,” which looks at the meaning of freedom in its many iterations. Junger is a journalist, author and filmmaker. Sy Montgomery returns for our monthly edition of “Afternoon Zoo.” She talks about her sympathy for the humpback whale who nearly swallowed a lobster fisherman off of Cape Cod, stand-up fathers of the animal kingdom, and the dogs who are learning to talk to their owners. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. Her latest book is "The Hummingbird's Gift: Wonder, Beauty and Renewal on Wings."  Michelle Singletary discusses her latest book, “What To Do With Your Money When Crisis Hits: A Survival Guide.” Singletary is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Washington Post, whose award-winning column "The Color of Money" provides insight into the world of personal finance. Michael Moss previews his new book and explains how some drug addiction experts are shifting their attention to food addiction. Moss is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author. His latest book is “Hooked: Food, Free Will And How The Food Giants Exploit Our Addictions.” Dr. Marcia Chatelain discusses the historic role McDonald's plays in the Black community and the origins of Black capitalism. Dr. Chatelain is a professor of history in African American studies at Georgetown University. She's the author of “Franchise: The Golden Arches in Black America,” which won a Pulitzer Prize this year for history. Elizabeth Hinton shares her research into the cycle of police and mob violence facing Black Americans, and how Black communities' responses to brutality have been characterized throughout history. Hinton is an associate professor of history in the Department of History and the Department of African American Studies at Yale. She's also a professor of law at Yale Law School. Her latest book is “America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s.” Daniel Lieberman talks about his new book on the evolution of human beings and our aversion to exercise, called "Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved To Do Is Healthy And Rewarding.” Lieberman is a professor in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University.

The United States of Anxiety
What Does Black Ambition Sound Like?

The United States of Anxiety

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 50:48


James Reese Europe was already famous when he enlisted to fight in World War I. But the band he took to the frontlines — as part of the famous 369th Infantry Regiment, also known as the Harlem Hellfighters — thurst him, and Black American music, onto the global stage. Moran sits down at the piano to show Kai how Europe's band changed music, and how jazz carries the resilient sound of Black history and ambition in America.  Companion listening for this episode: The ‘Beautiful Experiments' Left Out of Black History (2/8/2021) Saidiya Hartman introduces Kai to the young women whose radical lives were obscured by respectability politics, in the second installment of our Future of Black History series.   “The United States of Anxiety” airs live on Sunday evenings at 6pm ET. The podcast episodes are lightly edited from our live broadcasts. To catch all the action, tune into the show on Sunday nights via the stream on WNYC.org/anxiety or tell your smart speakers to play WNYC.    We want to hear from you! Connect with us on Twitter @WNYC using the hashtag #USofAnxiety or email us at anxiety@wnyc.org.

Sharon Says So
70. Until I Am Free with Dr. Keisha N. Blain

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 36:53


In this episode, Dr. Keisha Blain joins Sharon to talk about voting rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer. In her new book, Until I Am Free, Dr. Blain chronicles the life of Fannie Lou Hamer, a change-maker who has been set on the back shelf of history. Fannie Lou gave a powerful speech at the Democratic National Convention in 1964 at a time when Black voter suppression and violence against Black Americans was practiced across the country, especially in the South. Learn about how the Civil Rights Movement isn't an event we can leave to history, but a significant era that's still impacting Black American voters today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Living The Principles Podcast
Black American in Nigeria

Living The Principles Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 42:23


In this episode, LaTricia and Phyllis have a conversation with Porsche Steele.  Porsche shares her story of how she met her husband online, traveled to Nigeria to meet him and decided to stay in Nigeria.  She also shares the passionate work she does through the Emancipation Movement and her publishing services company, MysticqueRose.  Porsche is hosting a virtual Kwanzaa event during the seven days of Kwanzaa.  To learn move, visit her Facebook page @emancipation365 and her Instagram page @emancipationmvmt

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
December 22, 2021 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 53:14


Wednesday on the NewsHour, hospitals in the United States struggle to handle the influx of COVID patients following the rapid spread of the omicron variant. Then, we speak with a progressive Democrat about whether the party can salvage the president's derailed legislative agenda. And, the racial divide on COVID vaccinations remains stubbornly wide with many Black Americans still vaccine hesitant. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What Hartford has learned in its fight to raise Black vaccination rates

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 8:57


About 72 percent of Americans have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. During much of the vaccine rollout, Hispanic and Black Americans have been less likely to get vaccinated. The gap between white and Hispanic Americans has largely closed, but the vaccination rate for the Black community still lags significantly behind. Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
What Hartford has learned in its fight to raise Black vaccination rates

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 8:57


About 72 percent of Americans have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. During much of the vaccine rollout, Hispanic and Black Americans have been less likely to get vaccinated. The gap between white and Hispanic Americans has largely closed, but the vaccination rate for the Black community still lags significantly behind. Kaiser Health News correspondent Sarah Varney reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Disrupted
How understanding the history of African America helps put our present moment in context

Disrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 49:00


This episode originally aired on March 31st, 2021 This moment in American history can feel unprecedented. But white supremacist violence and debates over whose rights really matter are hardly new. This hour on Disrupted, we re-air conversations with two authors who provide crucial historical and theoretical context to this moment. Keisha N. Blain co-edited Four Hundred Souls, A Community History of African America. Jamal Greene is the author of How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession With Rights Is Tearing America Apart, a book untangling the complex history and politics of rights in America. GUESTS: Keisha N. Blain – Associate Professor of History at the University of Pittsburgh and co-editor of Four Hundred Souls, A Community History of African America. Her new book is called Until I Am Free: Fannie Lou Hamer's Enduring Message to America Jamal Greene – Dwight Professor of Law at Columbia Law School and Author of How Rights Went Wrong: Why Our Obsession With Rights Is Tearing America Apart This episode of Disrupted was originally produced by Catie Talarski and Anna Elizabeth. The rest of our team includes James Szkobel-Wolff and Zshekinah Collier. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Area 510 Podcast
Ep. 47 (We Ain't Right)

The Area 510 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 59:01


On episode 47, we start off will checking in with everyone, especially our host TJ as he experienced his first death at his job then we give a quick shout out to Cynthia Brown and follow up with some news going on in the Oakland, CA. We then discuss our thoughts on Iran sanctioning the U.S. over how they treated Black Americans and lead with the recent painting from Jonathan Harris. Lastly, we send out condolences to the Jōji Yanami, the voice of King Kai from Dragon Ball Z & end it with our Playaz & Freakz segement and a little roast session. Here is the time stamp: 0:00 (Intro) 3:53 (Wellness Check) 7:10 (Cynthia Brown's Glow Up) 10:04 (Bay News: OPD getting more Funding/Weather Changes) 16:39 (Iran Sanctions US over treatment of Black People) 28:41 (Jonathan Harris painting) 36:26 (R.I.P voice of King Kai/DBZ Kids) 38:58 (Playaz & Freakz) 51:47 (Roast Session) 56:39 (Closing Episode 47) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/area510/support

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition
Dul-Sayin' - The History of Kwanzaa

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 6:49


Dulcé Sloan gives a crash course on the Kwanzaa holiday, from its origins in 1966 as a way for Black Americans to honor their heritage to its waning popularity over the past three decades. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Biblical Mind
Slaves Understood Paul‘s Words While Slave Owners Twisted Them (Lisa Bowens)

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 39:01


Discussing her book African American Readings of Paul: Reception, Resistance, and Transformation, Dr. Lisa Bowens identifies how people twisted the Scriptures written by the Apostle Paul to promote slavery and justify it as a Christian practice. But at the same time, Dr. Bowens explains, Black Americans were interpreting Paul's writings for themselves, and throughout history, they still appealed to Pauline texts extensively to protest and resist their oppression, and ultimately to build a strong foundation for the American church. Show notes: 0:26 Hidden voices in Black Christian thought 4:25 What does sScripture actually say? 6:15 Nancy Ambrose and how Paul was preached to the enslaved 10:18 1774 Slave Petition 16:37 The slavery project and the broadening of the canon 19:40 John Jea and the miracle of literacy 25:40 Why we need to hear different voices 29:50 Salvation is spiritual and physical 34:37 For economic gain Show notes by Dominique LaCroix Credits for the music TBM podcast: hebraicthought.org/credits.

Part-Time Genius
Introducing: Immunity in our Community Episode 1

Part-Time Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 24:07


The development of COVID-19 vaccines, questions about mRNA technology, equitable distribution, and uncertainty about the long-term effects aren't the only factors fueling vaccine hesitancy amongst African Americans: a history of harmful studies, medical malpractice, and health care inequities continues to impact the community today. In this first episode of Covid-19 Immunity In Our Community, host Robin Roberts chats with Sandra Lindsay, the first American and first Black American to receive the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, and Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith, COVID-19 Equity Task Force Chair in the Biden administration, about how we can start to rebuild the Black community's trust in the vaccines, in order to achieve herd immunity and, hopefully, regain some sense of normalcy in our everyday lives. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

New Books Network
Samantha Seeley, "Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the United States" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 40:04


Samantha Seeley is the author of Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the United States, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2021. Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain explores the how, at various levels of government and among a variety of people the right to remain and who would be subject to removal was debated. Seeley's study illustrates how Native Americans and African Americans had to navigate a myriad of challenges to their place both within and outside of the nation. This work reorients the history of U.S. expansion and reconsiders how the early United States was built around the movement and non-movement of people. Dr. Seeley is an Assistant Professor at the University of Richmond. Derek Litvak is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland—College Park. His dissertation, "The Specter of Black Citizens: Race, Slavery, and Citizenship in the Early United States," examines how citizenship was used to both bolster the institution of slavery and exclude Black Americans from the body politic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in African American Studies
Samantha Seeley, "Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the United States" (UNC Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 40:04


Samantha Seeley is the author of Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain: Migration and the Making of the United States, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2021. Race, Removal, and the Right to Remain explores the how, at various levels of government and among a variety of people the right to remain and who would be subject to removal was debated. Seeley's study illustrates how Native Americans and African Americans had to navigate a myriad of challenges to their place both within and outside of the nation. This work reorients the history of U.S. expansion and reconsiders how the early United States was built around the movement and non-movement of people. Dr. Seeley is an Assistant Professor at the University of Richmond. Derek Litvak is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland—College Park. His dissertation, "The Specter of Black Citizens: Race, Slavery, and Citizenship in the Early United States," examines how citizenship was used to both bolster the institution of slavery and exclude Black Americans from the body politic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Lee B. Wilson, "Bonds of Empire: The English Origins of Slave Law in South Carolina and British Plantation America, 1660–1783" (Cambridge UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 47:46


Lee B. Wilson is the author of Bonds of Empire: The English Origins of Slave Law in South Carolina and British Plantation America, 1660-1783, published by Cambridge University Press in 2021. Bonds of Empire explores how English law gave the institution of slavery its ability to thieve and grow. By looking at how law was practiced, instead of solely focusing on how it was written, Wilson follows the development of the institution of slavery in South Carolina and the English law of slavery in the colony. The day to day legal life of slavery in the colon shows just how much English law was crucial, and not opposed, to the enslavement of people. Dr. Wilson is an Associate Professor at Clemson University. Derek Litvak is a PhD candidate at the University of Maryland—College Park. His dissertation, "The Specter of Black Citizens: Race, Slavery, and Citizenship in the Early United States," examines how citizenship was used to both bolster the institution of slavery and exclude Black Americans from the body politic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

Touré Show
Michael Eric Dyson–I Love Blackness

Touré Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 71:04


Michael Eric Dyson is a brilliant public intellectual and a great friend. I love talking with him because he's genius and because he loves Blackness so deeply. Here we dive into some of the messages in his new book Entertaining Race where he talks about the history of Black Americans being entertainers on every level. We are performative on a celebrity level from music to screen to sports, but we are also amazingly and beautifully performative on every level. Regular Black folks talk and walk and greet each other in ways that are expressive and performative and beautiful. We talk through all of that. Instagram: @toureshow Twitter: @toure Toure Show Episode 301 Host & Writer: Touré Senior Producer: Jackie Garofano Assistant Producer: Adell Coleman Editor: Ryan Woodhall Photographers: Chuck Marcus, Shanta Covington, and Nick Karp Booker: Claudia Jean The House: DCP Entertainment Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

So Called Oreos
[Playback] ”So How Do You Celebrate Holidays With Black Families?”

So Called Oreos

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 57:15


We're taking a look back at an episode during the So-Called Oreos day for the holiday season! The hosts start off on a little bit of a funny tangent (sorry!) about a white student not knowing he applied to an HBCU and some funny Jonas Brothers interactions. The conversation revolves around how Black people celebrate the holidays and how it may different from our white counterparts. Rachel and Amari explain how they celebrate in a Caribbean household and the four debate if potato salad is only seasonal and what goes on yams. They later discuss the history behind Kwanzaa and why many Black Americans don't celebrate as well as how to deal with grief during the holidays. Is Kwanzaa Still A Thing? www.npr.org/2012/12/28/16820286…anzaa-still-a-thing Join us on Discord!: discord.gg/d3RrepdTdQ Email: sufficientlyblackpodcast@gmail.com Twitter: @sufficientlyblk Instagram: @sufficinetlyblk YouTube: https://bit.ly/3nutxC2 Audience Survey: bit.ly/2vOYtH9

Claima Stories with Bimma
John Okevu Ojo II shares story about how his Nigerian heritage inspired his brand Little Africa

Claima Stories with Bimma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 33:16


On today's show, recorded live at ComplexCon in Long Beach, California, I speak with emerging designer John Okevu Ojo II of apparel brand Little Africa. Growing up in South Central, John grew up splitting time between his Black American mother and Nigerian father, oftentimes feeling as if he sat between two worlds. Former Nike Marketer, Bimma Williams interviews leading and emerging BIPOC creatives about how they were able to break into the notoriously guarded creative and sneaker industries. From these stories, listeners will learn how to claim their dream careers. Featuring Melody Ehsani, Jeff Staple, and James Whitner. Listen and Subscribe now.Subscribe: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/claimastories/

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, Omicron and Delta variants, and vaccine updates for 12-10-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 5:02


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest on Omicron and other COVID variants and new hotspots for December 10th, 2021. The number of COVID deaths in the US has been horrific, but researchers are again saying those deaths have been vastly undercounted. Especially among Native, Hispanic and Black Americans. New data at the county level for 2020 and January through October of this year gives more detail than ever, including where someone died, what other causes of death were on the death certificate, and whether a body was autopsied. Looking at the new data, public health experts say the true death toll is at least 20% higher than the official tally. That means the number of Americans who have died from the virus could be close to 1 million. The FDA gave emergency authorization for 16- and 17-year-olds to get Pfizer's booster once they're six months beyond their last dose. The CDC followed up hours later with a strong recommendation encouraging those teens to get the shot as soon as possible. Being an anti-vaxxer in Austria is getting expensive. There are now plans to impose fines of nearly $4,000 on anyone who flouts the vaccine mandate coming in February to all residents 14 and over. It's the first European country to implement a general vaccine mandate. If your problem with the vaccine is that it's not natural enough, how about a plant-based one? GlaxoSmithKline seems to have one that in tests has been shown to be 71% effective at protecting against COVID. Here's where the irony kicks in. GlaxoSmithKline's partner is Medicago, a subsidiary of Philip Morris, the cigarette people. And the plant being used is a close relative of tobacco. A new survey from the Public Religion Research Institute shows only 10% of Americans believe getting a COVID vaccine conflicts with their religious beliefs. 59% even say too many people are using religious beliefs as an excuse. 60% say there's no valid religious reason to refuse a vaccine. They're a bit more divided on whether religious exemptions should be allowed at all. In the United States cases were up 27%, deaths are up 12%, and hospitalizations are up 20% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending up since November 29. The five states that had the most daily deaths per 100,000 are Kentucky, Michigan, West Virginia, Wyoming, and Tennessee. There are 9,841,074 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Connecticut 73%, Rhode Island 70%, Delaware 66%, Massachusetts 54%, and Illinois and New Jersey 51%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Waseca, MN. Seward, KS. Allen, KS. Fayette, IN. Vermilion, IL. Bennington, VT. Fountain, IN. Benton, MN. Sullivan, NH. And Piatt, IL. There have been at least 794,647 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 74.4%, Rhode Island at 74.1%, and Maine at 73.5%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are Wyoming at 46.3%, Alabama unchanged at 46.6%, and Mississippi unchanged at 47.4%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 60.4%. Globally, cases were up 8% and deaths were flat over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 21,695,681 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 110,894. France 56,854. The U.K. 50,867. Russia 30,209. And Poland 27,458. There have been at least 5,286,786 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
'Woke Racism' tackles anti-racism, performative action and its effect on Black Americans

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 7:29


Jeffrey Brown visits Columbia University to talk to professor and author John McWhorter, whose new book, "Woke Racism: How a New Religion Has Betrayed Black America," pushes back on ideas that have gained popularity in recent years amid the ongoing national debate over race and racism. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Ezra Klein Show
The father of environmental justice

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 50:51


Vox's Jamil Smith talks with Dr, Robert Bullard, a pioneer in the crusade for environmental justice, about his more than four decades in the fight. They discuss how the movement to recognize environmental civil rights began, overcame some of its early opposition, and the landmark legal case that established a constitutional protection against racist environmental policies and practices. Bullard, a member of the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council, also discusses how the Biden administration plans to address disproportionately affected communities. Host: Jamil Smith (@JamilSmith), Senior Correspondent, Vox Guest: Robert Bullard (@DrBobBullard), co-chair, National Black Environmental Justice Network; professor, Texas Southern University References:  "Another Reason We Can't Breathe" by Jamil Smith (Rolling Stone; Oct. 27, 2020) The 17 Principles of Environmental Justice (adopted by the NBEJN on Oct. 27, 1991) "Environmental Racism: Recognition, Litigation, and Alleviation" by Pamela Duncan (Tulane Environmental Law Journal, vol. 6, no. 2; 1993) Dumping in Dixie: Race, Class, and Environmental Quality by Robert Bullard (Routledge; 1990) "One reason why coronavirus is hitting Black Americans the hardest" by Ranjani Chakraborty (Vox; May 22, 2020) "There's a clear fix to helping Black communities fight pollution" by Rachel Ramirez (Vox; Feb. 26) "The Path to Achieving Justice 40" by Shalanda Young, Brenda Mallory, and Gina McCarthy (White House; July 20) Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey Vox Audio Fellow: Victoria Dominguez Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Megyn Kelly Show
Rise in Crime, Corporate Cowardice, and Media Hypocrisy in America, with Bari Weiss and Brandon Tatum | Ep. 216

The Megyn Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 94:17


Megyn Kelly is joined by Bari Weiss, "Common Sense" editor and "Honestly" host, and Brandon Tatum, author of "Beaten Black and Blue," to talk about corporate cowardice and money over morals related to China, the WTA standing up to China, the rise in "smash and grab" robberies and crime generally in America, an overly-racialized column from the New York Times, how life changes (and sometimes improves) with internet haters, Weiss' marriage, the Colin Kaepernick film, the state of policing in America, the push for Black Americans to consider options other than the Democratic party, confronting adversity, the Jussie Smollett trial, Chris Cuomo being fired by CNN, media hypocrisy, and more.Follow The Megyn Kelly Show on all social platforms: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/MegynKellyTwitter: http://Twitter.com/MegynKellyShowInstagram: http://Instagram.com/MegynKellyShowFacebook: http://Facebook.com/MegynKellyShow Find out more information at: https://www.devilmaycaremedia.com/megynkellyshow 

The Journal.
The Designer Who Made Streetwear Luxury

The Journal.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 20:52


Designer Virgil Abloh became the first Black American to hold a top creative job at a major luxury label. Abloh, who was artistic director of menswear at Louis Vuitton, was able to turn ordinary streetwear like hoodies and sneakers into high fashion, commanding big price tags and drawing celebrity customers. WSJ's Jacob Gallagher unpacks the legacy of Virgil Abloh, who died earlier this week at age 41. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices