Podcasts about Ku Klux Klan

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

American white supremacy group

  • 987PODCASTS
  • 1,283EPISODES
  • 48mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Ku Klux Klan

Show all podcasts related to ku klux klan

Latest podcast episodes about Ku Klux Klan

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers
THE FISHERMEN AND THE DRAGON-Kirk Wallace Johnson

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 57:06


By the late 1970s, the fishermen of the Texas Gulf Coast were struggling. The bays that had sustained generations of shrimpers and crabbers before them were being poisoned by nearby petrochemical plants, oil spills, pesticides, and concrete. But as their nets came up light, the white shrimpers could only see one culprit: the small but growing number of newly resettled Vietnamese refugees who had recently started fishing. Turf was claimed. Guns were flashed. Threats were made. After a white crabber was killed by a young Vietnamese refugee in self-defense, the situation became a tinderbox primed to explode, and the Grand Dragon of the Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan saw an opportunity to stoke the fishermen's rage and prejudices. At a massive Klan rally near Galveston Bay one night in 1981, he strode over to an old boat graffitied with the words U.S.S. VIET CONG, torch in hand, and issued a ninety-day deadline for the refugees to leave or else “it's going to be a helluva lot more violent than Vietnam!” The white fishermen roared as the boat burned, convinced that if they could drive these newcomers from the coast, everything would return to normal. A shocking campaign of violence ensued, marked by burning crosses, conspiracy theories, death threats, torched boats, and heavily armed Klansmen patrolling Galveston Bay. The Vietnamese were on the brink of fleeing, until a charismatic leader in their community, a highly decorated colonel, convinced them to stand their ground by entrusting their fate with the Constitution. Drawing upon a trove of never-before-published material, including FBI and ATF records, unprecedented access to case files, and scores of first-hand interviews with Klansmen, shrimpers, law enforcement, environmental activists, lawyers, perpetrators and victims, Johnson uncovers secrets and secures confessions to crimes that went unsolved for more than forty years. This explosive investigation of a forgotten story, years in the making, ultimately leads Johnson to the doorstep of the one woman who could see clearly enough to recognize the true threat to the bays—and who now represents the fishermen's last hope. THE FISHERMEN AND THE DRAGON: Fear, Greed, and a Fight for Justice on the Gulf Coast-Kirk Wallace Johnson

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Author and Journalist Kirk Wallace Johnson and Comedian JL Cauvin Episode 664

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 99:05


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day.  Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls. We hang out virtually on Thursday Nights at 8pm EST and anytime all of the time on Discord Kirk Wallace Johnson is an author and screenwriter.  His books include The Fishermen and the Dragon: Fear, Greed, and a Fight for Justice on the Gulf Coast, The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century, To Be a Friend is Fatal: the Fight to Save the Iraqis America Left Behind.  He is also the creator of Drug Spies, a scripted series about pharmaceutical espionage.  He is the founder of the List Project to Resettle Iraqi Allies. His writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, and Foreign Policy, among others. Prior to founding the List Project, Johnson served in Iraq with the U.S. Agency for International Development in Baghdad and then Fallujah as the Agency's first coordinator for reconstruction in the war-torn city. He is a a senior fellow at the USC Annenberg Center on Communication Leadership and Policy, and the recipient of fellowships from the American Academy in Berlin, Yaddo, MacDowell, and the Wurlitzer Foundation.  Prior to his work in Iraq, he conducted research on political Islamism as a Fulbright Scholar in Egypt.  He received his BA from the University of Chicago in 2002. Born in West Chicago, he lives in Los Angeles with his wife, son, and daughter. In the late 1970s, the fishermen of the Texas Gulf Coast were struggling. The bays that had sustained generations of shrimpers and crabbers were being poisoned by nearby petrochemical plants, oil spills, pesticides, and concrete.  The White fishermen, though, could only see one culprit: the small but growing number of newly resettled Vietnamese refugees who had recently started fishing. Tensions climbed as White fishermen called for refugee bans and threatened violence in the name of protecting what they claimed was their turf. After a young Vietnamese man killed a White crabber in self-defense, a posse responded by torching Vietnamese boats and a home, leading the Grand Dragon of the Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan to sense an opportunity. Over the next two years, amid a garish campaign of violence, death threats, and arson, with terrifying Klan rallies and boat patrols, many Vietnamese were ready to flee – until a charismatic South Vietnamese colonel convinced them to stand their ground and put their trust in the Constitution.  Throughout the dizzying clash, which culminated in a tense courtroom showdown, one woman could see clearly enough to recognize the true threat to the bays—and her determination to take on the real villains became the fishermen's last hope. Kirk Wallace Johnson's gripping book depicts a community set on fire by hatred, xenophobia, and ecological disaster. Drawing upon a trove of never-before-published material, case files, and interviews with Klansmen, shrimpers, law enforcement, environmental activists, lawyers, perpetrators, and victims, Johnson uncovers secrets and secures confessions to crimes that went unsolved for more than forty years. It's a story that braids corporate malfeasance with a battle over shrinking natural resources, at a turning point in the modern white supremacist movement, and highlights one woman's relentless battle for environmental justice. ------------------------------------------------------------------ JL Cauvin is the best Trump impersonator in the world. He is also a very talented Stand Up Comic with who I have known for a long time. JL has recorded 6 stand up albums! J-L's act is incredibly diverse and has led to six stand up albums: 2006′s Racial Chameleon, 2008′s Diamond Maker, 2012′s Too Big To Fail and 2013′s Keep My Enemies Closer, 2016's Israeli Tortoise, which hit #1 on the iTunes comedy chart and his 2018 double album Thots & Prayers. He has also released two albums as Donald Trump: 2017's Fireside Craps, an entire album as Donald Trump which hit #1 on the iTunes comedy chart and 2020's Fireside Craps: The Deuce which went #1 on both Amazon and iTunes' comedy charts and broke into the Top 40 on iTunes' overall album charts. Subscribe to JL new Patreon and get tickets to see us both this Saturday May 14 in NYC JL is the host of 2 podcasts "Righteous Prick" and "Making Podcasts Great Again"   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

QAnon Anonymous
Premium Episode 180: The Venus Project

QAnon Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 9:00


A self-taught futurist imagines a utopian world with no money, war, scarcity or property. Jacque Fresco considered himself beyond capitalism and communism, relying on technology, science, and resource management to create a perfect, cybernetically enhanced world. He was also pretty horny and claimed to have changed the minds of several Ku Klux Klan members about race. His ideas ended up being showcased at the United Nations. Subscribe for $5 a month to get an extra episode of QAA every week + access to ongoing series like 'Trickle Down': http://www.patreon.com/QAnonAnonymous Tickets to our Eugene, Oregon show on September 10th: http://tour.qanonanonymous.com Music by Pontus Berghe. Editing by Corey Klotz. Merch / Join the Discord Community / Find the Lost Episodes / Etc: http://qanonanonymous.com

New Books Network
Adele Holmes, "Winter's Reckoning" (She Writes Press, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 30:56


Madeline (Maddie) Fairbanks has created a satisfying life for herself in Jamesville since the death of her husband, Samuel, one of the town's leading citizens. An herbalist from a long line of female healers, she provides medical care to local residents at all levels of society, traveling into the hills and from house to house with Renetta Morgan, her young assistant. Although Ren is black and Maddie white, the townsfolk accept their partnership, since the only alternative is a circuit-riding doctor who appears a few times a year. Race relations in Jamesville are tense, with restrictions on who can walk where and which door to the general store serves which type of customer, yet for the most part, Ren and Maddie manage to skirt the rules without drawing undue attention to themselves. Then Carl Howard arrives in town. At first, he intends merely to pass through, but when he discovers that the town is waiting for a vicar who has not appeared on schedule, Carl sees an opening and announces that he is the reverend assigned to Jamesville's Protestant church. On his first Sunday, he preaches a hellfire-and-brimstone sermon condemning outspoken, independent women and racial integration. Maddie opposes his point of view, and he fights back by declaring her interest in herbal medicine the equivalent of witchcraft. Before long, the two are at loggerheads, Ren is caught in the middle, and the Ku Klux Klan is riding the wave of Carl's approval to threaten the people of Jamesville. In Winter's Reckoning (She Writes Press, 2022), Adele Holmes has created an unflinching portrayal of how one narcissistic individual can wreak havoc on an entire community, fanning the flames of underlying conflicts until they explode into violence and hatred. But she also shows how the strength of family, friends, and a powerful, committed heroine can combine to overcome such challenges—producing a novel as heart-warming as it is thought-provoking. Adele Holmes, MD, worked as a pediatrician for twenty years before retiring and turning her attention to fiction. Winter's Reckoning is her first novel. C. P. Lesley is the author of two historical fiction series set during the childhood of Ivan the Terrible and three other novels. Her latest novel, Song of the Sinner, appeared in January 2022. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Hashtag History
EP 109: The Racist History of the State of Oregon

Hashtag History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 42:14


This week on Hashtag History, we will be discussing the racist History of the State of Oregon. While many states across the United States have incredible racist History, Oregon is the only state in the country to enter the Union with a Black exclusion law, quite literally banning Black people within its borders. When they became a State in 1859, they entered as a Free State - meaning that slavery would not be permitted within its borders - but that's not because these people were on the right side of History. No, Oregon was so deeply racist that they didn't even want to look at Black people; enslaved or not. Oregon would not ratify the Fourteenth Amendment - the Amendment that provided equal protection of the law and gave citizenship to all Black people, including those formerly enslaved - until 1973! They also didn't ratify the Fifteenth Amendment - which gave Black men the right to vote - until 1959! And although Portland, Oregon's most populous city, has long had the reputation of being very liberal and progressive, it continues to rank as one of the whitest big cities in America. According to the most recent national census, Oregon's demographics show that nearly 83% of the state population is white with less than 2% Black. For Portland specifically, about 75% of the city is white and less than 6% is Black. We are going to be diving into all the things this week: How Oregon was quite literally established as a White Utopia from the onset, how white surpremacy hate groups (particularly the Ku Klux Klan) thrived - and continue to thrive - there, the gentrification and displacement of Black Americans (particularly in Portland), and what the State has done to combat this dark History. Follow Hashtag History on Instagram @hashtaghistory_podcast for all of the pictures mentioned in this episode. Citations for all sources can be located on our website at www.HashtagHistory-Pod.com. You can also check out our website for super cute merch! You can now sponsor a cocktail and get a shout-out on air! Just head to www.buymeacoffee.com/hashtaghistory or head to the Support tab on our website! You can locate us on www.Patreon.com/hashtaghistory where you can donate $1 a month to our Books and Booze Supply. All of your support goes a long ways and we are endlessly grateful! To show our gratitude, all Patreon Supporters receive an automatic 15% OFF all merchandise in our merchandise store, bonus Hashtag Hangouts episodes, a shoutout on social media, and stickers! Check out Macy's delicious wine here → https://glnk.io/rpln/hashtaghistory-podcast #macyswineshop THANKS FOR LISTENING!

Planeta Invierno
El Ku Klux Klan: historia y antecedentes. Parte 1

Planeta Invierno

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 35:16


El Ku Klux Klan se fundó en el sur de Estados Unidos en 1865, al terminar la guerra civil, con el propósito de defender la supremacía blanca, que se había visto en entredicho por la Reconstrucción, un programa federal que otorgaba ciertos derechos a la población negra. Parte 1.

Pod Damn America
Hot Fire Anders Rap Session

Pod Damn America

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 69:53


For some reason we rap a lot on this one. Also there's Choco Tacos, The Today Show, The Ku Klux Klan, and Willy Wonka. COME TO ANDERS SHOW IN BROOKLYN ON SATURDAY https://www.eventbrite.com/e/botanical-comedy-tickets-386570531867 MERCH poddamnamerica.bigcartel.com PATREON + DISCORD patreon.com/poddamnamerica

Aló Miami: Desmitificando EE.UU.
Aló Miami - Ep. 36 - El Ku Klux Klan de ayer y hoy

Aló Miami: Desmitificando EE.UU.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 49:59


El KKK nació por despecho a consecuencia de la guerra perdida y el fin de la esclavitud. Sin embargo, esta organización ha ido transformándose con el paso de los años, consiguiendo que el odio se convirtiera en algo rentable y moldeable. En este episodio veremos por qué el KKK aún existe y también por qué hoy en día no es, ni de cerca, el grupo supremacista blanco más peligroso.Puedes ver las notas de este podcast en www.alomiami.com y, si te apetece apoyarnos, puedes invitarnos a un café en https://ko-fi.com/alo_miami o apuntarte a nuestro Patreon para poder tener acceso a mucho más contenido. https://www.patreon.com/alo_miamiSolo allí podrás escuchar el podcast con Yankimarido donde damos nuestra opinión personal sobre todo esto y hablamos sobre muuchas otras cosas relacionadas.

The Takeaway
Summer Reading Recommendations From Our Listeners

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 3:47


Whether you're interested in history, politics, memoirs, or light reads by the pool, our listeners have recommendations for you: "Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil" by Susan Neiman “In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman's Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings.” "Against Fascism and War"  A report to the 7th Congress of the Communist International, 1935 that includes a 1936 speech on the People's Front and a short speech to Young Communist International. Foreword by James West, then a U.S. youth delegate to the 7th Congress.  "Dreams of El Dorado: A History of the American West" by H.W. BrandsIn Dreams of El Dorado, H. W. Brands tells the thrilling, panoramic story of the settling of the American West. "The Soul of America" by John Meachum Meachum writes about the Civil War, Reconstruction, and the birth of the Lost Cause; the backlash against immigrants in the First World War and the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s; the fight for women's rights; the demagoguery of Huey Long and Father Coughlin and the isolationist work of America First in the years before World War II; the anti-Communist witch-hunts led by Senator Joseph McCarthy; and Lyndon Johnson's crusade against Jim Crow. Each of these dramatic hours in our national life have been shaped by the contest to lead the country to look forward rather than back, to assert hope over fear—a struggle that continues even now. “Waterman's Song” by David Cecelski The first major study of slavery in the maritime South, The Waterman's Song chronicles the world of slave and free black fishermen, pilots, rivermen, sailors, ferrymen, and other laborers who, from the colonial era through Reconstruction, plied the vast inland waters of North Carolina from the Outer Banks to the upper reaches of tidewater rivers. "Four Funerals, No Marriage: A Memoir" by Mike Keren                                                                            Author Mike Keren gives his readers an inside look at his unexpected foray into caregiving to his sick and dying parents and in-laws. Often funny and always poignant, the story begins when his loving but difficult parents announce they are moving back to New Jersey from their retirement home in North Carolina because they “never really liked it there.” Within days of arriving on a house-hunting trip, his father is hospitalized with a stroke and his mother with another in a series of heart attacks. At the same time, his partner's mother is recuperating from a hysterectomy and struggling with chemotherapy after a diagnosis of uterine cancer. Additionally, he must deal with the unhappy marriage between his parents, sibling relationships that have often been his undoing, a homophobic world, and his own lifetime of affective dysregulation. "The Gown" by Jennifer Robson'It is about two young women who work for a dress designer just after World War II, and they were involved in making the gown for Queen Elizabeth's wedding.' "How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us Versus Them" by Jason StanleyAs the child of refugees of World War II Europe and a renowned philosopher and scholar of propaganda, Jason Stanley has a deep understanding of how democratic societies can be vulnerable to fascism: Nations don't have to be fascist to suffer from fascist politics. In fact, fascism's roots have been present in the United States for more than a century. Alarmed by the pervasive rise of fascist tactics both at home and around the globe, Stanley focuses here on the structures that unite them, laying out and analyzing the ten pillars of fascist politics—the language and beliefs that separate people into an “us” and a “them.” He knits together reflections on history, philosophy, sociology, and critical race theory with stories from contemporary Hungary, Poland, India, Myanmar, and the United States, among other nations.    

TAF International 2020 Organization
Global State of Emergency(Italian,Spanish,French,Portuguese,English)

TAF International 2020 Organization

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 22:07


To the United Nations, A Royal Order of Summons to the International Criminal Court by Royal Secret Service Of the Queendom Of Marafino for: Trump Organization, Political Associates,National Rifle Association,Ku Klux Klan, Proud Boys, Oath Keepers, Patriot Front, Neo Nazis, Conspiracy Theorists, Rogue Police Officers. Royal Document file available on Instagram: hawkeye_2022 file U.N. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/taf-international-2019/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/taf-international-2019/support

I SEE U with Eddie Robinson
9: Vietnamese Fishermen v. the KKK [Encore]

I SEE U with Eddie Robinson

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 52:22


In 1981, militant Klansmen in East Texas waged a terror campaign against recently immigrated Vietnamese fishermen who were trying to make a living near Galveston Bay. As tensions heated up, some began to label the conflict a “race war.” But a legal argument brought justice to the vulnerable community of Vietnamese refugees. Join us we take you on a journey through the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico featuring 87-year-old South Vietnamese army colonel, Nguyen Van Nam; his son Michael; and acclaimed author Kirk Johnson. Host Eddie Robinson also chats with the prosecuting attorney of the case, David Berg, as well as the lawyer representing the Ku Klux Klan–Sam Adamo.

The Underworld Podcast
The Jewish & Redneck Gangsters that Beat the KKK: Charlie Birger w/ Jake Hanrahan

The Underworld Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 57:17


In the era of prohibition, Charlie Birger built a bootlegging and gambling empire in southern Illinois, otherwise known as little Cairo. He charmed women, passed out money to children and poor families, bought off all the police and politicians...and killed anyone who got in his way. But he wasn't the only building an army in 1920's rural Illinois. The second iteration of the Ku Klux Klan was on the rise and enacting their own version of vigilante justice, attacking bootleggers, immigrants, and anyone who didn't fit into their version of America. The Birger Gang wasn't having it. War was coming. Danny is joined by Jake Hanrahan of Popular Front.

the moonshyne Jones podcast
The Mississippi three- the story of three Civil Rights Workers= Heroes murdered by the Ku Klux Klan

the moonshyne Jones podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 12:44


In this episode I talk about the horrific actions of the Nashoba County Sheriff's Department and the Ku Klux Klan in Mississippi. They horrifically murdered three civil rights workers but at the same time led to the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Their courage to stand up against evil has changed more lies than they could have ever imagined and this episode is dedicated to them and to all of those who fought for equality in the United States of America. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/moonshynejones/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/moonshynejones/support

MURDERISH
Michael Donald: “A Mother's Fight to Take Down the KKK” | MURDERISH Ep. 114

MURDERISH

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 45:44 Very Popular


In March of 1981, Michael Donald became the latest victim in America's history of racial violence. The young Black man was beaten, killed, and lynched by two members of the local Ku Klux Klan in his hometown of Mobile, Alabama, for nothing more than crossing their path. The resulting murder investigation triggered his mother, Beulah Mae Donald, to sue the state Klan into oblivion. A small comfort for the victim of America's last recorded lynching and his family. Check us out: Visit Murderish.com for more info about the show and Creator/Host, Jami. The website also has links to buy MURDERISH merchandise and become a Patreon supporter. Patrons can get access to exclusive, ad-free episodes. To sign up for Patreon, click “Go Behind the Scenes” at murderish.com OR click here for a direct link to our Patreon page https://www.patreon.com/Murderish. Let's get social: @MurderishPodcast (Instagram & TikTok), @MurderishPod (Twitter), search “Murderish podcast” (Facebook). Sponsors: - Outschool: Visit Outschool.com/murderish & use code murderish to save $15 on your child's first class. - Stamps.com: Visit Stamps.com, click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code MURDERISH for a 4-week trial, free postage, and a digital scale. - Best Fiends: Download Best Fiends FREE in the App Store or Google Play and get $5 worth of in-game rewards when you reach level 5. - Shopify: Visit Shopify.com/murderish (all lowercase) for a free 14-day trial and full access to Shopify's entire suite of features. Dirty Money Moves: Women in White Collar Crime: Subscribe now in your favorite podcast app! New episodes drop every Thursday. Click here to listen on Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dirty-money-moves-women-in-white-collar-crime/id1619521092 Follow Dirty Money Moves: Women in White Collar Crime on Instagram, TikTok and Twitter @DirtyMoneyMoves. Want to advertise on this show? We've partnered with Cloud10 | iHeartRadio to handle our advertising requests. If you're interested in advertising on MURDERISH, send an email to Sahiba Krieger mailto:sahiba@cloud10.fm with a copy to mailto:jami@murderish.com. Sound design: Justin Hellstrom. Music: Some of the music in this podcast was composed by Nico Vettese of We Talk of Dreams Research & Writing: Melanie Griffin Remember, listening to this podcast doesn't make you a murderer - it just means you're murder...ish. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

DiscourseSMT
The Most Unlikely Baseball Matchup Ever

DiscourseSMT

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 22:43


Kevin Kenney, Mike Martin, & Shawn Shianna, descibe the film they're making about a 1925 baseball game between a Black Baseball Team and the Ku Klux Klan. To Contact Kevin, Mike, & Shawn: Kevin;  kwklawfirm@aol.com Mike: martin_mike62@yahoo.com Shawn: sschianna@gmail.com    

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness
How Has White Supremacy F*cked With Reproductive Justice? with Professor Jacki Antonovich

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 62:35 Very Popular


Well, here we are. Roe v. Wade has been overturned, and it's more urgent than ever to rally for reproductive rights across the country—and understand how we got to this point. This week, Professor Jacki Antonovich joins Jonathan to explore the history of abortion care and forced sterilization in the US, how white supremacy has shaped reproductive politics, and why Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman isn't the historical fiction we may think it is.Jacqueline Antonovich is an Assistant Professor of History at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, PA. She is the author of the article, “White Coats, White Hoods: The Medical Politics of the Ku Klux Klan in 1920s America,” and she is currently working on a book on the history of women physicians and medical imperialism in the American West. Jacqueline is the creator and co-founder of Nursing Clio, a collaborative blog project that examines the historical roots of present-day issues surrounding gender, health, and medicine.Make sure to follow Professor Antonovich on Twitter @jackiantonovich and Nursing Clio on Twitter @NursingClio and at nursingclio.org.  Follow us on Instagram and Twitter @CuriousWithJVN to join the conversation, and find resources in light of the SCOTUS decision. Jonathan is on Instagram and Twitter @JVN and @Jonathan.Vanness on Facebook. Transcripts for each episode are available at JonathanVanNess.com. Love listening to Getting Curious? Now, you can also watch Getting Curious—on Netflix! Head to netflix.com/gettingcurious to dive in. Our executive producer is Erica Getto. Our associate producer is Zahra Crim. Our editor is Andrew Carson. Our socials are run and curated by Middle Seat Digital. Our theme music is “Freak” by QUIÑ; for more, head to TheQuinCat.com. Getting Curious merch is available on PodSwag.com.

Hysteria 51
Blurry Hysteria 10: Georgia Guidestone Shenanigans | BONUS

Hysteria 51

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 31:35 Very Popular


We are back in Georgia this week to talk more Georgia Guidestone Shenanigans.  Why were they destroyed? Who has been rallying against them for months? Who really was Robert Christian? It gets dark this week as we explore the creators of the stones and their tiers to Eugenics and The Ku Klux Klan, among other horribleness. So, wipe the dust out of your eyes from the fallen stones and get ready for an eye opening episode of Hysteria 51.  Special thanks to this week's research sources: Videos Doc: Dark Clouds Over Elberton: The True Story of the Georgia Guidestones by Director Christian J. Pinto Websites Georgia Guidestones - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia_Guidestones David Duke - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Duke Anthem Veterans Memorial - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthem_Veterans_Memorial?fbclid=IwAR2HEbS31jNwgz9s8hybjqtdSbkkRBlzNVV6b3fCgTQdnDoaOAZOGhGphsw Van's Hardware Journal - http://vanshardware.com/2015/09/part-1-iowa-white-supremacist-behind-the-georgia-guidestones/ Email us your favorite WEIRD news stories: weird@hysteria51.com Support the Show Get exclusive content & perks as well as an ad and sponsor free experience at https://www.patreon.com/Hysteria51 from just $1 Join Our Discord Server https://discord.gg/WuPKAZ6cpg Shop Be the Best Dressed at your Cult Meeting! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hysteria-51?ref_id=4106 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
Joe Brolly: 'We essentially have the KKK operating in the North'

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 13:18


This interview contains language and descriptions some listeners may find disturbing. The scenes in parts of Northern Ireland during so-called celebrations for July 12th are akin to the Ku Klux Klan. That's according to commentator Joe Brolly, who was speaking on The Hard Shoulder after an effigy of the region's First Minister-designate Michelle O'Neill was placed on a bonfire. The PSNI say they are aware of the incident and are investigating. There has also been condemnation of the appearance of election posters and Irish Tricolour flags on fires. Joe Brolly described some of the scenes Kieran on the show. "For too long all of this has been tolerated, and it's very important to call it out. "We've lodge members singing about a murdered Catholic girl, and feeling confident enough to put that video out there. "Bandsmen yesterday smashing up a house in the university area, in front of the police, throwing a wheelie bin through the window. "Signs on all of the mega bonfires saying 'Kill all Catholics, kill all Taigs.

B2B Marketing and More With Pam Didner
218 - SOLO: Quick Guide To Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

B2B Marketing and More With Pam Didner

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 9:09


A big hello from Raleigh, North Carolina. For this SOLO episode, I want to address an important question, but it's not something discussed widely. That's right, today's question is how to improve your emotional intelligence. In this episode, I will answer questions like: What is emotional intelligence? Why is it important? What can you do to improve it? So, what is emotional intelligence, also known as “EQ”?   Here is my own definition: EQ is the ability to see other people's points of view and make an effort to modify your actions to reach a resolution during conflicts or disagreements. It's a more business-setting definition.   Here is a definition from our BFF, Google: EQ is the ability to understand, use, and manage your own emotions in positive ways to relieve stress, communicate effectively, empathize with others, overcome challenges, and defuse conflict.   So, possessing a high EQ allows someone to be able to communicate with others from an empathetic perspective and defuse conflict in a positive way.   Once you understand the definition, it's easy to see the benefits of having a high EQ.   It can help you: -  Build better personal relationships with others -  Defuse conflicts and find compromises -  Enhance team morale -  Be a better version of yourself     How can you increase your EQ?   Work on listening intently It's not about hearing what others say, it's about listening earnestly and attentively. Sometimes there are underlying messages that others try to communicate, but they are either too polite to say things bluntly or unable to find the right words to explain their points of view.   You need to listen carefully. The best way to be sure you understand is to paraphrase what you've heard back to them. Use words such as “Ok, let me try to understand…”, “Here is my understanding…”, and “Let me paraphrase…”   By regurgitating, you subconsciously open up your mind a bit, and your brain takes a mental note of a completely different opinion.   At the same time, you show others not only that you are willing to listen, but that you “understand” them. The willingness to listen is a way to show compassion and empathy. Listening intently is the first requisite to improving your emotional intelligence.   Walk a mile in someone else's shoes Yesterday, I watched a 2019 movie called The Best of Enemies on Netflix; the Taraji Henson and Sam Rockwell film is based on a true story that happened in Durham, NC, in 1971. An unlikely friendship was forged between Civil Rights Activist Ann Atwater and local Ku Klux Klan leader CP Ellis.   Honestly, the Rotten Tomatoes review is only 52% and the audience score is 76%, so take that with a grain of salt, but I think the message of the film is useful to our discussion today.   The backdrop of the story is that a Black elementary school was caught on fire, leaving students with nowhere to learn.   The city council made a finding that the school was still usable which was not true so NAACP helped to file a lawsuit and asked for the students to be allowed to temporarily attend the local white school while the fire-damaged facilities were being rebuilt.   Rather than the judge making a decision, he decided to bring proven mediation expert Bill Riddick to help the town come to an agreement about what should happen.   Bill used an approach called charrette which invites everyone to have their say. He asked Ann and CP to co-chair the charrette, and through the open discussions, they narrowed down the issues they needed to discuss. The townspeople were broken down into different groups to brainstorm and hammer out different resolution points. Then, they would regroup as a whole each night for the wrap-up.   They also selected 10 people, 5 people from each side, for what they called the Senate. The Senate would vote on all resolutions on the final night of the charrette.   Many things happened during the course of the film to shift CP's mindset, but a pivotal moment came when he took a visit to the fire-damaged school in the summer, typically a season of leisure for children, where Black students were still attending school to try and make up for the lost time. It was then that he began to have a real change of heart.   Spoiler alert: He cast a pivotal vote for the resolution of school integration. At the end of the movie, you can see the real Ann Atwater and CP Ellis sharing their own stories.   Walking in someone else's shoes always has some profound impact on all of us whether we agree with that person's point of view or not.   You don't need to agree with them, but you need to be able to see where they're coming from and why they do certain things or think in certain ways. Sometimes, learning to accept differences is one way to move forward. Other times, making a pivotal change is a way to move forward.     Ultimately, your level of emotional intelligence directly equates to your level of empathy. It will affect your ability to healthily resolve conflict and form and maintain relationships, both in your personal life and at work, so it's well worth examining where or how you can make adjustments and improve.   Honestly, I am not a very emotional person, aka, I am not very sympathetic at times.   My take on life: it's tough (life is tough so deal with it!), and as humans, we often just have to deal with it. Although plenty of people share that viewpoint, it doesn't mean that everyone is on the same level, so I need to remember to check myself in order not to come off as an ass.   We all deal with hardship differently, so it's important to be sensitive to others' coping mechanisms.   I've become more sympathetic over time, but I won't lie, it's taken patience and practice! Life experience and interactions with a wide array of people have taught me a few things such as putting myself in other people's shoes.   I'd like to end this video with a quote from Brene Brown:   “Empathy has no script. There is no right way or wrong way to do it. It's simply listening, holding space, withholding judgment, emotionally connecting, and communicating that incredibly healing message of ‘You're not alone.'”   There is no right or wrong way to improve your emotional intelligence, but a good starting point is to start listening intently, be open-minded, and imagine yourself in someone else's shoes.   What do you think? I'd love to hear your thoughts.   Take care, bye!

House Rich: The Real Estate Show
Bruce's Beach, seized by LA in 1924, returned to black family's descendants my take & a market update.

House Rich: The Real Estate Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 9:10


Almost 100 years after the government took their land, it has been returned. This week, the Los Angeles Board of Supervisors unanimously approved that a beachfront property known as Bruce's Beach be transferred back to the descendants of its former owners, Willa and Charles Bruce. The Bruces bought their little corner of Los Angeles in 1912 and, in an era when segregated beaches were common, constructed the West Coast's first resort for black people, the Guardian reported. In 1924, after the relentless harassment of racist neighbors and the Ku Klux Klan failing to push out the community the Bruces built, the Manhattan Beach City Council condemned their portion of the neighborhood and seized over two dozen properties through eminent domain... I also cover a market update Email: hello@houserichshow.com Real Estate Referral Network- https://www.houserichshow.com/referral Home Buying & Credit Courses-https://coinsnculture.gumroad.com/l/rHHKs Blog- https://www.houserichshow.com/home IG- https://www.instagram.com/coinsnculture/ @coinsnculture coins-n-culture

This Is Nashville
White supremacy and the state of hate in Tennessee

This Is Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 50:33


Tennessee has a long history with hate groups and white nationalism. The state is the birthplace of the Ku Klux Klan, but more recently, a "White Lives Matter" protest at a Juneteenth celebration on June 18 in Franklin, Tennessee, provided a visible local example of anxieties around white identity. Another white supremacist group, American Renaissance, routinely hosts its annual conference at Montgomery Bell State Park.  In this episode, we're talking with local historians about how white supremacy has transformed over the years, how it has influenced Tennessee, and how these ideologies remain even as the state grows and diversifies. But first, WPLN reporter Cindy Abrams talks about the latest Curious Nashville investigation into the frustration caused by freight trains in some Nashville neighborhoods. Guests:  Cindy Abrams, WPLN reporter Betsy Phillips, historian, author and columnist for the Nashville Scene Daniel Sharfstein, professor of legal history at Vanderbilt University and author  

Eyewitness History
The Radio Station Was "Bombed Off The Air Twice By The Klan"; Founder Of Underground Press Gives His Account

Eyewitness History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 35:56


Thorne Dreyer, a political activist and progressive journalist most of his life, was a pioneer of the ‘60s-70s underground press. He was a founding editor of The Rag in Austin and Space City! in Houston, two of the most influential of the era's underground newspapers. Dreyer is a director of the New Journalism Project, is editor of The Rag Blog, and has hosted Rag Radio on KOOP 91.7-FM in Austin for the last 13 years. He is the author of Making Waves: The Rag Radio Interviews, published in 2022 by the Briscoe Center for American History and distributed by the University of Texas Press, and an editor of Celebrating The Rag: Austin's Iconic Underground. Newspaper (2016), and Exploring Space City!: Houston's Historic Underground Newspaper (2021). In Austin, Dreyer joined the Students for a Democratic Society where he was active in civil rights and the movement against the War in Vietnam. Dreyer grew up in Houston where his mother was a prominent artist and his father was a writer and editor at the Houston Chronicle. Their Dreyer Galleries was the center of a large community of artists, intellectuals, and political activists, and was often under fire from the Ku Klux Klan because of the family's support for human rights. He worked as a political consultant in Houston, as a correspondent for Texas Monthly, managed KPFT, the Pacifica radio station, ran a public relations business, and worked as an actor and music producer. He currently lives in Austin with his dog Picasso.

Desert Island Discs
Jon Ronson, writer and broadcaster

Desert Island Discs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 34:52 Very Popular


Jon Ronson is a writer and broadcaster whose award-winning podcast and Radio 4 series Things Fell Apart investigated the stories behind today's culture wars. His television programmes and books – from Them: Adventures with Extremists to So You've Been Publicly Shamed - explore what he calls “the worlds that are going on underground” and his subjects - from conspiracy theorists to internet trolls - inhabit the fringes of society. Jon was born in Cardiff in 1967. He started a media studies degree at the Polytechnic of Central London but left after two years to become the keyboard player for the musician and comedian Frank Sidebottom's Oh Blimey Big Band. He also managed the Manchester indie band Man from Delmonte. He worked as a presenter on KFM Radio with Terry Christian, Caroline Aherne and Craig Cash before moving back to London where he wrote for the listings magazine Time Out and later produced a weekly column about family life for the Guardian. In 1993 he began his television career with a BBC series called the Ronson Mission which he describes as having little adventures and interviewing people who were classed as outsiders by the mainstream. He went on to make programmes about the Ku Klux Klan, the Jesus Christians cult and the First Earth Battalion about a secret New Age unit which was set up within the US Army in the late 1970s. In 2012 Jon moved to New York. He became an American citizen in 2020. DISC ONE: A Message to You Rudy by The Specials DISC TWO: Cabaret sung by Jane Horrocks, from the Sam Mendes production of the musical Cabaret at the Donmar Warehouse, London in 1993 DISC THREE: Underground by Tom Waits DISC FOUR: Drivin' on 9 by The Breeders DISC FIVE: Simon Smith and the Amazing Dancing Bear by Randy Newman DISC SIX: Extraordinary Machine by Fiona Apple DISC SEVEN: America by Simon & Garfunkel DISC EIGHT: Jersey Girl (Live at Meadowlands Arena, E. Rutherford, New Jersey - July 1981) by Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band BOOK CHOICE: A Magnum photography book LUXURY ITEM: Legal medical marijuana CASTAWAY'S FAVOURITE: Jersey Girl by Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band Presenter: Lauren Laverne Producer: Paula McGinley

Femicide
36. The Story of Madge Oberholzter

Femicide

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 39:33


On March 15, 1925 a young woman was abducted by a man that had become infatuated with her and was insistently trying to date her. She was repeatedly raped and tortured for days before she attempted suicide by poisoning herself and he finally brought her home, claiming she had been in a car accident. Believing he was untouchable as the leader of the Indiana chapter of the Ku Klux Klan, he was soon shocked to learn she was able to give a full statement before her death and he was tried and convicted of his crimes. This tragic event ultimately led to the demise of the second incarnation of the KKK in the United States. This is the story of Madge Oberholtzer.Black Women in Motion |https://blackwomeninmotion.org Learning information about systemic racism in America and the KKK |https://www.annuity.org/financial-literacy/black-community/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ku_Klux_Klanhttps://www.splcenter.org/20110228/ku-klux-klan-history-racismhttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/158-resources-understanding-systemic-racism-america-180975029/https://education.nationalgeographic.org/resource/ku-klux-klanhttps://www.brennancenter.org/our-work/research-reports/hidden-plain-sight-racism-white-supremacy-and-far-right-militancy-lawhttps://www.wrtv.com/longform/the-ku-klux-klan-ran-indiana-once-could-it-happen-againMy personal blog post about BLM |https://www.thesleepypineapple.com/post/my-thoughts-on-racism-and-blacklivesmatterPatreon |https://www.patreon.com/Femicide_PodcastSupport My Podcast |https://www.buymeacoffee.com/FemicidePodcastFollow |@femicide_podcast on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/femicide_podcast/ @femicidepodcast on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/femicidepodcastHome Studio Equipment Used | Affiliate LinksBlue Yeti USB Microphone | https://amzn.to/2ShOMcrFoam Windscreen cover | https://amzn.to/38nriZaPop Filter | https://amzn.to/2Sjeu0vAcoustic Absorption Panel | https://amzn.to/39thLjcApple MacBook Pro | https://amzn.to/2OJip4cMusic credits |Ice flow musicMusic from https://filmmusic.io"Ice Flow" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com) License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)Welcome to horrorland musicMusic from https://filmmusic.io"Welcome To Horrorland" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)Information sources |Support the show

Humor en la Cadena SER
Especialistas Secundarios | Una pareja contrata por error una ruta por los Pueblos Supremacistas Blancos

Humor en la Cadena SER

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 6:26


Pedimos a los oyentes que nos cuenten vacaciones que salieron mal. Una pareja que en vez de Cádiz acabó por los pueblos del Ku Klux Klan, unos jóvenes de fiesta siete años en el Tíbet y un tío que se fue de safari a Kenia con su perro son los lamentables casos que nos cuentan

Especialistas Secundarios
Especialistas Secundarios | Una pareja contrata por error una ruta por los Pueblos Supremacistas Blancos

Especialistas Secundarios

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 6:26


Pedimos a los oyentes que nos cuenten vacaciones que salieron mal. Una pareja que en vez de Cádiz acabó por los pueblos del Ku Klux Klan, unos jóvenes de fiesta siete años en el Tíbet y un tío que se fue de safari a Kenia con su perro son los lamentables casos que nos cuentan

La Ventana
Especialistas Secundarios | Una pareja contrata por error una ruta por los Pueblos Supremacistas Blancos

La Ventana

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 6:26


Pedimos a los oyentes que nos cuenten vacaciones que salieron mal. Una pareja que en vez de Cádiz acabó por los pueblos del Ku Klux Klan, unos jóvenes de fiesta siete años en el Tíbet y un tío que se fue de safari a Kenia con su perro son los lamentables casos que nos cuentan

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Tim Wise Episode 634

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 39:02


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more   Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals
Capital's war on the working class w/ Prof. Chad Pearson and Prof. Ahmed White (G&R 168)

Green & Red: Podcasts for Scrappy Radicals

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 66:10


“The remedy” to labor troubles, said J. West Goodwin, a Missouri businessman and newspaperman “is a counter organization.” In a fascinating conversation around the history of capital and labor, we dive deep into the business sector's remedies to workers organizing unions, blacks seeking greater liberation and other forms of progress. We talk about laws criminalizing syndicalism and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), vigilante groups from the Ku Klux Klan to committees of "law and order" doing the bidding of the ruling class and private security forces that the bosses hire to repress labor organizing. We also discuss current events paralleling the earlier periods of labor and progressive repression. We talk about race, class and the iron heel of the state coming down on all those that resist it. We talk with Prof. Ahmed White at the University of Colardo Boulder, and Prof. Chad Pearson at Collin College about their forthcoming books (see the bios below) on the topics. Bios// Ahmed White is the Nicholas Rosenbaum Professor of Law at the University of Colorado-Boulder where he has taught labor and criminal law since 2000. He is the author of The Last Great Strike: Little Steel, the CIO, and the Struggle for Labor Rights in New Deal America (Oakland: University of California Press, 2016) as well as a great many law review articles, book chapters, reviews, and essays. His current book, Under the Iron Heel: The Wobblies and the Capitalist War on Radical Workers, will be published later this year by the University of California Press and he is presently at work on another book, this one about communist organizing and labor repression in the 1920s and 1930s. Chad Pearson teaches history at Collin College, a community college in Plano, Texas. He is the author of Reform or Repression: Organizing America's Anti-Union Movement (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016) and is co-editor with Rosemary Feurer (pronounced Foyer) of Against Labor: How U.S. Employers Organized to Defeat Union Activism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2017). He has published essays in Counterpunch, History Compass, Jacobin, Journal of Labor and Society, Labor History, Labour/Le Travail, and Monthly Review. His current book, Capital's Terrorists: Klansmen, Lawmen, and Employers in the Long Nineteenth Century, will be published by the University of North Carolina Press later this year. ----------------------------------------------------------- Outro// "Union Burying Ground" by Woody Guthrie Links// Pearson: Capital's Terrorists: Klansmen, Lawmen, and Employers in the Long Nineteenth Century (https://bit.ly/3zQ8anh) White: Under the Iron Heel The Wobblies and the Capitalist War on Radical (https://bit.ly/3n301Ev) The Ku Klux Klan Was Also a Bosses' Association (https://bit.ly/3y8tQtn) The Right-Wing Violence Trump Has Encouraged Has Deep Roots in American History (https://bit.ly/3tSrr3v) Memorial Day, 1937 (https://bit.ly/39Fo611) Law, Labor, and the Hard Edge of Progressivism: The Legal Repression of Radical Unionism and the American Labor Movement's Long Decline (https://bit.ly/3HEbW55) Follow Green and Red// https://linktr.ee/greenandredpodcast Check out our new website: https://greenandredpodcast.org/ Donate to Green and Red Podcast// Become a recurring donor at https://www.patreon.com/greenredpodcast Or make a one time donation here: https://bit.ly/DonateGandR This is a Green and Red Podcast (@PodcastGreenRed) production. Produced by Bob (@bobbuzzanco) and Scott (@sparki1969). “Green and Red Blues" by Moody. Editing by Isaac.

Call Of My Ancestors: True Stories, Wisdom, and Real Conversations about Life
The Selling of the American Dream and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan

Call Of My Ancestors: True Stories, Wisdom, and Real Conversations about Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 58:02


Find out why it was important to sell the American dream to certain immigrants part one. https://youtu.be/aDCyjdHPPtI https://youtu.be/x99pzn1dAWc --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hair-and-skin-alchemy/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hair-and-skin-alchemy/support

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 150: “All You Need is Love” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022


This week's episode looks at “All You Need is Love”, the Our World TV special, and the career of the Beatles from April 1966 through August 1967. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a thirteen-minute bonus episode available, on "Rain" by the Beatles. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ NB for the first few hours this was up, there was a slight editing glitch. If you downloaded the old version and don't want to redownload the whole thing, just look in the transcript for "Other than fixing John's two flubbed" for the text of the two missing paragraphs. Errata I say "Come Together" was a B-side, but the single was actually a double A-side. Also, I say the Lennon interview by Maureen Cleave appeared in Detroit magazine. That's what my source (Steve Turner's book) says, but someone on Twitter says that rather than Detroit magazine it was the Detroit Free Press. Also at one point I say "the videos for 'Paperback Writer' and 'Penny Lane'". I meant to say "Rain" rather than "Penny Lane" there. Resources No Mixcloud this week due to the number of songs by the Beatles. I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them. All my Beatles episodes refer to: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology. For this episode, I also referred to Last Interview by David Sheff, a longform interview with John Lennon and Yoko Ono from shortly before Lennon's death; Many Years From Now by Barry Miles, an authorised biography of Paul McCartney; and Here, There, and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles by Geoff Emerick and Howard Massey. Particularly useful this time was Steve Turner's book Beatles '66. I also used Turner's The Beatles: The Stories Behind the Songs 1967-1970. Johnny Rogan's Starmakers and Svengalis had some information on Epstein I hadn't seen anywhere else. Some information about the "Bigger than Jesus" scandal comes from Ward, B. (2012). “The ‘C' is for Christ”: Arthur Unger, Datebook Magazine and the Beatles. Popular Music and Society, 35(4), 541-560. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2011.608978 Information on Robert Stigwood comes from Mr Showbiz by Stephen Dando-Collins. And the quote at the end from Simon Napier-Bell is from You Don't Have to Say You Love Me, which is more entertaining than it is accurate, but is very entertaining. Sadly the only way to get the single mix of "All You Need is Love" is on this ludicrously-expensive out-of-print box set, but the stereo mix is easily available on Magical Mystery Tour. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript A quick note before I start the episode -- this episode deals, in part, with the deaths of three gay men -- one by murder, one by suicide, and one by an accidental overdose, all linked at least in part to societal homophobia. I will try to deal with this as tactfully as I can, but anyone who's upset by those things might want to read the transcript instead of listening to the episode. This is also a very, very, *very* long episode -- this is likely to be the longest episode I *ever* do of this podcast, so settle in. We're going to be here a while. I obviously don't know how long it's going to be while I'm still recording, but based on the word count of my script, probably in the region of three hours. You have been warned. In 1967 the actor Patrick McGoohan was tired. He had been working on the hit series Danger Man for many years -- Danger Man had originally run from 1960 through 1962, then had taken a break, and had come back, retooled, with longer episodes in 1964. That longer series was a big hit, both in the UK and in the US, where it was retitled Secret Agent and had a new theme tune written by PF Sloan and Steve Barri and recorded by Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But McGoohan was tired of playing John Drake, the agent, and announced he was going to quit the series. Instead, with the help of George Markstein, Danger Man's script editor, he created a totally new series, in which McGoohan would star, and which McGoohan would also write and direct key episodes of. This new series, The Prisoner, featured a spy who is only ever given the name Number Six, and who many fans -- though not McGoohan himself -- took to be the same character as John Drake. Number Six resigns from his job as a secret agent, and is kidnapped and taken to a place known only as The Village -- the series was filmed in Portmeirion, an unusual-looking town in Gwynnedd, in North Wales -- which is full of other ex-agents. There he is interrogated to try to find out why he has quit his job. It's never made clear whether the interrogators are his old employers or their enemies, and there's a certain suggestion that maybe there is no real distinction between the two sides, that they're both running the Village together. He spends the entire series trying to escape, but refuses to explain himself -- and there's some debate among viewers as to whether it's implied or not that part of the reason he doesn't explain himself is that he knows his interrogators wouldn't understand why he quit: [Excerpt: The Prisoner intro, from episode Once Upon a Time, ] Certainly that explanation would fit in with McGoohan's own personality. According to McGoohan, the final episode of The Prisoner was, at the time, the most watched TV show ever broadcast in the UK, as people tuned in to find out the identity of Number One, the person behind the Village, and to see if Number Six would break free. I don't think that's actually the case, but it's what McGoohan always claimed, and it was certainly a very popular series. I won't spoil the ending for those of you who haven't watched it -- it's a remarkable series -- but ultimately the series seems to decide that such questions don't matter and that even asking them is missing the point. It's a work that's open to multiple interpretations, and is left deliberately ambiguous, but one of the messages many people have taken away from it is that not only are we trapped by a society that oppresses us, we're also trapped by our own identities. You can run from the trap that society has placed you in, from other people's interpretations of your life, your work, and your motives, but you ultimately can't run from yourself, and any time you try to break out of a prison, you'll find yourself trapped in another prison of your own making. The most horrifying implication of the episode is that possibly even death itself won't be a release, and you will spend all eternity trying to escape from an identity you're trapped in. Viewers became so outraged, according to McGoohan, that he had to go into hiding for an extended period, and while his later claims that he never worked in Britain again are an exaggeration, it is true that for the remainder of his life he concentrated on doing work in the US instead, where he hadn't created such anger. That final episode of The Prisoner was also the only one to use a piece of contemporary pop music, in two crucial scenes: [Excerpt: The Prisoner, "Fall Out", "All You Need is Love"] Back in October 2020, we started what I thought would be a year-long look at the period from late 1962 through early 1967, but which has turned out for reasons beyond my control to take more like twenty months, with a song which was one of the last of the big pre-Beatles pop hits, though we looked at it after their first single, "Telstar" by the Tornadoes: [Excerpt: The Tornadoes, "Telstar"] There were many reasons for choosing that as one of the bookends for this fifty-episode chunk of the podcast -- you'll see many connections between that episode and this one if you listen to them back-to-back -- but among them was that it's a song inspired by the launch of the first ever communications satellite, and a sign of how the world was going to become smaller as the sixties went on. Of course, to start with communications satellites didn't do much in that regard -- they were expensive to use, and had limited bandwidth, and were only available during limited time windows, but symbolically they meant that for the first time ever, people could see and hear events thousands of miles away as they were happening. It's not a coincidence that Britain and France signed the agreement to develop Concorde, the first supersonic airliner, a month after the first Beatles single and four months after the Telstar satellite was launched. The world was becoming ever more interconnected -- people were travelling faster and further, getting news from other countries quicker, and there was more cultural conversation – and misunderstanding – between countries thousands of miles apart. The Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, the man who also coined the phrase “the medium is the message”, thought that this ever-faster connection would fundamentally change basic modes of thought in the Western world. McLuhan thought that technology made possible whole new modes of thought, and that just as the printing press had, in his view, caused Western liberalism and individualism, so these new electronic media would cause the rise of a new collective mode of thought. In 1962, the year of Concorde, Telstar, and “Love Me Do”, McLuhan wrote a book called The Gutenberg Galaxy, in which he said: “Instead of tending towards a vast Alexandrian library the world has become a computer, an electronic brain, exactly as an infantile piece of science fiction. And as our senses have gone outside us, Big Brother goes inside. So, unless aware of this dynamic, we shall at once move into a phase of panic terrors, exactly befitting a small world of tribal drums, total interdependence, and superimposed co-existence.… Terror is the normal state of any oral society, for in it everything affects everything all the time.…” He coined the term “the Global Village” to describe this new collectivism. The story we've seen over the last fifty episodes is one of a sort of cultural ping-pong between the USA and the UK, with innovations in American music inspiring British musicians, who in turn inspired American ones, whether that being the Beatles covering the Isley Brothers or the Rolling Stones doing a Bobby Womack song, or Paul Simon and Bob Dylan coming over to the UK and learning folk songs and guitar techniques from Martin Carthy. And increasingly we're going to see those influences spread to other countries, and influences coming *from* other countries. We've already seen one Jamaican artist, and the influence of Indian music has become very apparent. While the focus of this series is going to remain principally in the British Isles and North America, rock music was and is a worldwide phenomenon, and that's going to become increasingly a part of the story. And so in this episode we're going to look at a live performance -- well, mostly live -- that was seen by hundreds of millions of people all over the world as it happened, thanks to the magic of satellites: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "All You Need is Love"] When we left the Beatles, they had just finished recording "Tomorrow Never Knows", the most experimental track they had recorded up to that date, and if not the most experimental thing they *ever* recorded certainly in the top handful. But "Tomorrow Never Knows" was only the first track they recorded in the sessions for what would become arguably their greatest album, and certainly the one that currently has the most respect from critics. It's interesting to note that that album could have been very, very, different. When we think of Revolver now, we think of the innovative production of George Martin, and of Geoff Emerick and Ken Townshend's inventive ideas for pushing the sound of the equipment in Abbey Road studios, but until very late in the day the album was going to be recorded in the Stax studios in Memphis, with Steve Cropper producing -- whether George Martin would have been involved or not is something we don't even know. In 1965, the Rolling Stones had, as we've seen, started making records in the US, recording in LA and at the Chess studios in Chicago, and the Yardbirds had also been doing the same thing. Mick Jagger had become a convert to the idea of using American studios and working with American musicians, and he had constantly been telling Paul McCartney that the Beatles should do the same. Indeed, they'd put some feelers out in 1965 about the possibility of the group making an album with Holland, Dozier, and Holland in Detroit. Quite how this would have worked is hard to figure out -- Holland, Dozier, and Holland's skills were as songwriters, and in their work with a particular set of musicians -- so it's unsurprising that came to nothing. But recording at Stax was a different matter.  While Steve Cropper was a great songwriter in his own right, he was also adept at getting great sounds on covers of other people's material -- like on Otis Blue, the album he produced for Otis Redding in late 1965, which doesn't include a single Cropper original: [Excerpt: Otis Redding, "Satisfaction"] And the Beatles were very influenced by the records Stax were putting out, often namechecking Wilson Pickett in particular, and during the Rubber Soul sessions they had recorded a "Green Onions" soundalike track, imaginatively titled "12-Bar Original": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "12-Bar Original"] The idea of the group recording at Stax got far enough that they were actually booked in for two weeks starting the ninth of April, and there was even an offer from Elvis to let them stay at Graceland while they recorded, but then a couple of weeks earlier, the news leaked to the press, and Brian Epstein cancelled the booking. According to Cropper, Epstein talked about recording at the Atlantic studios in New York with him instead, but nothing went any further. It's hard to imagine what a Stax-based Beatles album would have been like, but even though it might have been a great album, it certainly wouldn't have been the Revolver we've come to know. Revolver is an unusual album in many ways, and one of the ways it's most distinct from the earlier Beatles albums is the dominance of keyboards. Both Lennon and McCartney had often written at the piano as well as the guitar -- McCartney more so than Lennon, but both had done so regularly -- but up to this point it had been normal for them to arrange the songs for guitars rather than keyboards, no matter how they'd started out. There had been the odd track where one of them, usually Lennon, would play a simple keyboard part, songs like "I'm Down" or "We Can Work it Out", but even those had been guitar records first and foremost. But on Revolver, that changed dramatically. There seems to have been a complex web of cause and effect here. Paul was becoming increasingly interested in moving his basslines away from simple walking basslines and root notes and the other staples of rock and roll basslines up to this point. As the sixties progressed, rock basslines were becoming ever more complex, and Tyler Mahan Coe has made a good case that this is largely down to innovations in production pioneered by Owen Bradley, and McCartney was certainly aware of Bradley's work -- he was a fan of Brenda Lee, who Bradley produced, for example. But the two influences that McCartney has mentioned most often in this regard are the busy, jazz-influenced, basslines that James Jamerson was playing at Motown: [Excerpt: The Four Tops, "It's the Same Old Song"] And the basslines that Brian Wilson was writing for various Wrecking Crew bassists to play for the Beach Boys: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Don't Talk (Put Your Head on My Shoulder)"] Just to be clear, McCartney didn't hear that particular track until partway through the recording of Revolver, when Bruce Johnston visited the UK and brought with him an advance copy of Pet Sounds, but Pet Sounds influenced the later part of Revolver's recording, and Wilson had already started his experiments in that direction with the group's 1965 work. It's much easier to write a song with this kind of bassline, one that's integral to the composition, on the piano than it is to write it on a guitar, as you can work out the bassline with your left hand while working out the chords and melody with your right, so the habit that McCartney had already developed of writing on the piano made this easier. But also, starting with the recording of "Paperback Writer", McCartney switched his style of working in the studio. Where up to this point it had been normal for him to play bass as part of the recording of the basic track, playing with the other Beatles, he now started to take advantage of multitracking to overdub his bass later, so he could spend extra time getting the bassline exactly right. McCartney lived closer to Abbey Road than the other three Beatles, and so could more easily get there early or stay late and tweak his parts. But if McCartney wasn't playing bass while the guitars and drums were being recorded, that meant he could play something else, and so increasingly he would play piano during the recording of the basic track. And that in turn would mean that there wouldn't always *be* a need for guitars on the track, because the harmonic support they would provide would be provided by the piano instead. This, as much as anything else, is the reason that Revolver sounds so radically different to any other Beatles album. Up to this point, with *very* rare exceptions like "Yesterday", every Beatles record, more or less, featured all four of the Beatles playing instruments. Now John and George weren't playing on "Good Day Sunshine" or "For No One", John wasn't playing on "Here, There, and Everywhere", "Eleanor Rigby" features no guitars or drums at all, and George's "Love You To" only features himself, plus a little tambourine from Ringo (Paul recorded a part for that one, but it doesn't seem to appear on the finished track). Of the three songwriting Beatles, the only one who at this point was consistently requiring the instrumental contributions of all the other band members was John, and even he did without Paul on "She Said, She Said", which by all accounts features either John or George on bass, after Paul had a rare bout of unprofessionalism and left the studio. Revolver is still an album made by a group -- and most of those tracks that don't feature John or George instrumentally still feature them vocally -- it's still a collaborative work in all the best ways. But it's no longer an album made by four people playing together in the same room at the same time. After starting work on "Tomorrow Never Knows", the next track they started work on was Paul's "Got to Get You Into My Life", but as it would turn out they would work on that song throughout most of the sessions for the album -- in a sign of how the group would increasingly work from this point on, Paul's song was subject to multiple re-recordings and tweakings in the studio, as he tinkered to try to make it perfect. The first recording to be completed for the album, though, was almost as much of a departure in its own way as "Tomorrow Never Knows" had been. George's song "Love You To" shows just how inspired he was by the music of Ravi Shankar, and how devoted he was to Indian music. While a few months earlier he had just about managed to pick out a simple melody on the sitar for "Norwegian Wood", by this point he was comfortable enough with Indian classical music that I've seen many, many sources claim that an outside session player is playing sitar on the track, though Anil Bhagwat, the tabla player on the track, always insisted that it was entirely Harrison's playing: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] There is a *lot* of debate as to whether it's George playing on the track, and I feel a little uncomfortable making a definitive statement in either direction. On the one hand I find it hard to believe that Harrison got that good that quickly on an unfamiliar instrument, when we know he wasn't a naturally facile musician. All the stories we have about his work in the studio suggest that he had to work very hard on his guitar solos, and that he would frequently fluff them. As a technical guitarist, Harrison was only mediocre -- his value lay in his inventiveness, not in technical ability -- and he had been playing guitar for over a decade, but sitar only a few months. There's also some session documentation suggesting that an unknown sitar player was hired. On the other hand there's the testimony of Anil Bhagwat that Harrison played the part himself, and he has been very firm on the subject, saying "If you go on the Internet there are a lot of questions asked about "Love You To". They say 'It's not George playing the sitar'. I can tell you here and now -- 100 percent it was George on sitar throughout. There were no other musicians involved. It was just me and him." And several people who are more knowledgeable than myself about the instrument have suggested that the sitar part on the track is played the way that a rock guitarist would play rather than the way someone with more knowledge of Indian classical music would play -- there's a blues feeling to some of the bends that apparently no genuine Indian classical musician would naturally do. I would suggest that the best explanation is that there's a professional sitar player trying to replicate a part that Harrison had previously demonstrated, while Harrison was in turn trying his best to replicate the sound of Ravi Shankar's work. Certainly the instrumental section sounds far more fluent, and far more stylistically correct, than one would expect: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Where previous attempts at what got called "raga-rock" had taken a couple of surface features of Indian music -- some form of a drone, perhaps a modal scale -- and had generally used a guitar made to sound a little bit like a sitar, or had a sitar playing normal rock riffs, Harrison's song seems to be a genuine attempt to hybridise Indian ragas and rock music, combining the instrumentation, modes, and rhythmic complexity of someone like Ravi Shankar with lyrics that are seemingly inspired by Bob Dylan and a fairly conventional pop song structure (and a tiny bit of fuzz guitar). It's a record that could only be made by someone who properly understood both the Indian music he's emulating and the conventions of the Western pop song, and understood how those conventions could work together. Indeed, one thing I've rarely seen pointed out is how cleverly the album is sequenced, so that "Love You To" is followed by possibly the most conventional song on Revolver, "Here, There, and Everywhere", which was recorded towards the end of the sessions. Both songs share a distinctive feature not shared by the rest of the album, so the two songs can sound more of a pair than they otherwise would, retrospectively making "Love You To" seem more conventional than it is and "Here, There, and Everywhere" more unconventional -- both have as an introduction a separate piece of music that states some of the melodic themes of the rest of the song but isn't repeated later. In the case of "Love You To" it's the free-tempo bit at the beginning, characteristic of a lot of Indian music: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] While in the case of "Here, There, and Everywhere" it's the part that mimics an older style of songwriting, a separate intro of the type that would have been called a verse when written by the Gershwins or Cole Porter, but of course in the intervening decades "verse" had come to mean something else, so we now no longer have a specific term for this kind of intro -- but as you can hear, it's doing very much the same thing as that "Love You To" intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] In the same day as the group completed "Love You To", overdubbing George's vocal and Ringo's tambourine, they also started work on a song that would show off a lot of the new techniques they had been working on in very different ways. Paul's "Paperback Writer" could indeed be seen as part of a loose trilogy with "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows", one song by each of the group's three songwriters exploring the idea of a song that's almost all on one chord. Both "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "Love You To" are based on a drone with occasional hints towards moving to one other chord. In the case of "Paperback Writer", the entire song stays on a single chord until the title -- it's on a G7 throughout until the first use of the word "writer", when it quickly goes to a C for two bars. I'm afraid I'm going to have to sing to show you how little the chords actually change, because the riff disguises this lack of movement somewhat, but the melody is also far more horizontal than most of McCartney's, so this shouldn't sound too painful, I hope: [demonstrates] This is essentially the exact same thing that both "Love You To" and "Tomorrow Never Knows" do, and all three have very similarly structured rising and falling modal melodies. There's also a bit of "Paperback Writer" that seems to tie directly into "Love You To", but also points to a possible very non-Indian inspiration for part of "Love You To". The Beach Boys' single "Sloop John B" was released in the UK a couple of days after the sessions for "Paperback Writer" and "Love You To", but it had been released in the US a month before, and the Beatles all got copies of every record in the American top thirty shipped to them. McCartney and Harrison have specifically pointed to it as an influence on "Paperback Writer". "Sloop John B" has a section where all the instruments drop out and we're left with just the group's vocal harmonies: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "Sloop John B"] And that seems to have been the inspiration behind the similar moment at a similar point in "Paperback Writer", which is used in place of a middle eight and also used for the song's intro: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Which is very close to what Harrison does at the end of each verse of "Love You To", where the instruments drop out for him to sing a long melismatic syllable before coming back in: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love You To"] Essentially, other than "Got to Get You Into My Life", which is an outlier and should not be counted, the first three songs attempted during the Revolver sessions are variations on a common theme, and it's a sign that no matter how different the results might  sound, the Beatles really were very much a group at this point, and were sharing ideas among themselves and developing those ideas in similar ways. "Paperback Writer" disguises what it's doing somewhat by having such a strong riff. Lennon referred to "Paperback Writer" as "son of 'Day Tripper'", and in terms of the Beatles' singles it's actually their third iteration of this riff idea, which they originally got from Bobby Parker's "Watch Your Step": [Excerpt: Bobby Parker, "Watch Your Step"] Which became the inspiration for "I Feel Fine": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] Which they varied for "Day Tripper": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Day Tripper"] And which then in turn got varied for "Paperback Writer": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] As well as compositional ideas, there are sonic ideas shared between "Paperback Writer", "Tomorrow Never Knows", and "Love You To", and which would be shared by the rest of the tracks the Beatles recorded in the first half of 1966. Since Geoff Emerick had become the group's principal engineer, they'd started paying more attention to how to get a fuller sound, and so Emerick had miced the tabla on "Love You To" much more closely than anyone would normally mic an instrument from classical music, creating a deep, thudding sound, and similarly he had changed the way they recorded the drums on "Tomorrow Never Knows", again giving a much fuller sound. But the group also wanted the kind of big bass sounds they'd loved on records coming out of America -- sounds that no British studio was getting, largely because it was believed that if you cut too loud a bass sound into a record it would make the needle jump out of the groove. The new engineering team of Geoff Emerick and Ken Scott, though, thought that it was likely you could keep the needle in the groove if you had a smoother frequency response. You could do that if you used a microphone with a larger diaphragm to record the bass, but how could you do that? Inspiration finally struck -- loudspeakers are actually the same thing as microphones wired the other way round, so if you wired up a loudspeaker as if it were a microphone you could get a *really big* speaker, place it in front of the bass amp, and get a much stronger bass sound. The experiment wasn't a total success -- the sound they got had to be processed quite extensively to get rid of room noise, and then compressed in order to further prevent the needle-jumping issue, and so it's a muddier, less defined, tone than they would have liked, but one thing that can't be denied is that "Paperback Writer"'s bass sound is much, much, louder than on any previous Beatles record: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] Almost every track the group recorded during the Revolver sessions involved all sorts of studio innovations, though rarely anything as truly revolutionary as the artificial double-tracking they'd used on "Tomorrow Never Knows", and which also appeared on "Paperback Writer" -- indeed, as "Paperback Writer" was released several months before Revolver, it became the first record released to use the technique. I could easily devote a good ten minutes to every track on Revolver, and to "Paperback Writer"s B-side, "Rain", but this is already shaping up to be an extraordinarily long episode and there's a lot of material to get through, so I'll break my usual pattern of devoting a Patreon bonus episode to something relatively obscure, and this week's bonus will be on "Rain" itself. "Paperback Writer", though, deserved the attention here even though it was not one of the group's more successful singles -- it did go to number one, but it didn't hit number one in the UK charts straight away, being kept off the top by "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra for the first week: [Excerpt: Frank Sinatra, "Strangers in the Night"] Coincidentally, "Strangers in the Night" was co-written by Bert Kaempfert, the German musician who had produced the group's very first recording sessions with Tony Sheridan back in 1961. On the group's German tour in 1966 they met up with Kaempfert again, and John greeted him by singing the first couple of lines of the Sinatra record. The single was the lowest-selling Beatles single in the UK since "Love Me Do". In the US it only made number one for two non-consecutive weeks, with "Strangers in the Night" knocking it off for a week in between. Now, by literally any other band's standards, that's still a massive hit, and it was the Beatles' tenth UK number one in a row (or ninth, depending on which chart you use for "Please Please Me"), but it's a sign that the group were moving out of the first phase of total unequivocal dominance of the charts. It was a turning point in a lot of other ways as well. Up to this point, while the group had been experimenting with different lyrical subjects on album tracks, every single had lyrics about romantic relationships -- with the possible exception of "Help!", which was about Lennon's emotional state but written in such a way that it could be heard as a plea to a lover. But in the case of "Paperback Writer", McCartney was inspired by his Aunt Mill asking him "Why do you write songs about love all the time? Can you ever write about a horse or the summit conference or something interesting?" His response was to think "All right, Aunt Mill, I'll show you", and to come up with a lyric that was very much in the style of the social satires that bands like the Kinks were releasing at the time. People often miss the humour in the lyric for "Paperback Writer", but there's a huge amount of comedy in lyrics about someone writing to a publisher saying they'd written a book based on someone else's book, and one can only imagine the feeling of weary recognition in slush-pile readers throughout the world as they heard the enthusiastic "It's a thousand pages, give or take a few, I'll be writing more in a week or two. I can make it longer..." From this point on, the group wouldn't release a single that was unambiguously about a romantic relationship until "The Ballad of John and Yoko",  the last single released while the band were still together. "Paperback Writer" also saw the Beatles for the first time making a promotional film -- what we would now call a rock video -- rather than make personal appearances on TV shows. The film was directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who the group would work with again in 1969, and shows Paul with a chipped front tooth -- he'd been in an accident while riding mopeds with his friend Tara Browne a few months earlier, and hadn't yet got round to having the tooth capped. When he did, the change in his teeth was one of the many bits of evidence used by conspiracy theorists to prove that the real Paul McCartney was dead and replaced by a lookalike. It also marks a change in who the most prominent Beatle on the group's A-sides was. Up to this point, Paul had had one solo lead on an A-side -- "Can't Buy Me Love" -- and everything else had been either a song with multiple vocalists like "Day Tripper" or "Love Me Do", or a song with a clear John lead like "Ticket to Ride" or "I Feel Fine". In the rest of their career, counting "Paperback Writer", the group would release nine new singles that hadn't already been included on an album. Of those nine singles, one was a double A-side with one John song and one Paul song, two had John songs on the A-side, and the other six were Paul. Where up to this point John had been "lead Beatle", for the rest of the sixties, Paul would be the group's driving force. Oddly, Paul got rather defensive about the record when asked about it in interviews after it failed to go straight to the top, saying "It's not our best single by any means, but we're very satisfied with it". But especially in its original mono mix it actually packs a powerful punch: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Paperback Writer"] When the "Paperback Writer" single was released, an unusual image was used in the advertising -- a photo of the Beatles dressed in butchers' smocks, covered in blood, with chunks of meat and the dismembered body parts of baby dolls lying around on them. The image was meant as part of a triptych parodying religious art -- the photo on the left was to be an image showing the four Beatles connected to a woman by an umbilical cord made of sausages, the middle panel was meant to be this image, but with halos added over the Beatles' heads, and the panel on the right was George hammering a nail into John's head, symbolising both crucifixion and that the group were real, physical, people, not just images to be worshipped -- these weren't imaginary nails, and they weren't imaginary people. The photographer Robert Whittaker later said: “I did a photograph of the Beatles covered in raw meat, dolls and false teeth. Putting meat, dolls and false teeth with The Beatles is essentially part of the same thing, the breakdown of what is regarded as normal. The actual conception for what I still call “Somnambulant Adventure” was Moses coming down from Mount Sinai with the Ten Commandments. He comes across people worshipping a golden calf. All over the world I'd watched people worshiping like idols, like gods, four Beatles. To me they were just stock standard normal people. But this emotion that fans poured on them made me wonder where Christianity was heading.” The image wasn't that controversial in the UK, when it was used to advertise "Paperback Writer", but in the US it was initially used for the cover of an album, Yesterday... And Today, which was made up of a few tracks that had been left off the US versions of the Rubber Soul and Help! albums, plus both sides of the "We Can Work It Out"/"Day Tripper" single, and three rough mixes of songs that had been recorded for Revolver -- "Doctor Robert", "And Your Bird Can Sing", and "I'm Only Sleeping", which was the song that sounded most different from the mixes that were finally released: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I'm Only Sleeping (Yesterday... and Today mix)"] Those three songs were all Lennon songs, which had the unfortunate effect that when the US version of Revolver was brought out later in the year, only two of the songs on the album were by Lennon, with six by McCartney and three by Harrison. Some have suggested that this was the motivation for the use of the butcher image on the cover of Yesterday... And Today -- saying it was the Beatles' protest against Capitol "butchering" their albums -- but in truth it was just that Capitol's art director chose the cover because he liked the image. Alan Livingston, the president of Capitol was not so sure, and called Brian Epstein to ask if the group would be OK with them using a different image. Epstein checked with John Lennon, but Lennon liked the image and so Epstein told Livingston the group insisted on them using that cover. Even though for the album cover the bloodstains on the butchers' smocks were airbrushed out, after Capitol had pressed up a million copies of the mono version of the album and two hundred thousand copies of the stereo version, and they'd sent out sixty thousand promo copies, they discovered that no record shops would stock the album with that cover. It cost Capitol more than two hundred thousand dollars to recall the album and replace the cover with a new one -- though while many of the covers were destroyed, others had the new cover, with a more acceptable photo of the group, pasted over them, and people have later carefully steamed off the sticker to reveal the original. This would not be the last time in 1966 that something that was intended as a statement on religion and the way people viewed the Beatles would cause the group trouble in America. In the middle of the recording sessions for Revolver, the group also made what turned out to be their last ever UK live performance in front of a paying audience. The group had played the NME Poll-Winners' Party every year since 1963, and they were always shows that featured all the biggest acts in the country at the time -- the 1966 show featured, as well as the Beatles and a bunch of smaller acts, the Rolling Stones, the Who, the Yardbirds, Roy Orbison, Cliff Richard and the Shadows, the Seekers, the Small Faces, the Walker Brothers, and Dusty Springfield. Unfortunately, while these events were always filmed for TV broadcast, the Beatles' performance on the first of May wasn't filmed. There are various stories about what happened, but the crux appears to be a disagreement between Andrew Oldham and Brian Epstein, sparked by John Lennon. When the Beatles got to the show, they were upset to discover that they had to wait around before going on stage -- normally, the awards would all be presented at the end, after all the performances, but the Rolling Stones had asked that the Beatles not follow them directly, so after the Stones finished their set, there would be a break for the awards to be given out, and then the Beatles would play their set, in front of an audience that had been bored by twenty-five minutes of awards ceremony, rather than one that had been excited by all the bands that came before them. John Lennon was annoyed, and insisted that the Beatles were going to go on straight after the Rolling Stones -- he seems to have taken this as some sort of power play by the Stones and to have got his hackles up about it. He told Epstein to deal with the people from the NME. But the NME people said that they had a contract with Andrew Oldham, and they weren't going to break it. Oldham refused to change the terms of the contract. Lennon said that he wasn't going to go on stage if they didn't directly follow the Stones. Maurice Kinn, the publisher of the NME, told Epstein that he wasn't going to break the contract with Oldham, and that if the Beatles didn't appear on stage, he would get Jimmy Savile, who was compering the show, to go out on stage and tell the ten thousand fans in the audience that the Beatles were backstage refusing to appear. He would then sue NEMS for breach of contract *and* NEMS would be liable for any damage caused by the rioting that was sure to happen. Lennon screamed a lot of abuse at Kinn, and told him the group would never play one of their events again, but the group did go on stage -- but because they hadn't yet signed the agreement to allow their performance to be filmed, they refused to allow it to be recorded. Apparently Andrew Oldham took all this as a sign that Epstein was starting to lose control of the group. Also during May 1966 there were visits from musicians from other countries, continuing the cultural exchange that was increasingly influencing the Beatles' art. Bruce Johnston of the Beach Boys came over to promote the group's new LP, Pet Sounds, which had been largely the work of Brian Wilson, who had retired from touring to concentrate on working in the studio. Johnston played the record for John and Paul, who listened to it twice, all the way through, in silence, in Johnston's hotel room: [Excerpt: The Beach Boys, "God Only Knows"] According to Johnston, after they'd listened through the album twice, they went over to a piano and started whispering to each other, picking out chords. Certainly the influence of Pet Sounds is very noticeable on songs like "Here, There, and Everywhere", written and recorded a few weeks after this meeting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Here, There, and Everywhere"] That track, and the last track recorded for the album, "She Said She Said" were unusual in one very important respect -- they were recorded while the Beatles were no longer under contract to EMI Records. Their contract expired on the fifth of June, 1966, and they finished Revolver without it having been renewed -- it would be several months before their new contract was signed, and it's rather lucky for music lovers that Brian Epstein was the kind of manager who considered personal relationships and basic honour and decency more important than the legal niceties, unlike any other managers of the era, otherwise we would not have Revolver in the form we know it today. After the meeting with Johnston, but before the recording of those last couple of Revolver tracks, the Beatles also met up again with Bob Dylan, who was on a UK tour with a new, loud, band he was working with called The Hawks. While the Beatles and Dylan all admired each other, there was by this point a lot of wariness on both sides, especially between Lennon and Dylan, both of them very similar personality types and neither wanting to let their guard down around the other or appear unhip. There's a famous half-hour-long film sequence of Lennon and Dylan sharing a taxi, which is a fascinating, excruciating, example of two insecure but arrogant men both trying desperately to impress the other but also equally desperate not to let the other know that they want to impress them: [Excerpt: Dylan and Lennon taxi ride] The day that was filmed, Lennon and Harrison also went to see Dylan play at the Royal Albert Hall. This tour had been controversial, because Dylan's band were loud and raucous, and Dylan's fans in the UK still thought of him as a folk musician. At one gig, earlier on the tour, an audience member had famously yelled out "Judas!" -- (just on the tiny chance that any of my listeners don't know that, Judas was the disciple who betrayed Jesus to the authorities, leading to his crucifixion) -- and that show was for many years bootlegged as the "Royal Albert Hall" show, though in fact it was recorded at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester. One of the *actual* Royal Albert Hall shows was released a few years ago -- the one the night before Lennon and Harrison saw Dylan: [Excerpt: Bob Dylan, "Like a Rolling Stone", Royal Albert Hall 1966] The show Lennon and Harrison saw would be Dylan's last for many years. Shortly after returning to the US, Dylan was in a motorbike accident, the details of which are still mysterious, and which some fans claim was faked altogether. The accident caused him to cancel all the concert dates he had booked, and devote himself to working in the studio for several years just like Brian Wilson. And from even further afield than America, Ravi Shankar came over to Britain, to work with his friend the violinist Yehudi Menuhin, on a duet album, West Meets East, that was an example in the classical world of the same kind of international cross-fertilisation that was happening in the pop world: [Excerpt: Yehudi Menuhin and Ravi Shankar, "Prabhati (based on Raga Gunkali)"] While he was in the UK, Shankar also performed at the Royal Festival Hall, and George Harrison went to the show. He'd seen Shankar live the year before, but this time he met up with him afterwards, and later said "He was the first person that impressed me in a way that was beyond just being a famous celebrity. Ravi was my link to the Vedic world. Ravi plugged me into the whole of reality. Elvis impressed me when I was a kid, and impressed me when I met him, but you couldn't later on go round to him and say 'Elvis, what's happening with the universe?'" After completing recording and mixing the as-yet-unnamed album, which had been by far the longest recording process of their career, and which still nearly sixty years later regularly tops polls of the best album of all time, the Beatles took a well-earned break. For a whole two days, at which point they flew off to Germany to do a three-day tour, on their way to Japan, where they were booked to play five shows at the Budokan. Unfortunately for the group, while they had no idea of this when they were booked to do the shows, many in Japan saw the Budokan as sacred ground, and they were the first ever Western group to play there. This led to numerous death threats and loud protests from far-right activists offended at the Beatles defiling their religious and nationalistic sensibilities. As a result, the police were on high alert -- so high that there were three thousand police in the audience for the shows, in a venue which only held ten thousand audience members. That's according to Mark Lewisohn's Complete Beatles Chronicle, though I have to say that the rather blurry footage of the audience in the video of those shows doesn't seem to show anything like those numbers. But frankly I'll take Lewisohn's word over that footage, as he's not someone to put out incorrect information. The threats to the group also meant that they had to be kept in their hotel rooms at all times except when actually performing, though they did make attempts to get out. At the press conference for the Tokyo shows, the group were also asked publicly for the first time their views on the war in Vietnam, and John replied "Well, we think about it every day, and we don't agree with it and we think that it's wrong. That's how much interest we take. That's all we can do about it... and say that we don't like it". I say they were asked publicly for the first time, because George had been asked about it for a series of interviews Maureen Cleave had done with the group a couple of months earlier, as we'll see in a bit, but nobody was paying attention to those interviews. Brian Epstein was upset that the question had gone to John. He had hoped that the inevitable Vietnam question would go to Paul, who he thought might be a bit more tactful. The last thing he needed was John Lennon saying something that would upset the Americans before their tour there a few weeks later. Luckily, people in America seemed to have better things to do than pay attention to John Lennon's opinions. The support acts for the Japanese shows included  several of the biggest names in Japanese rock music -- or "group sounds" as the genre was called there, Japanese people having realised that trying to say the phrase "rock and roll" would open them up to ridicule given that it had both "r" and "l" sounds in the phrase. The man who had coined the term "group sounds", Jackey Yoshikawa, was there with his group the Blue Comets, as was Isao Bito, who did a rather good cover version of Cliff Richard's "Dynamite": [Excerpt: Isao Bito, "Dynamite"] Bito, the Blue Comets, and the other two support acts, Yuya Uchida and the Blue Jeans, all got together to perform a specially written song, "Welcome Beatles": [Excerpt: "Welcome Beatles" ] But while the Japanese audience were enthusiastic, they were much less vocal about their enthusiasm than the audiences the Beatles were used to playing for. The group were used, of course, to playing in front of hordes of screaming teenagers who could not hear a single note, but because of the fear that a far-right terrorist would assassinate one of the group members, the police had imposed very, very, strict rules on the audience. Nobody in the audience was allowed to get out of their seat for any reason, and the police would clamp down very firmly on anyone who was too demonstrative. Because of that, the group could actually hear themselves, and they sounded sloppy as hell, especially on the newer material. Not that there was much of that. The only song they did from the Revolver sessions was "Paperback Writer", the new single, and while they did do a couple of tracks from Rubber Soul, those were under-rehearsed. As John said at the start of this tour, "I can't play any of Rubber Soul, it's so unrehearsed. The only time I played any of the numbers on it was when I recorded it. I forget about songs. They're only valid for a certain time." That's certainly borne out by the sound of their performances of Rubber Soul material at the Budokan: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "If I Needed Someone (live at the Budokan)"] It was while they were in Japan as well that they finally came up with the title for their new album. They'd been thinking of all sorts of ideas, like Abracadabra and Magic Circle, and tossing names around with increasing desperation for several days -- at one point they seem to have just started riffing on other groups' albums, and seem to have apparently seriously thought about naming the record in parodic tribute to their favourite artists -- suggestions included The Beatles On Safari, after the Beach Boys' Surfin' Safari (and possibly with a nod to their recent Pet Sounds album cover with animals, too), The Freewheelin' Beatles, after Dylan's second album, and my favourite, Ringo's suggestion After Geography, for the Rolling Stones' Aftermath. But eventually Paul came up with Revolver -- like Rubber Soul, a pun, in this case because the record itself revolves when on a turntable. Then it was off to the Philippines, and if the group thought Japan had been stressful, they had no idea what was coming. The trouble started in the Philippines from the moment they stepped off the plane, when they were bundled into a car without Neil Aspinall or Brian Epstein, and without their luggage, which was sent to customs. This was a problem in itself -- the group had got used to essentially being treated like diplomats, and to having their baggage let through customs without being searched, and so they'd started freely carrying various illicit substances with them. This would obviously be a problem -- but as it turned out, this was just to get a "customs charge" paid by Brian Epstein. But during their initial press conference the group were worried, given the hostility they'd faced from officialdom, that they were going to be arrested during the conference itself. They were asked what they would tell the Rolling Stones, who were going to be visiting the Philippines shortly after, and Lennon just said "We'll warn them". They also asked "is there a war on in the Philippines? Why is everybody armed?" At this time, the Philippines had a new leader, Ferdinand Marcos -- who is not to be confused with his son, Ferdinand Marcos Jr, also known as Bongbong Marcos, who just became President-Elect there last month. Marcos Sr was a dictatorial kleptocrat, one of the worst leaders of the latter half of the twentieth century, but that wasn't evident yet. He'd been elected only a few months earlier, and had presented himself as a Kennedy-like figure -- a young man who was also a war hero. He'd recently switched parties from the Liberal party to the right-wing Nacionalista Party, but wasn't yet being thought of as the monstrous dictator he later became. The person organising the Philippines shows had been ordered to get the Beatles to visit Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos at 11AM on the day of the show, but for some reason had instead put on their itinerary just the *suggestion* that the group should meet the Marcoses, and had put the time down as 3PM, and the Beatles chose to ignore that suggestion -- they'd refused to do that kind of government-official meet-and-greet ever since an incident in 1964 at the British Embassy in Washington where someone had cut off a bit of Ringo's hair. A military escort turned up at the group's hotel in the morning, to take them for their meeting. The group were all still in their rooms, and Brian Epstein was still eating breakfast and refused to disturb them, saying "Go back and tell the generals we're not coming." The group gave their performances as scheduled, but meanwhile there was outrage at the way the Beatles had refused to meet the Marcos family, who had brought hundreds of children -- friends of their own children, and relatives of top officials -- to a party to meet the group. Brian Epstein went on TV and tried to smooth things over, but the broadcast was interrupted by static and his message didn't get through to anyone. The next day, the group's security was taken away, as were the cars to take them to the airport. When they got to the airport, the escalators were turned off and the group were beaten up at the arrangement of the airport manager, who said in 1984 "I beat up the Beatles. I really thumped them. First I socked Epstein and he went down... then I socked Lennon and Ringo in the face. I was kicking them. They were pleading like frightened chickens. That's what happens when you insult the First Lady." Even on the plane there were further problems -- Brian Epstein and the group's road manager Mal Evans were both made to get off the plane to sort out supposed financial discrepancies, which led to them worrying that they were going to be arrested or worse -- Evans told the group to tell his wife he loved her as he left the plane. But eventually, they were able to leave, and after a brief layover in India -- which Ringo later said was the first time he felt he'd been somewhere truly foreign, as opposed to places like Germany or the USA which felt basically like home -- they got back to England: [Excerpt: "Ordinary passenger!"] When asked what they were going to do next, George replied “We're going to have a couple of weeks to recuperate before we go and get beaten up by the Americans,” The story of the "we're bigger than Jesus" controversy is one of the most widely misreported events in the lives of the Beatles, which is saying a great deal. One book that I've encountered, and one book only, Steve Turner's Beatles '66, tells the story of what actually happened, and even that book seems to miss some emphases. I've pieced what follows together from Turner's book and from an academic journal article I found which has some more detail. As far as I can tell, every single other book on the Beatles released up to this point bases their account of the story on an inaccurate press statement put out by Brian Epstein, not on the truth. Here's the story as it's generally told. John Lennon gave an interview to his friend, Maureen Cleave of the Evening Standard, during which he made some comments about how it was depressing that Christianity was losing relevance in the eyes of the public, and that the Beatles are more popular than Jesus, speaking casually because he was talking to a friend. That story was run in the Evening Standard more-or-less unnoticed, but then an American teen magazine picked up on the line about the Beatles being bigger than Jesus, reprinted chunks of the interview out of context and without the Beatles' knowledge or permission, as a way to stir up controversy, and there was an outcry, with people burning Beatles records and death threats from the Ku Klux Klan. That's... not exactly what happened. The first thing that you need to understand to know what happened is that Datebook wasn't a typical teen magazine. It *looked* just like a typical teen magazine, certainly, and much of its content was the kind of thing that you would get in Tiger Beat or any of the other magazines aimed at teenage girls -- the September 1966 issue was full of articles like "Life with the Walker Brothers... by their Road Manager", and interviews with the Dave Clark Five -- but it also had a long history of publishing material that was intended to make its readers think about social issues of the time, particularly Civil Rights. Arthur Unger, the magazine's editor and publisher, was a gay man in an interracial relationship, and while the subject of homosexuality was too taboo in the late fifties and sixties for him to have his magazine cover that, he did regularly include articles decrying segregation and calling for the girls reading the magazine to do their part on a personal level to stamp out racism. Datebook had regularly contained articles like one from 1963 talking about how segregation wasn't just a problem in the South, saying "If we are so ‘integrated' why must men in my own city of Philadelphia, the city of Brotherly Love, picket city hall because they are discriminated against when it comes to getting a job? And how come I am still unable to take my dark- complexioned friends to the same roller skating rink or swimming pool that I attend?” One of the writers for the magazine later said “We were much more than an entertainment magazine . . . . We tried to get kids involved in social issues . . . . It was a well-received magazine, recommended by libraries and schools, but during the Civil Rights period we did get pulled off a lot of stands in the South because of our views on integration” Art Unger, the editor and publisher, wasn't the only one pushing this liberal, integrationist, agenda. The managing editor at the time, Danny Fields, was another gay man who wanted to push the magazine even further than Unger, and who would later go on to manage the Stooges and the Ramones, being credited by some as being the single most important figure in punk rock's development, and being immortalised by the Ramones in their song "Danny Says": [Excerpt: The Ramones, "Danny Says"] So this was not a normal teen magazine, and that's certainly shown by the cover of the September 1966 issue, which as well as talking about the interviews with John Lennon and Paul McCartney inside, also advertised articles on Timothy Leary advising people to turn on, tune in, and drop out; an editorial about how interracial dating must be the next step after desegregation of schools, and a piece on "the ten adults you dig/hate the most" -- apparently the adult most teens dug in 1966 was Jackie Kennedy, the most hated was Barry Goldwater, and President Johnson, Billy Graham, and Martin Luther King appeared in the top ten on both lists. Now, in the early part of the year Maureen Cleave had done a whole series of articles on the Beatles -- double-page spreads on each band member, plus Brian Epstein, visiting them in their own homes (apart from Paul, who she met at a restaurant) and discussing their daily lives, their thoughts, and portraying them as rounded individuals. These articles are actually fascinating, because of something that everyone who met the Beatles in this period pointed out. When interviewed separately, all of them came across as thoughtful individuals, with their own opinions about all sorts of subjects, and their own tastes and senses of humour. But when two or more of them were together -- especially when John and Paul were interviewed together, but even in social situations, they would immediately revert to flip in-jokes and riffing on each other's statements, never revealing anything about themselves as individuals, but just going into Beatle mode -- simultaneously preserving the band's image, closing off outsiders, *and* making sure they didn't do or say anything that would get them mocked by the others. Cleave, as someone who actually took them all seriously, managed to get some very revealing information about all of them. In the article on Ringo, which is the most superficial -- one gets the impression that Cleave found him rather difficult to talk to when compared to the other, more verbally facile, band members -- she talked about how he had a lot of Wild West and military memorabilia, how he was a devoted family man and also devoted to his friends -- he had moved to the suburbs to be close to John and George, who already lived there. The most revealing quote about Ringo's personality was him saying "Of course that's the great thing about being married -- you have a house to sit in and company all the time. And you can still go to clubs, a bonus for being married. I love being a family man." While she looked at the other Beatles' tastes in literature in detail, she'd noted that the only books Ringo owned that weren't just for show were a few science fiction paperbacks, but that as he said "I'm not thick, it's just that I'm not educated. People can use words and I won't know what they mean. I say 'me' instead of 'my'." Ringo also didn't have a drum kit at home, saying he only played when he was on stage or in the studio, and that you couldn't practice on your own, you needed to play with other people. In the article on George, she talked about how he was learning the sitar,  and how he was thinking that it might be a good idea to go to India to study the sitar with Ravi Shankar for six months. She also talks about how during the interview, he played the guitar pretty much constantly, playing everything from songs from "Hello Dolly" to pieces by Bach to "the Trumpet Voluntary", by which she presumably means Clarke's "Prince of Denmark's March": [Excerpt: Jeremiah Clarke, "Prince of Denmark's March"] George was also the most outspoken on the subjects of politics, religion, and society, linking the ongoing war in Vietnam with the UK's reverence for the Second World War, saying "I think about it every day and it's wrong. Anything to do with war is wrong. They're all wrapped up in their Nelsons and their Churchills and their Montys -- always talking about war heroes. Look at All Our Yesterdays [a show on ITV that showed twenty-five-year-old newsreels] -- how we killed a few more Huns here and there. Makes me sick. They're the sort who are leaning on their walking sticks and telling us a few years in the army would do us good." He also had very strong words to say about religion, saying "I think religion falls flat on its face. All this 'love thy neighbour' but none of them are doing it. How can anybody get into the position of being Pope and accept all the glory and the money and the Mercedes-Benz and that? I could never be Pope until I'd sold my rich gates and my posh hat. I couldn't sit there with all that money on me and believe I was religious. Why can't we bring all this out in the open? Why is there all this stuff about blasphemy? If Christianity's as good as they say it is, it should stand up to a bit of discussion." Harrison also comes across as a very private person, saying "People keep saying, ‘We made you what you are,' well, I made Mr. Hovis what he is and I don't go round crawling over his gates and smashing up the wall round his house." (Hovis is a British company that makes bread and wholegrain flour). But more than anything else he comes across as an instinctive anti-authoritarian, being angry at bullying teachers, Popes, and Prime Ministers. McCartney's profile has him as the most self-consciously arty -- he talks about the plays of Alfred Jarry and the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio: [Excerpt: Luciano Berio, "Momenti (for magnetic tape)"] Though he was very worried that he might be sounding a little too pretentious, saying “I don't want to sound like Jonathan Miller going on" --

christmas united states america tv jesus christ love music american new york time black world canada head chicago australia english europe internet bible babies uk washington france england japan olympic games british mexico americans san francisco french canadian new york times dj war germany africa society christianity masters european australian italy philadelphia inspiration german japanese loving ireland public western putting south spain alabama night songs north america detroit wife north trip bbc greek indian turkey talent tokyo fish horses jews union vietnam sweden rain ride terror idea britain muslims animals melbourne beatles mothers old testament martin luther king jr production atlantic world war ii fallout liverpool manchester dutch recording places rolling stones shadows bills philippines cook invitation capitol judas personality village rock and roll birmingham denmark elvis aftermath benefit austria holland pope destruction ward hammer churches prisoners stones evans strangers ferrari tasks mood ticket shortly bob dylan depending sorrow djs prime minister newcastle liberal big brother buddha parliament cage civil rights khan hawks musicians lp pepper thirty compare john lennon epstein bach clarke invention shades henderson turkish frank sinatra paul mccartney look up lsd high priests cream ten commandments satisfaction ballad number one carnival orchestras pink floyd jamaican hoops richards meek chess crawford communists readers newsweek hindu gallery safari elect first lady rider johnston monitor steady good morning yogi wild west makes sgt jimi hendrix g7 motown fringe chester blu ray beach boys west end digest norwich leases autobiographies itv alice in wonderland lester bumblebee eric clapton rich man mercedes benz mick jagger anthology umbrella hinduism kinks bad boy ramones salvation army come together tunisia mount sinai george harrison ravi brotherly love rolls royce viewers indica bee gees blur paul simon billy graham livingston tilt eighth oddly mccartney ferdinand ringo starr seekers browne nb neanderthals unsurprisingly pale chuck berry kite ringo yoko ono emi monkees docker dunbar keith richards vedic ku klux klan japanese americans beatle abbey road revolver turing rsa john coltrane brian wilson reservation graceland bohemian british isles popes stooges open air barrow alan turing merseyside orton rupert murdoch otis redding smokey robinson royal albert hall sunnyside leonard bernstein musically secret agents concorde toe roy orbison oldham john cage good vibrations byrds hard days god save southerners isley brothers unger bangor prime ministers bible belt detroit free press abracadabra shankar west germany roll up north wales evening standard nme pacemakers ono george martin ian mckellen peter sellers beautiful people timothy leary damon albarn