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American white supremacy group

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Best podcasts about Ku Klux Klan

Latest podcast episodes about Ku Klux Klan

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Author and Speaker Tim Wise and Finance Expert Barry Ritholtz Episode 522

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 141:48


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books 35 mins Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. 1:28 The GREAT Barry Ritholtz who has spent his career helping people spot their own investment errors and to learn how to better manage their own financial behaviors. He is the creator of The Big Picture, often ranked as the number one financial blog to follow by The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and others. Barry Ritholtz is the creator and host of Bloomberg's “Masters in Business” radio podcast, and a featured columnist at the Washington Post. He is the author of the Bailout Nation: How Greed and Easy Money Corrupted Wall Street and Shook the World Economy (Wiley, 2009). In addition to serving as Chairman and Chief Investment Officer of Ritholtz Wealth Management, he is also on the advisory boards of Riskalyze, and Peer Street, two leading financial technology startups bringing transparency and analytics to the investment business.   Barry has named one of the “15 Most Important Economic Journalists” in the United States, and has been called one of The 25 Most Dangerous People in Financial Media. When not working, he can be found with his wife and their two dogs on the north shore of Long Island. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

French-Canadian Legacy Podcast
FCL News 1/18 & Joseph Dunn Preview

French-Canadian Legacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 10:12


Melody has finished ringing in 2022 so she's back with all the best articles and events the Franco world has to offer then Jesse will let you know about next week's guest Joseph Dunn. We hope you'll check back next week. Articles: French-Canadian history inspired Bend author's 'Daughter of the King' - https://www.bendbulletin.com/lifestyle/french-canadian-history-inspired-bend-authors-daughter-of-the-king/article_684a81c8-6cda-11ec-952e-f713fdb8bde7.html Kerry Chaput's website: https://www.kerrywrites.com/kerrychaputbooks The Unique Story of Public Education in Northern Maine: https://www.umfk.edu/archives/blog/public-edu-northern-maine-en/ Jack Kerouac Centennial in 2022: http://francoamerican.bdnblogs.com/2022/01/06/franco-american-news-and-culture/jack-kerouac-centennial-in-2022/ The two latest Franco Foods episodes: Cretons: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1_0e9TpGYk Financiers: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cgh6M4PvI8E&t=184s Podcasts: Language Matters w/ Kathleen Stein-Smith: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuMVoaq_NdA Les Aventures d'un Quebecois, Capsule no 19: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sINvl0qZtA Events: January 27, at 7pm, Ku Klux Klan in New England in the 1920s w/ David Vermette: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_22DSNMs4RWiQJM8bFky4zg Watch movies from Quebec until January 23: https://pleinsecrans.com/?fbclid=IwAR2szyjjj9xh0vhjjjEsBiAOOXXw9LUIMyZMlE_spOrwFX_8md9ZMJM6Nx4 Nouvelle Annee 1750s at Historic Fort Wayne, January 29: https://www.westbendnews.net/autonews/2022/01/15/nouvelle-annee-1750s-historic-fort-wayne/ Fort Wayne site: https://oldfortwayne.org/ Don't forget to check out our Patreon for extra bonus content and a way to support the show - https://www.patreon.com/fclpodcast You can get your own FCL Face Mask, check out our merch on Teespring – https://www.teespring.com/fclpodcast

The Muck Podcast
Episode 106: Stay Out of the Ocean | Wyatt Outlaw & the Kirk Holden War and George Q. Cannon

The Muck Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 71:11


Tina and Hillary cover Commissioner Wyatt Outlaw & the Kirk-Holden War and Utah Territorial candidate George Q. Cannon. Tina's Story Wyatt Outlaw was the first African American to be appointed Town Commissioner and constable of Graham, North Carolina in 1869. BUT when whites objected to being policed by a black man, the KKK lynch Wyatt leading to the Kirk-Holden War. Hillary's Story George Q. Cannon moved up the ranks to become a senior apostle in the Mormon Church and also served as non-voting delegate for Utah Territory in the United States Congress for 10 years beginning in 1872. BUT when political opponents learn of his plural marriages, his seat is jeopardized. Sources Tina's Story Black Then THE KIRK-HOLDEN WAR OF 1870 (https://blackthen.com/the-kirk-holden-war-of-1870/) The Murder of Wyatt Outlaw (https://blackthen.com/the-murder-of-wyatt-outlaw/)--by Matt Swift Caswell County Historical Association Kirk-Holden War (1870) (http://sites.rootsweb.com/~ncccha/memoranda/kirkholdenwar.html) City of Graham Remembrance of Constable Wyatt Outlaw (https://www.cityofgraham.com/remembrance-of-constable-wyatt-outlaw/) Civil War Era North Carolina Governor William W. Holden's Impeachment (https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/items/show/962) John Walter Stephens (https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/exhibits/show/republicans-kkk/john-walter-stephens) The Ku Klux Klan and the Kirk-Holden War (https://cwnc.omeka.chass.ncsu.edu/exhibits/show/republicans-kkk/kirk-holden) Elon News Network Alamance NAACP spearheads effort to rename park after Black councilman slain in 1870 (https://www.elonnewsnetwork.com/article/2021/02/rename-graham-park-after-wyatt-outlaw)--by Mackenzie Wilkes Medium The Confederate monument standing where the Klan killed Wyatt Outlaw (https://medium.com/@orangeintogrape/the-confederate-monument-standing-where-the-klan-killed-wyatt-outlaw-2884dd8d33f6)--by Mike Scott NC Pedia Governor Holden Speaks Out Against the Ku Klux Klan (https://www.ncpedia.org/anchor/governor-holden-speaks-out) The Kirk-Holden War (https://www.ncpedia.org/anchor/kirk-holden-war) Union League (https://www.ncpedia.org/union-league) North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultureal Resources Lynching of Wyatt Outlaw and the Kirk-Holden War (https://www.ncdcr.gov/blog/2015/02/26/lynching-of-wyatt-outlaw-and-the-kirk-holden-war) North Carolina History Holden Impeachment (https://northcarolinahistory.org/encyclopedia/holden-impeachment/) The Times News The life and tragic death of Wyatt Outlaw (https://www.thetimesnews.com/story/news/2015/08/16/the-life-tragic-death-wyatt/33672318007/) Trial of William W. Holden (https://ia802606.us.archive.org/12/items/trialofwilliamwh02hold/trialofwilliamwh02hold_bw.pdf) A Red Record Wyatt Outlaw (https://lynching.web.unc.edu/the-people/wyatt-outlaw/) Wikipedia Kirk-Holden War (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirk%E2%80%93Holden_war) William Woods Holden (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Woods_Holden) Wyatt Outlaw (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wyatt_Outlaw) Yes Weekly Wyatt Outlaw and the white men who put a monument where they lynched him (https://www.yesweekly.com/education/wyatt-outlaw-and-the-white-men-who-put-a-monument-where-they-lynched-him/article_7ef182a0-dc2b-11ea-a508-ab7d42bfc93b.html)--by Ian McDowell Photos Wyatt Outlaw (https://blackthen.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/wyatt...jpg)--taken from Black Then William Woods Holden (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/86/NCG-WilliamHolden.jpg)--via Public Domain George W. Kirk (https://www.ncpedia.org/sites/default/files/images_bio/Kirk_George_W_LoC.jpg)--from Library of Congress via Public Domain Hillary's Story BYU Religious Studies Center George Q. Cannon in Hawai‘i, 1850–54: Relationship Challenges of a Young Missionary (https://rsc.byu.edu/pioneers-pacific/george-q-cannon-hawaii-1850-54-relationship-challenges-young-missionary)--by Davis Bitton Church Historians Press The Journal of George Q. Cannon (https://www.churchhistorianspress.org/george-q-cannon/about?lang=eng) The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints George Q. Cannon: A Mighty Instrument (https://history.churchofjesuschrist.org/exhibit/george-q-cannon-a-mighty-instrument?lang=eng) History, Art & Archives Cannon, George Quayle (https://history.house.gov/People/Detail/10597) Utah Department of Heritage & Arts A PATRIARCH & THREE SCIONS: GEORGE Q. CANNON AND HIS OLDEST SONS JOHN, FRANK & ABRAHAM (https://heritage.utah.gov/a-patriarch-three-scions-george-q-cannon-and-his-oldest-sons-john-frank-abraham/) Wikipedia George Q. Cannon (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Q._Cannon) Photos George Q. Cannon (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/53/George_Q._Cannon_-_Brady-Handy.jpg/1024px-George_Q._Cannon_-_Brady-Handy.jpg)--by Mathew Benjamin Brady via Public Domain Cannon and his three oldest sons (https://heritage.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/GQC-JQC-FJC-and-AHC-1691x2048.jpg)--via Utah Department of Heritage & Arts Portrait of Polygamists in prison (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0a/Polygamists_in_prison.jpg/1920px-Polygamists_in_prison.jpg)--from Charles Roscoe Savage via Public Domain

Dubcast
Music | Life | Whatever EP27 - The KKK In New Jersey

Dubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 15:38


Greetings Dub Family!This is a story about the Ku Klux Klan in New Jersey. The Boogieman is real!Enjoy,DubbyJoin the mailing list at : https://dubassassins.comSupport the show (https://www.paypal.me/virtualtips)

Utah's Morning News
7 o'clock report Dec. 21, 2021

Utah's Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 21:56


University of Utah looking into reports of a Ku Klux Klan group entering a dorm to recruit other members.  Also a separate report of a brown substance found smeared on a door to a student's room. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Midnight Train Podcast
Christmas Disasters

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 115:39


For bonuses and to support the show, sign up at www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   This week is our Christmas special here on the train. First, we've covered Krampus, Christmas killings, and ghost story Christmas traditions. Then, in keeping with our tradition of crazy Christmas episodes, today, we bring you some crazy Christmas disasters! Christmas isn't immune to crazy shit going on, from natural disasters to fires. Not only that, we're giving you guys a pretty good dose of history today. So with that being said, let's get into some crazy Christmas stuff!   While this first topic isn't necessarily a disaster in the usual sense, it definitely caused nothing but problems. And yes, it's a disaster. In 1865 on Christmas Eve, something happened that would change things for many people in this country and still causes grief to this day. While most people in the u.s. were settling down for the night with their families, leaving milk out for Santa, and tucking the kids in for the night, a group of men in Pulaski, Tennessee, were getting together for a very different purpose. Frank McCord, Richard Reed, John Lester, John Kennedy, J. Calvin Jones, and James Crowe were all officers with the Confederacy in the civil war. That night, they got together to form a group inspired at least in part by the then largely defunct Sons of Malta. While it started as a social club, within months, it would turn into one of the most nefarious groups around, the Ku Klux Klan. According to The Cyclopædia of Fraternities (1907), "Beginning in April, 1867, there was a gradual transformation. ...The members had conjured up a veritable Frankenstein. They had played with an engine of power and mystery, though organized on entirely innocent lines, and found themselves overcome by a belief that something must lie behind it all – that there was, after all, a serious purpose, a work for the Klan to do." It borrowed parts of the initiation ceremony from the sons of Malta with the same purpose: "ludicrous initiations, the baffling of public curiosity, and the amusement for members were the only objects of the Klan," according to Albert Stevens in 1907. In the summer of 1867, local branches of the Klan met in a general organizing convention. They established what they called an "Invisible Empire of the South." Leading Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest was chosen as the first leader, or "grand wizard," of the Klan; he presided over a hierarchy of grand dragons, grand titans, and grand cyclops. The organization of the Ku Klux Klan coincided with the beginning of the second phase of post-Civil War Reconstruction, put into place by the more radical members of the Republican Party in Congress. After rejecting President Andrew Johnson's relatively lenient Reconstruction policies from 1865 to 1866, Congress passed the Reconstruction Act over the presidential veto. Under its provisions, the South was divided into five military districts. Each state was required to approve the 14th Amendment, which granted "equal protection" of the Constitution to formerly enslaved people and enacted universal male suffrage. From 1867 onward, Black participation in public life in the South became one of the most radical aspects of Reconstruction. Black people won elections to southern state governments and even the U.S. Congress. For its part, the Ku Klux Klan dedicated itself to an underground campaign of violence against Republican leaders and voters (both Black and white) to reverse the policies of Radical Reconstruction and restore white supremacy in the South. They were joined in this struggle by similar organizations such as the Knights of the White Camelia (launched in Louisiana in 1867) and the White Brotherhood. At least 10 percent of the Black legislators elected during the 1867-1868 constitutional conventions became victims of violence during Reconstruction, including seven who were killed. White Republicans (derided as "carpetbaggers" and "scalawags") and Black institutions such as schools and churches—symbols of Black autonomy—were also targets for Klan attacks. By 1870, the Ku Klux Klan had branches in nearly every southern state. The Klan did not boast a well-organized structure or clear leadership even at its height. Local Klan members, often wearing masks and dressed in the organization's signature long white robes and hoods, usually carried out their attacks at night. They acted on their own but supported the common goals of defeating Radical Reconstruction and restoring white supremacy in the South. Klan activity flourished particularly in the regions of the South where Black people were a minority or a slight majority of the population and were relatively limited in others. Among the most notorious zones of Klan activity was South Carolina, where in January 1871, 500 masked men attacked the Union county jail and lynched eight Black prisoners. Though Democratic leaders would later attribute Ku Klux Klan violence to poorer southern white people, the organization's membership crossed class lines, from small farmers and laborers to planters, lawyers, merchants, physicians, and ministers. In the regions where most Klan activity took place, local law enforcement officials either belonged to the Klan or declined to act against it. Even those who arrested Klansmen found it difficult to find witnesses willing to testify against them.    Other leading white citizens in the South declined to speak out against the group's actions, giving them implicit approval. After 1870, Republican state governments in the South turned to Congress for help, resulting in three Enforcement Acts, the strongest of which was the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871.   For the first time, the Ku Klux Klan Act designated certain crimes committed by individuals as federal offenses, including conspiracies to deprive citizens of the right to hold office, serve on juries and enjoy the equal protection of the law. In addition, the act authorized the president to suspend the habeas corpus, arrest accused individuals without charge, and send federal forces to suppress Klan violence. For those of us dummies that may not know, a "writ of habeas corpus" (which literally means to "produce the body") is a court order demanding that a public official (such as a warden) deliver an imprisoned individual to the court and show a valid reason for that person's detention. The procedure provides a means for prison inmates or others acting on their behalf to dispute the legal basis for confinement.   This expansion of federal authority–which Ulysses S. Grant promptly used in 1871 to crush Klan activity in South Carolina and other areas of the South–outraged Democrats and even alarmed many Republicans. From the early 1870s onward, white supremacy gradually reasserted its hold on the South as support for Reconstruction waned; by the end of 1876, the entire South was under Democratic control once again.   Now, this was just the first version of the Klan. A second version started up in the early 1900s and later on another revival which is the current iteration of the Klan. We're not going to go into the later versions of the Klan because well…. Fuck 'em! We've already given them too much air time! But… This most definitely qualifies as a Christmas disaster.   Next up, we have a couple natural disasters.    First up, Cyclone Tracy. Cyclone Tracy has been described as the most significant tropical cyclone in Australia's history, and it changed how we viewed the threat of tropical cyclones to northern Australia.   Five days before Christmas 1974, satellite images showed a tropical depression in the Arafura Sea, 700 kilometers (or almost 435 miles for us Americans) northeast of Darwin.   The following day the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center in Darwin warned that a cyclone had formed and gave it the name Tracy. Cyclone Tracy was moving southwest at this stage, but as it passed the northwest of Bathurst Island on December 23, it slowed down and changed course.   That night, it rounded Cape Fourcroy and began moving southeast, with Darwin directly in its path.   The first warning that Darwin was under threat came at 12:30 p.m. on Christmas Eve when a top-priority flash cyclone warning was issued advising people that Cyclone Tracy was expected to make landfall early Christmas morning.   Despite 12 hours' warning of the cyclone's impending arrival, it fell mainly on deaf ears.   Residents were complacent after a near-miss from Cyclone Selma a few weeks before and distracted by the festive season.   Indeed in the preceding decade, the Bureau of Meteorology had identified 25 cyclones in Northern Territory waters, but few had caused much damage. Severe Tropical Cyclone Tracy was a small but intense system at landfall.   The radius of the galeforce winds extended only 50 kilometers from the eye of the cyclone, making it one of the most miniature tropical cyclones on record, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).   Records show that at least six tropical cyclones had severely impacted Darwin before Tracy.   The worst of these was in January 1897 when a "disastrous hurricane" nearly destroyed the settlement, and 28 people died.   However, unlike Tracy, it is thought this cyclone did not directly pass over Darwin.   And while Tracy was reported as a category four cyclone, some meteorologists today believe it may have been a category five shortly before it made landfall.   At midnight on Christmas Day, wind gusts greater than 100 kilometers or over 62 miles per hour began to be recorded.   The cyclone's center reached East Point at 3:15 a.m. and landed just north of Fannie Bay at 3:30 a.m.   Tracy was so strong it bent a railway signal tower in half.    The city was devastated by the cyclone. At least 90 percent of homes in Darwin were demolished or badly damaged. Forty-five vessels in the harbor were wrecked or damaged.   In addition to the 65 people who died, 145 were admitted to the hospital with serious injuries.   Vegetation was damaged up to 80 kilometers away from the coast, and Darwin felt eerily quiet due to the lack of insect and birdlife.   Within a week after the cyclone hit, more than 30,000 Darwin residents had been evacuated by air or road. That's more than two-thirds of the population at that time.   Cyclone Tracy remains one of Australia's most significant disasters.   As Murphy wrote 10 years after the cyclone: "The impact of Cyclone Tracy has reached far beyond the limits of Darwin itself. All along the tropical coasts of northern Australia and beyond a new cyclone awareness has emerged."   Merry fucking Christmas! Damn, that sucks. The information in this section came from an article on abc.net.au   Next up, we are going way back. The Christmas Flood of 1717 resulted from a northwesterly storm, which hit the coastal area of the Netherlands, Germany, and Scandinavia on Christmas night of 1717. During the night of Christmas, 1717, the coastal regions of the Netherlands, Germany, and Scandinavia were hit by a severe north-western storm. It is estimated that 14,000 people died. It was the worst flood for four centuries and the last significant flood to hit the north of the Netherlands.   In the countryside to the north of the Netherlands, the water level rose up to a few meters. The city of Groningen rose up to a few feet. In the province of Groningen, villages that were situated directly behind the dikes were nearly swept away. Action had to be taken against looters who robbed houses and farms under the fraudulent act of rescuing the flood victims. In total, the flood caused 2,276 casualties in Groningen. 1,455 homes were either destroyed or suffered extensive damage. Most livestock was lost.   The water also poured into Amsterdam and Haarlem and the areas around Dokkum and Stavoren. Over 150 people died in Friesland alone. In addition, large sections of Northern Holland were left underwater and the area around Zwolle and Kampen. In these areas, the flood only caused material damage. In Vlieland, however, the sea poured over the dunes, almost entirely sweeping away the already-damaged village of West-Vlieland.   We also found this report from a German website. It's been translated, so our apologies if it's wonky.    "According to tradition, several days before Christmas, it had blown strong and sustained from the southwest. Shortly after sunset on Christmas Eve, the wind suddenly turned from west to northwest and eased a little. The majority of the residents went to bed unconcerned, because currently was half moon and the next regular flood would not occur until 7 a.m. At the time when the tide was supposed to have been low for a long time, however, a drop in the water level could not be determined. Allegedly between 1 and 2 a.m. the storm began to revive violently accompanied by lightning and thunder. Between 3 and 4 o'clock in the morning the water reached the top of the dike. The current and waves caused the dike caps to break, so that the tide rolled over the dike into the flat land with a loud roar of thunder. Many only had time to save themselves in the dark on the floor under the roof. Most of the time there was not even time to take clothes, drinking water and some food with you. Numerous houses could not withstand the rising water and the current. In the higher and higher water and the increasing current, windows were Doors and entire walls dented. Allegedly the hurricane and the storm surge raged against the coast for three full days, so that it was not until December 28 that the water fell so far that one could come to the aid of one's neighbors with simply built "boats." In many places, the dykes had been razed to the ground, which meant that in lower-lying areas, every regular flood caused renewed flooding. At the places where the dykes were broken, deep valleys, some of which were large, formed. In many places where the dike is led around in a semi-arch, these walls, also known as pools or bracken, are still visible and testify to the force of the water. At that time, many people are said to have believed that the march was forever lost. In the low-lying areas, the water was later covered with ice floes, sometimes held up for months. Up until the summer months, bodies were said to have been found repeatedly during the clean-up work on the alluvial piles of straw and in the trenches. Many people who survived the flood later fell victim to so-called marching fever. New storm surges in the following years ruined the efforts for the first time to get the dike back into a defensible condition, and many houses, which were initially only damaged, have now been completely destroyed. Numerous small owners left the country so that the Hanover government even issued a ban on emigration."   Looks like the Netherlands got a proper Christmas fucking as well! Some towns were so severely destroyed that nothing was left, and they simply ceased to exist. Damn.    Cyclones and floods… What else does mother nature have for us? Well, how's about an earthquake! On Friday, December 26, 2003, at 5:26 a.m., Bam city in Southeastern Iran was jolted by an earthquake registering a 6.5 magnitude on the Richter scale. This was the result of the strike-slip motion of the Bam fault, which runs through this area. The earthquake's epicenter was determined to be approximately six miles southwest of the city. Three more significant aftershocks and many smaller aftershocks were also recorded, the last of which occurred over a month after the main earthquake. To date, official death tolls have 26,271 fatalities, 9000 injured, and 525 still missing. The city of Bam is one of Iran's most ancient cities, dating back to 224A.D. Latest reports and damage estimates are approaching the area of $1.9 billion. A United Nations report estimated that about 90% of the city's buildings were 60%-100% damaged, while the remaining buildings were between 30%-60% damaged. The crazy part about the whole thing… The quake only lasted for about 8 seconds.   Now I know what you're thinking… That's not Christmas… Well, there spanky, the night of the 25th, Christmas, people started to feel minor tremors that would preface the quake, so fuck you, it counts.   We have one more natural disaster for you guys, and this one most of you guys probably remember. And this one was another that started last Christmas night and rolled into the 26th, also known as boxing day. So we're talking about the Boxing Day Tsunami and the Indian ocean earthquake in 2004.    A 9.1-magnitude earthquake—one of the largest ever recorded—ripped through an undersea fault in the Indian Ocean, propelling a massive column of water toward unsuspecting shores. The Boxing Day tsunami would be the deadliest in recorded history, taking a staggering 230,000 lives in a matter of hours.   The city of Banda Aceh on the northern tip of Sumatra was closest to the powerful earthquake's epicenter, and the first waves arrived in just 20 minutes. It's nearly impossible to imagine the 100-foot roiling mountain of water that engulfed the coastal city of 320,000, instantly killing more than 100,000 men, women, and children. Buildings folded like houses of cards, trees, and cars were swept up in the oil-black rapids, and virtually no one caught in the deluge survived.   Thailand was next. With waves traveling 500 mph across the Indian Ocean, the tsunami hit the coastal provinces of Phang Nga and Phuket an hour and a half later. Despite the time-lapse, locals and tourists were utterly unaware of the imminent destruction. Curious beachgoers even wandered out among the oddly receding waves, only to be chased down by a churning wall of water. The death toll in Thailand was nearly 5,400, including 2,000 foreign tourists.   An hour later, on the opposite side of the Indian Ocean, the waves struck the southeastern coast of India near the city of Chennai, pushing debris-choked water kilometers inland and killing more than 10,000 people, primarily women and children, since many of the men were out fishing. But some of the worst devastations were reserved for the island nation of Sri Lanka, where more than 30,000 people were swept away by the waves and hundreds of thousands left homeless.   As proof of the record-breaking strength of the tsunami, the last victims of the Boxing Day disaster perished nearly eight hours later when swelling seas and rogue waves caught swimmers by surprise in South Africa, 5,000 miles from the quake's epicenter.   Vasily Titov is a tsunami researcher and forecaster with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Center for Tsunami Research. He credits the unsparing destructiveness of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami on the raw power of the earthquake that spawned it. The quake originated in a so-called megathrust fault, where heavy oceanic plates subduct beneath lighter continental plates.    "They are the largest faults in the world and they're all underwater," says Titov.   The 2004 quake ruptured a 900-mile stretch along the Indian and Australian plates 31 miles below the ocean floor. Rather than delivering one violent jolt, the earthquake lasted an unrelenting 10 minutes, releasing as much pent-up power as several thousand atomic bombs.   In the process, massive segments of the ocean floor were forced an estimated 30 or 40 meters (up to 130 feet) upward. The effect was like dropping the world's most giant pebble in the Indian Ocean with ripples the size of mountains extending out in all directions.   Titov emphasizes that tsunamis look nothing like the giant surfing break-style waves that many imagine.   "It's a wave, but from the observer's standpoint, you wouldn't recognize it as a wave," Titov says. "It's more like the ocean turns into a white water river and floods everything in its path."   Once caught in the raging waters, the debris will finish the job if the currents don't pull you under.   "In earthquakes, a certain number of people die but many more are injured. It's completely reversed with tsunamis," says Titov. "Almost no injuries, because it's such a difficult disaster to survive."   Holy fuck… That's insane!   Well, there are some crazy natural disasters gifted to us by mother nature. So now let's take a look at some man-made disasters… And there are some bad ones.    First up is the 1953 train wreck on Christmas Eve in New Zealand. So this is actually a mix of mother nature fucking people and a man-made structure failing. This event is also referred to as the Tangiwai disaster. The weather on Christmas Eve was fine, and with little recent rain, no one suspected flooding in the Whangaehu River. The river appeared normal when a goods train crossed the bridge around 7 p.m. What transformed the situation was the sudden release of approximately 2 million cubic meters of water from the crater lake of nearby Mt Ruapehu. A 6-meter-high wave containing water, ice, mud, and rocks surged, tsunami-like, down the Whangaehu River. Sometime between 10.10 and 10.15 p.m., this lahar struck the concrete pylons of the Tangiwai railway bridge.   Traveling at approximately 65 km per hour, locomotive Ka 949 and its train of nine carriages and two vans reached the severely weakened bridge at 10.21 p.m. As the bridge buckled beneath its weight, the engine plunged into the river, taking all five second-class carriages with it. The torrent force destroyed four of these carriages – those inside had little chance of survival.   The leading first-class carriage, Car Z, teetered on the edge of the ruined bridge for a few minutes before breaking free from the remaining three carriages and toppling into the river. It rolled downstream before coming to rest on a bank as the water level fell. Remarkably, 21 of the 22 passengers in this carriage survived. Evidence suggested that the locomotive driver, Charles Parker, had applied the emergency brakes some 200 m from the bridge, which prevented the last three carriages from ending up in the river and saved many lives. Even still, 151 of the 285 passengers and crew died that night in the crash.   This information was taken from nzhistory.gov.    Next up is the Italian Hall disaster.    Before it was called Calumet, the area was known as Red Jacket. And for many, it seemed to be ground zero for the sprawling copper mining operations that absorbed wave after wave of immigrants into the Upper Peninsula.   Red Jacket itself was a company town for the Calumet and Hecla Mining Company, a large firm that in the 1870s was known as the world's largest copper producer. For a time, C&H had the world's deepest copper mines.   But the company wasn't immune from the organized labor push that swept across the Keweenaw Peninsula and other parts of the U.P. in 1913. Miners in Montana and Colorado had unionized, and in July of that year, the Western Federation of Miners called a strike against all Copper Country mines. According to a mining journal published that year, they were pushing for a $3 daily wage, 8-hour days, safer working conditions, and representation.   "The strike took place in a very complicated time in American history," said Jo Holt, a historian with the National Park Service's Keweenaw National Historical Park. "We had all these different things coming together. An increasingly industrialized country was grappling with worker's rights, gender issues, and immigration. We were moving from a gilded age into a progressive era, and recognizing the voice of labor.   "We see this event happen in the midst of that struggle."   "The reason it resonates today is we are still having these conversations. How do we create a just economy that functions for everybody? ... We are still, almost hundred and 10 years later, in the midst of these conversations."   As the strike wore into fall and the holiday season, a women's auxiliary group to the WFM organized a Christmas Eve party for the miners' families at the Italian Benevolent Society building, better known as the Italian Hall.   It was a big, boisterous affair, researchers have said. The multi-story hall was packed, with more than 600 people inside at one point. Children were watching a play and receiving gifts. Organizers later said the crowd was so large that it was hard to track who was coming in the door.   When the false cry of "Fire!" went up, pandemonium reached the sole stairway leading down to the street.   "What happened is when people panicked, they tried to get out through the stairwell," Holt said. "Someone tripped or people started to fall, and that's what created the bottleneck. It was just people falling on top of each other."   The aftermath was horrifying. As the dead were pulled from the pile in the stairwell, the bodies were carried to the town hall, which turned into a makeshift morgue. Some families lost more than one child. Other children were orphaned when their parents died.   One black and white photo in the Michigan Technological University Archives shows rows of what looks like sleeping children lying side-by-side. Their eyes are closed. Their faces were unmarred. The caption reads: "Christmas Eve in the Morgue."   After the dead were buried, some families moved away. Others stayed and kept supporting the strike, which ended the following spring.   Rumors emerged later that the Italian Hall's doors were designed to open inward, preventing the panicked crowd from pushing them outward to the street. Those were debunked, along with the suggestion in Woody Guthrie's "1913 Massacre" song that mining company thugs were holding the doors shut from the outside that night.   Damn… Mostly kids. On Christmas. That's a tough one.   Here's another touchy one. A race riot erupted in Mayfield, Kentucky, just before Christmas 1896. Although slavery in the U.S. ended after the Civil War, the Reconstruction period and beyond was a dangerous time to be black. Things were awful for non-whites in the former Confederacy, amongst which Kentucky was especially bad for racial violence. In December 1896, white vigilantes lynched two black men within 24 hours of each other between the 21st and 22nd, one for a minor disagreement with a white man and the other, Jim Stone, for alleged rape. A note attached to Stone's swinging corpse warned black residents to get out of town.   In response to this unambiguous threat, the local African-American population armed themselves. Rumors spread amongst the town's white people that 250 men were marching on the city, and a state of emergency was called. The whites mobilized, black stores were vandalized, and fighting broke out between the two sides on December 23. In the event, three people were killed, including Will Suet, a black teenager who had just got off the train to spend Christmas with his family. It was all over on Christmas Eve, and a few days later, an uneasy truce between the races was called.   Ugh! Y'all know what time it is? That's right, it's time for some quick hitters.   Many of us enjoy the Christmas period by going to the theatre or watching a movie. In December 1903, Chicago residents were eager to do just that at the brand-new Iroquois Theatre, which had been officially opened only in October that year. 1700 people in all crammed themselves in to see the zany, family-friendly musical comedy, Mr. Bluebeard. But just as the wait was over and the show started, a single spark from a stage light lit the surrounding drapery. The show's star, Eddie Foy, tried to keep things together as Iroquois employees struggled to put the curtains out in vain.   However, even the spectacle of a Windy City-native in drag couldn't stop the terrified crowd stampeding for the few exits. These, preposterously, were concealed by curtains and utterly inadequate in number. When the actors opened their own exit door to escape, a gust of wind sent a fireball through the crowded theatre, meaning that hundreds died before the fire service was even called. 585 people died, either suffocated, burned alive, or crushed. The scene was described in a 1904 account as "worse than that pictured in the mind of Dante in his vision of the inferno". Next up, the politics behind this ghastly event are pretty complicated – one Mexican lecturer described the massacre as "the most complicated case in Mexico" – but here's an inadequate summary. The small and impoverished village of Acteal, Mexico, was home to Las Abejas (the bees'), a religious collective that sympathized with a rebel group opposing the Mexican government. Thus, on December 22, 1997, members of the then-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party crept down the steep hill slopes above the village. They chose their moment to attack carefully as people gathered at a prayer meeting when they finally slunk into Acteal.   Over the next few hours, assassins armed with guns executed 45 innocent people in cold blood. Amongst the dead were 21 women, some of whom were pregnant, and 15 children. Worst of all, investigations into this cowardly act seem to implicate the government itself. Soldiers garrisoned nearby did not intervene, despite being within earshot of the gunfire and horrified screams. In addition, there was evidence of the crime scene being tampered with by local police and government officials. Though some people have been convicted, there are suspicions that they were framed and that the real culprits remain at large.   -Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring… except the Soviet Union. The Marxist-Leninist Khalq and Parcham parties had ousted the Afghan president in April 1978. Still, communism was so unpopular in Afghanistan that the mujahideen succeeded in toppling them just over a year later. So Khalq and Parcham turned to the Soviet Union for help, and on Christmas Eve that year, they obliged by sending 30,000 troops across the border into Afghanistan by the cover of darkness. Bloody fighting ensued, and soon the Soviet Union had control of the major cities.   The Soviets stayed for nine years, at which time the mujahideen, backed by foreign support and weapons, waged a brutal guerrilla campaign against the invaders. In turn, captured mujahideen were executed, and entire villages and agricultural areas were razed to the ground. When the Soviets finally withdrew in February 1989, over 1 million civilians and almost 125,000 soldiers from both sides were killed. From the turmoil after the Afghan-Soviet War emerged, the Taliban, installed by neighboring Pakistan, and with them Osama bin Laden. This indeed was a black Christmas for the world.   -How about another race riot… No? Well, here you go anyway. Although, this one may be more fucked up. The Agana Race Riot saw black and white US Marines fight it out from Christmas Eve to Boxing Day, 1944. Guam was host to both black and white US Marines in 1944. But instead of fighting the enemy, the white troops elected to turn on the all-black Marine 25th Depot Company. First, the white Marines would stop their fellow soldiers from entering Agana, pelt them with rocks, and shout racist obscenities at them. Then, on Christmas Eve 1944, 9 members of the 25th on official leave were seen talking to local women, and white Marines opened fire on them. Then, on Christmas Day, 2 black soldiers were shot dead by drunken white Marines in separate incidents.   Guam's white Marines were decidedly short on festive cheer and goodwill to all men. Not content with these murders, a white mob attacked an African-American depot on Boxing Day, and a white soldier sustained an injury when the 25th returned fire. Sick of their treatment by their fellow soldiers, 40 black Marines gave chase to the retreating mob in a jeep, but further violence was prevented by a roadblock. Can you guess what happened next? Yep, the black soldiers were charged with unlawful assembly, rioting, and attempted murder, while the white soldiers were left to nurse their aching heads.   One more major one for you guys, and then we'll leave on a kind of happier note. This one's kind of rough. Be warned.    In late December 2008 and into January 2009, the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) brutally killed more than 865 civilians and abducted at least 160 children in the northern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). LRA combatants hacked their victims to death with machetes or axes or crushed their skulls with clubs and heavy sticks. In some of the places where they attacked, few were left alive.   The worst attacks happened 48 hours over Christmas in locations some 160 miles apart in the Daruma, Duru, and Faradje areas of the Haut-Uele district of northern Congo. The LRA waited until the time of Christmas festivities on December 24 and 25 to carry out their devastating attacks, apparently choosing a moment when they would find the maximum number of people altogether. The killings occurred in the Congo and parts of southern Sudan, where similar weapons and tactics were used.   The Christmas massacres in Congo are part of a longstanding practice of horrific atrocities and abuse by the LRA. Before shifting its operations to the Congo in 2006, the LRA was based in Uganda and southern Sudan, where LRA combatants also killed, raped, and abducted thousands of civilians. When the LRA moved to Congo, its combatants initially refrained from targeting Congolese people. Still, in September 2008, the LRA began its first wave of attacks, apparently to punish local communities who had helped LRA defectors to escape. The first wave of attacks in September, together with the Christmas massacres, has led to the deaths of over 1,033 civilians and the abduction of at least 476 children.   LRA killings have not stopped since the Christmas massacres. Human Rights Watch receives regular reports of murders and abductions by the LRA, keeping civilians living in terror. According to the United Nations, over 140,000 people have fled their homes since late December 2008 to seek safety elsewhere. New attacks and the flight of civilians are reported weekly. People are frightened to gather together in some areas, believing that the LRA may choose these moments to strike, as they did with such devastating efficiency over Christmas.   Even by LRA standards, the Christmas massacres in the Congo were ruthless. LRA combatants struck quickly and quietly, surrounding their victims as they ate their Christmas meal in Batande village or gathered for a Christmas day concert in Faradje. In Mabando village, the LRA sought to maximize the death toll by luring their victims to a central place, playing the radio, and forcing their victims to sing songs and call for others to come to join the party. In most attacks, they tied up their victims, stripped them of their clothes, raped the women and girls, and then killed their victims by crushing their skulls. In two cases, the attackers tried to kill three-year-old toddlers by twisting off their heads. The few villagers who survived often did so because their assailants thought they were dead.   Yeah...so there's that. We could go much deeper into this incident, but we think you get the point.    We'll leave you with a story that is pretty bizarre when you stop and think about it. But we'll leave you with this story of an unlikely Christmas get-together. This is the story of the Christmas truce.    British machine gunner Bruce Bairnsfather, later a prominent cartoonist, wrote about it in his memoirs. Like most of his fellow infantrymen of the 1st Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, he was spending the holiday eve shivering in the muck, trying to keep warm. He had spent a good part of the past few months fighting the Germans. And now, in a part of Belgium called Bois de Ploegsteert, he was crouched in a trench that stretched just three feet deep by three feet wide, his days and nights marked by an endless cycle of sleeplessness and fear, stale biscuits and cigarettes too wet to light.   "Here I was, in this horrible clay cavity," Bairnsfather wrote, "…miles and miles from home. Cold, wet through and covered with mud." There didn't "seem the slightest chance of leaving—except in an ambulance."   At about 10 p.m., Bairnsfather noticed a noise. "I listened," he recalled. "Away across the field, among the dark shadows beyond, I could hear the murmur of voices." He turned to a fellow soldier in his trench and said, "Do you hear the Boches [Germans] kicking up that racket over there?"   Yes," came the reply. "They've been at it some time!"   The Germans were singing carols, as it was Christmas Eve. In the darkness, some of the British soldiers began to sing back. "Suddenly," Bairnsfather recalled, "we heard a confused shouting from the other side. We all stopped to listen. The shout came again." The voice was from an enemy soldier, speaking in English with a strong German accent. He was saying, "Come over here."   One of the British sergeants answered: "You come half-way. I come half-way."   In the years to come, what happened next would stun the world and make history. Enemy soldiers began to climb nervously out of their trenches and meet in the barbed-wire-filled "No Man's Land" that separated the armies. Typically, the British and Germans communicated across No Man's Land with streaking bullets, with only occasional gentlemanly allowances to collect the dead unmolested. But now, there were handshakes and words of kindness. The soldiers traded songs, tobacco, and wine, joining in a spontaneous holiday party in the cold night. Bairnsfather could not believe his eyes. "Here they were—the actual, practical soldiers of the German army. There was not an atom of hate on either side."   And it wasn't confined to that one battlefield. Starting on Christmas Eve, small pockets of French, German, Belgian, and British troops held impromptu cease-fires across the Western Front, with reports of some on the Eastern Front as well. Some accounts suggest a few of these unofficial truces remained in effect for days.   Descriptions of the Christmas Truce appear in numerous diaries and letters of the time. One British soldier, a rifleman, named J. Reading, wrote a letter home to his wife describing his holiday experience in 1914: "My company happened to be in the firing line on Christmas eve, and it was my turn…to go into a ruined house and remain there until 6:30 on Christmas morning. During the early part of the morning the Germans started singing and shouting, all in good English. They shouted out: 'Are you the Rifle Brigade; have you a spare bottle; if so we will come halfway and you come the other half.'"   "Later on in the day they came towards us," Reading described. "And our chaps went out to meet them…I shook hands with some of them, and they gave us cigarettes and cigars. We did not fire that day, and everything was so quiet it seemed like a dream."   Another British soldier, named John Ferguson, recalled it this way: "Here we were laughing and chatting to men whom only a few hours before we were trying to kill!"   Other diaries and letters describe German soldiers using candles to light Christmas trees around their trenches. One German infantryman described how a British soldier set up a makeshift barbershop, charging Germans a few cigarettes each for a haircut. Other accounts describe vivid scenes of men helping enemy soldiers collect their dead, of which there was plenty.   One British fighter named Ernie Williams later described in an interview his recollection of some makeshift soccer play on what turned out to be an icy pitch: "The ball appeared from somewhere, I don't know where... They made up some goals and one fellow went in goal and then it was just a general kick-about. I should think there were about a couple of hundred taking part."   German Lieutenant Kurt Zehmisch of the 134 Saxons Infantry, a schoolteacher who spoke both English and German, described a pick-up soccer game in his diary, which was discovered in an attic near Leipzig in 1999, written in an archaic German form of shorthand. "Eventually the English brought a soccer ball from their trenches, and pretty soon, a lively game ensued," he wrote. "How marvelously wonderful, yet how strange it was. The English officers felt the same way about it. Thus Christmas, the celebration of Love, managed to bring mortal enemies together as friends for a time."   So much more can be said about this event, but that seems like an excellent place to leave off this Christmas episode! And yes, when you really do stop and think about it… That's a pretty crazy yet fantastic thing.   Greatest disaster movies of all time   https://www.ranker.com/crowdranked-list/the-greatest-disaster-movies-of-all-time

action chicago reading australia new zealand australian american thailand mexico americans german fuck children santa christmas black stone indian colorado fire south numerous louisiana democrats republicans congress english bam french south africa love starting civil war british iran germany frankenstein land democratic tennessee cold lord scandinavia netherlands pakistan afghanistan african americans south carolina montana iroquois constitution mexican soldiers united nations sudan marine osama rumors doors amsterdam ku klux klan shortly john kennedy damn forty belgium kentucky richter krampus laden bloody malta guam sons klan leipzig knights uganda national park service friesland massacre soviet union christmas eve sri lanka sick union curious miners windy city no man disasters holt marines reconstruction bureau buildings indian ocean northern territory republican party enemy afghan bluebeard congo bois amendment us marines democratic republic boxing day meteorology woody guthrie taliban belgians haarlem groningen morgue klansmen kampen ka mayfield hanover zwolle upper peninsula allegedly chennai soviets confederacy western front christmas day christmas well dokkum congolese pulaski daruma human rights watch battalion fraternities sumatra calumet cyclop remarkably eastern front institutional revolutionary party andrew johnson cyclone tracy organizers christmas truce congo drc national oceanic phuket atmospheric administration noaa east point john ferguson jim stone richard reed wfm lra boxing day tsunami red jacket agana banda aceh c h ulysses s invisible empire mt ruapehu civil war reconstruction john lester keweenaw peninsula one british duru white brotherhood charles parker nathan bedford forrest acteal
Welcome to Florida
Episode 78: Oranges!

Welcome to Florida

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 49:31


This week's episode begins with foolishness from the governor in the state's efforts to combat climate change where he's more concerned about "left wing stuff." Our guest this week is Erin Thursby, author of "Florida Oranges: A Colorful History." From the Spanish colonizers through the Harriet Beecher Stowe, the Ku Klux Klan, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Bing Crosby and citrus greening, we discuss the enormous impact oranges have had on Florida.

Destination Freedom's podcast
S2 Ep5: The Lesson and The Conk

Destination Freedom's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 58:29


The Lesson, written by Kenya Fashaw Racial biases spark a fuse when a 17 year old Black student starts his first day at a new High School named after a Ku Klux Klan grand wizard. The student finds himself in unsolicited trouble and is confronted by a Black male Principal. The Principal begins to lecture the student and believes he is teaching the student a lesson but instead, receives a lesson from the student.   The Conk, written by Kenya Fashaw Black hair history is provided with this short excerpt about "The Conk '' hairstyle worn by Black men in the 1940s. A young Black musician walks into a barber shop inquiring about the conk hairstyle. A barber and his friend greet him with regular barbershop banter, knowledge, and education about the craze of the conk hairstyle for Black man, and the mindset that came along with it. Kenya Mahogany Fashaw is Co-Founder and the Chief Creative Officer of 5280 Artist Co-Op. She is a Spoken Word artist, actress and playwright. Kenya was recently selected to be part of the 2020-21 Denver Center of Performing Art Playwrights Group. This episode is followed by a bonus interview with Dr. Brenda Allen about Critical Race Theory. Dr. Brenda Allen is a Professor Emeritus at the University of Colorado. Follow @nocreditsproductions on Facebook and Instagram, and @donniebetts on Twitter. #Blackradiodays #socialjustice #destinationfreedomblackradiodays #donniebetts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Addressing Gettysburg Podcast
Private Confederacies with Author James Broomall

Addressing Gettysburg Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 73:02


This episode is brought to your for free because of our Patrons. Become a Patron and help us bring the story of Gettysburg and the men and women who helped shape its story to the masses. Click here!    Or support the show in another way. Click here!   I feel like a broken record, but what a great time I had interviewing Jim Broomall about his book "Private Confederacies". We met near the monument of the 111th Pa on Culp's Hill, in the shade, with a nice, gentle Pennsylvania breeze which seems to be a rarity for these in-the-field recordings in 2020. Anyway... How did the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction shape the masculinity of white Confederate veterans? As James J. Broomall shows, the crisis of the war forced a reconfiguration of the emotional worlds of the men who took up arms for the South. Raised in an antebellum culture that demanded restraint and shaped white men to embrace self-reliant masculinity, Confederate soldiers lived and fought within military units where they experienced the traumatic strain of combat and its privations together--all the while being separated from suffering families. Military service provoked changes that escalated with the end of slavery and the Confederacy's military defeat. Returning to civilian life, Southern veterans questioned themselves as never before, sometimes suffering from terrible self-doubt. Drawing on personal letters and diaries, Broomall argues that the crisis of defeat ultimately necessitated new forms of expression between veterans and among men and women. On the one hand, war led men to express levels of emotionality and vulnerability previously assumed the domain of women. On the other hand, these men also embraced a virulent, martial masculinity that they wielded during Reconstruction and beyond to suppress freed peoples and restore white rule through paramilitary organizations and the Ku Klux Klan.  James J. Broomall is assistant professor of history at Shepherd University and director of the George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War.    Get Private Confederacies from UNC Press here 

Today In Jewish History
6 Teves – Ku Klux Klan – 1865

Today In Jewish History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021


IDS Podcasts
The Dignity Project: The Black Market bombing

IDS Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 1:57


Vivian Bridgwaters and Keith Parker, former IU student body president and Black Panther, discuss the aftermath of the Black Market bombing in Bloomington. Vivian was a high school student in Bloomington when the shop was firebombed by two men affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan on Dec. 26, 1968. Keith was a college sophomore living in Indianapolis. This podcast is part of the IDS story “Indignity in death: Unmarked graves in Bloomington indicate long history of racism.”

IDS Podcasts
The Dignity Project: The Black Market bombing

IDS Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 0:55


Vivian Bridgwaters and Keith Parker, former IU student body president and Black Panther, discuss the aftermath of the Black Market bombing in Bloomington. Vivian was a high school student in Bloomington when the shop was firebombed by two men affiliated with the Ku Klux Klan on Dec. 26, 1968. Keith was a college sophomore living in Indianapolis. This podcast is part of the IDS story “Indignity in death: Unmarked graves in Bloomington indicate long history of racism.”

Escuchando Peliculas
Hijos del Sur (2020) #Drama #Biográfico #peliculas #audesc #podcast

Escuchando Peliculas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 96:14


País Estados Unidos Dirección Barry Alexander Brown Guion Barry Alexander Brown. Autobiografía: Bob Zellner Música Steven Argila Fotografía John Rosario Reparto Lucy Hale, Julia Ormond, Lucas Till, Brian Dennehy, Ludi Lin, Jake Abel, Lex Scott Davis, Cedric the Entertainer, Shamier Anderson, Nicole Ansari-Cox, Mike C. Manning, Michael Aaron Milligan, Dexter Darden Sinopsis El nieto de un miembro del Ku Klux Klan decide unirse al movimiento de lucha por los Derechos Civiles en los Estados Unidos al cumplir la mayoría de edad. Basada en la obra autobiográfica de Bob Zellner: "The Wrong Side of Murder Creek".

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Glenn Kirschner and Tim Wise Episode 492

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 116:54


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more also please donate to GiveWell.org/StandUp and start a store or shop at Shopify.com/Standup 44 Mins Glenn Kirschner is a former federal prosecutor with 30 years of trial experience.  He served in the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia for 24 years, rising to the position of Chief of the Homicide Section.  In that capacity, Glenn supervised 30 homicide prosecutors and oversaw all homicide grand jury investigations and prosecutions in Washington, DC. Prior to joining the DC U.S. Attorney's Office, Glenn served more than six years on active duty as an Army Judge Advocate General (JAG) prosecutor, trying court-martial cases and handling criminal appeals, including espionage and death penalty cases. Glenn tried hundreds of cases in his 30 years as a prosecutor, including more than 50 murder trials, multiple lengthy RICO trials and precedent-setting cases.  Glenn's YouTube Channel Glenn's Podcast 1:04 I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page  

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2723 - Violence and Truth After Emancipation w/ William A. Blair

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 77:32


Sam hosts William A. Blair, Professor of Middle American History at Penn State University, to discuss his recent book The Record of Murders and Outrages: Racial Violence and the Fight Over Truth at the Dawn of Reconstruction, on how the true histories of reconstruction, both in the horrible violence and influential policy, has been obscured by a white supremacist “redemption narrative”. They begin by discussing the historical study of the reconstruction era, and the influence of the Dunning School on manipulating the narrative, as Professor Blair walks through the influence of William A. Dunning's thoughts on a group of historians that did state by state studies of reconstruction, finding it overwhelmingly as a time of little accomplishment, while downplaying and normalizing the presence of racial violence. Next, Professor Blair contextualizes the Dunning School's development in the 1920s with an overwhelming turn towards professionalized history within a moment dominated by mainstream racist pseudoscience, before he and Sam dive into the professor's study of contemporary sources of the time, looking first at the Freeman's Bureau, the first national welfare agency which worked to bolster freed Black American's transition into society, alongside keeping “the record of murders and outrages,” which tracked the overwhelming racial violence against Black folks in the South. Introducing the data officially in 1867 with the Reconstruction Acts, William and Sam explore how Congressional Republicans used the bureau as an investigative arm to surveil the state of the South's reconstruction, particularly focusing on the issue of violent voter suppression, which began to boil over after these acts, with the Ku Klux Klan's influence and violence reaching their first peak in 1868. Next, they move into the violence that took place at the time, parsing through the coverage of both more notorious massacres, like those in Memphis and New Orleans in 1866, and the myriad unknown and hardly-reported massacres throughout the rest of the south, all of which contributed to overwhelming voter suppression, and touch on the harrowing historical impossibility of genuinely tracing and acknowledging the trauma that took place. They also cover the ideological organizing of the southern Democrats, from Charles Blackford's letter for the 1889 local elections and the emphasis on not deserting the polls, like some deserted the Confederacy, to Birth of a Nation in the early 1900s. Lastly, Professor Blair and Sam explore how narrative spinning begins immediately in the aftermath of massive issues with an ideological split, with Edward Pollard's “Lost Cause” being published in 1866, and the Dunning School following quickly. Sam also covers the wake of the Rittenhouse decision, contrasting it with the coverage of the Ahmaud Arbery case, in which the defendant cited lynchings, not to refer to the racist murder, but the treatment of the murderers. And in the Fun Half: Sam and the MR crew cover the Daily Wire's discussion on the Rittenhouse decision, and Candace Owen's putting discussing her “vengeance for Kyle,” in a segment that should've been produced by Monster Energy, John from San Antonio calls in to discuss the Freedom to Vote act and helps clarify the tally on the swings in Congressional seats, Pat from Nebraska chats the hypocrisy of gun nuts, and Aaron from CA tries to do inflation for houses, forgetting that, just like there's always open jobs that don't offer enough, there are always open houses that simply are used for wealth hoarding. They also cover Seb Gorka and Kid Rock both choosing incredibly embarrassing ways to return to the spotlight, Tucker Carlson and Chuck Todd blank on questioning their interview subjects, and Senator Kennedy asks Saule Omarova to renounce her middle school, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: sunsetlakecbd: Sunset Lake CBD & Majority Report are teaming up to turn America's most consumerist holiday into a fundraising opportunity for a great organization. Here's how it works: Visit SunsetLakeCBD.com starting November 22nd and all CBD Products will be between 30-60% OFF! Orders over $100 will receive a free jar of delicious CBD gummies - A $40 value, for free! NO PROMO CODE NEEDED PRODUCTS ARE ALREADY DISCOUNTED ON THE WEBSITE. StitchFix: You know your closet well, but what does it sound like? Yes, your closet. With Stitch Fix Freestyle, a shop that evolves alongside your taste, your closet will scream “so you” without actually screaming. Stitch Fix Freestyle is your trusted style destination where you can discover and instantly buy curated items based on your style, likes and lifestyle. Whether you're looking for a brand you love or to try a new one, at Stitch Fix Freestyle, you can shop hundreds of brands personalized to your size and fit. Get started today by filling out your style quiz at StitchFix.com/MAJORITY. That's StitchFix.com/MAJORITY to try Stitch Fix Freestyle. StitchFix.com/MAJORITY. Honey is the FREE shopping tool that scours the internet for promo codes and applies the best one it finds to your cart. Honey supports over 30,000 stories online – ranging from sites that have tech and gaming products to popular fashion brands. . even food delivery! If you don't already have Honey, you could be straight up missing out on free savings. It's literally FREE and installs in a few seconds. Get Honey for FREE at joinhoney.com/MAJORITY. That's joinhoney.com/MAJORITY. Storyworth: This holiday season, give a gift to your loved ones that makes them feel special and unique Give everyone you care about StoryWorth! Storyworth is an online service that helps you and your loved ones preserve precious memories and stories for years to come. Every week StoryWorth emails your relative or friend a thought-provoking question of your choice from their vast pool of options. With StoryWorth I am giving those I love most a thoughtful, personal gift from the heart and preserving their memories and stories for years to come. Go to Storyworth.com/majority and save $10 on your first purchase! That's StoryWorth.com/majority to save $10 on your first purchase! Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop  

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers
KLAN OF DEVILS-Stanley Nelson

True Murder: The Most Shocking Killers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 78:01


In the summer of 1965, several Ku Klux Klan members riding in a pickup truck shot two Black deputies on patrol in Washington Parish, Louisiana. Deputy Oneal Moore, the driver of the patrol car and father of four daughters, died instantly. His partner, Creed Rogers, survived and radioed in a description of the vehicle. Less than an hour later, police in Mississippi spotted the truck and arrested its driver, a decorated World War II veteran named Ernest Ray McElveen. They returned McElveen to Washington Parish, where he spent eleven days in jail before authorities released him. Afterward, the FBI sent its top inspector to Bogalusa, Louisiana, to participate in the murder inquiry, the only civil rights era FBI investigation into the killing of a Black law enforcement officer by the KKK. Despite that assistance, lack of evidence and witnesses unwilling to come forward forced Louisiana prosecutors eventually to drop all charges against McElveen. The FBI continued its investigation but could not gather enough evidence to file charges, leaving the murder of Oneal Moore unsolved.Klan of Devils: The Murder of a Black Louisiana Deputy Sheriff is Stanley Nelson's investigation of this case, which the FBI probed from 1965 to 2016. Nelson describes the Klan's growth, and the emergence of Black activism in Bogalusa and Washington Parish, against the backdrop of political and social change in the 1950s and early 1960s. With the assistance of two retired FBI agents who worked the case, Nelson also explores the lives of the primary suspects, all of whom are now dead, and points to the Klansmen most likely responsible for the senseless and horrific attack. KLAN OF DEVILS: The Murder of a Black Louisiana Deputy Sheriff-Stanley Nelson

The Ezra Klein Show
How Far-Right Extremism Invaded Mainstream Politics

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 69:02


Over the course of Donald Trump's presidency, the far-right fringe became a surprisingly visible and influential force in American politics. Eruptions of extremist violence — including the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017 and the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection — have made militant groups like the Proud Boys and conspiracy theories like QAnon into household names. On his popular cable news show, Tucker Carlson recently name-checked the “great replacement” conspiracy theory. And in a recent survey, nearly a third of Republicans agreed with the statement that “true American patriots may have to resort to violence in order to save our country.”The historian Kathleen Belew has spent her career studying political violence and the once-fringe ideas that now animate even right-of-center politics and news media. She is a co-editor of “A Field Guide to White Supremacy” and the author of “Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America,” which tells the story of how groups — including the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and Aryan Nations — coalesced into a radical white-power movement after the Vietnam War. These groups were united by a core set of beliefs about the threats of demographic change and governmental overreach, perceived hostility toward white Americans and the necessity of extra-political, often violent, action to achieve their aims.This is a conversation about how some of those ideas have seeped into mainstream Republican politics and what that could mean for the future of the party — and the country. It explores the radicalizing effects of Jan. 6, how irony and meme culture import far-right ideas into popular media, how warfare abroad can produce violence at home, why politics has started to feel apocalyptic across the spectrum, whether left-wing violence is as serious a threat as right-wing violence and more.Mentioned:Radical American Partisanship by Lilliana Mason and Nathan P. KalmoeMessengers of the Right by Nicole HemmerThe Hispanic Republican by Geraldo CadavaMothers of Massive Resistance by Elizabeth Gillespie McRaeBook Recommendations:Fortress America by Elaine Tyler MayFuture Home of the Living God by Louise ErdrichTiny You by Jennifer HollandThis episode is guest-hosted by Nicole Hemmer, a historian whose work focuses on right-wing media and American politics. She is an associate research scholar with the Obama Presidency Oral History Project at Columbia University and author of “Messengers of the Right: Conservative Media and the Transformation of American Politics.” You can follow her on Twitter @PastPunditry. (Learn more about the other guest hosts during Ezra's parental leave here.)You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld, audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin.

Chiesa Cristiana Evangelica  della Vera Vite
Il perdono da forma alle tue azioni | 14 Novembre 2021 |

Chiesa Cristiana Evangelica della Vera Vite

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


Il piano finale di Dio per le nostre vite  non è che la vita sarà facile  e che non ci faremo mai del male. Ma quando qualcuno sbaglia e si ravvede, come credenti, siamo chiamati a perdonare, a riconoscere il cambiamento e a riabilitare chi ci ha ferito. --- CLICCA SUL TITOLO PER ASCOLTARE IL MESSAGGIO Tempo di lettura: 15 minuti  Tempo di ascolto audio/visione video: 33 minuti Siamo all'ultimo appuntamento col il libro di Filemone e con il perdono. Nelle due precedenti predicazioni abbiamo visto alcuni aspetti del perché dovrei perdonare: perdonare mi libera dal passato e dall'amarezza, chiude le porte al Maligno  ed apre quelle del mio rapporto con Dio modellando il mio carattere ad essere più simile a Colui che mi ha perdonato. Sin qui abbiamo visto tutti casi in cui il perdono è più difficile, quelli dove siamo noi a dover fare il passo, perché dall'altra parte non c'è alcuna volontà  di chiedere scusa, di ravvedersi e di cambiare. Ma cosa succede quando l'altro mi chiede scusa, si ravvede e ce la mette tutta per cambiare? Beh, stranamente, una delle reazioni abbastanza comuni non è quella di abbracciare colui che si pente, ma di volergliela far pagare; di rendere “prezioso” il nostro perdono, di farlo desiderare e sudare  come contrappasso al male che abbiamo subito. Vorrei rileggere assieme a voi la lettera di Paolo, dal versetto 8 sino al termine: “Perciò, pur avendo molta libertà in Cristo di comandarti quello che conviene fare, preferisco fare appello al tuo amore, semplicemente come Paolo, vecchio e ora anche prigioniero di Cristo Gesù;  ti prego per mio figlio che ho generato mentre ero in catene, per Onesimo, un tempo inutile a te, ma che ora è utile a te e a me. Te lo rimando, lui, che amo come il mio cuore.  Avrei voluto tenerlo con me, perché in vece tua mi servisse nelle catene che porto a motivo del vangelo; ma non ho voluto fare nulla senza il tuo consenso, perché la tua buona azione non fosse forzata, ma volontaria.  Forse proprio per questo egli è stato lontano da te per un po' di tempo, perché tu lo riavessi per sempre; non più come schiavo, ma molto più che schiavo, come un fratello caro specialmente a me, ma ora molto più a te, sia sul piano umano sia nel Signore!  Se dunque tu mi consideri in comunione con te, accoglilo come me stesso.  Se ti ha fatto qualche torto o ti deve qualcosa, addebitalo a me. Io, Paolo, lo scrivo di mia propria mano: pagherò io; per non dirti che tu mi sei debitore perfino di te stesso. Sì, fratello, io vorrei che tu mi fossi utile nel Signore; rasserena il mio cuore in Cristo.  Ti scrivo fiducioso nella tua ubbidienza, sapendo che farai anche più di quel che ti chiedo. Al tempo stesso preparami un alloggio, perché spero, grazie alle vostre preghiere, di esservi restituito.  Epafra, mio compagno di prigionia in Cristo Gesù, ti saluta.  Così pure Marco, Aristarco, Dema, Luca, miei collaboratori.  La grazia del Signore Gesù Cristo sia con il vostro spirito.” (Filemone 8-25) Paolo sta rispedendo Onesimo a Filemone, e giustamente si preoccupa di quale sarà l'accoglienza che gli sarà riservata.  Come risolverà il problema Paolo? Permettetemi un ricordo personale. Trenta anni fa io facevo parte della chiesa di Monterosi: ne ero un semplice membro. Anche se avevo fatto il pastore dei giovani per un paio di anni nella chiesa di Ronciglione e avevo portato qualche messaggio là, non avevo nessuna esperienza di predicare davanti a quasi un centinaio di persone. Fu così che uno dei due conduttori di chiesa, Marvin Oxenham, alla fine di un culto mi disse: “Guarda, prepara qualcosa, perché tra qualche domenica  predicherai tu”. Marvin era (ed è) uno dei predicatori più talentuosi che io abbia mai ascoltato: figuratevi come mi sentivo io nel doverlo sostituire. La mattina che avrei dovuto predicare ero già teso di mio, quando entrando in sala, ascoltai le conversazioni di alcuni membri che si stavano informando di chi avrebbe portato il messaggio quella domenica. Le conversazioni erano spesso simili a questa: “Ah, non predica Marvin? Chi predica? Marco?!? Se lo avessi saputo manco venivo!” Non era il massimo dell'incoraggiamento per chi doveva predicare per la prima volta. Evidentemente la conversazione arrivò fino alle orecchie di Marvin, che, quando mi chiamò avanti per predicare, prima che iniziassi mi cinse un braccio attorno le spalle, poi, rivolgendosi alla sala, disse pressappoco così: “Marco oggi inizia il suo impegno come predicatore perché io glie lo ho chiesto; perciò, ascoltatelo con attenzione esattamente come se steste ascoltando me.” Non è mai facile essere il “sostituto” di qualcuno, soprattutto se quel qualcuno è famoso, talentuoso noto a tutti e da tutti amato; l'accoglienza di chi avrebbe preferito avere l'altro oscilla tra l'indifferente e l'irritato, raramente è un “Wow! Che bello che ci sei te invece dell'altro!” Io, in fondo, ero in pace con la mia chiesa: non avevo conti aperti con nessuno, ed era più facile per Mavin dire “accoglietelo come se accoglieste me”. Ma come sarebbe stato  se io avessi combinato qualcosa di grosso in chiesa? Mi avrebbero accolto ed ascoltato, oppure mi avrebbero tutti girato le spalle? Su scala enormemente maggiore è quello che prova Onesimo verso Filemone, ed è per quello che Paolo dice: “Te lo rimando, lui, che amo come il mio cuore.” (Filemone 12) Filemone avrebbe di sicuro ben voglia di rivedere Paolo, colui che lo ha portato a Cristo, e farebbe salti di gioia accogliendolo... Ma sarebbe lo stresso per Onesimo? Onesimo è uno schiavo in fuga.  Dovrebbe essere marchiato con una "F" sulla fronte.  È costato tempo e denaro a Filemone.  Filemone ha perso soldi e faccia attraverso la sua fuga.  Logico che non possa provare la stessa gioia nell'accoglierlo che proverebbe se arrivasse Paolo, Ma guarda cosa dice Paolo a Filemone:  “Se dunque tu mi consideri in comunione con te, accoglilo come me stesso. (Filemone 17) Questo è il versetto chiave dell'intero libro. Mettiti per un momento nei panni di Filemone: vorresti farlo? Accetteresti che Paolo e Onesimo siano uguali?  È Onesimo davvero qualcuno con cui hai comunione...  un benvenuto? Paolo sta chiedendo a Filemone  di riconoscere che il suo rapporto  con Onesimo è ora cambiato: non è più solo un rapporto “padrone-schiavo”. Si è formato un legame nuovo; un legame significativo che muta lo scenario e il futuro rapporto tra i due. Allora come si è arrivati a questo punto? Inizia dal versetto 10-11. “Ti prego per mio figlio che ho generato mentre ero in catene, per Onesimo,  un tempo inutile a te, ma che ora è utile a te e a me.”(Filemone 10-11) Durante tutta la mia vita io ho vissuto solamente a Montefiascone, mentre mia moglie ha cambiato  almeno una trentina di posti durante la sua vita. Ricordo che, quando andammo alla Questura a compilare i fogli per la richiesta di cittadinanza di mie moglie, c'era una sezione dove doveva elencare il luoghi dove aveva vissuto negli ultimi dieci anni: erano due righe sul foglio.  Janet cominciò a scrivere il più piccolo possibile per fa entrare dentro tutti i nomi, fino a quando il funzionario, con gli occhi sbarrati, le prese il foglio, dicendo: “Signora, basta, basta! Non servono altri oltre quelli che ha già scritto!” “Meno male – fece Janet – non ero arrivata nemmeno a metà!” Una delle cose belle di spostarsi  è il cambiare città, vederne di nuove, avere nuovi  amici. Una delle cose brutte è che, quando torniamo  nei luoghi dove avevamo vissuto è vedere che molto è cambiato, sia nei luoghi che nei vecchi amici, dobbiamo constatare che essi sono cambiati; per il luigi di sicuro in aspetto,  per gli amici sia l'aspetto ma anche la mentalità e le attitudini; non sembrano quasi più i vecchi amici di un tempo. Le persone cambiano...  cambiano continuamente. E questo che Paolo sta sottolineando a Filemone: “Tu sei cambiato, sei diventato credente, stai testimoniando Gesù, hai una chiesa in casa... Ma anche  Onesimo è cambiato!” Paolo vuole che Filemone riconosca che Onesimo è diverso.  Filemone potrebbe giustamente obiettare: “In che cosa è diverso?” In primo luogo, Onesimo è pentito. Perché lo dico e come faccio a saperlo? Come faccio a sapere che Onesimo  si sia pentito di essere fuggito da Filemone? Lo dico, perché so come la pensava Paolo sul rapporto che doveva esserci tra servi e padroni. In Colossesi aveva detto: “Servi, ubbidite in ogni cosa ai vostri padroni secondo la carne; non servendoli soltanto quando vi vedono, come per piacere agli uomini, ma con semplicità di cuore, temendo il Signore.” (Colossesi 3:22) E lo dico perché so cosa Paolo dice di Onesimo: “...ti prego per mio figlio che ho generato mentre ero in catene, per Onesimo.” (Filemone 10) Una nota:  Paolo non benedice la schiavitù dei servi verso i padroni, ma sta  insegnando a neo credenti  come comportarsi nella situazione in cui stanno vivendo e da cui non hanno nessuna possibilità di affrancarsi al momento. Paolo chiama Onesimo “figlio”; è un figlio generato attraverso la nuova vita in Cristo che è giunta tramite la sua conversone sincera e totale. Paolo non lo avrebbe mai chiamato figlio se non avesse avuto la certezza  del pentimento totale di Onesimo. Ma Paolo fa molto di più. Come pensi che sia arrivata a Colosse  la lettera che Filemone sta leggendo? Non era inviata per faxo o per email:  “Te lo rimando...” (Filemone 12 a) Tutte le lettere di Paolo sono state consegnate a mano; e ora Onesimo, il fuggitivo, sta dinanzi a Filemone,  con una lettera a firma di Paolo, e forse scruta Filemone mentre legge veloce la lettera, col cuore in gola... perché non sa se Filemone lo marchierà con la F del fuggitivo o lo abbraccerà con la F di “fratello in Cristo”. Onesimo sta rischiando la sua stessa vita portando quella lettera... Ma c'è ancora di più. Paolo dice che Onesimo è trasformato: “...un tempo inutile a te, ma che ora è utile a te e a me.” (Filemone 11) Qui Paolo usa un piccolo gioco di parole: Onesimo (in greco Ὀνήσιμος Onēsimos), significa "utile". Era un nome comune che veniva dato agli  schiavi una volta acquistati. Attenzione al gioco di parole di Paolo: “Ti mando Utile che ti era inutile, ma adesso è utile a me e a te” egli sta dicendo che Onesimo, “Utile” era “inutile” come schiavo” ma che ora come fratello in Cristo sarà “utile” sia a Paolo che a Filemone. Di quale utilità sta parlando Paolo? Quale “business” hanno in comune lui e Filemone? Nessuno, tranne il proclamare Cristo al mondo. Paolo afferma: “ L'utile Onesimo come schiavo di Filemone è inutile, ma come schiavo di Cristo è utile a entrambi! Possono davvero le persone cambiare così? La Bibbia afferma di si: “Siamo dunque stati sepolti con lui mediante il battesimo nella sua morte, affinché, come Cristo è stato risuscitato dai morti mediante la gloria del Padre, così anche noi camminassimo in novità di vita.  (Romani 6:4) Se dunque uno è in Cristo, egli è una nuova creatura; le cose vecchie sono passate: ecco, sono diventate nuove” (2 Corinzi 5:17) “Benedetto sia il Dio e Padre del nostro Signore Gesù Cristo, che nella sua grande misericordia ci ha fatti rinascere a una speranza viva mediante la risurrezione di Gesù Cristo dai morti.” (1 Pietro 1:3) Quello che vedete in foto è Johnny Lee Clary. Ha imparato a odiare in tenera età,  essendo cresciuto in una famiglia piena di razzismo, rabbia e bigottismo. A 14 anni fu sedotto dagli insegnamenti David Duke  il famigerato capo del Ku Klux Klan,  tanto da diventarne “Grand Wizard” un mago imperiale -  un leader di primo piano in un organizzazione  responsabile di attentati, omicidi e innumerevoli altri crimini, tutto in nome di odio e razzismo. Ma la sua vita non era facile.  La sua prima ragazza si rivelò essere un'informatrice dell'FBI.  Ebbe due divorzi; perse tutti i suoi amici.  Una notte era sul punto di suicidarsi, quando gridò a Dio di liberarlo dalla sua esistenza da incubo. E Dio, incredibilmente per Johnny, rispose. Da quel momento in poi, Johnny Lee ha usato la sua vita,  le sue esperienze e la sua quasi distruzione  per aiutare gli altri a lasciare lo stesso sentiero di male  che aveva percorso così a lungo.  Divenne pastore di una chiesa. Nel 1995 Johnny fu nominato dal Congresso Americano Direttore Nazionale per l'uguaglianza razziale. Le persone cambiano. Quando entra Cristo nella loro vita. Abbiamo visto nelle altre due predicazioni che il perdono non dipende da chi stiamo perdonando, e dal fatto che lui o lei si scusi con noi; il perdono è spesso una via che percorriamo da soli. Ma qualche volta accade!  Accade che chi ha sbagliato verso di noi si penta, si ravveda, e cambi... senza magari venirci a chiedere scusa, lo so, ma il loro pentimento è reale e lo vediamo dal loro atteggiamento  sia verso gli altri che verso di noi. Come reagiamo noi? Saremo disposti a  riconoscere che sono cambiati?  Continueremo ad identificare chi ci ha ferito con il male che hanno o ci hanno fatto, o li accoglieremo, come Paolo incoraggia Filemone a fare? Il vero perdono  passa anche attraverso il fatto di riconoscere che le persone cambiano. Ma c'è anche un altro passaggio: “Forse proprio per questo egli è stato lontano da te per un po' di tempo, perché tu lo riavessi per sempre;  non più come schiavo, ma molto più che schiavo, come un fratello caro specialmente a me, ma ora molto più a te, sia sul piano umano sia nel Signore! (Filemone: 15-16) Cosa vuole Paolo?  Cosa sta chiedendo a Filemone? Paolo vuole che Filemone RIABILITI Onesimo, gli renda la dignità,  lo faccia sentire di nuovo parte delle persone accettate. Paolo vuole che Filemone guardi la situazione  da un'angolazione diversa: “Filemone, so che sei stato ferito. E non dico che Onesimo sia  innocente.  Ma forse Dio aveva uno scopo in tutto questo. Forse tutto serviva perché Onesimo potesse conoscere me, e attraverso me Cristo, e pentirsi, e tornare... non più come schiavo, ma più che uno schiavo, un fratello amato. Forse Dio stava usando questo male per produrre il bene....” Sapete, succede.  Dio permette talvolta che accadano eventi in se brutti  in modo che le persone siano portate ad avere un rapporto con Lui.  Ricordate la storia di Giuseppe, figlio di Giacobbe?  I fratelli di Giuseppe erano gelosi di lui e lo vendettero come schiavo. La vita di Giuseppe passò attraverso molti alti e bassi  e alla fine lui divenne il secondo uomo importante in Egitto  dopo  il Faraone. Quando i fratelli ebbero bisogno di aiuto per il cibo  scoprirono che Giuseppe aveva tutto questo potere.  Allora si offrono a Giuseppe come schiavi. Questo è ciò Giuseppe disse loro: “Giuseppe disse ai suoi fratelli: «Vi prego, avvicinatevi a me!» Quelli s'avvicinarono ed egli disse: «Io sono Giuseppe, vostro fratello, che voi vendeste perché fosse portato in Egitto.  Ma ora non vi rattristate, né vi dispiaccia di avermi venduto perché io fossi portato qui; poiché Dio mi ha mandato qui prima di voi per conservarvi in vita. Infatti, sono due anni che la carestia è nel paese e ce ne saranno altri cinque, durante i quali non ci sarà raccolto né mietitura.  (Genesi 45:4-6) O che dire di quello che è successo al figliol prodigo in Luca 15.  Il figlio chiede a suo padre tutta la sua eredità  e la sperpera.  Disperato torna a casa, e chiede di essere uno schiavo del padre.  Invece il padre dice; "Ma il padre disse ai suoi servi: “Presto, portate qui la veste più bella e rivestitelo, mettetegli un anello al dito e dei calzari ai piedi; portate fuori il vitello ingrassato, ammazzatelo, mangiamo e facciamo festa,  perché questo mio figlio era morto ed è tornato in vita; era perduto ed è stato ritrovato”. E si misero a fare gran festa." (Luca 15:22-24) Qualche volta accade: non sappiamo come, ma Dio sfrutta una crisi un errore, uno sbaglio, un peccato per riaccendere il ricevitore dell'anima di chi lo commette ed entrare di nuovo in contatto con Lui. Il piano finale di Dio per le nostre vite  non è che la vita sarà facile  e che non ci faremo mai del male. Il piano ultimo di Dio nella vita  è che le persone arrivino a conoscerlo  come il loro Signore e Salvatore. E noi, come credenti, siamo tenuti a perdonare, a riconoscere il cambiamento e a riabilitare. Questa è la strada che Paolo vuole che prenda Filemone. “Se mi consideri un partner, accoglilo come accoglieresti me.  Perché in Cristo, io Paolo e Onesimo siamo la stessa cosa.” E' facile? No! Ma  perdono, riconoscimento e riabilitazione guariscono le relazioni interrotte tra marito e moglie. Perdono, riconoscimento e riabilitazione guariscono le relazioni interrotte tra genitori-figli. Perdono, riconoscimento e riabilitazione  risanano le relazioni interrotte tra credenti.  Perdono, riconoscimento e riabilitazione: tutto ciò significa perdonare davvero. Non è facile vero?  Ma quanto facile è stato  per Gesù perdonarci?  A lui è costatata la croce. L'amore che perdona non è mai gratis per colui che perdona. Ma l'amore che perdona, riconosce e riabilita porta gloria a Dio, e pace tra il suo popolo. Siamo alla fine di questa serie sul perdono, dove Paolo ci fa scoprire il vero perdono di chi crede. Perdorare... Per essere liberi dal passato e dall'amarezza,per chiudere le porte al maligno ed aprirle a Cristo,per modellare noi stessi ad immagine di chi ci ha perdonatoper dar forma all'amore con cui siamo stati amati. Preghiamo. Padre, siamo così colpiti da questa tremenda lezione di perdono. Se c'è qualcosa, Signore, nel mio cuore o nei cuori del tuo popolo qui che potrebbe essere in qualsiasi senso visto come un atteggiamento spietato verso chiunque, per favore perdonaci e rimuovilo poiché sappiamo che tu vieti un cuore che non perdona. Sappiamo di aver peccato contro di te, allo stesso tempo sappiamo che il tuo perdono per noi significa che possiamo perdonare quando le persone peccano contro di noi. Sappiamo anche, Signore, che la mancanza di perdono ci fa perdere la comunione con gli altri e  la comunione con Te e lascia i nostri peccati non perdonati. Confessiamo che la mancanza di perdono ci priva dell'amore di altri cristiani e scredita il tuo nome. Signore, con il tuo aiuto possiamo non essere spietati ma possiamo essere come Paolo che perdonava come Cristo e cercava che gli altri facessero lo stesso, così da poter conoscere la Tua benedizione e la gioia che giunge ai credenti obbedienti per per amore del nostro Salvatore.  Amen.GUARDA LE DIAPOSITIVE DEL MESSAGGIOGUARDA IL MESSAGGIO IN BASSA RISOLUZIONE SU FACEBOOKGUARDA IL VIDEO DEL MESSAGGIO IN BASSA RISOLUZIONE SU INSTAGRAM---GUARDA IL VIDEO DEL MESSAGGIO IN HD (Visita il nostro sito per ascoltare la registrazione audio, vedere il video del messaggio, per scaricare gli appunti e per vedere le diapositive del messaggio)

SCFB 260: GA-20 Does Hound Dog Taylor

"SOMETHING...came from Baltimore"

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 20:04


GA-20 was formed by friends Pat Faherty and Matthew Stubbs in Boston, MA in 2018. The project was born out of their mutual love of heavy traditional Blues, R&B, and Rock & Roll of the late 50s and early 60s. Faherty and Stubbs bonded over legendary artists like Lazy Lester, J.B. Lenoir, Earl Hooker, Buddy Guy, Otis Rush and Junior Wells. Feeling a void in current music, the duo have set out to write, record and perform a modern version of this beloved art form. Joined by drummer Tim Carman in 2019, GA-20 is a trio of 2 guitars, vocals and drums. Raw, passionate and honest performance, both on stage and in the studio, is the only goal. In June 2021 GA-20 announced the new album “GA-20 Does Hound Dog Taylor: Try It…You Might Like It!,” a 50th anniversary celebration of Hound Dog Taylor, to be released August 20 via Colemine Records in partnership with the legendary Alligator Records. Stubbs has spent the past 13 years as guitarist for Blues legend Charlie Musselwhite. During that time he has also backed up and toured with such Blues giants as John Hammond, James Cotton, Junior Watson and James Harman. Stubbs also leads his own original instrumental psych-rock band, 'The Antiguas.' Hound Dog Taylor as per Wiki “Hound Dog” Taylor was born with an abnormality: he had a sixth, very pinky finger on each hand. He grew up around Tchule and Greenwood in the Mississippi Delta, as did several other black blues musicians ( BB King , Albert King , John Lee Hooker , Muddy Waters , etc.). He made his first musical experiences playing the piano. He didn't really start playing the guitar until he was 21 years old. His musical style was strongly influenced by the then rising Elmore James . In his twenties he played in the Mississippi area, where he could be heard with Sonny Boy Williamson on the legendary radio show " King Biscuit Time ". But Taylor was expelled from Mississippi by the Ku Klux Klan in 1942 because he had a relationship with a white woman. He worked in Chicago as an electrician and other part-time jobs until the late 1950s. He also appeared as a guitarist in pompous night bars in southern Chicago. He was called “Hound Dog” because he was so fond of women and chased the steppe wolfish after them. During this time he changed his previously classic e-tuning to an energetic bottleneck style. In 1957 he finally devoted himself only to his music career. In 1960 he met the guitarist Brewer Phillips . The two became friends and formed the band The HouseRockers . With the first singles such as Baby Is Coming Home, Take Five and Christine , however, they met with little interest outside of Chicago. In 1965, drummer Ted Harvey joined the band. With him, the HouseRockers found their typically loud, hard blues accent with Taylor's rough voice and his slide play (bottleneck) on cheap Japanese guitars as well as Phillips' bass lines, which, played on a Fender Telecaster , replaced the missing bass. Bruce Iglauer , later Taylor's manager, got to hear the band for the first time in 1969 in Chicago's Eddie Shaw's. However, Iglauer's boss did not want to sign a record deal with Taylor. With its own financial support, Iglauer made it possible in 1971 to release Taylor's first record on the Alligator Records label . Without knowing it, he founded the now world-famous blues label. The album was a success with 9,000 records sold. The singles Give Me Back My Wig and It's Alright became the most famous songs. In 1973 the second record Natural Boogie came out on the market. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/somethingcame-from-baltim/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/somethingcame-from-baltim/support

Underground St. Louis
KKK vs Mafia - STL True Crime

Underground St. Louis

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 41:12


This was the battle for the soul of East St. Louis and Southern Illinois! The Ku Klux Klan fought a bloody war with two Mafia gangs with ties to Chicago and St. Louis during prohibition. Underground ST. LOUIS sits down to discuss these events almost 100 years later on the newest episode of STL True Crime! #WeGoDeep #undergroundstlFor exclusive content visit our website https://www.undergroundstl.com/

Austin Found Podcast
Ep. 68 The Klan was not always underground

Austin Found Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 16:06


The Ku Klux Klan has emblazoned a long historical scar on Texas. At one point during the 1920s, the group was almost a daily fact of life. It took an effort by crusaders such as future Texas Gov. Dan Moody to quell the tide. 

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast
October 29, 2021: Nikki Medoro - Are offensive costumes getting more politically incorrect?

The Morning Show with Nikki Medoro Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:11


A high school student in Pittsburg, CA, dressed as a Ku Klux Klan member to school, and the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro asks what's an appropriate punishment or was it just a dumb kid following a dare? Is an offensive costume in the eye of the beholder? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
October 29, 2021: Nikki Medoro - Are offensive costumes getting more politically incorrect?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 17:11


A high school student in Pittsburg, CA, dressed as a Ku Klux Klan member to school, and the Morning Show with Nikki Medoro asks what's an appropriate punishment or was it just a dumb kid following a dare? Is an offensive costume in the eye of the beholder? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency
Season II, Episode IV: Ulysses S. Grant and the Ku Klux Klan Act

The Past, the Promise, the Presidency

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 60:58


Welcome to The Past, The Promise, The Presidency Season II, Episode IV: Ulysses S. Grant and the Ku Klux Klan Act. In our previous episode on Bleeding Kansas and the Utah War, we discussed the intense violence and bloodshed that led up to the cataclysmic wrenching of the Union in half during the Civil War. But what happened after the Union shattered? It's not easy to put the pieces of national unity back together after a civil war, nor was it a simple task to change the hearts and minds of people who were willing to die to defend slavery and white supremacy. After the passage of the 15th amendment in 1870, African-American men in the South eagerly made the most of their new right to vote and elected many Black representatives to state and local governments.In response, white supremacists organized into local chapters of the Ku Klux Klan, which waged vicious campaigns of violence, murder, and destruction to intimidate Black Americans and other Republicans that supported their right to vote. After investigators discovered the extent of the KKK's reign of terror, President Grant asked Congress to pass legislation that gave him additional powers to address the threat on the ground.Congress complied in 1871 and passed the Ku Klux Klan Act. Grant then issued a warning to Southern states, but especially to specific counties in South Carolina, that if they didn't stop their campaign of terror, he would declare martial law. Five days later, he fulfilled that promise and suspended Habeas Corpus in nine South Carolina counties. Grant sent in troops to arrest KKK members and deployed US Attorneys to try cases against the Klan. These efforts were remarkably effective, but just a year later, Grant backed away from his efforts to protect civil liberties. Why did Grant take such decisive action? And then why did he stop? What were the motivations behind his handling of this crisis?How did the public respond to the Ku Klux Klan Act?How does this crisis inform our current moment? To learn the answers to these questions, we spoke with two fantastic guests. First, we spoke with Dr. Yohuru Williams who is the Distinguished University Chair and Professor of History and Founding Director of the Racial Justice Initiative at the University of St. Thomas and the author of numerous books about African American history.We then talked to Dr. Megan Kate Nelson, a writer, historian, and expert on the Civil War and the United States west. Her most recent book, The Three-Cornered War: The Union, the Confederacy, and Native Peoples in the Fight for the West was a finalist for the 2021 Pulitzer Prize.

Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast
Hollywood's infamous birth: Birth of a Nation and Intolerance

Criteria: The Catholic Film Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 81:35


D.W. Griffith's The Birth of a Nation is a landmark of world cinema and arguably gave birth to Hollywood on an economic level. A technical masterpiece said to have established the grammar of cinema, it is also an astonishingly racist film (and was considered so even in 1915), portraying black people as subhuman and the Ku Klux Klan as civilization-saving heroes. Griffith's follow-up, Intolerance: Love's Struggle Through the Ages, was even more ambitious, telling four stories in four different time periods: the fall of Babylon, the life and passion of Christ, the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre, and a modern love story. While the film condemns intolerance, it is not Griffith's apology for Birth of a Nation, but rather his self-defense against his critics. In this episode James and Thomas discuss both films, trying to understand what sort of artist Griffith was and what his Founding Father status in Hollywood history might tell us about cinema as a medium of entertainment and emotional manipulation. The Birth of a Nation is an exceedingly well-crafted but fundamentally immoral work which offers some food for thought about the power of cinematic rhetoric. Intolerance is included in the Values category of the Vatican film list, but James and Thomas find it to be an incoherent, empty spectacle whose attempt to attribute all of human tragedy to the single vice of “intolerance” falls laughably flat. (And it also has its immoral side, if less fundamentally.) We hate to say it, but the earlier film is the superior one on the level of storytelling craft. If you don't want to choose between racist and incoherent, though, watch Griffith's later melodrama Broken Blossoms, which unlike Intolerance, actually does contradict the racism of his most famous film. Watch discussion on YouTube: https://youtu.be/JawFbn-b7B0 Links The Birth of a Nation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kN_o3zeD81g Intolerance https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIMpKXR83pg Broken Blossoms https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FQXb89LXuJo Music is The Duskwhales, “Take It Back”, used with permission. https://theduskwhales.bandcamp.com/ This podcast is a production of CatholicCulture.org. If you like the show, please consider supporting us! http://catholicculture.org/donate/audio

Louisiana Insider
Episode 60: Klan of Devils – New Book Reports On 1965 Murder of a Black Louisiana Deputy

Louisiana Insider

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 44:36


Stanley Nelson is a north Louisiana journalist who has made a specialty out of investigating Ku Klux Klan-related murders. His newest book, "Klan of Devils: The Murder of A Black Louisiana Deputy Sheriff" tells the harrowing story of a 1965 crime in which two Washington Parish deputies were shot while on duty. One deputy died, but the other was only - though severely – injured and able to provide some witness information. The book traces the ensuring investigation and the eventual involvement of the FBI. It is a riveting study of racial relations during that time. Nelson joins Errol Laborde, executive editor of Louisiana Life, along with podcast producer Kelly Massicot to reveal the detail of the crime and the investigation. Oh yes, we'll also hear about a secret meeting held between then Governor John McKeithen, looking for help, and the FBI.

Givers, Doers, & Thinkers—A Podcast on Philanthropy and Civil Society
Episode 25: Philip Hamburger & restrictions on a charity's free speech

Givers, Doers, & Thinkers—A Podcast on Philanthropy and Civil Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 50:32


Today Jeremy speaks with Philip Hamburger about the surprising origins of the IRS's restrictions on a charity's political speech, and why those restrictions ought to be regarded as unconstitutional. Philip Hamburger is the Maurice and Hilda Friedman Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, and President of the New Civil Liberties Alliance. He writes on constitutional law and its history—with particular emphasis on religious liberty, freedom of speech and the press, judicial office, administrative power, and unconstitutional conditions. He also studies Anglican, Baptist, and Quaker history, early secularism, and the Ku Klux Klan. He has twice received the Sutherland Prize for the most significant contribution to English legal history, and has been awarded the Henry Paolucci-Walter Bagehot Book Award, the Hayek Book Prize, and the Bradley Prize.Jeremy dives in by asking Philip about his book, Liberal Suppression: Section 501(c)(3) and the Taxation of Speech. His argument that the IRS essentially taxes speech is both compelling and provocative. Philip connects the origins of the 501(c)(3) free speech restrictions to former Ku Klux Klan imperial wizard Hiram Evans and his hatred of the Catholic Church. Philip argues that the net effect is that all theologically orthodox speech is treated as a threat to democracy. He continues that the mere history behind this tax law should cause Americans to pause and ask whether it is constitutional or not. All of this and more during this week's episode with Philip Hamburger.On this week's Practicalities segment, American Philanthropic partner Matt Gerken discusses the influence and importance of donor surveys for nonprofits. Donor surveys provide the unique opportunity to cultivate and identify major gift opportunities in your donor file. This allows your organization to understand donor priorities and learn what they believe and care about. Learn more about American Philanthropic's donor surveys here.Do you want to participate in the 2021 Performance Fundraising Survey that Jeremy mentioned at the end of the podcast? You can join the survey by clicking here. When you participate in this survey, you will receive a free digital copy of the final report and be entered into a drawing with prizes ranging $100-$3,000 in value. The survey closes October 31—participate before it is too late!You can find Givers, Doers, & Thinkers here at Philanthropy Daily, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Google Podcasts, Buzzsprout, and wherever you listen to p

G.T.F.O. The Podcast
How to GTFO of a White Nationalist Organization

G.T.F.O. The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 55:48


Since the Ku Klux Klan first formed in 1865, white supremacist groups in the United States have propagated racism, hatred, and violence. Their extremist ideologies persist in the United States today. According to Statista in 2020, approximately 838 of them are in existence. Those who join such groups differ in backgrounds, families, education level and socioeconomic status. Regardless of upbringing and history, most of these individuals who join seek a sense of belonging and purpose. Therefore, fighting for the same cause. Yet, what if these individuals find they want to leave such a group? How do they find forgiveness from others and also learn to forgive themselves? My guest in this episode, Arno Michaelis, left a white nationalist group 20 years ago through education, forgiveness and human connection. His story will fascinate you, frustrate you and show you that growth and finding and peace is possible.

Candid Conversations with Jonathan Youssef
Episode 115: How a Violent Klansman Came to Christ: Thomas A. Tarrants

Candid Conversations with Jonathan Youssef

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 37:24


A former white-supremacist and Klansman, once infamously called the "most dangerous man in Mississippi," sits with Jonathan and retells his incredible journey from a life of violence and hate to a life of radical love fueled by the grace and mercy of Jesus Christ.  In high-school, Thomas was enticed by extremist ideology and became involved in the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. He was shot and wounded several times and arrested by police after an attempted bombing of the home of a Jewish leader. Thomas was sentenced to thirty years in the Mississippi State Penitentiary. He then escaped prison but was captured by the F.B.I. He was returned to prison where he would spend the next three years in a small, solitary cell.  During this time, Thomas began to search for truth. He started with the great philosophers and was then led to the Bible where he truly encountered Jesus Christ for the very first time.  This dramatic interview will have you in awe and on the edge of your seat as Thomas tells of his radical transformation that smacks of a live action movie. His complete change is evidence that the Gospel of Christ can transform even the hardest heart and mind.Thomas A. Tarrants is President Emeritus of the C.S. Lewis Institute. After serving twelve years as president and nine years as vice President, he retired from his position as Vice President for Ministry and Director, Washington Area Fellows Program, with CSLI in June 2019.  Tom holds a Master of Divinity Degree, as well as a Doctor of Ministry Degree in Christian Spirituality. He is an ordained minister in the Evangelical Church Alliance and a member of the Evangelical Theological Society.Get Your Copy of Consumed by Hate, Redeemed by LoveAfter you listen to this episode, you may have your own questions. We would love to hear from you! To ask Jonathan a question or connect with the Candid community, visit https://LTW.org/CandidAlso, join the conversation on our social media pages:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/candidpodInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/candidpodTwitter: https://twitter.com/thecandidpod

Kansas Reflector Podcast
Seaman High School name controversy

Kansas Reflector Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 26:36


Students at Seaman High School just north of Topeka ignited intense community conversation last year when their research revealed the school districts namesake had been an exalted cyclops in the Ku Klux Klan. Now, animosity over critical race theory has inflamed debate about whether to change the district's name. Joining host Sherman Smith on the Kansas Reflector podcasts to talk about the school name and community response are Seaman High School seniors Kevinh Nguyen and Emma Simpson.

The Farm
The Secret History of International Fascism Part I w/ Dr. Danny Weil, Russ Bellant & Recluse

The Farm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 188:39


fascism, definition of fascism, Michigan politics, DeVos family, corporate takeover of government, private schools, dismantling public education, local government, school boards, right wing takeover of local politics, National Association of Manufacturers, Henry Ford, Ford Motor Company, Boris Brasol, Thule Society, William J. Cameron, Christian Identity theology, domestic terrorism, militias, paramilitaries, Friekorps, Italy, Black Shirts, Weimer Republic, breakdown of liberal democracy, Beer Hall Putsch, January 6, coup, mythos, colonialism, Ku Klux Klan, Knights of the Golden Circle, John Wilkes Booth, Manifest Destiny, German-American Bund, William "Will Bill" Donovan, American Legion, FDR, Business Plot, Smedley Butler, National Crime Syndicate, Meyer Lansky, Russia, White Russians, Palantir, Peter Thiel, Meyer Lansky, Israel, Nazi-Israeli collaboration, Martin Bormann, World Commerce Corporation, SOFINDUS, Otto Skorzeny, ratlines, capital flight, Golden Lilly, drug trafficking, yakuza, Unification Church, Bank of International Settlements, Vatican, Pope Pius

TonioTimeDaily
Dismantle Republican Jesus

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 101:28


"Robert Jones, CEO of the Public Religion Research Institute, comes from a line of white American Christians that stretches back before the Revolutionary War. His ancestors weren't large plantation owners or Confederate generals, or ― as far as he knows ― active members of the Ku Klux Klan. For much of his life, Jones believed the “unremarkable” nature of his family's background meant that white supremacy wasn't a part of their history. But he's recently started to tell a different kind of story ― one that acknowledges that white privilege shaped his family's sojourn on American soil. His ancestors were wealthy enough to own slaves, Jones said. The family settled in Georgia on land the government seized from indigenous Creek and Cherokee people. They became Southern Baptists, part of a denomination founded in 1845 on the belief that it was perfectly moral for Christians to be slave owners. Decades later, after Jones's great-grandfather was killed in a clay mining accident, co-workers allegedly killed an innocent Black worker in retaliation. Jones still remembers how satisfied his great-uncle appeared while retelling that story, as if this arbitrary and unjustified act of racial violence helped balance the scales after a white man's death. It wouldn't be hard for many white Christians to find examples of white supremacy's claims on their own family's trees, Jones said. But white Christians' image of themselves and their religion has been warped by what Jones calls “white-supremacy-induced amnesia.” Jones wrestles with that amnesia in his new book, “White Too Long: The Legacy of White Supremacy in American Christianity.” He argues that white Christians ― from evangelicals in the South to mainline Protestants in the Midwest to Catholics in the Northeast ― weren't just complacent onlookers while political leaders debated what to do about slavery, segregation and discrimination. White supremacist theology played a key role in shaping the American church from the very beginning, influencing not just the way denominations formed but also white Christians' theology about salvation itself. HuffPost spoke with Jones about his book earlier in July. Just as his own family history would be incomplete without acknowledging the influences of white supremacy, Jones said it's impossible to talk about American Christianity without recognizing that racism helped shape the church. How did your own eyes open to the ways that white Christianity and white supremacy are entangled? I grew up in Jackson, Mississippi. I was deeply immersed in white Southern Baptist evangelical culture. I was that kid who was always at church, four to five times a week. I have a degree from a Southern Baptist college, and I have a Master of Divinity degree from a Southern Baptist seminary. But it wasn't until I was in grad school in my 30s that I really began to examine the history of my denomination's direct ties to slavery. Along with that, in my day job as CEO of PRRI, we're repeatedly confronted with public opinion data that suggests white Christians really have a blind spot in seeing racial injustice and particularly structural racism. So it was a combination of really reckoning with my own family's history, together with seeing patterns in the data that just made it so clear that this is not a story of some distant past, but this is very much still in the DNA of white Christianity today." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

RNZ: Sunday Morning
Calling Home: Rosie Manins in Atlanta, Georgia

RNZ: Sunday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 20:27


To say Nelsonian Rosie Manins' introduction to life in Atlanta has been something of a baptism of fire would be an understatement. A former ODT journalist who is married to a Grammy Award-nominated Georgia native (Jamaica Smith), Rosie now works as a courts reporter, and has seen Confederate monuments taken from public view, experienced the race riots after George Floyd's death, met Martin Luther King Jr.'s sister, and interviewed a black man who was attacked by the KKK as a boy -- not to mention living through the horror of Covid-19 as the state recorded over one million cases and 20,000 deaths. She's Calling Home this morning. Nelsonian Rosie Manins is Calling Home from Atlanta. The former ODT journalist who is married to a Grammy Award-nominated Georgia native, Jamaica Smith, and works as a court reporter, and has seen Confederate monuments taken from public view, experienced the race riots after George Floyd's death, met Martin Luther King Jr.'s sister, and interviewed a black man who was attacked by the KKK as a boy -- not to mention living through the horror of Covid-19 as the state recorded over one million cases and 20,000 deaths.

American Conservative University
To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 by Bret Baier. Fox News Documentary.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 37:12


To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 by Bret Baier. Fox News Documentary.   To Rescue The Republic with Bret Baier - Fox News Documentary https://youtu.be/qqAoejKg0Nw Padma Enter 10 To Rescue The Republic with Bret Baier - Fox News Documentary #FoxNews #Documentary https://t.me/foxnewstrump https://t.me/trumpsaveamerica1   About the book- To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 by Bret Baier The #1 bestselling author and Fox News Channel's Chief Political Anchor illuminates the heroic life of Ulysses S. Grant "To Rescue the Republic is narrative history at its absolute finest. A fast-paced, thrilling and enormously important book." —Douglas Brinkley An epic history spanning the battlegrounds of the Civil War and the violent turmoil of Reconstruction to the forgotten electoral crisis that nearly fractured a reunited nation, Bret Baier's To Rescue the Republic dramatically reveals Ulysses S. Grant's essential yet underappreciated role in preserving the United States during an unprecedented period of division. Born a tanner's son in rugged Ohio in 1822 and battle-tested by the Mexican American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of the Civil War. His daring and resolve as a general gained the attention of President Lincoln, then desperate for bold leadership. Lincoln appointed Grant as Lieutenant General of the Union Army in March 1864. Within a year, Grant's forces had seized Richmond and forced Robert E. Lee to surrender. Four years later, the reunified nation faced another leadership void after Lincoln's assassination and an unworthy successor completed his term. Again, Grant answered the call. At stake once more was the future of the Union, for though the Southern states had been defeated, it remained to be seen if the former Confederacy could be reintegrated into the country—and if the Union could ensure the rights and welfare of African Americans in the South. Grant met the challenge by boldly advancing an agenda of Reconstruction and aggressively countering the Ku Klux Klan.  In his final weeks in the White House, however, Grant faced a crisis that threatened to undo his life's work. The contested presidential election of 1876 produced no clear victory for either Republican Rutherford B. Hayes or Democrat Samuel Tilden, who carried most of the former Confederacy. Soon Southern states vowed to revolt if Tilden was not declared the victor. Grant was determined to use his influence to preserve the Union, establishing an electoral commission to peaceably settle the issue. Grant brokered a grand bargain: the installation of Republican Hayes to the presidency, with concessions to the Democrats that effectively ended Reconstruction. This painful compromise saved the nation, but tragically condemned the South to another century of civil-rights oppression. Deep with contemporary resonance and brimming with fresh detail that takes readers from the battlefields of the Civil War to the corridors of power where men decided the fate of the nation in back rooms, To Rescue the Republic reveals Grant, for all his complexity, to be among the first rank of American heroes.

American Conservative University
To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 by Bret Baier. Fox News Documentary.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 37:12


To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 by Bret Baier. Fox News Documentary.   To Rescue The Republic with Bret Baier - Fox News Documentary https://youtu.be/qqAoejKg0Nw Padma Enter 10 To Rescue The Republic with Bret Baier - Fox News Documentary #FoxNews #Documentary https://t.me/foxnewstrump https://t.me/trumpsaveamerica1   About the book- To Rescue the Republic: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 by Bret Baier The #1 bestselling author and Fox News Channel's Chief Political Anchor illuminates the heroic life of Ulysses S. Grant "To Rescue the Republic is narrative history at its absolute finest. A fast-paced, thrilling and enormously important book." —Douglas Brinkley An epic history spanning the battlegrounds of the Civil War and the violent turmoil of Reconstruction to the forgotten electoral crisis that nearly fractured a reunited nation, Bret Baier's To Rescue the Republic dramatically reveals Ulysses S. Grant's essential yet underappreciated role in preserving the United States during an unprecedented period of division. Born a tanner's son in rugged Ohio in 1822 and battle-tested by the Mexican American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of the Civil War. His daring and resolve as a general gained the attention of President Lincoln, then desperate for bold leadership. Lincoln appointed Grant as Lieutenant General of the Union Army in March 1864. Within a year, Grant's forces had seized Richmond and forced Robert E. Lee to surrender. Four years later, the reunified nation faced another leadership void after Lincoln's assassination and an unworthy successor completed his term. Again, Grant answered the call. At stake once more was the future of the Union, for though the Southern states had been defeated, it remained to be seen if the former Confederacy could be reintegrated into the country—and if the Union could ensure the rights and welfare of African Americans in the South. Grant met the challenge by boldly advancing an agenda of Reconstruction and aggressively countering the Ku Klux Klan.  In his final weeks in the White House, however, Grant faced a crisis that threatened to undo his life's work. The contested presidential election of 1876 produced no clear victory for either Republican Rutherford B. Hayes or Democrat Samuel Tilden, who carried most of the former Confederacy. Soon Southern states vowed to revolt if Tilden was not declared the victor. Grant was determined to use his influence to preserve the Union, establishing an electoral commission to peaceably settle the issue. Grant brokered a grand bargain: the installation of Republican Hayes to the presidency, with concessions to the Democrats that effectively ended Reconstruction. This painful compromise saved the nation, but tragically condemned the South to another century of civil-rights oppression. Deep with contemporary resonance and brimming with fresh detail that takes readers from the battlefields of the Civil War to the corridors of power where men decided the fate of the nation in back rooms, To Rescue the Republic reveals Grant, for all his complexity, to be among the first rank of American heroes.

História pros brother
Por onde anda a KKK?

História pros brother

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:36


O grupo supremacista Ku Klux Klan nasceu no final da Guerra Civil Americana, como um subproduto. Os Confederados foram derrotados, e junto com sua derrota veio também o fim da escravidão. A União venceu e obrigou todos os estados a acabaram com o regime escravagista. Os derrotados decidem então criar um grupo miliciano que perseguiria os negros dos EUA, com linchamentos, enforcamentos e até incendiando pessoas. Não há uma certeza sobre a origem do nome do grupo, mas acredita-se que a origem é das palavras "Ku Klux" grega “kyklos”, que significa “círculo” e que transmite a ideia de uma sociedade secreta e “Klan” deriva de “clan", em inglês, que é clã pra remeter a clãs familiares. O grupo teve três fases, sendo a primeira fase de 1865 até 1871, a segunda iniciou-se em 1915 a 1945 e a terceira iniciou-se a partir da década de 1950. Acredita-se que a terceira fase nunca acabou, por mais que o movimento tenha enfraquecido. Hoje em dia a A Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) investiga esses grupos terroristas e racistas, e estima que existam 8 mil pessoas vinculadas pelos EUA com instituições que se auto intitulem continuações do movimento. Se por um lado a descentralização é um ponto positivo pois mostra uma falta de unidade e consequentemente de poder do grupo, por outro, dificulta as formas de acabar com o movimento racista.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2698 - The Homeschooling Movement and Its Quest To Shrink The Public Sector w/ Heath Brown

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 72:27


Sam and Emma host Heath Brown, associate professor of public policy at the City University of New York (CUNY), John Jay College, and the CUNY Graduate Center, to discuss his recent book Homeschooling the Right: How Conservative Education Activism Erodes The State, on the rise of homeschooling policy in the US, how it relates to public education, and the impact it has had on national politics. They discuss the institutionalization of homeschooling beginning in the 1970s as a seed of the conservative movement we see today, stemming from 1974 West Virginia protests of new textbook policy incorporating the work of civil rights leaders like Malcolm X which brought out support from established conservative organizations like the John Birch Society and the Ku Klux Klan, and new ones like the Heritage Foundation, all looking to bolster the right to opt-out of the “indoctrination” of public schooling. After discussing the roles of key conservative activists, such as Alice Moore and RJ Rushdoony, and how the movement has bolstered the fundamentalist perspectives that we see in the push against Critical Race Theory we see today, Professor Brown dives into the differences we see between the homeschooling movement, which took off in the '80s bolstered by conservatives, and the movement for charter schools, which has found continuous bipartisan support since the ‘90s, both in how they found support, and in their organized opposition, which exists against charter schools and their financial implications for normal public school institutions. He, Emma, and Sam also explore the progress that has bolstered the institution of homeschooling, particularly in the growth of technology and the internet, before looking at its influence on conservative activism and organizing, from Homeschoolers for Bush to even Ted Cruz's 2016 campaign. They wrap up the interview by discussing the demobilizing capacity of undermining public institutions, and Sam and Emma also take on the bloody legacy of Colin Powell and run through recent updates on the IATSE strike, vaccine development, and Joe Manchin. And in the Fun Half: Adam Kinzinger grapples with loving the game (democracy) but hating the players (voters), Matt from CT calls in to talk alternative COVID treatments and NOT Joe Lieberman, Gregory for Oklahoma's HD-26 calls in with updates on his campaign, and Jesse Watters does some word salad on that mysterious, unidentified ruling class in early America (white folks). Steven Crowder capitalizes on the homophobia from Matt Walsh and Tucker Carlson to help bolster his super legit masculinity, plus, your calls and IMs!   Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: ZipRecruiter: Some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves - so we know we've got the one that's best for us - like cuts of steak or mattresses. What if you could do the same for hiring - choose your ideal candidate before they even apply? That's where ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' comes in - it gives YOU, as the hiring manager, the power to pick your favorites from top candidates. According to ZipRecruiter Internal Data, jobs where employers use ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' get on average two and a half times more candidates — which helps make for a faster hiring process. See for yourself! Just go to this exclusive web address, ZipRecruiter.com/majority, to try ZipRecruiter for free! Tushy: Hello Tushy cleans your butt with a precise stream of fresh water for just $79. It attaches to your existing toilet – requires NO electricity or additional plumbing – and cuts toilet paper use by 80% – so the Hello Tushy bidet pays for itself in a few months. Go to hellotushy.com/majority to get 10% off today! Honey is the FREE shopping tool that scours the internet for promo codes and applies the best one it finds to your cart. Honey supports over 30,000 stories online – ranging from sites that have tech and gaming products to popular fashion brands. . even food delivery! If you don't already have Honey, you could be straight up missing out on free savings. It's literally FREE and installs in a few seconds. Get Honey for FREE at joinhoney.com/MAJORITY. That's joinhoney.com/MAJORITY. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! 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I Am Refocused Podcast Show
BRET BAIER Talks new Book - TO RESCUE THE REPUBLIC: ULYSSES S. GRANT, THE FRAGILE UNION AND THE CRISIS OF 1876

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 7:14


BRET BAIER is the chief political anchor for Fox News Channel and the anchor and executive editor of Special Report with Bret Baier. He previously served as Chief White House Correspondent for Fox News Channel and as the network's National Security Correspondent based at the Pentagon, reporting on military and national security affairs. A recipient of the National Press Foundation's Sol Taishoff Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism, Baier is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Three Days at the Brink: FDR's Daring Gamble to Win WWII; Three Days in Moscow: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of the Soviet Empire; Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower's Final Mission; and Special Heart: A Journey of Faith, Hope, Courage and Love. He lives with his family in Washington, DC.Learn more at https://bretbaier.com/ or follow Bret on social media:Twitter: @BretBaier Instagram: BretBaier Facebook: @BretBaier YouTube: Bret BaierABOUT BRETT BAIER'S BOOK TO RESCUE THE REPUBLIC: ULYSSES S. GRANT, THE FRAGILE UNION AND THE CRISIS OF 1876From Bret Baier, New York Times bestselling author, award-winning chief political anchor for Fox News Channel, and the anchor and executive editor of Special Report with Bret Baier, comes TO RESCUE THE REPUBLIC: Ulysses S. Grant, the Fragile Union, and the Crisis of 1876 (Custom House; Hardcover; $28.99; on sale October 12, 2021), a riveting and timely reassessment of Ulysses S. Grant. This first installment in Baier's new book series illuminates the life and legacy of one of America's most consequential yet misunderstood leaders, Ulysses S. Grant, whose actions both as general and as president played an unparalleled role in preserving the United States.Published against the backdrop of our own time's extreme political division and recent contested election, Baier's meticulously researched narrative could not be more relevant. While Grant's military genius during the Civil War is rightly celebrated, it has overshadowed our appreciation of his remarkable political leadership as president during the Reconstruction Era. Baier argues that Grant's two terms in the White House were equally consequential, notably his commitment to protecting the rights of African Americans and suppressing the Ku Klux Klan. All the while, Grant sought to all hold together the fragile Union-a mission that would be tested by a crisis that consumed his last days in office, one that threated to plunge the nation back into civil war.Born a tanner's son in rugged Ohio in 1822 and battle-tested by the Mexican American War, Grant met his destiny on the bloody fields of the Civil War. His daring and resolve as a general gained the attention of President Lincoln who appointed Grant as Lieutenant General of the Union Army in March 1864. Within a year, Grant's forces had seized Richmond and forced Robert E. Lee to surrender. Four years later, the reunified nation faced another leadership void when, following Lincoln's assassination, an unworthy successor completed his term. Again Grant answered the call. At stake once more was the future of the Union, for though the Southern states had been defeated, it remained to be seen if the former Confederacy could be reintegrated into the country-and if the Union could ensure the rights and welfare of African Americans in the South. Grant met the challenge by boldly advancing an agenda of Reconstruction.In his final weeks in the White House, however, Grant faced a crisis that threatened to undo his life's work. The contested presidential election of 1876 produced no clear victory for either Republican Rutherford B. Hayes or Democrat Samuel Tilden, who carried most of the former Confederacy. Soon Southern states vowed to revolt if Tilden was not declared the victor. Grant was determined to use his influence to conserve the Union, establishing an electoral commission to peaceably settle the issue. Grant brokered a grand bargain: the installation of Republican Hayes to the presidency, with concessions to the Democrats that effectively ended Reconstruction. This painful, though perhaps necessary compromise saved the Union, but the consequences of Reconstruction's roll-back stills haunt the country.Deep with contemporary resonance and brimming with fresh detail, TO RESCUE THE REPUBLIC reveals Grant, for all his complexity, to be among the first rank of American heroes.PRISE FOR TO RESCUE THE REPUBLIC"With To Rescue The Republic, Bret Baier, the nation's leading reporter of history, has written a veritable tour de force. This remarkable book is history as it should be: magnificently composed, meticulously researched, and brimming with lessons for today's divided political arena. Baier has brought to life the riveting but too often forgotten story of how US Grant preserved the Republic at one of its moments of greatest peril. This is not just a tale for our age, but an absorbing tale for the ages. It belongs on the bookshelf of every lover of history."- Jay Winik, New York Times bestselling author of April 1865 and 1944"Bret Baier's To Rescue the Republic is narrative history at its absolute finest. With great verve and a fair-and-balanced ethic, Baier brilliantly recounts the heroic life of Ulysses S. Grant - as Civil War general, U.S. President, Reconstruction Era leader and beloved national icon. His dramatic retelling of the election of 1876 which pitted Samuel J Tilden against Rutherford B. Hayes is stupendous. A fast-paced, thrilling and enormously important book. Highly recommended!"- Douglas Brinkley, the Katherine Tsanoff Brown Chair in Humanities and Professor of History at Rice University and author of American Moonshot 

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Anti Racist Writer and Speaker Tim Wise and Comedian and Cultural Commentator Christian Finnegan Episode 455

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 92:08


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more I've known Tim Wise for over 10 years and I have tried to showcase his work wherever I go from siriusxm to CNN to this podcast. I always learn so much when I read or talk to him. Today Tim and I talked about his latest writing Get all of his books Tim Wise, whom scholar and philosopher Cornel West calls, “A vanilla brother in the tradition of (abolitionist) John Brown,” is among the nation's most prominent antiracist essayists and educators. He has spent the past 25 years speaking to audiences in all 50 states, on over 1000 college and high school campuses, at hundreds of professional and academic conferences, and to community groups across the nation. He has also lectured internationally in Canada and Bermuda, and has trained corporate, government, law enforcement and medical industry professionals on methods for dismantling racism in their institutions. Wise's antiracism work traces back to his days as a college activist in the 1980s, fighting for divestment from (and economic sanctions against) apartheid South Africa. After graduation, he threw himself into social justice efforts full-time, as a Youth Coordinator and Associate Director of the Louisiana Coalition Against Racism and Nazism: the largest of the many groups organized in the early 1990s to defeat the political candidacies of white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. From there, he became a community organizer in New Orleans' public housing, and a policy analyst for a children's advocacy group focused on combatting poverty and economic inequity. He has served as an adjunct professor at the Smith College School of Social Work, in Northampton, MA., and from 1999-2003 was an advisor to the Fisk University Race Relations Institute in Nashville, TN. Wise is the author of seven books, including his highly-acclaimed memoir, White Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son, as well as Dear White America: Letter to a New Minority, and Under the Affluence: Shaming the Poor, Praising the Rich and Sacrificing the Future of America. His forthcoming book, White LIES Matter: Race, Crime and the Politics of Fear in America, will be released in 2018. His essays have appeared on Alternet, Salon, Huffington Post, Counterpunch, Black Commentator, BK Nation, Z Magazine and The Root, which recently named Wise one of the “8 Wokest White People We Know.” Wise has been featured in several documentaries, including “The Great White Hoax: Donald Trump and the Politics of Race and Class in America,” and “White Like Me: Race, Racism and White Privilege in America,” both from the Media Education Foundation. He also appeared alongside legendary scholar and activist, Angela Davis, in the 2011 documentary, “Vocabulary of Change.” In this public dialogue between the two activists, Davis and Wise discussed the connections between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality and militarism, as well as inter-generational movement building and the prospects for social change. Wise is also one of five persons—including President Barack Obama—interviewed for a video exhibition on race relations in America, featured at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington DC. Additionally, his media presence includes dozens of appearances on CNN, MSNBC and NPR, feature interviews on ABC's 20/20 and CBS's 48 Hours, as well as videos posted on YouTube, Facebook and other social media platforms that have received over 20 million views. His podcast, “Speak Out with Tim Wise,” launched this fall and features weekly interviews with activists, scholars and artists about movement building and strategies for social change. Wise graduated from Tulane University in 1990 and received antiracism training from the People's Institute for Survival and Beyond, in New Orleans. 53:00 Christian Finnegan  is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor based in New York City.   BUY HIS NEW ALBUM--- "Show Your Work: Live at QED"   Finnegan is perhaps best known as one of the original panelists on VH1's Best Week Ever and as Chad, the only white roommate in the “Mad Real World” sketch on Comedy Central's Chappelle's Show. Additional television appearances as himself or performing stand up have included “Conan”, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson”, "Would You Rather...with Graham Norton", “Good Afternoon America” and multiple times on The Today Show and Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and on History's I Love the 1880s. He hosted TV Land's game show "Game Time". As an actor, Finnegan portrayed the supporting role of "Carl" in the film Eden Court, a ticket agent in "Knight and Day" and several guest roles including a talk show host on "The Good Wife". In October 2006, Finnegan's debut stand up comedy CD titled Two For Flinching was released by Comedy Central Records, with a follow-up national tour of college campuses from January to April 2007. “Au Contraire!” was released by Warner Bros. Records in 2009. His third special "The Fun Part" was filmed at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston on April 4, 2013 and debuted on Netflix on April 15, 2014. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

História em Meia Hora
Ku Klux Klan

História em Meia Hora

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 34:19


Supremacista branco é que nem alho: tem que socar bem. Separe trinta minutos do seu dia e aprenda com o professor Vítor Soares sobre a KKK: Ku Klux Klan. Se você quiser ter acesso a episódios exclusivos e quiser ajudar o História em Meia Hora e continuar de pé, clique no link: www.apoia.se/historiaemmeiahora --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/historiaemmeiahora/support

Crime Writers of Color
Patricia Raybon--Writer of Faith & Mystery and ALL THAT IS SECRET

Crime Writers of Color

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 37:56


Patricia Raybon—author of ALL THAT IS SECRET—is interviewed by Robert Justice. Patricia Raybon is an award-winning author and novelist who writes at the daring intersection of faith and race. Her books include My First White Friend, winner of the Christopher Award, I Told the Mountain to Move, a prayer memoir about her struggle to learn to pray, that was a Christianity Today Book of the Year finalist, and Undivided: A Muslim Daughter, Her Christian Mother, Their Path to Peace, coauthored with her younger daughter Alana Raybon. Patricia's essays on faith and race have been published in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Newsweek, USA Today, Guideposts, Christianity Today, and other national publications and blogs. Her first fiction is a 1920s murder mystery series about a young Black theologian—a fan of Sherlock Holmes—solving crime and murder in Colorado's dangerous era of the Ku Klux Klan. Its debut title, All That Is Secret, is set to release Oct. 5, 2021, from Tyndale House. Parade Magazine picked All That Is Secret among its Fall 2021 “Mysteries We Love.” Patricia's essays on faith and race have been published in the New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, USA Today, USA Weekend, Country Living Magazine, Chicago Tribune, The Denver Post, Guideposts, In Touch Magazine (In Touch Ministries), Christianity Today, popular blogs including the Washington Post's “Acts of Faith” and aired on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition.  A regular contributor at Our Daily Bread and the (in)courage community at DaySpring, she also teaches and coaches at writing conferences and workshops nationwide.  A lifelong Colorado resident, Patricia lives with her husband Dan, a retired educator. They have two grown daughters, a son-in-law, five grandchildren and a “grand dog” Max. Links Patricia's Website Robert Justice's Website Crime Writers of Color Website Podcast Music Provided by Chris Lang Jazz

American History Tellers
Roaring Twenties | The Age of Jazz | 2

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:43


In the 1920s, Americans moved to the city in droves, and a new, diverse generation sparked an era of dizzying social change. It was the Age of Jazz, a time when Black Americans brought a revolutionary new musical style to northern cities. Free-spirited flappers haunted urban nightclubs. And Harlem, New York became the epicenter of a renaissance in Black artistic and political expression.But rapid changes in the city sparked fear and backlash in the countryside. Rural white Americans vigorously defended traditional religious values, and fundamentalist preachers drew massive audiences. Meanwhile, a resurgent Ku Klux Klan drew millions of new members by targeting not just Black Americans, but also Jews, Catholics, and recent immigrants. In 1925, the divide between urban and rural America came to a head in a sleepy town in eastern Tennessee, where the sensational “Scopes Monkey Trial” pitted the forces of science and religion against each other.Support us by supporting our sponsors!SimpliSafe - Get 20% off your entire system and your first month of monitoring service free when you enroll in interactive monitoring simplisafe.com/tellersSleep Number - Special offers for a limited time at sleepnumber.com/tellersSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside Influence
Daryl Davis - One man and the Ku Klux Klan: The power of meeting conflict with curiosity

Inside Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 79:28


Daryl Davis - One man and the Ku Klux Klan: The power of respectful communicationHow does a black musician who's jammed with the likes of Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, BB King and even Bill Clinton - become friends with an Imperial Wizard from the Ku Klux Klan?In this polarised world, breaking down entrenched positions may be the most important skill needed by us all. If two passionate sides can agree to disagree, long enough to find what they have in common - could we overcome climate change, poverty and even racism?My guest on this episode of Inside Influence podcast would say a resounding yes.On today's Inside Influence Podcast episode I talk to R&B musician and Race Reconciliator Daryl Davis about talking to the “other”.Growing up overseas as the son of diplomats, he returned to the US as a 10-year-old and was shocked to discover that people could hate him because of the colour of his skin. Later that year he saw MLK assassinated.This formed a question that went on to define the course of his life: “‘How can you hate me if you don't even know me?”Through music he discovered a beautiful universal language and had a wonderful career playing the piano for some of the greats such as Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis. One night while playing in a bar in Frederick Maryland, he met a Ku Klux Klan member and decided the best way to find an answer to his question was to attend their rallies.Rather than a debate, he was looking to have a conversation. Rather than trying to convince or convert, he decided to approach people with curiosity and respect.Over the past 30 years, Daryl Davis has inspired 200+ people to quit the Ku Klux Klan. Through dialogue and (as you'll come to hear) a thirst to first understand before being understood.Today's Guest Daryl DavisDaryl Davis is an award-winning R&B piano player, actor, author, and race relations expert.He has worked with Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley's Jordanaires, The Legendary Blues Band and many others. He currently tours with The Daryl Davis Band. He is also an actor and appeared on HBO's critically acclaimed series The Wire.As a Race Reconciliator, he has been sent around the world by the State Department to talk about conflict reconciliation and race relations. He has won numerous awards and has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, NPR and other media outlets to talk about race relations. He hosts a podcast called Changing Minds and has written a book on his relationships with Klu Klux Klan members called “Klan-destine Relationships”LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daryl-davis-5226b24/Twitter: https://twitter.com/realdaryldavisInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/realdaryldavis/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DarylDavisRaceReconciliator/“One person can make an exponential change because when they impact another, that person then goes on to impact another.”“You cannot change someone's reality, they have to change it themselves.”“You have to invite the other to participate and when you see that happen collectively, that is when huge things happen.”You'll learnHis journey from that bar in Maryland to immersing himself in the world of the KKK – what he learned, how he has learned to respond and what that has to teach us about having deeply difficult conversations.Why he is NEVER offended by what he hears in those conversations – this one intrigued me the most – including how he stays in a place of active respect and curiosity – in situations that would bring most people's blood to the boil.Why he always start with ‘commonality' - and he uses some beautiful language here – essentially beginning any difficult conversation with what he has in common with the other person, before moving to what he has in contrast.Why change never happens in the moment, I think this one is worth hearing a few times – we will never change someone's mind in the moment. The intention instead is to invite them to an exploration (NOT A DEBATE) – and then respectfully sow seeds that they can reflect on later.Why self awareness and courage are muscles we all have – and only by strengthening and using those muscles – can we inspire others to start doing the same. Parents and leaders, this one is on us.As someone who considers himself to be ‘just a rock and roll player' how Daryl has managed to achieve what many movements have not – by first deciding to listen.And finally, Daryl's own personal roadmap to having deeply difficult conversations. A game changing tool for any conversation or situation where the emotions and stakes are at their most intense.References and links mentionedThe Charlotteville “Unite the Right” Rally.My new ebook The Influencer Code.The Mark Twain quote was from The Innocents Abroad / Roughing It.Daryl's book Klan-destine RelationshipsIf you liked this episode, you might also enjoyBob Chapman – Truly human leadership: What it means to lead like everybody mattersHamish Thomson – Why it's not always right to be right Judy Atkinson - 4 Keys to Transform Conflict with Deep ListeningJonah Berger - How to change anyone's mind without having to pushSubscribe to and Review the Inside Influence PodcastThanks for tuning into this week's episode of the Inside Influence Podcast! If the information in my conversations and interviews have helped you in your business journey, please head over to iTunes, subscribe to the show, and leave an honest review. Your reviews and feedback will not only help us continue to deliver great, helpful content, but it will also help us reach even more amazing people just like you!Also, don't forget to hop on my website juliemasters.com and download my new ebook The Influencer Code See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson
Confederate Statues are Coming Down

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 34:34


Confederate monuments are coming down every day in this country, but as Connor Towne O'Neill details in his book “Down Along With That Devils Bones,” we're still fighting a “Cold Civil War,” where monument removal is a change that is important symbolism but does not get at the systemic problems. Connor became invested in the conversations and arguments happening around Confederate monuments when he moved to Alabama and came upon a memorial for Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate Army general and the first Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan--a man whose 200th birthday was just celebrated by Neo-Confederates this past summer. Connor shares the story of who Forrest was, the role he played in the Civil War, and why he's still a hero to some racist white southerners today. And though his busts have come down in Tennessee, there's much work to be done by white people, specifically engaging in conversations with one another about racism, white supremacy, and the factual history of this country. Because these Confederate monuments didn't start showing up until the turn of the 20th century, in what is believed to be an attempt to “tidy up the legacy of the Civil War,” and you know Black people weren't behind that one. BUY Connor's book here: https://bookshop.org/books/down-along-with-that-devil-s-bones-a-reckoning-with-monuments-memory-and-the-legacy-of-white-supremacy/9781616209100 Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Naked Conversations
S6E2: Using Theater for Social Justice: Inclusive Leadership and Beyond

Naked Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 70:49


Welcome to Season 6 Episode 2 of Race, Culture & Beyond: A Naked Conversation Podcast. On today's episode, we are joined by Trent Norman of Affinity Arts Consulting as we discuss improving human connection and advancing Social Justice through the art of Theatre.  Trent Norman (he/his/him/they/them/theirs) has a history of Diversity & Inclusion work;  As a student activist, he created the (1) Black Students Organization at Fort Lewis College, (2) UCAP (United Coalition Against Prejudice) – a not-for-profit organization created to address the Ku Klux Klan, and a (3) a performance Theatre group.    Trent received his Bachelor of Arts Degree in English Literature and Theatre Performance while participating as a Residence Assistant and a student-athlete; Trent's Master of Science is in Social Psychology; focusing his energies on group dynamics and facilitation.    Trent continued his love of theatre as the co-founder and director of the University of Colorado's Interactive Theatre Project and Affinity Arts Consulting (AAC).    Through AAC Trent has created and facilitated performance about social issues for a variety of audiences including restorative justice practitioners, national and international university conferences, first-year student orientations, K-12 teacher educators, sexual assault prosecutor, and support services and environmental justice advocates; using theatre to engage audiences in learning and information sharing.    Additionally, Trent works with the Center for Academic Performance Excellence (CAPE) on the University of Colorado's Anschutz medical campus helping medical professionals improve their practice, communication skills and patient relationships as an actor and facilitator. He has served as the Assistant Director for Organizational Diversity at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he developed a stand-alone Diversity curriculum implemented by other instructors he trained. Trent created and implemented a diversity plan for the Division of Student Affairs, engaged the Department of Housing and Dining Services in a unit-wide Diversity training and with colleague Rebecca Brown Adelman received the NYU Steinhart excellence award for innovative theatre practices for their work at the University of Colorado and Affinity Arts. Trent has published and leads workshops on facilitation and used that experience to center his diversity & inclusion work. Trent participated in the Social Justice Training Institute (as a participant and intern); has been certified to train in the NCBI (National Coalition Building Institute) model; has a training certificate from NCORE (National Conference On Race and Ethnicity in American Higher Education) and completed the Social Justice Education Training Certificate from NCORE. Trent is also a professional photographer, writer, ski instructor, and avid cyclist.    The conversation with Trent is not only thought-provoking but rich with experience, humor, and wisdom. Tune in to hear Trent discuss: The connection between JEDI (justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion) and Theatre  How Theatre can be used as a tool for exploring identity How Theatre can amplify and bridge the gap between intention and impact Strategies for creating spaces for real and raw conversations to take place   Thank you thank you for listening to the show.  It is such an honor to have these conversations with you. They are necessary and needed and we are here to do the work. A special thank you to Trent for his time, his expertise, and his wisdom.    For access to ALL the resources mentioned, sign up for the “resource roundup” at sagebhobbs.com/nc-podcast.    The (short & awesome) newsletter will also keep you in the loop on the latest episodes, and other opportunities.    Let's connect: Like what you hear? Please subscribe to Naked Conversations on Apple Podcasts. Or Stitcher. Or Google Play. Or any of the following – Overcast, Blubbry, TuneIn Radio, Player.fm.   For (much appreciated) gold stars: Leave a rating + review! Just a few short words will help more folks find the show and be a part of this conversation. Thank you!    Also, please send a DM on Instagram to @sagebhobbs or @ericayhoward to let us know what you love about the show, what topics you'd like to hear covered, or your dream interviewee.

The Opperman Report
Guest: Mark Ebner

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 102:58


Church of Scientology "Hollywood, Interrupted" ,"Six Degrees of Paris Hilton"Ain't It Cool?: Kicking Hollywood's Butt New York Times best selling author Mark Ebner is an award winning investigative journalist who has covered all aspects of celebrity and crime culture for Spy, Rolling Stone, Maxim, Details, Los Angeles, Premiere, Salon, Spin, Radar, Angeleno, The Daily Beast.com, Gawker.com, BoingBoing.net and New Times among other national and international and internet publications. He has repeatedly positioned himself in harm's way, conducting dozens of investigations into such subjects as Scientology, Pit Bull fighting in South Central Los Angeles, the Ku Klux Klan in Texas, celebrity stalkers, drug dealers, missing porn stars, sports groupies, mobsters, college suicides and Hepatitis C in Hollywood. Ebner has produced for and/or appeared as a journalist-commentator on NBC, ABC, CBS, MSNBC, A&E, The BBC, Channel 4 (UK), National Public Radio, Court TV, Fox News, FX, VH-1 and E! Entertainment Television. He has been a featured guest on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, The Today Show, The Early Show, Inside Edition, The Dylan Ratigan Show, Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn, Fox & Friends, Catherine Crier Live, and a host of other television and radio programs in the US, Canada, the United Kingdom and Asia. In 2000, Ebner hosted his own nationally syndicated radio program, Drastic Radio, and co-authored the New York Times/Los Angeles Times best-seller, "Hollywood, Interrupted" in 2005 with the late Andrew Breitbart of the Drudge Report. He followed that collaboration with the Hollywood true crimer "Six Degrees of Paris Hilton" (Simon and Schuster) in 2008, and 2011 saw publication of "We Have Your Husband" (Berkley Books)with Jayne Garcia Valseca which resulted in a Lifetime Movie adaptation of the same title. 2013 and 2014 bring Being Uncle Charlie (Random House Canada)with former Canadian undercover copper Bob Deasy and Poison Candy with former Florida prosecutor Elizabeth Parker respectively. Ebner consulted on the Emmy-nominated "Trapped In The Closet" episode of South Park for Comedy Central, consulted for NBC/Dateline on the "Paris Hilton Tapes" report, and field produced a one-hour VH1 special on the same topic. He also hosted "Rich and Reckless," a crime show for TruTV, co-starred in I Can't Believe I'm Still Single (Showtime), and blogs when he can at HollywoodInterrupted.com. http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Ebner/e/B0...

Cultish
Part 3: Congressmen William D. Upshaw & the Klu Klux Klan.

Cultish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 59:44


In part 3, we look at a 1920s congressman from Georgia by the name of William D. Upshaw & the unique impact he ended up having on the Branham Cult. William D. Upshaw was a United States Congressman and revivalist from Georgia who was closely affiliated with William Joseph Simmons during the early years of the 1915 Ku Klux Klan and later with Roy E. Davis as Davis rose to the rank of the Imperial Wizard of the Klan. Upshaw was known as the "driest of the dries" for his position against drinking alcohol, helped turn the State of Georgia into the first "dry state", and almost single-handedly led Simmons and the Klan to victory during the 1921 Congressional Hearings. Upshaw helped promote William Branham's revivals by posing as a wheelchair invalid at Roy Davis' request, advertised other revivalists in the Voice of Healing/Latter Rain revivals, and toured with the Branham campaigns until his death in 1952. How did the exactly KLU-KLUX-KLAN formulate & how much influence did they really have in U.S. politics at that time? What role did Congressman Upshaw have in the KLAN & what sort of influence did he really have on Roy E. Davis & William Branham? Tune in to find out!"

Cultish
Part 2: William Branham, Roy E. Davis, & The formulation of "The Message".

Cultish

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 75:23


In part 2, we continue in the mid 1920's & look at the formulation of a unique relationship between William Branham & Roy E Davis. Roy Davis was an evangelist from Texas who ordained William Branham into the Pentecostal faith, mentored Branham in his church, and taught Branham to drink poison to gain new converts. Davis was also an official spokesperson for William Joseph Simmons in both the 1915 Ku Klux Klan and the Knights of the Flaming Sword white supremacy groups, and eventually an Imperial Wizard of the K.K.K. Davis fled to Jeffersonville, IN after a series of criminal activities ranging from bank robbery and swindling to bigamy and sexual crimes. Before those crimes were exposed and he was extradited on charges of Grand Theft, Davis planted the church that would become Branham's "Billie Branham Pentecostal Tabernacle" and eventually the "Branham Tabernacle" when Branham's stage persona transitioned to "Baptist". How exactly did famous historical events like the uncertainty of the great depression, the systematic racial tensions of the Jim Crow Era, & Branham's relationship with Roy E Davis helped formulate his underlying worldview & the Cult known as “The Message” Tune in to find out! You can find more about our guest John Collins at https://william-branham.org/site/john_collins "

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1435 A History of White Violence in Policy and Practice

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 61:10


Air Date 8/18/2021 Today we take a look at history of white people deciding to get their way through violence and the tradition of having the government look the other way Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: The KKK: History and Myth - Professor Buzzkill History Podcast - Air Date 8-24-17 Practically nothing in the history of the United States has suffered from myth-making and misunderstanding as much as the history of race relations and racist violence. The history Ku Klux Klan is no exception. This is ironic. Ch. 2: Remembering a White Supremacist Coup - Reveal - Air Date 10-23-20 On the eve of a contentious election, Reveal looks back to the nearly forgotten election of 1898 in Wilmington, North Carolina. A coup d'etat gave birth to much of the structural racism that still plagues our nation today. Ch. 3: Voices: Children ‘stripped of innocence' - Cape Up - Air Date 4-11-19 A member of the Little Rock Nine and a survivor of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing both lost the illusion of safety in their young lives. Ch. 4: Armed and Dangerous - On the Media - Air Date 9-24-20 Armed right-wingers are stoking violence in cities across the country. On this week's On the Media, a look at the origins of the American militia movement. Plus, as things heat up, Facebook is fanning the flames. Ch. 5: The Evolution of All-American Terrorism - Reveal - Air Date 6-27-20 The Trump years have seen an increase in domestic terrorist attacks linked by hateful ideologies that thrive online. Reveal teams up with Type Investigations to track each case and determine what the government has done to fight them. Ch. 6: Radical Caucasian Extremism - News Beat - Air Date 1-9-21 This hugely important episode highlighted the threat posed by such extremists, even as many in the media and government engaged in Islamophobic rhetoric about Muslim Americans. Ch. 7: "Nobody actually accounts for this violence": How the FBI fails to track white supremacist terrorism - Democracy Now! - Air Date 8-5-19 Former FBI agent Mike German says "Unfortunately their policies have actually masked how they use their domestic terrorism resources to make it harder for the Congress to understand how many of those resources are going toward white supremacist violence," MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 8: Tucker Carlson Doubles Down on White Supremacist 'Great Replacement' Theory - The Mehdi Hasan Show - Air Date 4-13-21 The Atlantic's Adam Serwer and Mehdi discuss Carlson's history of promulgating racist rhetoric on prime time television and its real-life consequences. Ch. 9: Southern Shame Culture & How to Fight Racism w/Jemar Tisby - The Holy Post - Air Date 1-20-21 Jemar Tisby (The Color of Compromise) rejoins Phil to discuss his new book, How to Fight Racism. Actual, real steps to be part of the solution, not part of the problem! VOICEMAILS Ch. 10: Response on remix climate episode - Alan from Connecticut FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 11: Final comments on the arguments against individual climate action MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Activism Music: This Fickle World by Theo Bard (https://theobard.bandcamp.com/track/this-fickle-world) Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE: Description: Black and white photo taken during "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, AL on March 7th 1965. A young John Lewis has fallen on the grass, lifting one hand, while a police officer stands over him wielding a billy club. Credit: "12 - Civil Rights Movement" (low resolution). Original from the Library of Congress (via U.S. Embassy The Hague on Flickr) | License | Changes: Cropped   Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

This Day in Esoteric Political History
Leo Frank and the KKK's Resurgence (1915)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 19:03


It's August 17th. This day in 1915, a Jewish man by the name of Leo Frank was kidnapped from jail and hanged by a mob in Marietta, Georgia. Jody, Niki, and Kellie discuss how the incident helped galvanize a resurgent Ku Klux Klan, and how much anti-Semitism should be part of the story of lynchings and mob violence in the early part of the 20th century. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro, Executive Producer at Radiotopia