Podcasts about martin luther king jr

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American activist and leader in the civil rights movement (1929-1968)

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Latest podcast episodes about martin luther king jr

Perspective
COVID-19: boosters, divorce, and a mental health crisis

Perspective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 40:38


The mental health crisis kids face as the world weathers the pandemic and other factors including divorce. Mixing and matching COVID-19 boosters. Supply chain problems, NFL's race norming settlement, the Dave Chappelle controversy, stigmitizing Spanglish, and celebrating the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial.

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson
Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg

Make It Plain with Mark Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:31


Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg takes time to talk with Mark about the vast benefits of the Build Back Better plan, which stands to create jobs and make lives healthier and more enriched, and also addresses issues of environmental and racial injustice. We then get to hear from leaders of congress who commemorated 10 years since the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. was erected next to the National Mall. He speaks with Speaker Pelosi, Congresswoman Terri Sewell, Congressman Troy Carter, Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, Congressman Bobby Scott, Actor and Author Hill Harper, and MLK Memorial Foundation President Harry Johnson. Executive Producer: Adell Coleman Producer: Brittany Temple Distributor: DCP Entertainment For additional content: makeitplain.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Literary Treks: A Star Trek Books and Comics Podcast

The Struggle Within. The Federation continues to deal with the fallout of the Borg invasion as well as the recent secession of Andor, which is leading the Federation to look for allies to join the Khitomer Accords anywhere they can find them. In this episode of Literary Treks hosts Matthew Rushing and Bruce Gibson are joined by Casey Pettitt to talk about the next book in the Typhon Pact series, The Struggle Within. We discuss it being an ebook only, picking up the pieces, just listen, looking for balance, nonviolence, just another group, our ratings and final thoughts. In the news section of the show we review issue number one in the Mirror War comic. News Mirror War #1 (00:03:58) Feature: The Struggle Within Ebook Only (00:15:59) Picking Up the Pieces (00:21:34) Just Listen (00:27:54) Looking for Balance (00:32:18) Nonviolence (00:41:02) Just Another Group (00:44:29) Ratings (00:50:13) Final Thoughts (00:53:34) Hosts Matthew Rushing and Bruce Gibson Guest Casey Pettitt Production Matthew Rushing (Editor and Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Greg Rozier (Associate Producer) Casey Pettitt (Associate Producer)

Star Trek Podcasts: Trek.fm Complete Master Feed
Literary Treks : 331: MLK Would Be Proud

Star Trek Podcasts: Trek.fm Complete Master Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 58:19


The Struggle Within. The Federation continues to deal with the fallout of the Borg invasion as well as the recent secession of Andor, which is leading the Federation to look for allies to join the Khitomer Accords anywhere they can find them. In this episode of Literary Treks hosts Matthew Rushing and Bruce Gibson are joined by Casey Pettitt to talk about the next book in the Typhon Pact series, The Struggle Within. We discuss it being an ebook only, picking up the pieces, just listen, looking for balance, nonviolence, just another group, our ratings and final thoughts. In the news section of the show we review issue number one in the Mirror War comic. News Mirror War #1 (00:03:58) Feature: The Struggle Within Ebook Only (00:15:59) Picking Up the Pieces (00:21:34) Just Listen (00:27:54) Looking for Balance (00:32:18) Nonviolence (00:41:02) Just Another Group (00:44:29) Ratings (00:50:13) Final Thoughts (00:53:34) Hosts Matthew Rushing and Bruce Gibson Guest Casey Pettitt Production Matthew Rushing (Editor and Producer) C Bryan Jones (Executive Producer) Greg Rozier (Associate Producer) Casey Pettitt (Associate Producer)

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Write Now, Write for the Future

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 9:41


President Biden and Vice President Harris visited the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. today to mark its 10th anniversary. It got Boyd to thinking about one of his favorite topics: When looking at historical figures, it's usually better to ignore the flaws, stop "canceling" them, and write for a better future instead.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Biden is Off the Rails Again! - 10.21.21 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:11


Biden spoke last night in Scranton and gave us some doosies and now today we get even more Biden sound during the annual dedication of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.

WAMU: Local News
MLK Memorial 10th Anniversary Causes Visitors To Reflect On King's Legacy

WAMU: Local News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 3:45


Over the last decade, the memorial has become a meeting point for activist groups and a spot on pilgrimages for world leaders and peacemakers.

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio
The National Center for Civil and Human Rights Advocates for Freedom

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 32:20


Jill Savitt, CEO for the National Center of Civil and Human Rights, joins the Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio podcast to discuss the center's exhibits and the importance of advocating for civil and human rights. Savitt joins hosts Carol Morgan and Todd Schnick for the Around Atlanta segment. Savitt, involved with the museum for the last 10 years, became the CEO of the center two years ago. Before there was a physical building to house the center, Savitt curated the human rights gallery, an exhibit on the top floor that showcases human rights around the globe. “It's such a delight to be able to come to Atlanta for this role. I love it. It's a fantastic city,” said Savitt. "Our museum is really a backbone because [Atlanta] is the birthplace of civil rights and the hometown of Dr. King. We bring all of that storytelling to life in our museum.” The center is both a museum and a civil rights institution that centers around three stories. The first is the story of the U.S. civil rights movement titled “Rolls Down Like Water,” highlighting the narratives of those that many know as well as unknown heroes. “Spark of Conviction,” the human rights gallery, links the civil rights movements of the fifties and sixties to the nonviolent human rights movements throughout the world in an immersive and dynamic experience. From large-scale world events such as the fall of the Berlin Wall to Tiananmen Square, the exhibit introduces viewers to the world's human rights defenders taking up the cause of human dignity within their own societies. Through several dynamic installations, the experience defines human rights, its origins and how they are enforced. There are also exhibits that focus on the greatest champions of human rights as well as some of the biggest perpetrators of human rights abuse, many of whom got away with their crimes. The museum's third permanent exhibit centers around the papers and artifacts of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Named “Voice to the Voiceless,” the gallery is a sacred place to many and offers non-scholars a space to see the papers, handwriting and personal effects of Dr. King. The papers are rotated and showcased based on a particular theme and the current one, “Beloved Community,” allows visitors to see the famed leader's papers discussing the importance of community. Outside of the facility, the center hosts programs for schools K-12 to teach human rights history as well as a program for law enforcement that focuses on the history of human rights, law enforcement's role in history and its responsibility to keep democratic societies healthy. There is also a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Training Program offered to workforces looking to become more inclusive. There are also smaller programs that focus on LGBTQ+ rights and human trafficking. Savitt said, “Our overarching concern, our mantra, is to help people tap their own power to protect their rights and the world around them.” Equal Dignity at Work consists of seven different modules designed for workplaces to breach crucial topics, including workplace bias, industry trends, diversity and inclusion. The brave conversations allow participants to recognize prejudices and discuss them. The programs do not touch on recruitment, pipelining or nurturing talent but focus on connecting history to the present moment and breaking down barriers. In the United States, the current political atmosphere makes it hard for many to discuss opposing views without leading to a larger argument. These brave conversations promote grace and acknowledge that while people may say unintentionally hurtful things, educating participants on rephrasing questions to keep topics open and calm is beneficial for exposing others to opposing arguments and educating in a healthy and respectful manner. “Workplaces are some of the most integrated places we have and are the perfect places to practice pluralism. It's the place to talk to people who are different than you,

Ideas Untrapped
RULE OF LAW AND THE REAL WORLD

Ideas Untrapped

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 64:14


''Rule of law'' is the generally accepted description for how well a political system conforms to formal rules - rather than functioning through the whims of the most powerful social or political agents. For a society to be described as one functioning under rule of law - there must be rules and those rules must be equally applied to everyone in the society. Let us call this Letter of the Law. These rules are usually expressed through the constitution of a country and enforced through the courts. But simply having rules and enforcing them does not suffice in the making of the rule of law - and it is an incomplete (however accurate) conception of it. Some rules can be drafted in bad faith or with the express purpose of protecting the interest of the political elites responsible for governance. This is why many scholars have argued that the rule of law can only be said to exist in a state that functions under rules designed to protect the civil liberties (individual rights, freedom of speech, freedom of association, etc.) of the people living within its territory. Let us call this the Character or Spirit of the Law. The character of the law understood as the fulfilment of constitutionally-guaranteed civil liberties is the most common standard by which governance is judged to conform or deviate from the rule of law. For example, countries that routinely violate the rights of citizens in whatever form cannot be said to be governed by the rule of law, even if it has a written constitution. Consideration of the character of the law is the context to understanding the work of my guest on this episode, Paul Gowder.He is a professor of law at NorthWestern university with a broad research interest and expertise. Paul departs from this common derivation of the character of the law as rooted in liberty - and argued that for the rule of law to be broadly applicable in different societies (not dependent on the political institutions and ethical ideals of any specific society) with varying cultures and traditions of governance, it must be rooted in Equality. To understand Paul's argument, I will briefly state two important aspects that set the tone for our conversation - this should not be taken as an exhaustive summary of his work and I encourage you to check out his website and book. The first is that the rule of law as a principle regulates the actions of the state (government), and it is not to be conflated with other rules that regulate the actions of citizens. This is such an important point because one of the most egregious expressions of the law is when a government uses it to oppress citizens. Secondly, Paul outlines three components of the rule of law based on equality as 1) regularity - the government can only use coercion when it is acting in ''good faith'' and under ''reasonable interpretation'' of rules that already exist and are specific to the circumstances. 2) publicity - the law has to be accessible to everyone without barriers (''officials have a responsibility to explain their application of the law, ...failure to do so commits hubris and terror against the public"). 3) generality - the law must be equally applicable to all. Putting all these elements together gives us a rule of law regime where everyone is equal before the law, and the state does not wantonly abuse citizens or single out particular groups for systematic abuse.I enjoyed this conversation very much, and I want to thank Paul for talking to me. Thank you guys too for always listening, and for the other ways you support this project.TRANSCRIPTTobi; I greatly enjoyed your work on the rule of law. I've read your papers, I've read your book, and I like it very much. I think it's a great public service if I can say that because for a lot of time, I am interested in economic development and that is mostly the issue that this podcast talks about. And what you see in that particular conversation is there hasn't really been that much compatibility between the question of the rule of law or the laws that should regulate the actions of the state, and its strategy for economic development. Most of the time, you often see even some justification, I should say, to trample on rights in as much as you get development, you get high-income growth for it. And what I found in your work is, this does not have to be so. So what was your eureka moment in coming up with your concept, we are going to unpack a lot of the details very soon, but what motivated you to write this work or to embark on this project?Paul; Yeah, I think for me, part of the issue that really drives a lot of how I think about the rule of law and you know, reasons behind some of this work is really a difference between the way that those of us who think about human freedom and human equality, right? I think of it as philosophers, right. So they're philosophers and philosophers think about the ability of people to live autonomous lives, to sort of stand tall against their government, to live lives of respect, and freedom and equality. And that's one conversation. And so we see people, like, you know, Ronald Dworkin, thinking about what the rule of law can deliver to human beings in that sense. And then, you know, there's this entire development community, you know, the World Bank, lots of the US foreign policy, all of the rest of those groups of people and groups of ideas, talk about the rule of law a lot and work to measure the rule of law and invest immense amounts of money in promoting what they call the rule of law across the world. But mostly, it seems to be protecting property rights for multinational investment. And I mean, that makes some kind of sense, if you think that what the rule of law is for is economic development, is increasing the GDP of a country and integrating it into favourable international networks of trade. But if you think that it's about human flourishing, then you get a completely different idea of what the rule of law can be, and should be. And so this sort of really striking disjuncture between the two conversations has driven a lot of my work, especially recently, and especially reflecting even on the United States, I think that we can see how domestic rule of law struggles - which we absolutely have, I mean, look at the Trump administration, frankly, as revolving around this conflict between focusing on economics and focusing on human rights and human wellbeing.Tobi; It's interesting the polarization you're talking about. And one way that I also see it play out is [that] analyst or other stakeholders who participate in the process of nation-building in Africa, in Nigeria… a lot of us that care about development and would like to see our countries grow and develop and become rich, are often at opposite ends with other people in the civil society who are advocating for human rights, who are advocating for gender equality, who are advocating for so many other social justice issues. And it always seems like there's no meeting ground, you know, between those set of views, and I believe it does not have to be so. So one thing I'm going to draw you into quite early is one of the distinctions you made in so many of your papers and even your book is the difference between the conception of the rule of law that you are proposing versus the generally accepted notion of the rule of law based on individual liberty in the classical liberal tradition. I also think that's part of the problem, because talking about individual liberty comes with this heavy ideological connotation, and giving so many things that have happened in Africa with colonialism and so many other things, nobody wants any of that, you know. So you are proposing a conception of the rule of law that is based on equality. Tell me, how does that contrast with this popularly accepted notion of the rule of law [which is] based on individual liberty?Paul; So I think the way to think about it is to start with the notion of the long term stability of a rule of law system. And so here is one thing that I propose as a fact about legal orders. Ultimately, any kind of stable legal order that can control the powerful, that is, that can say to a top-level political leader, or a powerful multinational corporation, or whomever, no, you can't do this, this violates the law and make that statement stick depends on widespread collective mobilization, if only as a threat, right. And so it's kind of an analytic proposition about the nature of power, right? If you've got a top-level political leader who's in command of an army, and they want to do something illegal, it's going to require very broad-based opposition, and hence very broad-based commitment to the idea of leaders that follow the law in order to prevent the person in charge of an army from just casually violating it whenever they want. Okay, accept that as true, what follows from that? Well, what follows from that is that the legal system has to actually be compatible with the basic interests of all. And what that tends to mean and I think this is true, both historically, and theoretically, is leaving aside the philosophical conceptual difference between liberty and equality, which I'm not sure is really all that important. Like I think, ultimately, liberty and equality as moral ideas tend to blur together when you really unpack them. But practically speaking, any stable legal order that can control the powerful has to be compatible with the interests of a broad-based group of the human beings who participate in that legal order. And what that entails is favouring a way of thinking about the rule of law that focuses on being able to recruit the interests of even the worst off. In other words, one that's focused on equality, one that's focused on protecting the interests of the less powerful rather than a laissez-faire libertarian conception of the rule of law that tends to be historically speaking, compatible with substantial amounts of economic inequality, hyper-focus on ideas - like property rights, that support the long-standing interests of those who happen to be at the top of the economy, often against the interests of those that happened to be at the bottom of the economy, right. That's simply not a legal order that is sustainable in the long run. Lately, I've been thinking a lot about the way that this has played out in [the] United States history, in particular. I might have a book that's coming out in December that focuses on a historical account of the development of the rule of law, particularly in the United States. I mean, it's my own country. And so at some point, I had to get talked into writing that book. And we can see that in our history right at the get-go, you know, in the United States, at the very beginning, the rule of law dialogue tended to be focused on protecting the interests of wealthy elite property holders. And this actually played a major part, for example, in the United States' most grievous struggle, namely the struggle over slavery, because slaveholders really relied on this conception of the Rule of Law focusing on individual freedom and property rights to insist on a right to keep holding slaves against the more egalitarian idea that “hey, wait a minute, the enslaved have a right to be participants in the legal system as well.” And so we can see these two different conceptions of legality breaking the United States and breaking the idea of legal order in the United States right at the get-go. And we see this in country after country after country. You know, another example is Pinochet's Chile, which was the victim of [the] United States' economics focused rule of law promotion efforts that favoured the interests of property holders under this libertarian conception over the interests of ordinary citizens, democracy and mass interests. In other words, over the egalitarian conception, and again, you know, devolved into authoritarianism and chaos.Tobi; Yeah, nice bit of history there, but dialling all the way, if you'll indulge me... dialling all the way to the present, or maybe the recent past, of course; where I see another relevance and tension is development, and its geopolitical significance and the modernization projects that a lot of developed countries have done in so many poor and violent nations, you know, around the world. I mean, at the time when Africa decolonized, you know, a lot of the countries gravitated towards the communist bloc, socialism [and] that process was shunted, failed, you know, there was a wave of military coups all over the continent, and it was a really dark period.But what you see is that a lot of these countries, Nigeria, for example, democratized in 1999, a lot of other countries either before then or after followed suit. And what you see is, almost all of them go for American-style federal system, and American-style constitutional democracy, you know. And how that tradition evolved... I mean, there's a lot you can explain and unpack here... how that tradition evolved, we are told is the law has a responsibility to treat people as individuals. But you also find that these are societies where group identities are very, very strong, you know, and what you get are constitutions that are weakly enforced, impractical, and a society that is perpetually in struggle. I mean, you have a constitution, you have rules, and you have a government that openly disregards them, because the constitutional tradition is so divorced from how a lot of our societies evolve. And what I see you doing in your work is that if we divorce the rule of law from the ideal society, you know [like] some societies that we look up to, then we can come up with a set of practical propositions that the rule of law should fulfil, so walk me through how you resolve these tensions and your propositions?Paul; Well, so it's exactly what you just said, right? I mean, we have to focus on actual existing societies and the actual way that people organize their lives, right. And so here's the issue is, just like I said a minute ago, the rule of law fundamentally depends on people. And when I say people, I don't just mean elites. I don't just mean the wealthy, I don't just mean the people in charge of armies, and the people in charge of courthouses, right? Like the rule of law depends, number one, on people acting collectively to hold the powerful to the law. And number two, on people using the institutions that we say are associated with the rule of law. And so just as you describe, one sort of really common failure condition for international rule of law development efforts - and I don't think that this is a matter of sort of recipient countries admiring countries like the US, I think this is a matter of international organizations and countries like the US having in their heads a model of what the law looks like and sort of pressing it on recipient countries.But you know, when you build institutions that don't really resemble how the people in a country actually organize their social, political and legal lives, you shouldn't be surprised when nobody uses them. You shouldn't be surprised when they're ineffective. But I mean, I think that it's been fairly compared to a kind of second-generation colonialism in that sense where countries like the US and like Germany, attempt to export their legal institutions to other countries, without attending to the ways that the people in those countries already have social and legal resources to run their lives. And so I'll give you an example that's interesting from Afghanistan. So in Afghanistan, sort of post the 2000s invasion, and so forth, some researchers, mostly affiliated with the Carnegie Institution, found that the really effective rule of law innovations, the really effective interventions were ones that relied on existing social groups and existing structures of traditional authority. And so, you know, you could build a courthouse and like, ask a formal centralized state to do something, maybe it would work, maybe it wouldn't, maybe people would use it, maybe they wouldn't. But if you took local community leaders, local religious leaders, gave them training, and how to use the social capital they already have to help do things like adjudicate disputes, well, those would actually be effective, because they fit into the existing social organization that already exists. So I'll give you another example. I have a student who... I had… I just graduated an S.J.D student from Uganda who wrote a dissertation on corruption in Uganda. And one of the things that he advocated for I think, really sensibly was, “ okay, we've got this centralized government, but we've also got all of these traditional kingdoms, and the traditional kingdoms, they're actually a lot more legitimate in the sociological sense than the centralized government.People trust the traditional kingdoms, people rely on the traditional kingdoms for services, for integrating themselves into their society. And so one useful way of thinking about anti-corruption reforms is to try and empower the traditional kingdoms that already have legitimacy so that they can check the centralized government. And so that kind of work, I think, is where we have real potential to do global rule of law development without just creating carbon copies of the United States. Tobi; The process you describe, I will say, as promising as it may sound, what I want to ask you is how then do you ensure that a lot of these traditional institutions that can be empowered to provide reasonable checks to the power of the central government also fulfil the conditions of equality in their relation to the general public? Because even historically, a lot of these institutions are quite hierarchical...Paul; Oh, yeah... and I think in particular, women's rights are a big problem.Tobi; Yeah, yeah and there's a lot of abuses that go on locally, even within those communities, you know. We have traditional monarchies who exercise blanket rights over land ownership, over people's wives, over so many things, you know, so how then does this condition of equality transmit across the system?Paul; Yeah, no, I think that's the really hard question. I tell you right now that part of the answer is that those are not end-state processes. By this I mean that any realistic conception of how we can actually build effective rule of law institutions, but also genuinely incorporate everyone's interests in a society is going to accept that there's going to be a kind of dynamic tension between institutions.You know, sometimes we're going to have to use the centralized state to check traditional institutions. Sometimes we're going to have to use traditional institutions to check the centralized state. Elinor Ostrom, Nobel Prize-winning political scientist and her sort of the Bloomington School of Political Economy, emphasized for many years this idea that they called Polycentrism. That is the idea that multiple, overlapping governance organizations that are sort of forced to negotiate with one another, and forced to learn from one another, and really integrate with one another in this sort of complex tension-filled kind of way, actually turns out to be a really effective method of achieving what we might call good governance. And part of the reason is because they give a lot of different people, in different levels of [the] organization, ways to challenge one another, ways to demand inclusion in this decision, and let somebody else handle that decision, and participate jointly in this other decision. And so I think that neither the centralized state alone, nor traditional institutions alone is going to be able to achieve these goals. But I think efforts to integrate them have some promise. And India has done a lot of work, you know, sort of mixed record of success, perhaps, but has done a lot of work in these lines. I think, for example, of many of the ways that India has tried to promote the growth of Panchayats, of local councils in decision making, including in law enforcement, but at the same time, has tried to do things like promote an even mandate, the inclusion of women, the inclusion of Scheduled Castes, you know, the inclusion of the traditionally subordinated in these decision making processes. And as I said, they haven't had complete success. But it's an example of a way that the centralized state can both support traditional institutions while pushing those institutions to be more egalitarian.Tobi; Let's delve into the three conditions that you identified in your work, which any rule of law state should fulfil. And that is regularity, publicity, and generality. Kindly unpack those three for me.Paul; Absolutely. So regularity is...we can think of it as just the basic rule of law idea, right? Like the government obeys the law. And so if you think about this notion of regularity, it's... do we have a situation where the powerful are actually bound by legal rules? Or do we have a situation where, you know, they just do whatever they want? And so I'd say that, you know, there's no state that even counts as a rule of law state in the basic level without satisfying that condition, at least to some reasonable degree. The idea of publicity really draws on a lot of what I've already been saying about the recruitment of broad participation in the law. That is, when I say publicity, what I mean is that in addition to just officials being bound by the law, ordinary people have to be able to make use of the law in at least two senses. One, they have to be able to make use of the law to defend themselves. I call this the individualistic side of publicity, right? Like if some police officer wants to lock you up, the decision on whether or not you violated the law has to respond to your advocacy, and your ability to defend yourself in some sense. And then there's also the collective side of this idea of publicity, which is that the community as a whole has to be able to collectively enforce the boundaries of the legal system. And you know, we'd talk a lot more about that, I think that's really the most important idea. And then the third idea of generality is really the heart of the egalitarian idea that we've been talking about, which is that the law has to actually treat people as equals. And one thing that I think is really important about the way that I think about these three principles is that they're actually really tightly integrated. By tightly integrated, I mean you're only going to get in real-world states, regularity (that is, officials bound by the law) if you have publicity (that is, if you have people who aren't officials who actually can participate in the legal system and can hold officials to the law). We need the people to hold the officials in line. You're only going to get publicity if you have generality. That is, the people are only going to be motivated to use the legal system and to defend the legal system if the legal system actually treats them as equals. And so you really need publicity to have stable regularity, you really need generality to have stable publicity.Tobi; Speaking of regularity, when you say what constrains the coercive power of the state is when it is authorised by good faith and reasonable interpretation of pre-existing reasonably specific rules. That sounds very specific. And it's also Scalonian in a way, but a lot of people might quibble a bit about what is reasonable, you know, it sounds vague, right? So how would you condition or define reasonable in this sense, and I know you talked about hubris when you were talking about publicity. But is there a minimum level of responsibility for reasonability on the part of the citizen in relation to a state?Paul; That's, in a lot of ways, the really hard philosophical question, because one of the things that we know about law is that it is inherently filled with disagreement, right? Like our experience of the legal system and of every state that actually has something like the rule of law is that people radically disagree about the legal propriety of actions of the government. And so in some sense, this idea of reasonableness is kind of a cop-out. But it's a cop-out that is absolutely necessary, because there's no, you know, what [Thomas] Nagel called a view from nowhere. There's no view from nowhere from which we can evaluate whether or not on a day to day basis, officials are actually complying with the law in some kind of correct sense. But again, I think, you know, as you said, to some extent, that implies that some of the responsibility for evaluating this reasonableness criterion falls down to day to day politics, falls down to the judgment of ordinary citizens. Like, my conception of the rule of law is kind of sneakily a deeply democratic conception, because it recognizes given the existence of uncertainty as to what the law actually requires of officials both on a case by case basis. And, broadly speaking, the only way that we're ever going to be able to say, Well, you know, officials are more or less operating within a reasonable conception of what their legal responsibilities are, is if we empower the public at large to make these judgments. If we have institutions like here in the US, our jury trials, if we have an underlying backstop of civil society and politics, that is actively scrutinizing and questioning official action.Tobi; So speaking of publicity, which is my favorite...I have to say...Paul; Mine too. You could probably tell. Tobi; Because I think that therein lies the power of the state to get away with abusive use of its legitimacy, or its power, so to speak. When you say that officials have a responsibility to explain their application of the law, and a failure to do so commits hubris and terror against the public. So those two situations - hubris and terror, can you explain those to me a bit?Paul; Yeah. So these are really, sort of, moral philosophy ideas at heart, particularly hubris. The idea is there's a big difference, even if I have authority over you, between my exercising that authority in the form of commands and my exercising that authority in the form of a conversation that appeals to your reasoning capacity, right. So these days, I'm thinking about it in part with reference to... I'm going to go very philosophical with you here... but in reference to Kant's humanity formulation of the categorical imperative, sorry. But that is a sense in which if I'm making decisions about your conduct, and your life and, you know, affecting your fundamental interests, that when I express the reasons to you for those decisions, and when I genuinely listen to the reasons that you offer, and genuinely take those into account in my decision making process, I'm showing a kind of respect for you, which is consistent with the idea of a society of equals.As opposed to just hi, I'm wiser than you, and so my decision is, you know, you go this way, you violated the law, right? Are we a military commander? Or are we a judge? Both the military commander and the judge exercise authority, but they do so in very different ways. One is hierarchical, the other I would contend is not.Tobi; Still talking about publicity here, and why I love it so much is one important, should I say… a distinction you made quite early in your book is that the rule of law regulates the action of the state, in relation to its citizens.Paul; Yes.Tobi; Often and I would count myself among people who have been confused by that point as saying that the rule of law regulates the action of the society in general. I have never thought to make that distinction. And it's important because often you see that maybe when dealing with civil disobedience, or some kind of action that the government finds disruptive to its interests, or its preferences, the rule of law is often invoked as a way for governments to use sometimes without discretion, its enforcement powers, you know.So please explain further this distinction between the rule of law regulating the state-citizen relation versus the general law and order in the society. I mean, you get this from Trump, you get this from so many other people who say, Oh, we are a law and order society, I'm a rule of law candidate.Paul; Oh, yeah.Tobi; You cannot do this, you cannot do that. We cannot encourage the breakdown of law and order in the society. So, explain this difference to me.Paul; Absolutely, then this is probably the most controversial part of my account of the rule of law. I think everybody disagrees with this. I sort of want to start by talking about how I got to this view. And I think I really got to this view by reflecting on the civil rights movement in the United States in particular, right. Because, you know, what we would so often see, just as you say about all of these other contexts, is we would see officials, we would see judges - I mean, there are, you know, Supreme Court cases where supreme court justices that are normally relatively liberal and sympathetic, like, you know, Justice Hugo Black scolding Martin Luther King for engaging in civil disobedience on the idea that it threatens the rule of law. It turns out, and this is something that I go into in the book that's coming out in December... it turns out that King actually had a sophisticated theory of when it was appropriate to engage in civil disobedience and when it wasn't. But for me, reflecting on that conflict in particular, and reflecting on the fact that the same people who were scolding peaceful lunch-counter-sit-ins for threatening the rule of law and, you know, causing society to descend into chaos and undermining property rights and all the rest of that nonsense, were also standing by and watching as southern governors sent police in to beat and gas and fire hose and set dogs on peaceful protests in this sort of completely new set of like, totally unbounded explosions of state violence. And so it seems to me sort of intuitively, like these can't be the same problem, right, like ordinary citizens, doing sit-ins, even if they're illegal, even if we might have some reason to criticize them, it can't be the same reason that we have to criticize Bull Connor for having the cops beat people. And part of the reason that that's the case, and this is what I call the Hobbesian property in the introduction to the rule of law in the real world...part of the reason is just the reality of what states are, right? Like, protesters don't have tanks and police dogs, and fire hoses, right? Protesters typically don't have armies. If they do, then we're in a civil war situation, not a rule of law situation, the state does have all of those things. And so one of the features of the state that makes it the most appropriate site for this talk about the rule of law is this the state has, I mean, most modern states have, at least on a case by case basis, overwhelming power. And so we have distinct moral reasons to control overwhelming power than we do to control a little bit of legal disobedience, right, like overwhelming power is overwhelming. It's something that has a different moral importance for its control. Then the second idea is at the same time what I call the [...] property... is the state makes claims about its use of power, right? Like ordinary people, when they obey the law or violate the law, they don't necessarily do so with reference to a set of ideas that they're propagating about their relationship to other people. Whereas when modern states send troops in to beat people up, in a way what they're doing is they're saying that they're doing so in all of our names, right, particularly, but not exclusively in democratic governments. There's a way in which the state represents itself as acting on behalf of the political community at large. And so it makes sense to have a distinctive normative principle to regulate that kind of power.Tobi; I know you sort of sidestepped this in the book, and maybe it doesn't really fit with your overall argument. But I'm going to push you on that topic a bit. So how does the rule of law state as a matter of institutional design then handles... I know you said that there are separate principles that can be developed for guiding citizen actions, you know...Paul; Yes. Tobi; I mean, let's be clear that you are not saying that people are free to act however they want.Paul; I'm not advocating anarchy.Tobi; Exactly. So how does the rule of law state then handle citizens disagreements or conflicting interests around issues of social order? And I'll give you an example. I mentioned right at the beginning of our conversation what happened in Nigeria in October 2020. There's a unit of the police force that was created to handle violent crimes. Needless to say that they went way beyond their remit and became a very notoriously abusive unit of the police force. Picking up people randomly, lock them up, extort them for money. And there was a situation where a young man was murdered, and his car stolen by this same unit of the police force and young people all over the country, from Lagos to Port Harcourt to Abuja, everywhere, felt we've had enough, right, and everybody came out in protest. It was very, very peaceful, I'd say, until other interests, you know, infiltrated that action. Paul; Right. Tobi; But what I noticed quite early in that process was that even within the spirits of that protests, there were disagreements between citizens - protesters blocking roads, you know, versus people who feel well, your protest should not stop me from going to work, you know, and so many other actions by the protesters that other people with, maybe not conflicting interests, but who have other opinions about strategy or process feel well, this is not right. This is not how to do this. This is not how you do this, you know, and I see that that sort of provided the loophole, I should say, for the government to then move in and take a ruthlessly violent action. You know, there was a popular tollgate in Lagos in the richest neighbourhood in Lagos that was blocked for 10 days by the protesters. And I mean, after this, the army basically moved in and shot people to death. Today, you still see people who would say, Oh, well, that's tragic. But should these people have been blocking other people from going about their daily business? So how does the rule of law regulate issues of social order vis-a-vis conflict of interest?Paul; So I think this is actually a point in favour of my stark distinction between state action and social action as appropriate for thinking about the rule of law. Because when you say that the state used...what I still fundamentally think of as like minor civil disobedience...so, like blocking some roads, big deal! Protesters block roads all the time, right, like protesters have blocked roads throughout human history, you know, like, sometimes it goes big, right? Like they love blocking roads in the French Revolution. But oftentimes, it's just blocking... so I blocked roads.I participated in, you know, some protests in the early 2000s. I participated in blocking roads in DC, right, like, fundamentally "big deal!" is the answer that the state ought to give. And so by saying to each other and to the government, when we talk about the rule of law, we mean, the state's power has to be controlled by the law, I think that gives us a language to say... even though people are engaging in illegal things, the state still has to follow legal process in dealing with it, right.The state still has to use only the level of force allowed by the law to arrest people. The state can't just send in the army to shoot people. And the principle that we appeal to is this principle of the rule of law. Yeah, maintaining the distinction between lawbreaking by ordinary people and law-breaking by the state helps us understand why the state shouldn't be allowed to just send in troops whenever people engage in a little bit of minor lawbreaking and protests.Tobi; So how does the law... I mean, we are entering a bit of a different territory, how does the law in your conception handles what... well, maybe these are fancy definitions, but what some people will call extraordinary circumstances. Like protests with political interests? Maybe protesters that are funded and motivated to unseat an incumbent government? Or in terrorism, you know, where you often have situations where there are no laws on paper to deal with these sort of extraordinary situations, you know, and they can be extremely violent, they can be extremely strange, they're usually things that so many societies are not equipped to handle. So how should the rule of law regulate the action of the state in such extraordinary circumstances?Paul; Yeah, so this is the deep problem of the rule of law, you know, this is why people still read Carl Schmitt, right, because Carl Schmitt's whole account of executive power basically is, hey, wait a minute emergencies happen, and when emergencies happen, liberal legal ideas like the rule of law dropout, and so fundamentally, you just have like raw sovereignty. And that means that the state just kind of does what it must. Right. So here's what I feel about Schmitt. One is, maybe sometimes that's true, right? And again, I think about the US context, because I'm an American and you know, I have my own history, right? And so in the US context, I think, again, about, Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, right.Like Abraham Lincoln broke all kinds of laws in the Civil War. Like today, we'd call some of the things that he did basically assuming dictatorial power in some respects. I mean, he did that in the greatest emergency that the country had ever faced and has ever faced since then. And he did it in a civil war. And sometimes that happens, and I think practically speaking, legal institutions have a habit of not standing in the way in truly dire situations like that. But, and here's why I want to push back against Carl Schmitt... but what a legal order can then do is after the emergency has passed...number one, the legal order can be a source of pressure for demanding and accounting of when the emergency has passed, right. And so again, I think of the United States War on Terror, you know, we still have people in United States' custody imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay.September 11 2001, was almost 20 years ago. It's actually 20 years ago and a month, and we still have people locked up in Guantanamo Bay. That's insane. That's completely unjustifiable. And one of the jobs of the legal system is to pressure the executive to say, okay, buddy, is the emergency over yet? No, really, we think that the emergency is over yet. I want reasons, right, publicity again, I want an explanation from you of why you think the emergency is still ongoing. And the legal system can force the executive to be accountable for the claim that the emergency is still ongoing. That's number one. Number two is that law tends to be really good at retroactively, sort of, retrofitting things into legal order, right. And so again, I think about the Civil War. You know, after the US Civil War, lots of civil wars, sorry. American-centric person trying to fight against it. But after the US Civil War, you know, the courts took a pause. And then we have a lot of cases where they took a lot of the things that Lincoln did, they said, okay, some of them at least were illegal, some of them were legal, but only under very specific circumstances. And so they actually built legal doctrine that took into account the emergency that Lincoln faced, and then later wars, such as in the Second World War, the courts took the lessons from the experience in the American Civil War, and used that to impose more constraints. So to bring it about that the emergency actions that Franklin Roosevelt took in the Second World War weren't completely sui generis, sort of like right acts of sovereignty, but were regulated by legal rules created during the Civil War, and after the Civil War. And again, they weren't perfect, right? You know, during the Second World War, the United States interned Japanese Americans, you know, again, sort of completely lawless, completely unjustifiable, but you know, it's an ongoing process. The point is that the legal system is always... the law is always reactive in emergencies. But the reactive character of the law can nonetheless be used as a way to control and channel sovereign power, even in these sort of Schmittian emergency situations.Tobi; So two related questions, your work is interdisciplinary, because you try to blend a lot of social science into legal philosophy. But speaking of legal order and your primary profession, I mean.. for the sake of the audience parties into a lot of other cool stuff, I'm going to be putting up his website in the show notes. But speaking of legal order, and the legal profession, why is so much of the legal profession fascinated with what I would say the rule by law, as opposed to the rule of law. A lot of what you get from lawyers, even some law professors in some situations is [that] the law is the law, and you have to obey it. And even if you are going to question it, however unjustified it may seem, you still have to follow some processes that maybe for ordinary citizens are not so accessible or extremely costly, you know, which I think violate regularity, right, the way you talk about it retrospective legislation, and so many other things. So why is the legal profession so fascinated with the law, as opposed to justification for the law?Paul; Yeah, I think that question kind of answers itself, right. It's unfortunate... I mean, it's sort of natural but it's unfortunate that the people who most influence our dialogue about the way that we, you know, live in [the] society together with a state, namely by organizing ourselves with law happen to be people who are the specialists who find it easiest, right? And so I think the simple answer is right on this one, at least in countries like the United States, I'm not sure how true this is in other countries. But in the United States, the domination of legal discourse by lawyers necessarily means that the sort of real practical, real-world ways in which ordinary people find interacting with anything legal to be difficult, oppressive, or both just aren't in view, right? This is hard for them to understand.But I think in the US, one of the distortions that we've had is that we have an extremely hierarchical legal profession, right. So we have very elite law schools, and those very elite law schools - one of which I teach at - tend to predominantly produce lawyers who primarily work for wealthy corporations and sort of secondarily work for the government. Those lawyers tend to be the ones that end up at the top of the judiciary, that end up in influential positions in academia, that end up, you know, in Congress. The lawyers that, you know, see poor people, see people of subordinated minority groups and see the very different kinds of interactions with the legal system that people who are worse off have, that see the way that the law presents itself, not as a thing that you can use autonomously to structure your own life. But as a kind of external imposition, that sort of shows up and occasionally inflicts harm on you. Those lawyers aren't the ones who end up in our corridors of power. And it's very unfortunate, it's a consequence of the hierarchical nature of, at least in the US, our legal profession. And I suspect it's similar in these other countries as well.Tobi; In your opinion, what's the... dare I say the sacrosanct and objective - those are rigid conditions sorry - expression of the rule of law? The current general conception of the rule accedes to the primacy of the Constitution, right. I've often found that problematic because in some countries you find constitutional provisions that are egregious, and in other cases, you find lawyers going into court to challenge certain actions that they deem unjust, or that are truly unjust on the basis of the same constitution. Right. So what do you think is the most practical expression of the rule of law? Is it written laws? Is it the opinion of the judges? Is it how officials hold themselves accountable? What's the answer?Paul; So I think I'm gonna like sort of twist this a little bit and interpret that question is like, how do you know the extent to which the rule of law exists in a particular place? And my answer is, can ordinary people look officials in the eye, right, you know... if you're walking down the street, and you see a police officer, you know, are you afraid? Or can you walk past them and confidently know you're doing nothing wrong so there's nothing really effectively but they can do to you, right? If you're called in to deal with some kind of bureaucratic problem, like the tax office, can you trust that you exist in a relationship of respect? You know, can you trust that when you show them, actually here are my receipts, I really did have that expense, that that's going to be taken seriously? You know, if people, everybody, feels like they can stand tall, and look government officials in the eye, then to that extent, I think that the rule of law exists in a society.Tobi; Final question, what's the coolest idea you're working on right now?Paul; Oh, gosh. So like I said, I've got two books under contract right now. The first book is a history/theoretical constitutional law account of the development and existing state of the rule of law in the United States. The second book, which I'm more excited about, because it's the one that I plan to write this year, but it's also a lot harder, is I'm trying to take some of the governance design ideas that we see from the notion of rule of law development, and others such as governance development things and apply them to Private Internet platforms, right? Like, basically to Facebook. Um, I was actually involved in some of the work, not at a super high level, but I was involved in some of the work in designing or doing the research for designing Facebook's oversight board. And I'm kind of trying to expand on some of those ideas and think about, you know, if we really believe that private companies, especially in these internet platforms are doing governance right now, can we take lessons from how the rest of the world and how actual governments and actual states have developed techniques of governing behaviour in highly networked, large scale super-diverse environments and use those lessons in the private context? Maybe we can maybe we can't I'm not sure yet. Hopefully, by the time I finish the book, I'll know.Tobi; That's interesting. And I'll ask you this, a similar, I'll say a related situation is currently happening in Nigeria right now, where the President's Twitter handle or username, tweeted something that sounded like a thinly veiled threat to a particular ethnic group. And lots of people who disagreed with that tweet reported the tweet, and Twitter ended up deleting the tweet in question, which high-level officials in Nigeria found extremely offensive, and going as far as to assert their sovereign rights over Twitter and say, well, it may be your platform, but it is our country and we are banning you. How would you adjudicate such a situation? I mean, there's the question of banning Donald Trump from the platform and so many other things that have come up.Paul; Yeah, I mean, it's hard, right? So there are no easy answers to these kinds of problems. I think, ultimately, what we have to do is we have to build more legitimate ways to make these decisions. I mean, here are two things that we cannot do, right?Number one is we can't just let government officials, especially when, you know, as with the Donald Trump example, and so many others, the government officials are the ones who are engaging in the terrible conduct make these decisions. Number two is we also just can't let a bunch of people sitting in the Bay Area in California make those decisions. Like, ultimately, this is on, you know, property in some abstracted sense of like the shareholders of these companies. But we cannot simply allow a bunch of people in San Francisco, in Menlo Park, and you know, Cupertino and Mountain View, and all of those other little tech industry cities that have no understanding of local context to make the final decisions here. And so what we need to do is we need to build more robust institutions to include both global and local and affected countries, grassroots participation, in making these decisions. And I'm trying to sort of sketch out what the design for those might look like. But, you know, talk to me in about a year. And hopefully, I'll have a book for you that will actually have a sketch.Tobi; You bet I'm going to hold you to that. So, a year from now. So still on the question of ideas, because the show is about ideas. What's the one idea you'd like to see spread everywhere?Paul; Oh, gosh, you should have warned me in advance... that... I'm going to go back to what I said at the very beginning about the rule of law. Like I think that the rule of law depends on people, right? Like there is no such thing as the rule of law without a society and a legal system that genuinely is equal and advantageous to ordinary people enough to be the kind of thing that people actually support. Like ordinary people... if you cannot recruit the support of ordinary people for your legal political and social system, you cannot have the rule of law. That's true whether you're a developing country, that's true whether you're the United States, right. Like I think, you know, part of the reason that we got Donald Trump in the United States, I think, is because our legal system and with it our economy, and all the rest are so unequal in this country, that ordinary voters in the United States didn't see any reason to preserve it. Right and so when this lunatic and I mean, I'm just going to be quite frank here and say Donald Trump is a complete lunatic, right... when this lunatic is running for office who shows total disregard for existing institutions, like complete willingness to casually break the law. An electorate that actually was full of people who felt (themselves) treated respectfully and protected and supported by our legal and political institutions would have sent that guy packing in a heartbeat. But because the American people don't have that experience right now, I think that's what made us vulnerable to somebody like Donald Trump.Tobi; Thank you so much, Paul. It's been so fascinating talking to you.Paul; Thank you. This has been a lot of fun. Yeah, I'm happy to come back in a year when I've got the platform thing done.Tobi; Yeah, I'm so looking forward to that. This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at www.ideasuntrapped.com/subscribe

EQ for Entrepreneurs
#182: The Power of a Coach. How Could a Coach Unlock Your Potential.

EQ for Entrepreneurs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:35


Free Course at eqgangster.com   EQ Mafia Opening Soon!    Have you ever had a coach?    When?    For how long?   Do a COACHING AUDIT    What was the impactful coach you've ever had?   What impact did they have on you?   What lessons did you learn from them?   Why were they so impactful for you?   Do you currently have a coach?    Why?   Why not?    Do you feel you're operating at your max potential?    If not, why wouldn't you seek out a coach?   Do the top business people & athletes & artists in the world have coaches?    I would argue they all do.   Why not you?   What would you be willing to pay for a coach?    Why would you want a coach?    What impact could a coach have in your life?    What areas of your life would you want to work on?    How serious are you about growing & changing?    Find a coach.   Shop around.   The difference between where you're at & where you want to be could be a coach that could help unlock areas within you that could take you to the next level of your life.   For me…as a coach, I view myself as a miner of precious gems & hidden treasure.   Every client / leader of mine that I coach it is a privilege to help them discover & refine their gifts, strengths, passions & superpowers.    You may be the next Einstein or Harriet Tubman or Rosa Parks or Elon Musk or Pablo Picasso or Martin Luther King Jr. or Beethoven.    A coach could help you discover the hidden treasure in your life that you are meant to bring to the world to make it & leave it a better place. They could help you discover your purpose. What would that be worth to you? What value would you place on that?    I've had coaches throughout my life. Some have been amazing & life changing. Others have taught me what kind of leader I don't want to be. Both are valuable.   How do coaches pull out your hidden treasure?    Powerful, effective, insightful questions that challenge you to view yourself through a different lens & challenge you to do some deep reflection & digging.   One of the other powerful benefits of a coach is that it forces you to invest in yourself for an undistracted period of time—30min, an hour, 1.5 hrs.   When is the last time you've done that?    Genuinely taken an hour every week or month to reflect & think deeply about your gifts, strengths & superpowers & how you can be even more impactful?   You are worth the investment in yourself.    Find a coach that can help you reach your full potential.   The world's greatest have coaches. Why not you? You have greatness w/in you.   EQ MAFIA & Free EQ101 Course, visit eqgangster.com

Business Bros
Artificial Intelligence To Match Entrepreneurs with Jay Fiset

Business Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:25


829 Jay Fiset is a best selling author, student of human nature, avid outdoorsman at 5 star hotels, speaks fluent smart ass, can see and reflect your life mission in 5 minutes flat, loves having 2 sons so he can play with their toys, still fantasizes about his wife after 25 years, loves ideas, but loves results even more, can simultaneously laugh and cry for different reasons at the same time, has never been star struck (but he did not get a chance to meet Martin Luther King, and there would have been teenage girl screaming if he had). He is dedicated to facilitating great business relationships and supporting people to organize their life and resources around their passions and gifts. Click below to find out how you can partner with Jay. ________ Want your customers to talk about you to their friends and family? That's what we do! We get your customers to talk about you so that you get more referrals with video testimonials. Go to www.BusinessBros.biz to be a guest on the show or to find out more on how we can help you get more customers! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/businessbrospod/support

New Dimensions
Our Personal Invitation to Heal America's Racial Karma - Larry Ward, Ph.D.- ND3738

New Dimensions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 57:20


This moment in our social history compels us to invite ourselves into a path of discovery, learning, and practices to transform our collective racist karma. As a Black man residing in America, Larry Ward says to those who say, “I am not racist” …We are invited to dismantle the systems that perpetuate that profound misperception of what it means to be human. The assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. was the catalyst that sparked Larry Ward's journey into a life of planetary peacemaking. He's been subjected to racial profiling and has experienced a bombing in his home in Idaho. He was able to move past these traumas when his path led him to the introduction of Buddhist practice in Calcutta in 1977. When he met Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh in 1991, the practice of Buddhism became truly central to his life. He was ordained as a Dharma teacher in Plum Village in 2000 and is the co-founder of the Lotus Institute, which offers Buddhist practice for change makers on the journey of individual and collective liberation.Larry Ward, Ph.D. is the author of America's Racial Karma, And Invitation to Heal (Parallax Press 2020) Interview Date: 7/31/2021  Tags: MP3, Larry Ward, racialized consciousness, karma, karmic wheel, intention, George Floyd, grief, injustice, racism, Social Change/Politics, Buddhism, History

Art Beauty Equilibrium
Ep80 Nick Cannon's on making babies, Lox vs Dipset, No More MLK, and What do you Bring to the table?

Art Beauty Equilibrium

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 31:02


Live Tuesday August 10, 2021 @ 8:30 AM Podcast broadcasting live with G, Shima, J, and Lynden. Every Tuesdays @ 8:30 AM PT Copyright, Liability Waiver and Disclaimers. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act, without the prior express written consent of Art Beauty Equilibrium, LLC. While we and all other persons associated directly or indirectly with this site and video use their best efforts in preparing the content for this site, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the content of the videos, including any content, links or resources shared, including those by third parties. Furthermore, all parties specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. No legal advice is being given herein. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. No liability or damages shall take place because of this content. Furthermore, your use of this site and watching these videos confirms your agreement that California law applies to all disputes relating to this site and videos and, venue for all claims and disputes relating to this site and videos shall be in Los Angeles County, California. #ABEPODCAST​​​​​​​​ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/artbeautyequilibrium/support

What's On Your Mind?
901OTM: Memphis Voices for Palestine with Dania Helou

What's On Your Mind?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 26:06


Dania Helou is a Memphis-based life-long Palestinian American activist and co-founder of Memphis Voices for Palestine. She believes it is important to speak out as it pertains to the intersectional liberation and equality of various marginalized peoples as a means to carry-fourth and honor MLK's legacy. Dania recommends @letstalkpalestine for those who want to learn more about this topic and email memphisvoicesforpalestine@gmail.com and follow them on IG (@memphisvoicesforpalestine) and Facebook. The premise of 901 On The Mind, the newest subseries of the What's On Your Mind podcast (@whatsonyourmindpodcast), is to highlight local Memphis-based stories: the history of this city, the people, the spirit, and the grit and grind of who we are. These episodes are hosted by Jani (@janirad.me) and filmed live and on-site in Downtown Memphis at the Arcade Restaurant IG: @arcaderestaurant (Memphis' oldest Cafe, founded in 1919!) and are produced as Instagram Live IGTV episodes and podcast episodes. As always, thank you for the theme music @briank_williams28 BK Williams! . Become a monthly supporter of the show and stream episodes online at janirad.com/podcast.   Forza10 @forza10america has a top selection of premium gourmet science based wet and dry food for both dogs and cats designed to address just about every condition your pet might encounter. Join Oliver and Baahu on their Forza10 journey, and get $10 off your purchase with code JANI10 at checkout.   Jani Rad | Facilitator, Trainer, Speaker Podcaster Professional storyteller empowering others to tell their own story www.janirad.com IG: @janirad.me

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Want ads: Israel seeks new Jewish Agency chair

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 21:31


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Today's guests are diplomatic correspondent Lazar Berman and US reporter Jacob Magid, hosted by Jessica Steinberg. Berman discusses the possible candidates for Jewish Agency chairpeople, now that Intelligence Minister Elazar Stern's candidacy has been withdrawn. He fills us in on the politics of filling the position, and what's needed in this significant job that oversees the cross-section of the global Jewish community and Israel. Berman also speaks about Swedish foreign minister Ann Linde's visit to Israel, the first by a Swedish official in over a decade, as relations between the two countries have thawed in recent months. Magid tells the podcast about the recent visit of Israeli ambassador Gilad Erdan to the South Side of Chicago, where an Israel trauma model is being used to cope with gun violence. He discusses the motivation of the Israeli embassy to work on a grassroots level in the US, finding a way to connect to communities and minorities. Discussed articles include: Jewish Agency postpones vote for chairman after Stern scandal In decade's 1st Israel visit by a Swedish FM, Linde vows to combat antisemitism Enough of MLK and Heschel: Israel outreach in Chicago aims to form new narrative Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: View of the Jewish Agency headquarters in Jerusalem, November 29, 2016. (Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SAX IN THE MORNING
10-19-21: Show up, shut up and put up

SAX IN THE MORNING

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:36


There are lots of different kinds of leaders in life, but there's one type whose credibility doesn't even carry as far as their voice as they tell everyone how to live. I'm talking about the locker room lawyer. You all know this person, trying to pump people up with words backed with zero action. They lack the experience and knowledge to lead others yet try to do so anyway with boisterous speeches and high fives. Real leaders just show up, they shut up and they put up. If you listen closely when people are asked what makes a given person a good leader you will almost always hear them say something like “They lead by example. They just show up and work hard and show everyone how to get things done.” Obviously there are the rare spectacular leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. or Knute Rockne who combine their passion, knowledge and work ethic,  with unparalleled eloquence. But for the rest of us, the best way to be a great leader is to suit up and show up and say only what needs to be said. 

Weekly Motivation
CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONS

Weekly Motivation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:41


This episode is spoken by Ray Lewis, Rich Wilkerson Jr, Les Brown, Eric Thomas, Martin Luther King Jr. You can see more of Ray Lewis at tr.im/RayLewis, Rich Wilkerson Jr at tr.im/RichWilkersonJr, Les Brown at tr.im/LesBrown, Eric Thomas at tr.im/EricThomas, Martin Luther King Jr at tr.im/MartinLutherKingJr. The music is In The End by 2WEI. You can see more of 2WEI at tr.im/2WEI.

TrapNerds
Is MLK Salty We Sexing wHiTeS? (Ep. 196)

TrapNerds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 37:46


Song: Strip Club Shit - TrapNerds. Feat. Moehondis. Why aren't the Black Panthers as active anymore? Does your partner have to post you on social media? I'm not Ben Stiller, I don't wanna meet your parents. The wHiTeS stay exploiting Black culture. QOTW: Who's Your Favorite Athlete Wife, Girlfriend or Significant Other? Which Spice Girl was the best? Drake wrote Best I Ever Had about Teyana Taylor? A Rod vs Ben Affleck vs Diddy. Girls and guys have different opinions on what toxic is.

Mitchell Report Unleashed Podcast
Episode 316: SERIOUSLY, What's going on with DATING & RELATIONSHIPS? WITH Austin Dr. Julio Broughton

Mitchell Report Unleashed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 45:44


Austin Julio Broughton, also known as Dr. Julio, a nickname given to him by his high school peers, is an Award winning public speaker, Content Creator and Political Science major. Dr. Julio has traveled the U.S. delivering not only the sermons and speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but also his own talks on “The All Things Principle” which teaches people how to identify their “IT” factor which pushes them to become the best version of themselves.WE SMOKED THIS A WHOLE EPISODE CATERED TO YOU TO ACHIEVE THE RELATIONSHIP YOU WANT. THIS IS THE SELF DEVELOPMENT & SELF IMPROVEMENT POD.THE TIME STAMPS SPEAK FOR ITSELF.SEE YOU IN THE COMMENTS RESPECTFULLY :52: Why do you want to go one on one debate with Kevin Samuels? The imagine consultant, influencer and lifestyle coach? :2:45: In your personal views, why do you feel modern dating is so flawed in todays society? :6:24: We hear the term “high value man” in todays society, is high value a term we use when it comes to money status or do we have a jaded view when we hear that term? :20:21: Devils advocate time when it comes to posting THAT content online? :22:15: OnlyFans topic comes up buckle up for Dr.Julio responses to that one. :27:15: Why does GHOSTING HAPPEN in dating? Why does it happen a lot. Can we solve it? Dr.Julio dropped some gems and my rebuttal is major key. :35:12: Dr.Julio goes off.. :38:20: Masculine energy vs feminine energy why is it important in the right relationships. What do you feel woman can do differently to understand the dynamics about dating men in todays society? Why do you feel courting early in relationships is something that many men fail to do, but a lot of woman do not recognize. Masculine energy vs feminine energy why is it important in the right relationships. Why do you feel courting dead in relationships? Or is it something that many are scared to do now. Because of this social proof high status in social media? → CONNECT WITH AUSTIN JULIO BROUGHTON ←INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/thedr.julio/YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/AustinJBroughtonGOFUND ME: https://www.gofundme.com/f/drjulioaustinoffscript→ CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA ←INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/officially.rory/TWITTER: https://twitter.com/officiallyroryLINKEDIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mitchellrory/Website: https://www.rorymitchell.ca

Feast of Fun : Gay Talk Show
FOF #2989 - Matt Brown Takes on the Dave Chappelle Controversy

Feast of Fun : Gay Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 66:32


You've probably already heard about the controversy or even weighed in on Dave Chappelle's final comedy special for Netflix, The Closer, where the comedy legend spends most of the hour taking an irreverent and critical look at the collective struggle of LGBTQ folks.Despite being a comedy special everyone loves to hate, Chappelle does bring up some wonderful sex positive material like wondering what MLK Jr would have to say about glory holes. Unfortunately, Chapelle proclaims himself team TERF while perpetuating some harmful ideas about trans bodies and compares trans women's genitals to vegan burgers.The Closer is probably the longest set any comedian has ever spent talking on LGBTQ+ issues and is way more complicated than clickbait articles would have you believe.All controversy aside, we are puzzled that Dave Chappelle would align himself with the same regressive people he claimed were the reason why he abruptly walked away from a 50 million dollar paycheck when he quit his successful show on Comedy Central over 15 years ago.MATT BROWN: https://www.msbrowncomedy.com/GET YOUR FREE ONE YEAR DOT GAY DOMAIN: www.feastoffun.gayACCESS THOUSANDS OF LEGENDARY FEAST OF FUN SHOWS 
with NO ADS:https://feastoffun.com/plusToday comedian Matt Brown, Ms Brown if you're nasty, joins us to take a look at Dave Chappelle's comedy special “The Closer” and the surrounding controversy around his comments on LGBTQ plus folks and trans bodies.Plus-- Star Trek's William Shatner responds to his co-star's George Takei comments on him being unfit for spaceflight due to his age and weight. Oh my!

Fatherless Fathers Podcast
Martin Luther, The King Jr.

Fatherless Fathers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 33:36


Sean Moses returns to Fatherless Fathers Podcast to discuss his portrayal of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in my new book, “Sean Moses Is Martin Luther, The King Jr.” This book has been receiving rave reviews since its release in June 2021, including the following starred review from Kirkus Reviews: "A well-illustrated tale that's also a great pick to expand libraries' Black history sections."

Moonshots - Adventures in Innovation
Ryan Holiday: Courage Is Calling

Moonshots - Adventures in Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 56:41


Ryan Holiday's first book of an exciting new series on the virtues of ancient philosophy explores the most foundational virtue of all: Courage.In Courage Is Calling (buy on Amazon), Ryan Holiday breaks down the elements of fear, an expression of cowardice, the elements of courage, an expression of bravery, and lastly, the elements of heroism, an expression of valor. Through engaging stories about historic and contemporary leaders, including Charles De Gaulle, Florence Nightingale, and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, Holiday shows you how to conquer fear and practice courage in your daily life.In a world in which fear runs rampant—when people would rather stand on the sidelines than speak out against injustice, go along with convention than bet on themselves, and turn a blind eye to the realities of modern life—we need courage more than ever. 

Refuge Church Atlanta
Shame & Guilt - Be the Bridge

Refuge Church Atlanta

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 155:21


“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, “Letter...

The Glenn Beck Program
Ep 121 | 'Welcome to Anarchism, Glenn' | Michael Malice | The Glenn Beck Podcast

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 73:28


Buckle up, this one is a wild ride. Author of "The Anarchist Handbook" and podcast host of "Your Welcome" Michael Malice wants to burn it all down, peacefully and with a smile. “My rights are NOT up for discussion,” he tells Glenn. He explains why his version of America will save America. He and Glenn also discuss why corporate media is shrinking, why Boomers love Martin Luther King Jr., how Trump earned the spite vote, and why gun control is officially solved. But how does anarchism solve the China problem or potential nuclear threats? Somehow, he has the answer. He also tells Glenn how a concept like Blaze Media brought down the Soviet Union and why, in spite of anxious talk of "national divorce," he has so much hope for the future.    Sponsor:  Pre-Born partners with clinics in the highest abortion-rate cities and regions. They have a passion to save babies, and to see these women come to Christ. Over the past 15 years, they've counseled over 340,000 women considering abortion: more than 169,000 babies have been saved, and over 51,000 women have surrendered their lives to Christ. To donate, dial POUND 250 and say keyword “BABY” or go to PreBorn.com/Glenn.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Millennial Mentorship
MQ Ep. 465: True Compassion

Millennial Mentorship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:54


Today on the Mentorship Quest we have a quote coming at you from the OG of activism and American civil rights - Martin Luther King Jr. He says, "True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar. It comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring." In this episode we discover how you can create true change through your acts of compassion.

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis
Hillary Clinton's Election Double Standard, Katie Couric Admits to Editing RBG Interview, and Previewing O'Reilly's Interview with President Trump

Bill O’Reilly’s No Spin News and Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:08


Tonight's rundown: How much longer can the media ignore and cover up President Biden's failures? Bill heads to Florida to interview Former President Donald Trump Let's turn back time – remember when Hillary Clinton claimed the 2016 election was stolen from her and we had an investigation for two years into Russia collusion?! Katie Couric admits to editing out negative comments by Ruth Bader Ginsburg about those who kneel during the National Anthem Chicago Police plan legal action against the mayor's vaccine mandate for city workers The Rolling Stones have officially retired one of their songs, ‘Brown Sugar,' after complaints that the song is offensive to black women Seattle school cancels Halloween parade because it ‘marginalizes students of color' This Day in History, 1964: Martin Luther King Jr. wins the Nobel Peace Prize Final Thought: The media desperately needs Donald Trump back! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

dadAWESOME
195 | Tim Olson PART 2 - Abandonment, Identity, and Tools to Speak Life to Our Kids

dadAWESOME

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 38:23


dadAWESOME   We're on a mission to add LIFE to the dad life. We're passionate about helping dads live fully alive as they lead their kids to God's awesomeness.  | YouTube |  Instagram | Facebook | Twitter   Tim Olson   Tim Olson is an author, teacher, Principal. Pastor, and life coach with forays into audio publishing, radio hosting, and home remodeling. His understanding of father-child relationships was fostered through years of observation and application in education, coaching clients around the world, and working with the National Fathering Ministry in Minnesota and Ukraine. As a business life coach, it was through coaching family business owners that the significant connections between a father and his children (or with his own father) finally gelled into observable patterns that helped form the basis for his coaching and for his book, The Legacy of Absence. Through it all, he's found his way to helping others to discover who they are meant to be and to become that person. He and his wife, Kay, have been married for 54 years and are blessed with three children, six grandchildren, four bonus grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. They make their home in New Hope, MN.   UPCOMING FATHERS FOR THE FATHERLESS 100 Mile Bike Rides   — NEW YORK, NY — October 16th, 2021 — PHOENIX, AZ — November 20th, 2021 Register Here: https://f4f.bike/ Make a DONATION to FATHERS FOR THE FATHERLESS   Show Notes:   Text “DAD” to 651-370-8618 to join the dadAWESOME Nudge to become an intentional dad LINK TO PART 1 of the conversation with Tim Olson  timolsonauthor.com 2:18 - Images from the book: present father, the involved father, the passive father and the absent father   LINKS to the images: https://dadawesome.org/195/  2:49 - "You can be present physically and not present emotionally, spiritually and intellectually. And you know, that's actually even worse." Sharing statistics on risk of pathological behavior in children. 6:05 - Story from Ukraine of two fathers that work out of the home - one is absent, and one is still intentional even though not physically close - and the stark difference in the success of the kids 9:06 - Working with inmates, what do they wish they had from their dads? 10:48 - "We've realized that death is not as bad for kids as being abandoned and just just a dad who's overworking is abandonment. We all abandoned our kids. And every kid, every person has been abandoned to some extent, some so little you don't even recognize it. And we don't realize that that's what it is. We just remember the not being chosen part." 11:34 - Describing the reconciliation process 14:21 - "[Dad's role is] to prepare us to face the world on our own. And so he does that primarily by teaching us four things and developing them in us. And those four things are: self-esteem, confidence, maturity and identity. And identity is perhaps the most important because that describes who we are and whose we are.... These are perhaps the most important words that a father can say, I believe: 'You are mine. You belong to me. I love you.' That's identity." 17:17 -  "How we deal with the hurt and wounds of our own father's failures, determines our ability to be good fathers and mothers, you know, to our own children. 17:38 - Quoting Richard Rohr - "If we do not transform our pain, we will most assuredly transmit it." 17:56 -  In Louis Meade's book, he says to forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover that the prisoner was me." 26:27 - 4 Things he shared with his kids: 26:32 - "I know that things happened in our relationship that hurt you. I said things and did things that hurt you. Even now, I didn't even know it. And I want you to know that I would never do anything like that on purpose intentionally, but I know it happened. And so I want to ask you to please forgive me for those things." 27:35 - "I am no longer your parent and you are no longer my child. Well, that sounds pretty offensive at first. I said instead, from now on, I am just your father and you are just my son." 29:27 - "It would please me more than anything to continue to be able to speak into your life." 30:15 - "No matter what you do, with your decisions and with your life, good or bad, it will never change how much I love you. That will never change." 33:01 - Quote from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter."    Episode Links:   https://timolsonauthor.com/ https://www.dadsfirst.org/ Tim's book - The Legacy Of Absence FATHERS FOR THE FATHERLESS Make a Donation to dadAWESOME Join the dadAWESOME Prayer Team  

Post Reports
A new model for affordable housing

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 17:01


In a predominantly Black Chicago neighborhood, how one affordable housing program is addressing inequality by enabling homeownership. Read more:Over the years, rows of two-story stone houses and small buildings have fallen into disrepair in the Chicago neighborhood of North Lawndale. The neighborhood was made famous in 1966, when the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. — hoping to turn the focus of the civil rights movement on housing inequalities in the North — moved his wife and four children into a dilapidated apartment there. Decades later, much has stayed the same in North Lawndale, where crime and poverty rates remain high. Last year, more than 2,000 empty lots dotted the neighborhood. But a group of local developers and activists are pushing to change things. They're planning to build 1,000 standalone affordable homes for people who already live in the neighborhood as renters, so they can buy homes and start building equity and generational wealth through homeownership.The approach aims to end poverty by focusing not on rental subsidies, but on finance classes and helping people buy their own homes. But according to reporter Kyle Swenson, it's an approach that will need federal government buy-in to really succeed.

The New Dimensions Café
Buddhism and Systemic Racism in America-A Black Man's Quest for Karmic Healing - Larry Ward, Ph.D. - C0535

The New Dimensions Café

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 15:43


The assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. was the catalyst that sparked Larry Ward's journey into a life of planetary peacemaking. He's been subjected to racial profiling and has experienced a bombing in his home in Idaho. He was able to move past these traumas when his path led him to the introduction of Buddhist practice in Calcutta in 1977. Then when he met Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh in 1991, the practice of Buddhism became truly central to his life. He was ordained as a Dharma teacher in Plum Village in 2000 and is the co-founder of the Lotus Institute, which offers Buddhist practice for change makers on the journey of individual and collective liberation. Larry Ward, Ph.D. is the author of America's Racial Karma, An Invitation to Heal (Parallax Press 2020)Interview Date: 7/31/2021   Tags: MP3, Larry Ward, racism, Thich Nhat Hanh, Plum Village, mindfulness, unprocessed trauma, systemic unjustice, ancestral trauma, Resmaa Menakem, white body supremacy, racialized trauma, circles of sanity, Social Change/Politics, Buddhism

Online Marketing Strategies Podcast
#189: MLK - The Final 24 Hours

Online Marketing Strategies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 20:24


Martin Luther King Jr. became the predominant leader in the civil rights movement to end racial segregation and discrimination in America during the 1950s and 1960s, and was a leading spokesperson for nonviolent methods of achieving social change. His eloquence as a speaker and his personal charisma combined with a deeply rooted determination to establish equality among all races despite personal risk won him a worldwide following.  He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 and was selected by Time magazine as its Man of the Year. His “I Have a Dream” speech, which is now considered to be among the great speeches of American history, is frequently quoted. His success in galvanizing the drive for civil rights, however, made him the target of conservative segregationists who believed firmly in the superiority of the white race and feared social change.  He was arrested over 20 times and had his home was bombed. Ultimately, he was assassinated on April 4, 1968, on the balcony of a motel where he was staying in Memphis.  The "Remember This" Podcast is sponsored by Gift Shop For Guys. Looking for a cool gift for the man in your life? At Gift Shop For Guys we have spent countless hours sourcing and creating high-quality affordable items and accessories. Check out our huge selection of Cool T-Shirts and Fun-T-Shirts for your man. We carry a vast range of products that are ready to ship to you today. Free Shipping within the USA. E: support@giftshopforguys W: https://giftshopforguys.com We're a huge fan of connecting on social media. If you're on these social networks, let's follow each other: Instagram ▶️ https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuysInsta Facebook ▶️ https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuysFBook Podcast    ▶️ https://geni.us/RememberThisPodcast YouTube   ▶️ https://geni.us/RememberThisYouTube Gift Shop For Guys Suite 12, 5th Floor, Dymocks Building 428 George Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 ▶️ E: support@giftshopforguys.com ▶️ W: https://geni.us/GiftShopForGuys

The Retrospectors
On This Day: Playboy's Identity Crisis

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:11


The world's most famous adult magazine went ‘SFW' on 12th October, 2015 - when Scott Flanders, then Playboy's chief executive, announced that future editions would no longer contain full nudity. The change lasted for only one year.‘Reading it for the articles' had, at one time, been a plausible option - the magazine had published stories by Margaret Atwood and interviews with Malcolm X, Vladimir Nabokov, Martin Luther King Jr., and Jimmy Carter. But, in the internet era, Playboy had become more lucrative as a clothing brand than as a credible print title, finally ceasing publication in 2020.In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly revisit the first issue, from 1953; dig into Hugh Hefner's burial plot; and visit Playboy's website, FOR RESEARCH…Further Reading:‘Playboy to remove nudity from magazine' (Channel 4 News, 2015): https://www.channel4.com/news/playboy-to-remove-nudity-from-magazine‘Playboy's Postfeminism Problem' (Diggit, 2018): https://www.diggitmagazine.com/column/playboys-postfeminism-problem‘Playboy Is Bringing Nudity Back' (ThinkTank, 2017): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiJzqwM4ibAFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 132: Every Box Tells a Story: Marc Cohen's Box Art Jewelry with Art Jeweler, Marc Cohen- Part 1

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 36:47


What you'll learn in this episode: Why Marc's box art jewelry was inspired by his time working in the theater industry How Marc went from selling his work on the streets of New York City to selling them to Hollywood's biggest celebrities Why artists have always borrowed from each other's work Why box art is a conversation starter that breaks down barriers How every box tells a story Additional Resources: Instagram Photos: Museum of Israel Exhibition  Currently on view at SFO Airport  Marc Cohen and Lisa Berman (no relation)  About Marc Cohen: Marc Cohen is a highly regarded artist known for his wearable box art. As a former actor, stage manager and set designer, Cohen's two-inch-square boxes resemble stage sets with three-dimensional figures and images. His one-of-a-kind pieces sit on the shelves of numerous celebrities and can be worn like a brooch or pin. The archive of Cohen's work is housed at California art jewelry gallery Sculpture to Wear. Transcript: Inspired by his time in theater and created to resemble a stage, Marc Cohen's box art pieces are well-known among rare jewelry lovers and Hollywood's most famous artists, actors and producers. Part three-dimensional art, part jewelry, the two-by-two boxes feature images and tiny figures that reflect our world. He joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about his process for creating box art; what it was like to work with theater greats like Tom O'Horgan and Paula Wagner; and why his pieces are more than just shadow boxes. Read the episode transcript for part 1 below.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Marc Cohen. Marc is a former actor, set designer and stage manager. He is a highly regarded artist recognized for his box art, which graces the shelves of many celebrities. The box art pieces are often worn as brooches. We'll hear all about his jewelry journey today, but before we do that, I want to thank Lisa Berman of Sculpture to Wear for making it possible for Marc to be with us today. Marc, so glad to have you. Marc: As am I. Thank you for inviting me. Sharon: Great to be with you. Tell us about your jewelry journey. It started with you traveling around the world from what you've said. Tell us about that and how everything worked from there. Marc: I was a 20-year-old young man and I left America, basically, on a freight ship. That's how I started the journey. I have a saying now, which is “Every box art tells a story.” The irony of that is that when I travel, because I was on the road for a very long time, going all over the world, I liked collecting things but I had no place to put them. I found these little, tiny boxes that I used to take candy out of, and when they were empty, I went, “Oh, this is a great thing to put little things inside of.” I already was starting the idea of collecting little objects that I might go back to at some point and use it as a part of the art. But I traveled; I went around the world all the way to India until 1970. Then in 1970, I decided to return to America and relocate myself within the country. Prior to that, I had left in 1966. It was during the Vietnam War.  I was raised in Southern California, so I came back to America and went back to my roots. I have a stepsister, and she had a friend named Tom O'Horgan. Tom O'Horgan is actually very famous in the theater world, primarily because he directed the show on Broadway called “Hair.” He directed many other shows after that, but that is the one he's most known for. In meeting each other for the first time, he asked me about myself, and I said, “I traveled around the world and I don't have any real direction about what I want to do next.” He said, “Well, I need a driver because I'm working on these film projects. Do you drive?” and I said, “Yeah, I drive.” So, he hired me as a driver.  During that period, which was in the mid-70s, I drove him around Los Angeles. I knew Los Angeles like the back of my hand, and we went to all these different studios and met all these different, incredibly famous people; directors, writers and the like, actors and so on and so forth. I was getting a little bit of a background, but what I didn't know at the time, not until many years later, was how I ended up becoming a curator and jewelry maker. I was influenced by the work of Tom O'Horgan. Being a set director, he did plays. The things he worked on in LA ended up getting finished, and he said, “I'm going back to New York. Keep in touch with me. Maybe there's some work for you in New York.”  About six months later, I called him on the phone. He said, “Marc, we're doing this show on Broadway. It's about Lenny Bruce and I have a great job. I'd love you to come and work on it.” I said, “Well, I've never lived in New York, but I do know who Lenny Bruce is. So yeah, I'm coming.” I went to New York and got a room at the Chelsea Hotel. It was during the time of Andy Warhol and a lot of other people living in the Chelsea Hotel. So here I am, in the middle of this incredible epicenter of activity; there was so much different art on the walls of the Chelsea Hotel back in those days, and all these Warhol people and other characters from the avant garde world in New York City. That's the background of how I got to where I got. What I mean is that as a young guy, I didn't know a lot, and I didn't have a lot of background in art per se. I was more like a young guy who was just wandering on the planet, as I said earlier.  So, here I am in New York. I'm in the middle of an epicenter of activity, and Tom says to me, “Well, we're in pre-production for the show, and there are a lot of other things I would like you to do for me.” He gave me a lot of different jobs, and I went around and did that for a while until the show went into production. During those pre-production meetings, he would meet with all these different designers. One of those designers is now a very famous set designer by the name of Robin Wagner. Robin Wagner went on to design “A Chorus Line” and a lot of other incredible Broadway productions. Robin, over the years, became one of my closest friends. The reason I bring him up is because we used to go his studio, which at the time was in a building called 890 Studios, which is owned by Michael Bennett, who was the director of “A Chorus Line.” I'd go to his studio with Tom, and he would have models of shows. I was picking up the incredibly creative process of how you put together an idea for a show and a stage. He would have little characters he would use to put on models of shows. I took note of those little figures, but I kept it hidden in the back of my brain, not knowing anything, nothing preplanned about what I was doing other than being Tom's assistant. We eventually went to Broadway with “Lenny.” “Lenny” opened. It was a big success and for about 30 years, I worked primarily with Tom O'Horgan in theater.  Sharon: Is it Tom O'Horgan? Marc: Yes, it's spelled O-‘-H-o-r-g-a-n. He was an artist. He always considered himself to be one of those people that didn't do things that are the typical Broadway. I mean, when you think about “Hair”—I didn't work on the original. I worked on a later production with Tom, but by that point, I had already worked on “Lenny Bruce,” “Jesus Christ Superstar” and so many other amazing things. We did opera. Tom did a lot of things, and Tom's influences and Robin's influences are guides to what I eventually ended up becoming, which is an artist who creates wearable art.  When you think about jewelry, for me, typically jewelry would be semiprecious stones, silver, gold, pearls, all that kind of stuff. I'm not the kind of creator or designer that would even know where to start to put those things together. I love beads. In the 60s, I made my own beads and necklaces, but I didn't see that as where I wanted to go. Because of my memory of the stage and theater and stories—when I told you earlier about the boxes, during the period I was living in New York, I collected a lot of things in my little East Village apartment.  I happened to be downtown in the Soho area; I was down on Canal Street. I was walking along the street, and all the shops had things out in front of them for sale. I walked by, and there were empty boxes and lots of other things. I was just motivated to buy them, so I bought them. I brought them back to my apartment and I was sitting at my little worktable looking at all these objects. I'm thinking, “Maybe I could make something out of this. I know that this coming year, Tom has this big Christmas party, and usually he's the guy who gives everybody something unique for a present.” There I was, looking at all these things, and I looked at the little box and glued a little figure I had inside the box. For example, this is a box. It's an empty one. Sharon: Like an acrylic, plastic box. Marc: A plastic box, an acrylic plastic box. Most people would take this box. It has a lid. They would put anything in it, but they didn't think they could put a whole story together. When I put the little figures in the box like that, and it has a lid and I put it like that, then I have a box with people standing in front of it, but they're sort of looking through. What are they looking at? I started to figure out I needed to have an image to tell the story. This is the World Trade Center. Sharon: So, you're creating little worlds inside the box. Marc: Right. Since I started the idea in 1985, I have made thousands, and out of those thousands, many of them are one-of-a-kind. How I can I put it? Because of my traveling and because I'm a very sentimental guy—with these boxes, the little characters can't talk; they're little plastic figures. They only way you could tell the story, as jewelry tells a story, is by what you put behind them. So, in this case, I put the World Trade Center. I had a little character standing there looking at it. I actually made this before the World Trade Center fell down.  My meaning of all of this is that it was something in the beginning I was aware of. The one I'm wearing on my lapel—this one is a door. There's a woman standing, looking not at us; she's looking towards the doorway. Anybody who would come up and look at my work, they would say, “Wow, that is amazing! Where did you get that?” This is how it started and how I got into fashion. “Where did you get that?” and I said, “Well, I made it.” And they said, “Really? Where can I get one?” And I said, “You can buy this one.” In the beginning, I used to sell right off my lapel. I love dressing. Double-breasted suits are my favorite attire, so I would have a box on my lapel. As I said, I would go all over New York City to openings, plays and the like. At openings and galleries and museums or wherever I went, people from across the gallery, they would see me dressed and see this thing on my lapel, curious to what it is. They would walk up to me. They wouldn't even look at me; they would look right at the box and go, “Oh my god, what is that?” When I said, “Well, it's a box and I made it,” they would go, “Wow! I want it.”  It got me to the point where—this is the most interesting thing—many years later, after traveling and having lived in Israel—one of the places I did live—after about 25 years, I decided to go back there for a visit. I had friends that had immigrated to Israel, and some of my friends were there to stay. I went to visit them, and they all are in the arts. When I was there, one day they said, “Why don't we go to the Israel Museum up in Jerusalem?” I was in Tel Aviv staying with them. We go up to Jerusalem. I was wearing a box. I'm walking around the Israel Museum—this is so amazing to me—and a woman from across the room, a very tiny lady, walks up to me. She says the same thing many other people said: “Wow! What is that? Where did you get that?” I said, “Well, I made it,” as I said earlier.  The point of it is that these boxes have a story in them. For me, every story leads into another. How I mean that is that a person who I don't even know comes up to me, looks at my work; they're inspired by it; they talk about it; they tell me things about it that I've never myself, as the creator of it, imagined how significant it was or what it meant to them. As in theater, as in my relationship to Tom O'Horgan—who broke the fourth wall when he did “Hair” on Broadway—during the period I was creating these, people in New York and probably everywhere else didn't exactly walk up to each other and start a conversation with strangers. I had the object that changed all that, and I had not realized that until I started going out and wearing them.  Getting back to Israel, this woman, who I later found out was named Tammy Schatz, she was the curator of one of the wings in the Israel Museum. She invites me the next day to come and sit and talk with them, because they were planning this show and exhibition the following year called “Heroes.” So, I went back the next day. I sat with her and bunch of other people and they started telling me what they were planning. They said, “Well, you're an American, and you must know a lot about American pop culture. You know Superman and Batman and all the stuff like that,” and I said, “Yeah, I do.” Once they learned I worked in theater and designed sets—because by this point, I was not only making little box sets, I was also making large set pieces for shows. I have also done installations and the like. So, they invited me based on an illustration I sent to them. The next year, I went back to Israel, and I did this 10-feet-high, 25-feet-long three-dimensional cityscape. It was boxes, another version of boxes. It goes on and on from there, Sharon. It's always been fascinating me, how these boxes have gotten me into all kinds of great trouble. As I continue to say, every box tells a story. Sharon: We'll have pictures of the boxes when we post the podcast, but I want to describe it to people. These are small. What, two by two?  Marc: Two-inch square, three quarters of an inch deep. When you buy them, they're empty; they don't have anything except the lid and the box. I basically invented an idea; up to that point, I never saw anybody else doing what I was doing. Later on, I found that I inspired other people's creativity. There was these little boxes, and every picture tells a story. A picture's worth a thousand words. Sharon: Marc, before all this happened, before you befriended Tom and he befriended you, did you consider yourself artistic or creative? Was that a field you wanted to pursue? Marc: Kind of. I didn't literally say, “Wow, I'm an artist! I'm going to create.” When I was a young guy growing up—I grew up in Philadelphia until I was about 13. My father and mother were in the beauty business. My father was a very well-known women's hairdresser. He had his own beauty parlor. My parents were beatniks back in the 50s in Philadelphia. They were very artistic people, and all their friends were very artistic. When you're a 13, 14-year-old, it doesn't register, “Oh, I'm going to grow up to be like my parents,” but they are influences. They all wore black all the time, and as I was growing up, that was my look; I wear all black. I'm going to high school during the 60s, and it's all surfers and bleach blond hair, and here comes me with skin-tight black pants and Beatle boots and cravats. Kids who were friends, they would come up and say, “Who are you? What do you think you're doing? You must be an artist.” The idea stuck, but as I said about journeys through life, the fascinating thing for me is that I could go around the world, have all these different things happening in my 20s, return to New York and be on this journey where I'm still at.  I know your podcast has to do with why we're here: to talk about jewelry. I came up with a way for people to wear jewelry that has a story in it and it isn't just a beautiful necklace. Most of my clients over the years have been women, and women know something much more than men know about wearing an object that attracts attention. Women know how to find beautiful objects and adorn themselves, whether it's a necklace or earrings or the like. What I also found was interesting—and this actually happened; I neglected to mention this, but at one point when I stopped doing theater with Tom and only focused on making box art, I ended up becoming a street artist.  I was selling in the beginning to every major department store, and I was getting orders for thousands of boxes that I had to come up with. I was a one-man factory, so I was pulling my hair out of my head thinking, “How the hell am I going to get all these boxes out?” Eventually I discovered there's no way I can be a manufacturer of these things; they're all one-of-a-kind. I'm not going to make 12 of the same thing. A friend of my said, “There's a street fair down on Broadway. Maybe you should go there and sell on the street.” That opened a doorway, like this doorway that's on my lapel, into a world that I have never been able to look back on. What I mean by that is that once I discovered going to Soho, which was in the early stages of its evolution to become an epicenter for artists, many of them very famous—Keith Haring, David Hockney, the list is incredible of the people that were living in Soho during this period.  I went down there; on West Broadway there were very few artists, and I was one of them. I would be standing there all dressed, and people would be walking up and down the street. It was the most incredible way for them to find out if I was marketing what I had on my lapel. People would walk by, they'd see this guy with a fedora all in black, wearing a box, and they'd be curious. “What's he wearing?” They'd come up. They wanted to ask me a about them and how much they were. They would say, “I'll take that one, that one and that one,” and that used to happen to me constantly. I never could make enough. The thousands I had made that never got sold in department stores were being sold like crazy on the streets of Soho. I started to get a reputation as the box man. One of the clients that bought from me called me the box man. There were times I would go down to Soho in the early morning on Saturday or Sunday, and there were people milling around where I would stand, waiting for me. They would go, “Here comes the box man.” It was crazy.  Among all those people, some of the people that stopped and looked at my work were people like David Hockney. David Hockney actually came up to me one day, after a lot of people walked away buying my stuff, and he was looking at them real close up. He started talking to me and giving me suggestions about what I could do with them and how I could display them. He said, “You've got this little box. Where are you going to put it? Maybe you should put it in something, like a frame?” That was the most incredibly brilliant selling idea for my boxes. What I did with the frame idea, when I figured out how to do it—there are many of them behind me; they're all frames. The idea was that you can wear it, but you can also put it on your wall, and your wall can wear your art. I made it so the frame had an opening in it that the box sat inside of. If you're going out to an opening or a fashion show or something like that, “I think tonight I'll wear one of the Marc Cohens.” That was the idea, and that took off like crazy from there.  I have to also tell you I didn't have any agents. I didn't have a rep or anything like that. The only rep I had was Marc Cohen. So, it was a cool journey through art. I evolved the idea of being an artist selling on the street, where I just had an easel, to having a pushcart. It was like immigrants coming to America way, way back, my family being some of them that went to Philadelphia. My great, great grandmother, she had a pushcart on South Street in Philadelphia. It's another part of the story of jewelry. It bridged into me getting even more known.  I went back to California where I grew up. I found that in Santa Monica, they had a promenade they were developing. They actually had people with carts they rented they would put out on the promenade. I found out I could rent carts, so I rented one and came up with this idea. It actually came from people on the street. People would walk by and say, “Wow, you're like a tiny gallery with all your art.” I came up with this name, the World's Smallest Art Gallery. I took the cart and turned it into a miniature to scale, like if you went into a gallery, but it was open to the people to see it from all different sides. I had walls and characters that were larger than the ones in my boxes. They were standing looking at the art. It was all on that level; it was very interactive. People would walk by, and there would be a lot of celebrities all the time on the street. Suddenly, not only was it regular people buying work, not only David Hockney, but very famous people in Hollywood. Along the way, I reconnected with a friend of mine who was very famous, Paula Wagner. She's now very famous for being a producer with Tom Cruise; they had a company called Cruise Wagner. She's a friend of mine from all the way back to the “Lenny” days. We rekindled our friendship in LA. She knows everybody in Hollywood, and once she saw my work, she flipped out and said, “We've got to do something with this.” She hired me, and the first thing I did for her was wearable box art in a frame. It was for Oliver Stone.  Sharon: I'm sorry, who it was for? I didn't hear. Marc: Oliver Stone the director. Sharon: Oliver Stone, oh wow!  Marc: She also represented Val Kilmer and Tom Cruise and Demi Moore. Before you know it, she's asking me if I can make a box for this person, on and on. The biggest thing for me at the time was Madonna. I knew Madonna from a long time ago. When I say I knew her, I lived in New York in the early 70s and 80s, and I used to go to all these clubs. I would go to this one called Danceteria. At the time, Madonna was a coat check girl there, and eventually she did a show there, which I saw with a bunch of my friends. Then she went on to do whatever she wanted on her own.  Somehow or another, a friend of hers bought one my pieces to give to her as a gift, but this is the best part of it. I didn't know this until much later on. One night in LA, I went to this private photo exhibition; it was a photographer who had done all the photography for Rudi Gernreich, the fashion designer with those bathing suits. I'm going to the exhibition with friends. I had my box on my lapel. I'm walking around and it's a tiny, little gallery, so people don't follow each other—everybody goes wherever they're going. A bunch of people are coming that way and we're walking, walking, walking. We come to this one, most famous photograph of a topless model. I'm looking at photograph, and standing next to me is Madonna. I turn and right away, she looks at me and goes, “I have one of those boxes.” I said, “I'm the artist. I made it,” and she said to me, “I Iove that box and I have it right by my bed,” and I said, “Oh, how cool.” She asked me a few questions and I filled her in on my background. I didn't bring up the fact that I remember her from Danceteria.  Then it was like an avalanche. I got picked up by Maxfield's Clothing Store in LA when I started the frames. Everybody saw how cool it is as an art piece, but you can wear it. Maxfield loved what I was doing, and he took me on and carried my stuff in his store. This is another amazing thing: the dresser for Arsenio Hall was in the store one day buying things for him to wear on the show. I don't know whether it was a man or a woman, but they bought an outfit for Arsenio, and the salesperson said, “We just got this new wearable art piece in. You've got to see this.” They looked at it and bought one. That night on the Arsenio Hall Show—if you ever watch his talk show, there's intro music, and then the curtain goes away and he stands there; it's Arsenio Hall. On that particular night, he's standing there, wearing a collarless Armani suit, and on his jacket is a square.  From a distance you can't tell what it is. I found out this afterwards. I got the tape. It was amazing; he didn't himself know what it really was, but he came out and the camera zooms up on him. When I saw what the box was, I got a chill. It was a period where I started to not just do people standing in the box, looking at the image or looking out away from the image; it was a period where I was putting images up against the face, so it would be a three-dimensional idea. In this particular one, it was Martin Luther King. I had done part of his face in profile in the foreground, and then I had done some backdrop. It had something to do about racial issues.  I didn't just make cutesy box art. I really am not about cutesy box art. I'm very passionate about a lot of things in life. I'm very political about certain things, and I want people to have an opportunity to talk with each other about things that are meaningful, particularly where we live these days. It's important to have that doorway of how people get through it and interact with each other without being sensitive and thinking you're going to be judged by whatever they say or do. We are in a period where people have to be careful about that. So, it amazes me that this tool—because it is a tool—is, in a way, much different than things made by other jewelry designers that Lisa Berman curates or represents. That is mostly what Lisa represents, like Robert Lee Morris. I knew Robert Lee Morris personally. He's a genius and he's a friend. Thomas Mann is one of my closest friends. I'm friends with others as well because of how we interact with each other.  The image is what it's about. It's how the characters are placed within the box. Along the way, I started thinking, “I want to get out even more than what I've done. I want to try to make work even more original.” We live in a period where they have this thing called a 3D printer. It prints pretty much anything. I can create a series of my own characters, which is something I always wanted to do. I've only just started doing this. I started developing this idea, where I custom make three-dimensional boxes on this scale and a much larger scale. That's where I'm headed. I have lots of collectors. They would be more than happy if I started making little box art again. My newest work is much larger. I make boxes now that are 20 feet big, installation pieces.  Sharon: They're hard to wear. Marc: They're hard to wear, right? I know your program is primarily about jewelry. The thing about that, though, is what I am planning to do. When I do have that exhibition, the large-scale Marc Cohen box art exhibition, I will have miniatures of that exhibition, like many other people do when they market things. The Van Gogh Experience—I don't know if you've seen this, but there's a thing on the road right now that's video mapping Van Gogh's paintings on a building. When you go to the gift shop, they've marketed Van Gogh's work to death. I would do something similar as a collectable.  I had Sotheby's in London; they heard about me through our people in Israel. I was invited to do this big exhibition at Sotheby's. It's a big auction and a silent auction. I got commissioned to make three boxes with lights. There weren't any more wearable, but I did that, and it sold for the equivalent to $10,000. Suddenly, my prices are changing. The people that bought my boxes on the street from the beginning—it's embarrassing to say—but when I first started selling them, my boxes were $20. They're no longer $20. They have been selling at auction for a lot more than $20. Now there's talk about me in way that I never, ever imagined, and it's joyful. After 40 years of doing nothing but making boxes, I don't know what— This is part 1 of a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week! Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Madlik Podcast – Torah Thoughts on Judaism From a Post-Orthodox Jew

Parshat Noach - Join Geoffrey Stern, Rabbi Adam Mintz and Pastor Dumisani Washington of IBSI - Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel and Christians United For Israel for a live recording of a discussion on Clubhouse Friday October 8th with the Pastor regarding his book Zionism and the Black Church: Why Standing with Israel Will Be a Defining Issue for Christians of Color in the 21st Century. We follow a less traveled path down Noah's family tree. We discover the Biblical Mission of Africa and the bond between the Children of Shem and the Children of Ham. Sefaria Source Sheet: www.sefaria.org/sheets/352058  Transcript: Geoffrey Stern  00:00 [To Reverend Dumisani Washington] Thank you so much for being with us. On on our clubhouse when you come up to the platform, we say first of all that you're coming up to the bimah [the podium or platform in a synagogue from which the Torah and Prophets are read from]. And then second of all, when we make you a presenter, we give you smicha... So that means that you are ordinated. So instead of Reverend, we'll call you Reb. Is that okay? Dumisani Washington  00:20 That sounds good to me. Sounds good, no problem. Geoffrey Stern  00:23 So anyway, welcome to Madlik. Madlik is every week at four o'clock, and we do record it and post it as a podcast on Sunday. And if you listen to it, and you'd like what you hear, feel free to share it and give us a few stars. And what we do is disruptive Torah. And what we mean by disruptive Torah is we look at the ancient text of the Torah, with maybe a new lens, or to see a new angle. And today, I'm delighted to say that we're not only looking at it through a new lens, but we're looking at it through another lens, a lens of a pastor, of a man of God, who we will learn about his mission. I heard about it on clubhouse one evening, I was scrolling, and I stumbled upon you Reverend, and you're on a mission and you see Judaism and you see Zionism from a whole new perspective. So I want to thank you for coming on. And I want to say that, as I told you, in my email that I sent you that you know, every week about Saturday on Shabbat, on Sunday, I start thinking about what I'm going to pick as a subject matter for the coming Madlik session. And I purchased your book maybe two months ago, and it was sitting by the side of my bed, and for some reason, and of course, I'm sure there are no coincidences in this world. I picked it up this Shabbat. And it starts with our portion of Noah, it starts by talking about the line less traveled by us Jews of Shem's son Ham. And I should say that nothing is written for no reason in the Bible. And when it gives you a genealogy, it's because of what comes in the future. And many of us Jews will look at the genealogy in Genesis 10. And focus on Shem... with Semites. And that's where the name comes from. And we go down that path, and your book starts. And of course, I should say that your book is called "Zionism and the Black Church, Why Standing with Israel will be a Defining issue for Christians of color in the 21st Century". And it begins by traveling down this path less taken, of Ham. Welcome to Madlik.  But if you could begin by touching upon our portion of the week, no off and and and discussing what you see in it, and maybe your mission. Dumisani Washington  03:06 Absolutely. And thank you, again, Rabbi for having me on. Yes, there are six chapters in "Zionism in the Black Church". And the first chapter is entitled The African Biblical Tie to Israel. And so we as I say, in the book started the beginning, right, we start at the beginning of the Scriptures, and so as you know, between the two portions of "Bereshi"  I believe whether the towards the end is when Noah was first introduced, but of course in "Noach" there's the explanation of the nations where all the nations of the earth come from, from Noah's three sons Shem, Ham, and Jafet. And so we recognize that in the Scriptures, it is said that Ham has four sons. And there's a couple of unique things as you know, you read the book, that the scriptures that in the law of Moses deals, Psalms and some of the prophets, there's a term that's given several times in the scripture about Ham's descendants harms the sentence differently, then either Jafet or Shem.  The land of Ham is actually something that's in the scriptures. And I don't know what that Hebrew word is ... "Aretz Ham" ... I never looked at that part of it, Rabbi but it talks about that, which is really interesting because there's not, to my knowledge, and I've kind of looked at for a little while, a similar rendering like the Land of Japhet or Land of Shem. Right? We're obviously the genealogy is there, right? But there's not the same thing that deals with the land and the peoples .... interesting and we've come to know that of the four sides of Hem, which are in order Kush, which you know, is where obviously the Hebrew for later on Ethiopia I believe is a Greek word, but from that region Mitzrayim, which is Egypt. Fut or Put which is Libya, and then Canaan, which is Canaan, right? So those four sons who come from him. But interestingly in the scriptures when it says land of Ham, it almost exclusively refers to Egypt and Ethiopia, what we would call today, Africa, right? This region. And again, you're talking about an antiquity these regions were much broader in size. And they are today if you look at the map today, you see Egypt as a small state and go down to the south, west, south east, and you'll see Ethiopia then you see Yemen, you see Kenya, well, obviously all those states weren't there that happened much later in modernity is particularly after the colonial period where those nations were carved up by a few states in Europe, and they were given certain names everything right, but these were regions in the Bible. And so Kush, the land of Kush, and the land of Mitzrayim, they're actually dealt with many, many times. Right? After the words obviously "Israel" and "Jerusalem". You have the word Ethiopia, I believe one of the Ethiopian scholar says some 54 times or something like that the word Ethiopia actually comes up in the Bible, obviously not as many times as Israel or Jerusalem but more than virtually any other nation other than Egypt. Right? So Egypt obviously that we know too. Africa plays a huge role in Israel's story right? The 430 years in slavery is in Africa, right? The Torah was received at Sinai: Africa. All these things happen in Africa. At some point God tells Jeremiah during the time of the impending doom, the exile that will happen at the hand of of Nebuchadnezzar and God says to to the Israelites to the Judeans, and "don't run down into Egypt, Egypt won't be able to save you." Why does he say that? Well, because historically the Israelites would go to Egypt when it until it got safer, right? For those Christians who may be on the call, you'll know that in the New Testament, Jesus, his parents take him down into Egypt because Herod's gonna kill him. Right? So there's this ongoing relationship between Ham and Shem, that's very intertwined. Moses, his wife, or his second wife, depending on how you interpret it....  Some of the sages. She's Ethiopian, right? She's kushite. So you have this interchangeable thing all the time, throughout the scriptures, but actually starts with the genealogy. And I'll say just one last thing, rabbis ..... we're opening up. This is also unfortunately, as I mentioned, the book as you know, the misnomer of the quote unquote, "Curse of Ham", as we know in the text, Ham is never cursed for what happens with Noah it is Canaan that is cursed. And he actually says, a curse that Canaan become a servant of servants shall he be, even though it was Ham who however you interpreted.... I've heard many different interpretations of "uncovered the nakedness he saw his father, naked," but somehow, for whatever reason, Noah cursed Canaan, not Ham.  Who is Canaan...  is one of him so's, his fourth son, as we know those who are listening, you may know that it is The Curse of Ham, quote, unquote, that has been used sadly, unfortunately, among many other things as a justification of the slavery of Africans. Right? That somehow, Africans are quote, unquote, "Cursed of Ham", therefore, the transatlantic slave trade, the trans Saharan slave trade, those things are somehow...  God prescribed these things in the Bible, the curse was making him black. That's why he's like all those things that are nowhere in the text whatsoever, right? skin color is not in the text. slavery as a descendant of Ham. None of those things are in the text. What's in the text? Is that Canaan is cursed for that? And so we start there, Rabbi, and from there trying to walk out this whole Israel Africa thing. Adam Mintz  08:47 First of all WOW... thank you so much. I just want to clarify in terms of color, I think that's a very interesting thing. It's very possible that in the biblical period, everybody was dark. Dumisani Washington  09:00 Yes, sir. I mentioned that in the book as well. But yes, sir. Yes, yeah. All right. Sorry, Adam Mintz  09:04 I didn't see that in your book. But that's important, you know, because a lot of people are caught up in this color thing. Did you know that there's a distinction, we don't know it for sure but it makes sense that everybody was dark in those periods. So that the difference in color was not significant. So when, when Moses marries goes to Ethiopia, maybe is king of Ethiopia, and marries an Ethiopian. And the idea is that he marries a foreigner. The fact that she's darker may or may not have been true.   Dumisani Washington  09:39 Yes, absolutely. No, thank you Rabbi. And I do touch on that, as well. We say in the terms in this modern term, even in my book, I use the term Christians of color and I don't usually use those terms just in when I'm speaking. I did it that way in the title so that it would be presented in a way that is going to deal with some provocative things but hopefully the people that they read it they'll see what I mean by that and if you're talking about the Israelite people, the Hebrew people they are what I call an afro Asiatic people. Israel is still at that at the point of where those two continents meet right Southwest Asia northeast Africa is landlocked with Egypt I tell people God opened up the Red Sea because he wanted to right ... He's big and bad and he can do what he wants to do but you can literally; I wouldn't recommend it obviously, but you could literally walk from Egypt to Israel and you always have been able to for 1000s of years that has always been the case and so you have a people that in terms of skin tone or whatever... Yes, absolutely, they would be what we would call today quote unquote people of color right and so unfortunately particularly in our country we all know race and colorism is such a huge topic and it's often so divisive and it's used in so many different ways and we know much of that goes back to whether slavery, Jim Crow, people being assigned work obviously based on how dark or light they are all of those things but the problem as you all know is that those things aren't in the Bible right? There's no God likes this person doesn't like this person, this person's dark this person's like, that type of thing. But again, that's what men do, we are fallen creatures, we read what we want to read into the text, and then we use it unfortunately, in a way that's not helpful. Let me just say and pause here, I can tell you that as a Christian pastor, over the years of my just delving into what we often call the Jewish roots of our faith, by studying Torah with rabbis and with other Jewish scholars, my faith has been more important to me than ever in that it helps me understand even more so right, what is the Hebrew in this word here? What do the sages say about that, that's been a fascinating journey for me, over the last 30 some odd years since I've been doing this particular work. Geoffrey Stern  11:58 So I just want to jump in, you said so many things. But there is in this verse that we are reading today, the word "ashkenaz", he was one of the children of of Shem, and you quote, an Ethiopian Rabbi named Ephraim Isaac, and this is a sample of some of the humor in your book or the sense of discovery. And somebody said to him, You don't look Jewish. And he said:, "Ethiopia is mentioned the Bible over 50 times, but Poland not once." And I feel like that was, that was a great line. And what it really talks to is our preconceptions, and your book, and your vision, and your mission breaks preconceptions of what it is to be a Jew, what the mission of a Jew is, but most importantly, what the relationship is between the Jewish people and the African people. And one of the things that you touched upon was the sense of Mitzraim and Kush , and in your book, you really talk about how many times they're interchangeable, because really, it is the same area and those of us who think about Mitzrayim, or Egypt, we focus on the Exodus story, we focus on the pharaoh story. But as you mentioned, the prophets later on, we're having to talk to the Jews about not going back, because ultimately, the experience in Egypt was always favorable, it was our neighbor, and it was our place of refuge. Abraham goes down there with Sarah twice, Jacob sends his kids down there during a time of famine. The relationship and the reference to a Ham and to Mitzrayim  and to Kush is a very positive one. And yes, it does say in our week's parsha of all of the children, it says, "b'artzetam v'goyehem" , that they have a special language, and they have a family and they have a land. So the fact that we are neighbors is so important in the biblical context. So I said if we were going to walk down this wonderful path, and I would love for a second to talk about your mission about reuniting our two peoples and some of the challenges that you have. Clearly you don't speak to groups like us very much, although I think that I'm going to have an opportunity later to say that I think you should, because there's so much that we can learn. But what is your mission? How did you discover it? And what are your challenges? Dumisani Washington  14:40 Well, I'll do it concise, just because I don't want to take up too much time to firstly touch as much as we can. I am the founder and CEO of an organization called The Institute for Black Solidarity with Israel. I started it in 2013 but for about nearly seven years, I was not as active I started it. I did a lot of touring and a lot of speaking throughout the United States, churches, sometimes synagogues as well. And with this mission, it was a mission that was really placed in my heart. Actually in 2012, my first trip to Israel, I went as a guest of Christians United for Israel, I would come later on to join the staff with CUFA. But I was a guest pastor, I knew some friends who were part of the organization. And the short version of that story was my first tip ever, I'm in Israel, I'm at the Western Wall of the kotel. And I have a very intense experience in which I feel although Africa and Israel were passions of mine already, but the fusing of those two things together and a real work in which we continue to strengthen the alliance between Israel and Africa. And then obviously, in the States in the black and Jewish community. And there and finished the first edition of the book now, what you have there Rabbi is the second edition. And we started this organization for that very purpose to do both of those things continue to strengthen the black Jewish relationship, and also the Israel Africa Alliance. And so the challenges have been probably more than any other thing disinformation, right? There's a lot of false information that's there, when it comes to those things that would seek to divide and separate when you're talking about whether Africa Israel, now we're talking about the modern state of Israel, obviously, the rebirth of Israel in 1948. Israel's close ties with African nations throughout the continent, starting especially with Golda Meir, the foreign minister, all the way up into the 70s, where you have, as I mentioned in the book, Israel has more embassies throughout Africa than any other nation other than the United States, African economy, some of them are thriving, a great deal. You have a lot of synergy between the African nations and Israel. And after the Yom Kippur War in 1973, like never before Israel's enemies target that relationship between Israel and its African neighbors for different reasons. One of those is voting in the United Nations, right? And that became very much of a challenge. So one of the greatest challenges is, is information. What we share in the book and when we do our organization, we teach what we call an organization "Authentic History” is really simply telling what happened, how did something [happen]. Whether we're talking about biblically, whether we're discussing the parsha or we're talking about historically, right? We're talking about what the relationship was, and is. Why those connections there? And I'll just give one quick example if you're talking about black Jewish synergy in the United States, not just Dr. King's relationship with Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel in the civil rights community, not that it happened, right? But why, what was that synergy about? Right? So we've delve into that. We share from the documents from the Rabbinical Assembly; Dr. King's most famous words regarding Israel that were recorded 10 days before he was killed, right, why? And as a pastor, what we call a prophetic moment. Why 10 days before he's taken from us, is he telling the black community in the world to stand with Israel with all of our mind and protect its right to exist? Why is he saying these things? What's so important about it. And even the generation before? Why was it a black and Jewish man who changed the trajectory of this nation, Booker T. Washington, and Julius Rosenwald; millions of now first and second generation, slave; free slaves, right? but who had no access to education, not in a broader sense, and why that synergy saw some 5400 Rosenwald schools built throughout the segregated south. We touch on those historical points, and we delve into why that black Jewish synergy has been so powerful for so many people for so long. So that is our mission to strengthen those ties, because we believe that there's a great future ahead. Geoffrey Stern  19:05 You did such amazing research. I mean, I can tell you I never knew that Herzl said about Africa, "that once I have witnessed the redemption of Israel, my people, I wish to assist in the redemption of the Africans." And that is taking a small quote out of a full paragraph where the histories of the two people are so similar. I mean, it comes to us as a pleasant surprise, these synergies but it shouldn't because both our peoples have really traversed and continue to reverse the same pathway. And you quote Marcus Garvey and even Malcolm X and William Dubois. Malcolm X says "Pan Africanism will do for the people of African descent all over the world, the same that Zionism has done for Jews. All over the world." there was a sincere admiration for this miracle of a people returning to its land, we were talking before you came on about this whole kind of image of an ark. And it reminds you of Odesyuss... and it reminds you of all of these stories of man going on this heroic journey to find their their roots to come back, gain, experience and come back to their homeland, to their Aretz.. On the one hand, your job should be very simple. I guess, like any other fights, the closer you are, the bigger the friction can be. And there's nothing bigger than the friction between brothers. But it's such a challenge to address, as you say the misinformation. Dumisani Washington  20:51 Absolutely. And this is, again, why that's our primary goal. And then as part of what our mission is, we have launched here just recently, an initiative called The PEACE initiative. And PEACE is an acronym for Plan for Education, Advocacy, and Community Engagement, and the short version of that, again: We recruit young, black American and African young people from certain cities throughout the United States, a group of them, they go to a 16 week study course having some of the same conversations we're having now, including the modern state of Israel, ancient Israel, the United Nations, all these things that intersect when it comes to the black Jewish relations, then they will travel to Israel for about 10 days, and returned to the cities from where they've been recruited, and be the hub of black Jewish synergy in their communities. We believe with our organization that one of the reasons for the synergy that we've seen in the past, whether it was at the turn of the century with Booker T Washington, and Julius Rosenwald, or the mid part of the century with Dr. King and Rabbi Heschel, right now we are in different challenges, there are challenges that face particularly the more vulnerable black communities. And we see that that synergy could really address so many issues, whether it's education, whether it's jobs, those types of things, they can be really be addressed in a very holistic way. And really harnessing that synergy between the black and the Jewish community. And this is what we are doing. An Israel advocacy that is also rooted in these communities. And it's amazing. We see already rabbis and black pastors are working together all over the country. So that continues to happen. But we want to highlight those things even more and go even further in meeting some of the challenges what we call MC ambassadors will be leading that in different cities across the country. Geoffrey Stern  22:02 That's amazing. I want to come back to this sense of self-discovery and pride. And we always talk about it from our own perspective. So if you're African American, you want to make sure that your children believe that black is beautiful, that they come from an amazing heritage to be proud of who they are. And if you're Jewish, you want the same thing. But it seems to me, and you kind of cage the question in this way, "Why standing with Israel will be a defining issue for Christians of color", when we as Jews can see ourselves in the black community as we did during the civil rights movement that redeems us. And that empowers us. And I think what you're saying, and I don't want to put words into your mouth, but the same thing works in reverse. That in a sense, when the African community can recognize in Israel, its own story. It also can find a part of itself. Is there any truth there? Dumisani Washington  23:50 I believe so Rabbi. I believe that that's exactly as a matter of fact, what we saw was the synergy. So let me use the example and go back to the early 1900s with Booker T. Washington, Julius Rosenwald. The way that story happens, as you may know is that Booker T Washington writes his seminal book "Up From Slavery". Julius Rosenwald, who lives in Chicago at the time, is very active in his community. As a matter of fact, he was active, using his wealth; of those of you who don't know of Sears Roebuck fame, he is the one who took his company to this whole different level, economically and everything. And so with his wealth as a businessman, he's helping the Jews who are being persecuted in Russia. And one of his own testimony, I don't say this part of the book, but I kind of alluded to it, that here he is driving to work from the suburbs to where his factory is where his store is, and he's passing by throngs of black people who've left the South, right? looking for a better life, but they're living in very, very bad conditions, a lot of poverty and everything. And he says to himself, basically, if I'm going to do all of this to help Russian Jews right, way over the other side of the world, and I have this human crisis right here, where I live, I want to be able to do that and his, his Rabbi was Emile Hirsch, one of the founding members of the NAACP. Right? So his Rabbi encourages him. And we see this with our Jewish brothers and sisters all the time, see yourself, do help, do use your wealth, use your ability, right? To help. And so he reads Booker T. Washington's book he's taken with him, they begin to correspond. And Booker T. Washington says, Here's how you can help me I'm trying to build schools for my people who don't have access. And Rabbi to your point. Here is this man, this Jewish man who is very well aware of his history, he knows his People's History of persecution and struggle and triumph, right? Very much sees himself in that black story, and then he uses his ability. It's amazing even what he does; there's a Rosenwald film about Rosenwald schools, I believe his children were the ones who produced it. And they were saying that what he actually did was pretty ingenious, he put up a third of the money, the black community raised a third of the money, and then he challenged the broader white community to partner with them and bring the last third and that is how those Rosenwald Schools began.  Because what he wanted to do, he wanted to see people come together, he wanted to see them all work together. Even though Booker T. Washington passes away only three years into that, right, that venture continues on Julius Rosenwald goes and sits on the board of the Tuskegee college, Tuskegee University, right? There's this long connection that's there. So in that struggle, the black American community, and he connected with this black American leader, the one of the most prominent of the time, Booker T, Washington, and they, like I tell people, changed the world. Like, can we imagine what the United States would have been if you had those millions of now freed slaves, right? with no access, and particularly those who are living in the Jim Crow South, no access whatsoever to education, Would the Harlem Renaissance have become what it become, with the black Wall Street, whether it was in Tulsa, whether in Philadelphia, these things that explode because of the access to education to now these first and second generations of people coming out of slavery, right? So I believe that that's the case and which is why I'll say again, here today, some of those challenges are there, some of the challenges are different than they were, obviously 50, 60, 70, 80 years ago, but we believe in organization that those challenges can be met with that same amazing synergy between the black and the Jewish community. Geoffrey Stern  27:26 A lot of people would argue that the rift or the change of the relationship between the African American community and the Jewish community was when the Jews or Israel stopped being looked at as the David in the Goliath story and we won the Six Day War. And how do you ensure that the facts are told, but also as you climb out of the pit, and as you achieve your goals, you shouldn't be necessarily punished for being successful. Success is not a sin. It's an inspiration. But it seems to me that's one of the challenges that we have, especially in the Jewish community for our next generation of children, who really do see ourselves not as the minority and don't see ourselves anymore mirrored in the African American community. Dumisani Washington  28:25 But one of my favorite things about the Jewish tradition of the Seder, is that you all lean and recline in the Seder today, and you tell your children, when we had the first one, we sat with our sandals on, our staff, in our hand, our belts ....because we were slaves leaving slavery, but now we are no longer. And that whole ethos of telling children, right? There's a strong parallel in the black American community, right? The whole point of going from struggle to a place where you can live in peace or at the very least, you recognize and realize the sacrifice of the people who came before you right? And I won't step into the controversial for lots of different reasons, we'll be able to unpack it, but let me just say this, for the black American experience when you're talking I often teach this in our sermons and other things that arc .... and let me say again, no, people are monolith. Obviously we just kind of put that on the table, all the Jews arent' alike all black Americans aren't alike..... Having said that, there is an overarching story when you talk about black Americans, who, from slavery to Jim Crow, segregation, black codes, all of those types of things to the modern era. And that story cannot accurately be told without talking about God and His people. In other words, when you're talking about the spirituals "Go Down Moses". "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho" and I talked about that in the book, these songs that are rooted in the scriptures, most of the time in, in the Tanakh, our Jewish brothers and sisters' side of the Bible. I mean, sometimes in the New Testament, most of the time, these songs are being sung in hope. And that hope was realized, right? It's not an Negro spiritual song technically, but I put it in that category, part of the greatest one ever. I mean, how it culminates would be "Lift Every Voice and Sing" us a song that today has all these political things connected to it for lots of different unfortunate reasons. But when James Weldon Johnson wrote that song, wrote it as a poem? Those stanzas and anybody listening to this, I want to tell Google that Google Lift Every Voice and Sing"; just read the words. And this was a very powerful, very, very much God and God's love, and our hope and our faith and our trust, and our honoring the people who came before us; all of those things. And he talked about being free. Now, it's written in 1899. Right? You still have questions. I mean, there are no laws against lynching there going on, it's still crushing racism. However, he as a father in the black community is not only acknowledging what God has done, there's amazing things that are happening. One of the economist's that I quote, in my book, Thomas Sol said that the black community after slavery, and less than 50 years after slavery went from 0% literacy to almost 50% literacy, in that half a century, something economic historians say has never happened before. And now you're later on, you're talking about the black Wall Street, you're talking about black oil barons and landowners and factory owners, right? You're talking about this black middle class emerging. There's been no civil rights bill, right? There's been no Pell grants for school. These things don't even exist yet. We're talking about the 19 teens and the 1920s. You're talking about black people who had previously been slaves for hundreds of years. Why am I saying all that we as a people know full well; if we know our history, know full well what it is to come from all of those dire situations into a place of blessing, even though there may be struggles just like our Jewish brothers and sisters. We are convinced an organization that as we know, as a black community, particularly younger people that we are talking with, and teaching, as we know and appreciate our history, not the history that's regurgitated in terms of media and, and for political purposes. But truly our history, there is a great deal to be proud of about that. And to see, as I said in the sermon a couple of months ago, not only does it not a victim narrative, I descended from superheroes, my people went through slavery, Jim Crow, and still build on Wall Street still built the Tuskegee Institute. Still, we're soldiers who fighting for their own freedom in the Civil War. I mean, you're talking on and on and on things that they should have never been able to accomplish. When I consider what they accomplished with not very much help often. I recognize the greatness of the heritage that I come from, then that allows me to see an Israel rise like a phoenix from the ashes and not spurn that but recognize that our Jewish brothers and sisters have gone through millennia of this and Israel then to be celebrated, not denigrated. Adam Mintz  33:12 Thank you. We want to thank you. Your passion, and your insight is really brought a kind of a new insight to our discussion here. We really want to thank you, you know, we at Madlik we start on time and we end on time, Shabbat is about to begin in just a little while. Hopefully we'll be able to invite you back in the future as we continue this conversation. But I know I join Geoffrey and everybody on the call and everybody who's gonna listen to the podcast. Thank you for joining us and for really your insight and your passion. You really leave us with so much to think about as we begin the Shabbat. Dumisani Washington  33:51 Thank you. Thank you for having me. Adam Mintz  33:53 Thank you Geoffrey, Shabbat Shalom, everybody, Geoffrey Stern  33:55 Shabbat Shalom. And Reb Dumisani, you mentioned the songs. There's a whole chapter in your book about Negro spirituals. And as the rabbi said, w are approaching the Shabbat. And as you observe the Sunday we observed Saturday, but you know that the secret of living without a land or being on a difficult mission is that Sabbath, the strength of the Sabbath, and the connection between Noah and the word Menucha which is "rest" is obvious. And there was a great poet named Yehuda halevi. And he wrote a poem about the Yona; the dove that Noah sent out of the ark to see if there was dry land. And he he said that on Shabbat. Yom Shabbaton Eyn L'shkoach, "the day of Shabbat you cannot forget"  Zechru l'reach Hanichoach"  He also uses Reach Nichoach which is a pleasing scent,Yonah Matzah Bominoach, the yonah, the dove found on it rest v'shom ynuchu yegiah koach  and there in the Shabbat , in that ark of rest on that ark of Sunday or Saturday is where we all gain strength. So I wish you continued success in all that you do. And that this Shabbat and this Sunday we all gather the strength to continue our mission. But I really do hope that we get another chance to study Torah together. And I really hope that all of the listeners go out and buy your book, Zionism in the Black Church because it is an absolute thrill. And I understand you're coming out with a new book that's going to talk more about the Jewish people and the various colors and flavors that we come in. Dumisani Washington  35:55 Hopefully to put that out next year sometime. Absolutely. Geoffrey Stern  35:59 Fantastic. Well thank you so much so Shabbat Shalom and we are we are in your debt. Dumisani Washington  36:05 Thank you. Shabbat Shalom and looking forward to bye bye   Music: Lift Every Voice and Sing - Melinda Dulittle https://youtu.be/6Dtk9h1gZOI 

Trip FM
Dexter: Para cada Djamila existe um Fernando Holiday

Trip FM

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


"Ao mesmo tempo em que temos personalidades negras tentando fazer com que nosso povo marche para frente, outros andam na contramão" Dos 48 anos que o rapper Dexter tem de vida, treze foram vividos na prisão. De dentro do Carandiru, ele se reinventou, investiu na música e criou uma trajetória de sucesso. Mas isso são águas passadas: fica cada vez mais incoerente começar a contar a sua história pelo cárcere. Nem mesmo o rap é o suficiente para defini-lo. Hoje, o cantor é também ator e se arrisca como sambista – quem acompanha os shows do Péricles e do Salgadinho, por exemplo, sabe de suas participações. É até um discreto amante da moda, mas tem mantido o visual imutado para preservar as características do personagem CD, papel que interpreta na série Pico da Neblina, da HBO, que está em gravação da segunda temporada. Dexter é ainda uma potente arma na busca por uma sociedade mais justa e igualitária. Dos projetos sociais que participa, destaca-se o Trampo Justo, em parceria com o juiz Iberê Diase, voltado a jovens assistidos por casas de acolhimento que, aos 18 anos, precisam deixar as instituições onde moram para encarar o mundo sozinhos. Nada disso parece ser possível, no entanto, se o compositor, como ele mesmo conta, não tivesse decidido crescer intelectualmente. Na prisão, escolheu o caminho dos livros e hoje procura semear a informação. Quando perguntado o que acha do entretenimento que glamouriza a vida do crime, responde: "Glamour é ler". E embora reconheça que uma série de figuras importantes e conscientes tenham assumido a frente na luta contra o racismo, lamenta aqueles que parecem jogar contra. "Ao mesmo tempo em que temos Preto Zezé, Silvio de Almeida, Djamila e diversas personalidades negras tentando fazer com que o nosso povo marche para frente, temos também Fernando Holiday e Sergio Camargo andando na contramão, sendo contra tudo aquilo que acreditamos". Em um papo com o Trip FM, Dexter conta ainda sobre a mãe, uma gari que decidiu adotá-lo com um mês de idade. Confira no player, no Spotify ou leia um trecho da entrevista abaixo. LEIA TAMBÉM: Com o projeto Trampo Justo, Dexter e o juiz Iberê Dias ajudam jovens em casas de acolhimento [IMAGE=https://revistatrip.uol.com.br/upload/2021/10/615f38a29a94d/dexter-rapper-cantor-trip-fm-mh.jpg; CREDITS=Mariana Pekin / TRIP Editora; LEGEND=Dexter no palco do Trip Transformadores, de 2019; ALT_TEXT=Dexter ] Trip FM. Deve fazer uns três anos que não nos falamos. De lá até aqui, na sua visão, existiu uma melhora na situação do povo preto ou ainda continua muito sofrido e baixo o nível de equidade? Dexter. Ao mesmo tempo em que temos Preto Zezé, Silvio de Almeida, Djamila Ribeiro e diversas personalidades negras tentando fazer com que o nosso povo marche para frente, temos também Fernando Holiday e Sergio Camargo andando na contramão, sendo contra tudo aquilo que acreditamos. O fato de termos pessoas capacitadas à frente, discutindo, já é uma melhora considerável. É um momento de uma briga muito dura. Estamos no front, a gente está batendo, mas continuamos apanhando para caralho. Existem negros que são contra as cotas, contra personalidades que são referência para nós. Por isso que a juventude precisa entender a importância dessa caminhada: muita coisa está nas mãos deles. Tem um monte de gente no ringue brigando pela melhora do nosso povo, pela melhora do Brasil. Quando a diversidade entra no eixo, todo mundo ganha, porque a gente consome, constrói. Me conta do planeta samba. Sei que não é de hoje que você tem essa conexão, mas agora parece que de fato você pousou nele. Eu gosto de MPB, do sertanejo raiz, da música que me faz bem. O rap é o meu carro-chefe, mas o samba sobretudo é uma música que me convence e me alegra muito. De uns anos para cá tenho feito muita participação. Com o Péricles, com o Salgadinho, por exemplo. E eles aparecem nos meus shows também, o que mostrou para alguns críticos que rap é música, sim. Por muito tempo o rap me fez ficar preso. Os próprios fãs acreditam com veemência que rapper não pode fazer outra coisa. Mas quando eu comecei a circular no samba e as pessoas começaram a ver, eles passaram a me compreender e a aceitar. Quando eu lancei o samba, graças a Deus só vieram elogios.  A gente que faz revista, rádio e propaganda carrega um pouco a culpa de criar desejo na cabeça das pessoas ao mesmo tempo que grande parte da população não tem dinheiro para comprar um bife. Como você lida com isso, com o moleque que de repente que vai querer comprar um tênis porque viu você usando? Eu fui uma criança privada de muita coisa, mas hoje meu sustento me garante algum consumo. Acho que devo ter essa liberdade para usufruir, pois foi o suor que me deu. O que tento fazer é dizer nas minhas letras e entrevistas que a juventude precisa conquistar. A gente sabe das dificuldades que o Brasil apresenta para eles, mas o que me resta é acreditar no que proponho, que é: leia, se informe e busque a sua liberdade. Martin Luther King já dizia que a liberdade jamais vai ser dada pelo opressor. A maneira de não me culpar é dizendo ao jovem que ele precisa conquistar. Nesse país, com honestidade, só se conquista batalhando. A minha música explica para eles que não é preciso passar pela etapa que eu passei, que é o crime.

C-10 Mentoring & Leadership Podcast
C-10 Students on Leadership #1

C-10 Mentoring & Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 33:53


This week's episode is a little different than any other since we launched about 17 months ago. We're biased, but we think it's going to be really cool.Going into this school year we decided that we wanted our students in the C-10 Mentoring & Leadership program to dive deeper into leadership. To be more intentional about how they think about leadership.With that in mind, and feeling that the guests we have on this podcast offer great leadership lessons, a few weeks ago we told the students about a new project they're taking on this year. We asked them to pick an episode of the C-10 Podcast that they wanted to listen to, pick a segment that spoke to them the most, and then prepare a short talk about that segment...or be interviewed by their mentor about that segment. (All five students in this first group chose to be interviewed.) And then we opened it up to questions from the other students and mentors.So, this week, five students from our C-10 program are going to be the stars -- the experts, as we told them -- for this episode.Keep this in mind: we typically have about 40-45 people at each session, and the five students you'll hear from in this episode all volunteered to be in the first group. They volunteered to get up in front of the group and speak. Take charge of this. That alone speaks to their leadership now and in the future. This group includes two new students -- a sophomore and a junior, two more juniors and a senior. Two of the students in this group are actually siblings.We'll introduce each student and mentor along the way, but here's who you'll hear:-- Alissa and her mentor Jen Fescoe after a clip from Olympic gold medal swimmer Shannon Vreeland.-- Dawson, who's regular mentor was not there, so pinch hitter Todd Donoho will interview Dawson after a clip from two-time Olympic silver medalist in gymnastics, Terin Humphrey.-- One special person our students have heard from a couple of times during their weekly sessions is Carl Jemison, who grew up in Birmingham during the Civil Rights movement, and knew Martin Luther King Jr. Second-year student Trey and his mentor Stann Tate will talk about Carl.-- First-year student Norman and his mentor, Andrew Kreiling, will talk about a segment from one of our other mentors, George Norton, who spent the bulk of his career in the Army.-- Finally will be Andrew's other student and lone senior this week, Sidney, who selected a clip from KMBC meteorologist Bryan Busby's episode. It's a little different week, but we hope you enjoy hearing from some of our students.LINKS:We're currently in the Crown Town Challenge campaign to thank your mentor AND provide mentoring for high school students in Kansas City. For more info, click here.For more information about the C-10 Mentoring & Leadership program for high school students, visit our website.To make a financial gift to give students life-changing one-on-one mentoring, visit our secure donation page.For all episodes of the C-10 podcast and ways you can listen, click here.If you'd like to make a comment, have a suggestion for a future guest, or your company would like to help underwrite this podcast, please visit our contact page.

Thinker Sensitive
Ep. 23 The Weekly: A Prophetic Word From MLK

Thinker Sensitive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 30:42


In the opening episode of our new weekly segment, Ryan reads through and comments on an article that he wrote on Martin Luther King Jr. during the turmoil and civil unrest of 2020. The original article was entitled, "A Prophetic Word From MLK."

SCOTUScast
Nestle USA, Inc. v. Doe - Post-Decision SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:45


On June 17, 2021 the Supreme Court issued its 8-1 decision in Nestle USA, Inc. V. Doe et al and the consolidated case of Cargill, Inc. v. Doe I. In this case, the Court considered the question of whether an aiding and abetting claim against a domestic corporation brought under the Alien Tort Statute can overcome the exterritoriality bar where the claim based is on allegations of general corporate activity in the United States and where the plaintiffs cannot trace the alleged harms, which occurred abroad at the hands of unidentified foreign actors, to that activity.Discussing this decision today are Julian Ku, Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Faculty Director of International Programs, and Maurice A. Deane Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Law, Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University, Professor William S. Dodge, the John D. Ayer Chair in Business Law and MLK Jr. Professor of Law at the UC Davis School of Law and Ilya Shapiro, Vice President and Director at the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute.

Quilt Buzz
Episode 040: Jennifer Swope of The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Quilt Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 42:27


Show Notes:0:57 - David and Roberta Logie Department of Textile and Fashion Arts1:01 - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston1:07 - Boston 3:08 - Winterthur Program, American Material Culture 5:29 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)5:36 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories5:46 - Grab tickets to visit the Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 5:48 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)6:14 - Logan International Airport7:30 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection 7:40 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection catalogue 7:52 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)7:57 - Quilts of Gee's Bend8:26 and 8:44 - The Pilgrim / Roy collection 8:47, 8:51 and 9:33 - Gerald Roy8:48, 8:56 and 9:38 - Paul Pilgrim9:06 - Josef Albers9:48 - Brimfield10:02 and 10:05 - Amish12:11- Quilt and craft revival 12:23 - Studio craft movement14:24 - Carla Hemlock14:26 - Kahnawake Mohawk14:33 - Beading work 15:39 - Ivy league school17:46 - The Ann and Graham Gund Gallery19:17 - Foam core galleries19:29 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection 19:44 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 20:09 - Foam core galleries20:15 - Kyla Hygysician22:48 - Poston Internment Camp22:50 - Arizona22:52 - World War II22:52 - Masako Hirata22:53 - Quilt by Japanese American kids in the Poston Internment Camp22:56 - Masako Hirata's fourth grade class 23:04 - National Japanese American Historical Society 23:05 - San Francisco23:35 - Harriet Powers's Bible Quilt23:39 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)23:40 - Harriet Powers's Pictorial quilt23:49 - Harriet Powers24:30 - Michael Thorpe (@iversonsdurag)24:21 - New York 24:23 - Newton, Massachusetts24:31 - Longarm quilting machine 24:37 - George Floyd24:46 - Michael Thorpe's quilt and poem 25:00 - Applique26:48 - Poston Internment Camp fourth grade class quilt 26:56 - World War II27:03 - Civil War27:10 - Applique 28:12 - Civil War29:10 - Harriet Powers29:53 - Harriet Powers's Pictorial quilt29:55 - Memphis World Fair of 189731:07 - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston32:43 - Steely Dead32:46 - Denver33:24 - John and Hank Green 33:34 - Indiana33:47 - Quilt Buzz34:10 - Log Cabin traditional quilt block 34:14 - Four-Patch traditional quilt block 34:16 - Nine-Patch traditional quilt block34:30 - Gerald Roy34:34 - Paul Pilgrim34:57 - Resist-dyed textile techniques 36:22 - Wholecloth quilts 36:23 - Victorian Crazy quilts 36:25 - Traditional sampler quilts 36:53 - Harriet Powers36:59 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 37:05 - Quilts and Color. The Pilgrim / Roy Collection exhibition 37:11 - Faith Ringgold's quilt, Dream 2: King of the Sisterhood (1988)37:36 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 37:38 - Applique37:47 - Tie dye37:53 - Faith Ringgold37:54 - Sharpie28:05 - Dr Martin Luther King 38:09 - Fannie Lou Hamer38L10 - Rosa Parks38:16 - Civil Rights movement38:25 - Sylvia Hernández38:26 - Williamsburg, Brooklyn38:44 and 38:54 - Connecticut 39:42 - Faith Ringgold39:45 - Harriet Powers39:55 - Susan Hoffman 40:02 - Bisa Butler 40:08 - Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories exhibition 40:56 - Museum of Fine Arts, Boston website41:21 - MFA (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston)Click here for more information on Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories and how to visit the museumFollow us:Amanda: @broadclothstudio https://broadclothstudio.com/Wendy: @the.weekendquilter https://the-weekendquilter.com/Anna: @waxandwanestudiohttps://www.waxandwanestudio.com/Quilt Buzz: @quilt.buzzhttps://quiltbuzzpodcast.com/Intro/Outro Music:Golden Hour by Vlad Gluschenko

Outspoken with Joshua Gagnon
Ep 066: What Affects Me Affects You

Outspoken with Joshua Gagnon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 28:09


What does love ask of us as it comes to our relationships with other people? What does it mean to love other people in our own decision making process? Does what I do affect you?    Martin Luther King Jr. once said;    “Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be, and you can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be.” - MLK   Tune in to hear Roman and Josh talk about what it means to live a life with others in mind, as it comes to our choices, our actions, and ultimately our hearts, on this week's episode of Outspoken.    If you enjoy listening to this podcast, please leave us a review on Apple Podcast or Stitcher or take the time to share it on social media.   Connect with Joshua Gagnon:    Website: https://joshuagagnon.com    Twitter: @joshgagnon   Facebook: @Pastor Josh Gagnon   Instagram:  @joshgagnon

Win At Home First
Are you doing today what will make you better for tomorrow, with Patrick Wathen, President of Equity Commercial Real Estate

Win At Home First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 43:07


In this episode, you'll discover…  How humility and respect go hand in hand when leading your team and your family (2:19)  The counterintuitive reason adding your faith to your company's value statement opens more doors than it closes (even if you think it'll make you lose customers) (10:15)  How having “healthy tension” in your business pushes your company to grow (14:14)  The subtle mindset shift to make in your prayers that helps you align with God's plan for your life (16:11)  2 simple ways to motivate and inspire others around you when you're feeling unmotivated and uninspired (23:16)  The “Sleep On It Secret” military generals and Martin Luther King Jr. used to make wiser decisions instead of rushing into a bad solution (25:41)  How dedicating too much time to work sabotages your relationship with your kids (and how to spend time with your family without sacrificing your career) (30:31)  If you'd like to connect with Patrick Wathen, you can send him an email at pwathen@equity.net.  Or you can check out Equity Commercial Real Estate at https://equity.net or his construction company at https://ECSbuilds.com.   If you're a Cincinnati business owner or leader and you want to grow over the next 12 months, I want to help you. I'm launching another cohort of Prioritized Leader Academy in October. If you'd like to learn more about the program, send me an email at cory@corymcarlson.com or give me a call at 720-301-8377. Are you crushing it at work but struggling at home? If you want to learn how to win at home, then go to https://CoryMCarlson.com and download your free copy of “10 Ways To Win At Home.” If you're looking for a resource to help you with these times when your work is now in your home, check out my book Win At Home First on Amazon. Forbes Magazine rated it one of 7 books everyone on your team should read.

Inside Influence
Daryl Davis - One man and the Ku Klux Klan: The power of meeting conflict with curiosity

Inside Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 79:28


Daryl Davis - One man and the Ku Klux Klan: The power of respectful communicationHow does a black musician who's jammed with the likes of Chuck Berry, Jerry Lee Lewis, BB King and even Bill Clinton - become friends with an Imperial Wizard from the Ku Klux Klan?In this polarised world, breaking down entrenched positions may be the most important skill needed by us all. If two passionate sides can agree to disagree, long enough to find what they have in common - could we overcome climate change, poverty and even racism?My guest on this episode of Inside Influence podcast would say a resounding yes.On today's Inside Influence Podcast episode I talk to R&B musician and Race Reconciliator Daryl Davis about talking to the “other”.Growing up overseas as the son of diplomats, he returned to the US as a 10-year-old and was shocked to discover that people could hate him because of the colour of his skin. Later that year he saw MLK assassinated.This formed a question that went on to define the course of his life: “‘How can you hate me if you don't even know me?”Through music he discovered a beautiful universal language and had a wonderful career playing the piano for some of the greats such as Chuck Berry and Jerry Lee Lewis. One night while playing in a bar in Frederick Maryland, he met a Ku Klux Klan member and decided the best way to find an answer to his question was to attend their rallies.Rather than a debate, he was looking to have a conversation. Rather than trying to convince or convert, he decided to approach people with curiosity and respect.Over the past 30 years, Daryl Davis has inspired 200+ people to quit the Ku Klux Klan. Through dialogue and (as you'll come to hear) a thirst to first understand before being understood.Today's Guest Daryl DavisDaryl Davis is an award-winning R&B piano player, actor, author, and race relations expert.He has worked with Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley's Jordanaires, The Legendary Blues Band and many others. He currently tours with The Daryl Davis Band. He is also an actor and appeared on HBO's critically acclaimed series The Wire.As a Race Reconciliator, he has been sent around the world by the State Department to talk about conflict reconciliation and race relations. He has won numerous awards and has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, NPR and other media outlets to talk about race relations. He hosts a podcast called Changing Minds and has written a book on his relationships with Klu Klux Klan members called “Klan-destine Relationships”LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daryl-davis-5226b24/Twitter: https://twitter.com/realdaryldavisInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/realdaryldavis/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DarylDavisRaceReconciliator/“One person can make an exponential change because when they impact another, that person then goes on to impact another.”“You cannot change someone's reality, they have to change it themselves.”“You have to invite the other to participate and when you see that happen collectively, that is when huge things happen.”You'll learnHis journey from that bar in Maryland to immersing himself in the world of the KKK – what he learned, how he has learned to respond and what that has to teach us about having deeply difficult conversations.Why he is NEVER offended by what he hears in those conversations – this one intrigued me the most – including how he stays in a place of active respect and curiosity – in situations that would bring most people's blood to the boil.Why he always start with ‘commonality' - and he uses some beautiful language here – essentially beginning any difficult conversation with what he has in common with the other person, before moving to what he has in contrast.Why change never happens in the moment, I think this one is worth hearing a few times – we will never change someone's mind in the moment. The intention instead is to invite them to an exploration (NOT A DEBATE) – and then respectfully sow seeds that they can reflect on later.Why self awareness and courage are muscles we all have – and only by strengthening and using those muscles – can we inspire others to start doing the same. Parents and leaders, this one is on us.As someone who considers himself to be ‘just a rock and roll player' how Daryl has managed to achieve what many movements have not – by first deciding to listen.And finally, Daryl's own personal roadmap to having deeply difficult conversations. A game changing tool for any conversation or situation where the emotions and stakes are at their most intense.References and links mentionedThe Charlotteville “Unite the Right” Rally.My new ebook The Influencer Code.The Mark Twain quote was from The Innocents Abroad / Roughing It.Daryl's book Klan-destine RelationshipsIf you liked this episode, you might also enjoyBob Chapman – Truly human leadership: What it means to lead like everybody mattersHamish Thomson – Why it's not always right to be right Judy Atkinson - 4 Keys to Transform Conflict with Deep ListeningJonah Berger - How to change anyone's mind without having to pushSubscribe to and Review the Inside Influence PodcastThanks for tuning into this week's episode of the Inside Influence Podcast! If the information in my conversations and interviews have helped you in your business journey, please head over to iTunes, subscribe to the show, and leave an honest review. Your reviews and feedback will not only help us continue to deliver great, helpful content, but it will also help us reach even more amazing people just like you!Also, don't forget to hop on my website juliemasters.com and download my new ebook The Influencer Code See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Winning Minds
Winning Minds 2021.17 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr (MLK Jr)

Winning Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 9:16


This is a simple reading of two versions of MLK Jr's essay, The Purpose of Education. Unfortunately, he never made this a speech or a sermon, so we do not have the privilege of hearing it in his own gifted and powerful voice. But he was more than a voice. He was far more than I could ever describe here. But I'll leave it at this: he was a man with a WINNING mind, and I believe the thoughts, questions and arguments you are about to hear are still very useful and relevant. Thank you for listening. I hope you enjoy it and that it contributes to your next WINNING decision. Who was Martin Luther King Jr? The Purpose of Education (01) The Purpose of Education (02) *Credit: intro track is "Warriors" by Bizzle (God Over Money)* God Over Money Records | Music, Apparel, & Lifestyle God Over Money - YouTube Music during Ad Sponsor: Butterfly Woke by Jeris (c) copyright 2020 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/VJ_Memes/61357 Ft: airtone --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

It's A Man's World Podcast
Ep. 178 — #RoomateFromHell

It's A Man's World Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 71:16


This week the gang plays a variation of the F*** Mary Kill game this week, we read a letter about a listener who went out on a cheap ass date. The crew discusses Lil Fizz apologizing to Omarion, The Super Bowl halftime show, George Floyds statue being vandalized,. and the new Power spinoff. We give Christina Milian Dime of the week,and play ones gotta go with three UGK classics. Black Black Black goes to R Kelly and his Lawyer for comparing the shamed singer to MLK.

First Baptist Church of Arlington - FBCA Podcast
What Do You Believe About Prejudice?

First Baptist Church of Arlington - FBCA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021


Dennis R Wiles FBC Arlington October 3, 2021 2021 A JOURNEY OF FAITH Celebrating 150 Years of Ministry: Appreciating Our Past Anticipating Our Future FALL 2021 What Do You Believe? September 5 – November 6, 2021 What Do You Believe About Prejudice? Acts 10:34-35 Fall 2021: What Do You Believe? Acts 10:34-35 Then Peter began to speak: “I now realize how true it is that God does not show favoritism but accepts from every nation the one who fears him and does what is right. Prejudice: an unfair and unreasonable opinion or feeling, especially when formed without enough thought or knowledge. -Cambridge Dictionary The problem we have with prejudice is not in its identification or definition; it is in its eradication. Prejudice is a great time saver. You can form opinions without having to get the facts. -E. B. White Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future and renders the present inaccessible. -Maya Angelou Prejudice lies at the root of many ills – not the least of which is racism. I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality… I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word. –Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. –James Baldwin CHRISTIAN RESPONSE TO PREJUDICE Because of our worldview (Image of God), we believe in the inherent dignity and worth of every human being. Prejudice and its ensuing ill are all results of the fallen nature of humanity and must be acknowledged as sin. We begin to address the sin of prejudice by removing the log from our own eye. Through God's guidance and power, we commit ourselves to be agents of reconciliation and restoration in our own communities.

The Children's Book Podcast
Are Banned Books the Problem?

The Children's Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 6:17


Last October, the all-white school board of the Central York School District in York, Pennsylvania, unanimously banned a list of educational resources. The books included on this list are Worth Noting.Links:List of diversity resources banned in Central York schools (accessed September 22, 2021)Equity Book Resource List (accessed September 22, 2021)Sources consulted:“STUDENTS PROTEST BOOK BANS IN PENNSYLVANIA SCHOOL DISTRICT'” (Book Riot, September 9, 2021)“SCHOOL DISTRICT MAINTAINS BAN OF ANTIRACIST BOOKS DESPITE STUDENT PROTESTS'” (Book Riot, September 15, 2021)“School district bans books on Rosa Parks and Malala. Now students want answers'” (CNN, September 16, 2021)“Students fight back against a book ban that has a Pennsylvania community divided'” (CNN, September 16, 2021)“Central York school board votes unanimously to rescind book ban: ‘It has taken far too long'” (York Daily Record, September 20, 2021)“Central York School District reverses diversity book ban'” (Fox 43, September 20, 2021)“In Central York, kids rose up to save books on MLK, Rosa Parks from their parents | Will Bunch Newsletter'” (The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 21, 2021)

Blunt Force Truth
One Race, the Human Race - An Interview with Dr. Alveda King

Blunt Force Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 59:02


Today's show rundown: What does Dr. Alveda King think her Father and Uncle would think of the state of race relations today. With institutions segregating graduation and all the other activities. Alveda King says that if they were here today they would reference the Bible - Acts 17:26 - the day will come when there is no Black Power or no White Power, only Human Power. We have the ability as the Human Race to come together from different backgrounds, ethnicity, race etc. Chuck says that if we could just get the Left interested in The Constitution, and The Bible we could get some things done. Mark & Chuck talk a little about how Pres. Trump could NOT be a racist...he was quoted saying "We all bleed the same". We are all ONE RACE - the Human Race. Sure we have different ethnicities, but there is only One Human Race. Speak for Life has come into being from an awareness campaign over the last 16 years. From the womb to the tomb, valuing human dignity...regardless of skin, money, gender etc. Speaking for LIFE. Dr. King is working on a curriculum for children so they could learn and then speak from a place of being informed on the Sanctity of Life. Fear, anger, & strife. If the government can keep the population living like this, churning and churning to make us hate each other, they have the power. If we are anchored in love, forgiveness, and faith WE have the power. About Alveda King: Dr. Alveda C. King is the daughter of the late slain civil rights activist Rev. A. D. King and the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. She is the founder of pro-life organization Speak for Life, and currently serves as a Fox News Channel contributor and the host of Fox Nation's “Alveda King's House.” Dr. King is also a former Georgia State Legislator, and a 2021 recipient of the Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award. Full Bio: https://www.alvedaking.com/alveda-king Alveda's Websites: https://www.alvedaking.com http://speakforlife.org https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0063645/ Give H2Max a try and let us know what you think: buyh2max.com Help us bring you the best content possible. Due to the left's boycotts of those who advertise with Conservatives, we have had a number of advertisers back-out to avoid possible backlash. Support the show and gain access to even more content at https://www.patreon.com/bftpodcast Don't forget to leave us a voicemail for the chance to have it played on a future episode. You can do so by clicking the link. https://bluntforcetruth.com/voicemail/ Also, check out the store on our website to get your own Blunt Force Truth gear. https://store.bluntforcetruth.com/

Informed Pregnancy Podcast
Anna Maleika Tubbs - After Birth

Informed Pregnancy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:39


Advocate, Consultant, and Author of 'The Three Mothers', How the Mothers of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation, and Mother of 2, Anna Malaika Tubbs joins the podcast to share her recent home birth experience of her 2nd child.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Creative Audios.in
WHEN I MET CORRETA SCOTT KING Feat. Willie D Davis IV | AJAY TAMBE

Creative Audios.in

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 8:43


International Storytelling Event . Meeting Coretta Scott King Opportunities don't always come when you want them but you have to take them when they do. This was my opportunity to meet a Black History Legend of the Civil Rights Movement. Coretta Scott King (née Scott; April 27, 1927 – January 30, 2006) was an American author, activist, civil rights leader, and the wife of Martin Luther King Jr. As an advocate for African-American equality, she was a leader for the civil rights movement in the 1960s. King was also a singer who often incorporated music into her civil rights work. King met her husband while attending graduate school in Boston. They both became increasingly active in the American civil rights movement. Our Guest Storyteller : Willie D Davis IV connect with Willie on Instagram @theactorwillied and @nexicon . --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/creativecellsaudios.in/support

Fearless with Jason Whitlock
Ep 60 | Will Smith's 'Open Marriage' vs. Scriptural Truth | MLK 'Color-Blind' No Longer Applies?

Fearless with Jason Whitlock

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 76:54


Whitlock welcomes Leonydus Johnson, host of “Informed Dissent,” to talk about the ongoing vaccine controversy and his Twitter run-in with Martin Luther King Jr.'s daughter. Why are health agencies now saying you are not fully vaccinated until 14 days after the jab? How did King's desire for a “color-blind” society get discarded by the Left, including MLK's own daughter? What did Johnson say to get him blocked by Bernice King? On Tennessee Harmony, the pastors weigh in on Will Smith's recent comments that he and Jada Pinkett-Smith have an “open marriage.” Are their relationship issues curable with the application of traditional values?   ​​Today's Sponsor: Get with Good Ranchers today and support American farmers! Visit https://GoodRanchers.com/FEARLESS to get $20 OFF and FREE express shipping. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Brohio Podcast
Martin Luther King and the Secret FBI Files

The Brohio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 98:54


There are many unsettled rumors and, myths and conspiracies about the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. We investigate all the allegations in this episode. We also head into uncharted territory where we disclose information about an FBI investigation that alleges Dr. King sexually assaulted 50 different prostitutes. What a ride!!Link to FBI Document: https://www.archives.gov/files/research/jfk/releases/docid-32989551.pdf#page=1Sponsors:Get the mental health help you need, today!!betterhelp.com/brohioFREE FOOD!!! HELLOFRESH!!!14 free meals!!hellofresh.com/brohio14PROMO CODE: BROHIO14Get it up and show her what you're made of!!bluechew.comPROMO CODE: BROHIOFREE SAMPLE!!