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Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

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Ninja Rob
Talking Sense w/ Rick Migliarese

Ninja Rob

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 84:38


In today's episode (ep. 138), we take a break from our normal format and present to you an interview. Marco interviews Rick Migliarese. Rick is the co-owner of Balance Studios. Philadelphia's oldest and most successful Brazilian jiu-jitsu schools.Talking to Rick you realize how important his father was and continues to be to him. Even eight years after his father's death Rick still uses life lessons taught by his father. We talk about how every moment good or bad has made Rick who he is today, and he would not change any of it. We discuss chess, how the game's decision process has helped Rick learn from failure, and how he applies that to training. Rick also advises you to not be the smartest or the toughest person in the room, this way you can always be learning.

Locked On 76ers - Daily Podcast On The Philadelphia Sixers
Will the Philadelphia 76ers wait until the offseason to trade Ben Simmons?

Locked On 76ers - Daily Podcast On The Philadelphia Sixers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 37:58


Another day means another trade rumor involving Philadelphia 76ers star Ben Simmons. Ky Carlin and Keith Pompey examine another report that has come out and said that the Sixers have their eyes set on acquiring James Harden from the Brooklyn Nets. Plus buy or sell the notion that Simmons is willing to sit out the entire season if he is not moved at the trade deadline as well as the improved play of Tyrese Maxey. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sean's Sports Stop
Episode 378

Sean's Sports Stop

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:17


On Episode 378 of the legendary Sean's Sports Stop podcast, Sean reports the biggest news in sports and gives us scintillating opinion on everything going on, which includes: Russel Wilson exploring possibilities out of Seattle (1:00), Australia deporting Novak Djokovic (6:08), Kevin Durants injury (9:00), Jalen Hurts saying the Philadelphia Eagles will bounce back (10:00), Novak Djokovic possibly missing the French Open (12:10), Day 1 of the 2022 Australian Open (14:30), Ben Roethlisberger likely retiring after playoff loss to Kansas City Chiefs (16:10), latest College Basketball AP Poll (18:30), Georgia Bulldogs bulking up for a repeat (22:00), NFL GM saying college players are more entitled (23:15), Jimmy Garrapolo embracing the criticism and winning (26:25), Dallas Cowboys firing Mike McCarthy? (29:20), Ben Simmons possibly sitting out the entire season to force a trade out of Philadelphia (31:20), James Harden not committing to the Brooklyn Nets (32:35), Las Vegas Raiders firing GM Mike Mayock (33:45), and the Los Angeles Rams THRASHING the Arizona Cardinals to advance to the divisional round. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/seanssportsstop/message

Philly Take with RB
Philadelphia Sixers Lose To Wizards, James Harden To Philly Rumors, & Ben Simmons For Bradley Beal?

Philly Take with RB

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:59


The Philadelphia Sixers lost to the Wizards today by a final score of 117-98, and fell to 25-18 on the season. In other news, Marc Stein is reporting that there is noise circulating about a potential James Harden trade, and there is interest from the Sixers. Lastly, Bradley Beal should be a top target to land in Philadelphia. Today, we discuss all of this and provide some thoughts on everything. #Sixers #JamesHarden #BradleyBeal #SixersNews #NBANews #NBATrade #NBA Philly Take with RB Merch Store: https://philly-take-with-rb.creator-spring.com/ Subscribe to Philly Take with RB on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZ6xo8_BSzZJVYfWEqEt1Gw INSTA: https://www.instagram.com/rbphillytake/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/RBPhillyTake

VSiN Best Bets
Philadelphia CityCast with Ryan Rothstein | January 17, 2022

VSiN Best Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:55


Ryan Rothstein discusses the Eagles' 31-15 season-ending loss in Tampa Bay. The question surrounding Jalen Hurts as franchise QB will be in full swing for the organization. If you're enjoying the Philadelphia CityCast podcast, follow/subscribe wherever you get your podcasts! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Speaking to Influence
Joseph Chott – SVP, Brown Brothers Harriman: Generational and Financial Communication Strategies

Speaking to Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 38:03


Two topics are sure to make a room uncomfortable – politics and money. This week Laura explores who and why we trust people with vulnerable topics with private banking expert Joseph Chott. Joe's experience developing relationships with powerful people has given him incredible experiences in having difficult conversations about financials, customizing investment plans to align with personal beliefs, and communicating expertise and advice from one generation to the next. During this conversation, Joe shares why he's focusing on improving his follow-up, encouraging simplicity in financial conversations, and why every difficult conversation deserves a phone call.   Here are a few things you'll learn during this conversation: Why leaders of large companies struggle with elevator pitches The problem with delivering too much context too quickly How to avoid “the Expert's Curse” A simple strategy for understanding the nuance of presenting an opinion   During the 24 Hour Influence Challenge Joe challenges himself to “upgrade” his 30-second elevator pitch and Laura shares simple ways to pique interest and encourage further conversation.  Joseph Chott, CFA is the Senior Vice President at Brown Brothers Harriman. A Relationship Manager in the Philadelphia office, Joe works with high-net-worth clients, business owners, endowments, and foundations. Prior to joining the firm in 2014, Joe was a Team Leader in the corporate banking group for M&T Bank. Joe is a board member of the Catholic Foundation of Greater Philadelphia, Business Leadership Organized for Catholic Schools, North Light Community Center, and the Risk Management Association of Philadelphia. He is a graduate of Villanova University and a CFA Charterholder.   You can learn more about Joe in the following ways: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joseph-chott-b88b2812/ Email: joseph.chott@bbh.com Website: https://www.bbh.com/us/en.html   To learn more about Dr. Laura Sicola and how mastering influence can impact your success go to https://www.speakingtoinfluence.com/quickstart and download the quick start guide for mastering the three C's of influence.   You can connect with Laura in the following ways: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drlaurasicola LinkedIn Business Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/vocal-impact-productions/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWri2F_hhGQpMcD97DctJwA Facebook: Vocal Impact Productions Twitter: @Laura Sicola  Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/vocalimpactproductions Instagram: @VocalImpactProductions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dom Giordano Program
Philly Crime Spreads to Suburbs, Paul Manafort Drops In

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 43:45


Full Hour | Today, Dom led off the Dom Giordano Program by discussing the spread of crime in and around Philadelphia after a rash of crime in Abington, an affluent suburb of Philadelphia. Giordano reveals the crimes that have shuttered Montgomery County, and tells of the assailants, who all share one common trait in being from Philadelphia. Giordano tells about the lack of accountability that has blossomed due to Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner's policies, to which he attributes the heightened suburban crime. Then, Paul Manafort, former chair of the Trump presidential campaign, joins Dom Giordano to preview his upcoming book, Political Prisoner: Persecuted, Prosecuted, but Not Silenced. Manafort was thrust into the national spotlight after being convicted of various financial crimes including tax evasion and money laundering, arguably in retaliation for his support and work with Donald Trump. Manafort tells of his time spent at Riker's Island, telling of the solitary confinement he was forced into after refusing to turn on Trump, allegedly for his own safety. In addition, Manafort reveals whether he felt his safety was at risk at any time, updates his heath situation, and tells how he plans to move forward in the political sphere after the controversy. (Photo by Yana Paskova/Getty Images)  

The Dom Giordano Program
Fmr. Police Chief on Crime Spike, Didinger on Eagles Loss

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 42:55


To lead off the second hour, former Montgomery County Police Chief Bill Kelly returns to the Dom Giordano Program to discuss the heightened crime in Abington and surrounding areas perpetrated by Philadelphia citizens. First, Giordano and Kelly discuss whether the lackadaisical policies of District Attorney Larry Krasner have removed accountability from criminals, and give particular ideas for reform to fix the issues we're seeing. Kelly, an expert in reform, offers his opinion on the new radical nature of policies, and tells whether he believes the lack of accountability has presented opportunity for criminals. In addition, Kelly talks about the demoralization of police, and tells of the hardships police officers face on the job.  Then, Philadelphia legend Ray Didinger returns to the Dom Giordano Program to break down the Eagles season-ending Wildcard loss to the Buccaneers yesterday. First, Giordano and Didinger blast Jalen Reagor for his performance in the game, including a demoralizing muffed punt, with Didinger noting his suggestion last that week that Eagles coach Nick Sirianni sit Reagor for his repeated mistakes through the season. In addition, Ray tells what he believes makes Tom Brady an all-time great, and reveals whether he thinks the Eagles will bail on Jalen Hurts as starting QB moving forward. (Photo by Getty Images)

The Dom Giordano Program
Fmr. MontCo Police Chief Bill Kelly on Spread of Philadelphia Crime into Suburbs

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 9:34


To lead off the second hour, former Montgomery County Police Chief Bill Kelly returns to the Dom Giordano Program to discuss the heightened crime in Abington and surrounding areas perpetrated by Philadelphia citizens. First, Giordano and Kelly discuss whether the lackadaisical policies of District Attorney Larry Krasner have removed accountability from criminals, and give particular ideas for reform to fix the issues we're seeing. Kelly, an expert in reform, offers his opinion on the new radical nature of policies, and tells whether he believes the lack of accountability has presented opportunity for criminals. In addition, Kelly talks about the demoralization of police, and tells of the hardships police officers face on the job. (Photo by Getty Images)

The Dom Giordano Program
Ray Didinger on Eagles' Season-Ending Loss to Tom Brady's Buccaneers

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 11:43


Philadelphia legend Ray Didinger returns to the Dom Giordano Program to break down the Eagles season-ending Wildcard loss to the Buccaneers yesterday. First, Giordano and Didinger blast Jalen Reagor for his performance in the game, including a demoralizing muffed punt, with Didinger noting his suggestion last that week that Eagles coach Nick Sirianni sit Reagor for his repeated mistakes through the season. In addition, Ray tells what he believes makes Tom Brady an all-time great, and reveals whether he thinks the Eagles will bail on Jalen Hurts as starting QB moving forward. (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)

Not In My House
Dre Baldwin: Work On Your Game (Former Pro Hooper & Author)

Not In My House

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:03


Dre Baldwin is in the house! This is a great episode for all hoopers and entrepreneurs looking to find success even when the odds are against you. Whether it's pro basketball, writing, business, or podcasting, Dre has always had the competitive fire to find success.Dre was cut from his high school team until his senior year of high school. His hard work and desire led him to a college basketball opportunity at the Division III level and a 9-year overseas career. Dre is far more than just a hooper though. He always had that business and sales mindset even as a player and that has carried on to his success in other areas of life. He is the CEO of Work On Your Game, an author of 29 books, a podcaster…there is truly nothing that Dre doesn't do.BIG thanks to Dre Baldwin for taking the time to hang out with us. Truly an inspiring person and without a doubt has a winning mentality in every project that he takes on. We just can't wait to see what does next!Thank you Dre Baldwin!Use this link for a Free book, The Third Day:http://ThirdDayBook.com (He has a 3- and 10-book options too for gifting books!)And here's the link for the FREE 30-minute "Game Session" : http://www.WorkOnYourGameUniversity.com/HouseAnd Dre's text number to get his FREE #DailyMotivation text: 1.305.384.6894Here are Dre's social media links –http://LinkedIn.com/in/DreAllDayhttp://Facebook.com/WorkOnYourGame http://Twitter.com/DreAllDayhttp://Instagram.com/DreBaldwinhttp://YouTube.com/Dreupthttp://DreAllDay.comYou can find this episode on Apple, Spotify or any source for podcasts.Follow us on social media for news, updates and highlight reels!Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/notin.myhouse.79Instagram- @Not_in_my_house_podcastTwitter - @NOTINMYHOUSEpc

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio
Did You Know? The story of the South Philadelphia church that inspired Civil Rights anthem "We Shall Overcome"

Scroll Down: True Stories from KYW Newsradio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:20


Did you know the Civil Rights anthem ‘We Shall Overcome' has roots to a church on Broad Street in Philadelphia? On this episode of KYW Newsradio In Depth, listen to Reverend Robert L. Johnson tell the rich history of Tindley Temple United Methodist, where he serves as pastor, and how he's trying to keep the legacy and memory of the church's namesake — Dr. Charles A. Tindley — alive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Radio Times
The Regional Roundup – January 17th

Radio Times

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 49:00


In 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. joined fellow civil rights activist Cecil B. Moore to protest the segregation of Girard College in Philadelphia.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Imbalanced History Of Rock And Roll: Doo Wop Roots with Harvey Holiday

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 62:30


This week, a Philly legend, the great Harvey Holiday joins the Imbalanced Boys as they dig into how vocal groups, singing together, changed in the early decades of Rock n' Roll. As popular music morphed from the '40s into the '50s, there was a change in tone, and approach. Young kids, singing together, unaccompanied, began to gain popularity. A&R guys were on the lookout in subways, bathrooms and ON STREET CORNERS! Now retired, Harvey offers his views as someone who experienced it as a kid, became a part of it, and, of course, played the hell out of the music on the radio! His long-term radio influence is part of why there's such a strong R&B presence, even today, in the city where we live, Philadelphia! Listen to this cool episode, and then get caught up here!!! Thanks to our sponsors: Welcome to Boldfoot Socks as our newest sponsor of the podcast! Check them out by clicking here, and enter the Code "History15" to save 15% on your order!!! And as always, Crooked Eye Brewery for their support of the podcast! Listen to this cool episode, and then get caught up here!!! Thanks to our sponsors: Welcome to Boldfoot Socks as our newest sponsor of the podcast! Check them out by clicking here, and enter the Code "History15" to save 15% on your order!!! And as always, Crooked Eye Brewery for their support of the podcast! This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Aunti Oni Story Village *!*
Martin Luther King Jr.

Aunti Oni Story Village *!*

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:15


Do you know about Martin Luther King Jr.? If you do or you don't, you can listen to this original story poem written by Charlotte Blake Alston, an internationally acclaimed storyteller, narrator, singer, and librettist, from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Miss Charlotte wrote this lovely poem for elementary/primary school children to learn about the life of Martin Luther King Jr. and why he's so important in American history.Miss Charlotte has a big pocketbook of stories as she is a popular African and an American griot. She also plays the kora, an African string instrument, and is the official storyteller for the Philadelphia Orchestra in Pennsylvania, USA!You can watch and listen to Miss Charlotte tell stories on YouTube and learn more about her on her website: Charlotte Blake Alston.(c) 1995 Martin Luther King Jr. Storypoem by Charlotte Blake AlstonMusic: (c) Feel This Way by Wanna BeatMix & Mastered: DJ King CanalIf you love Martin Luther King Jr., story poem, spread the word about this podcast with your teachers, family & friends thanks!Visit with Aunti Oni & friends in Story Village Live! a monthly cultural storytelling adventure live on Zoom.To support this podcast with a one-time or monthly donation and help sustain future episodes feel free to...Click YES! Thank ya kindly *!* See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 209: Wire Taps— Dartmouth grad with 11 years of work experience in Japan. Syrian American chemical engineer looking to transition to consulting. West African candidate weighing offers from Booth, Johnson, Yale and Stern, for Investment Banking.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:58


This Martin Luther King Day edition of the podcast takes a moment to recognize the unparalleled contributions of Dr. King before moving into the latest news from the MBA admissions front. With R2 deadlines mostly in the rearview, Graham is impatient about interview invites and Alex offers him some advice in this regard. Your hosts then break down the latest Employment Report from Kellogg and mention the recent publication of Real Humans pieces for UT Austin, Vanderbilt Owen, and Boston Carroll. Also of note, two upcoming 'deferred enrollment' events hosted by Clear Admit and featuring admissions representatives from Berkeley, Chicago Booth, Columbia, CMU Tepper, UVA Darden, Wharton, Yale SOM, and MIT Sloan - sign up here! https://bit.ly/demba22 As to this week's featured candidates, Alex and Graham kick things off with a close look at a Dartmouth grad who has worked for 11 years in Japan. He's launched several entrepreneurial ventures, most recently setting up a language school. A super GMAT and fascinating experience helps, but he will really need to show fit and that he plans to fully engage during his MBA experience. Next, Alex selects a Syrian American chemical engineer who has worked in the petrochemical industry and wants to move to consulting and sustainability. She also has a passion for advocacy work and is currently in the midst of a 'gap year' to pursue that passion (while applying to b-school). Finally, from DecisionWire, Graham and Alex break down the dilemma for a candidate who is weighing offers from Chicago / Booth, Cornell / Johnson, Yale SOM and NYU / Stern - with varying scholarship amounts. The admitted student is from West Africa and is seeking to enter Investment Banking. Your hosts also give credit to the contributions from the community on DecisionWire for this entry. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was mixed, produced, re-mixed, and version-ed, by the incredible Dennis Crowley in sunny Philadelphia. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen, and to tell at least 100 friends about it. Thanks for listening!

Big Buckets Podcast
New Year, Same League

Big Buckets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 17:27


Checking in for the first pod of 2022! Welcome back -- we're so excited to cover the second half of the NBA's 75th inaugural season as we approach the trade deadline/ all star weekend. Marcus breaks down MVP possibilities, locks for the post season, speculation on what will happen with Ben Simmons in Philadelphia & Kyrie's new part-time hooping position with the Nets.--Are Ja Morant and the Grizz legit title contenders just one year after finishing 8th in the west?--Does Cleveland deserve TWO all-stars named from the Cavs this year?--Can LeBron and Anthony Davis save the Lakers from Russell Westbrook? Or do they have bigger problems than their declining point guard?  Next week so be ready as we follow up and debate all this + more! Also every share/ like on the podcast will enter for an NBA TopShot NFT giveaway! Details on our instagram page. Stay safe, HAPPY NEW YEAR!Support the show (https://www.bigbucketspod.com)

Locked On Celtics - Daily Podcast On The Boston Celtics With Rainin' J's
Boston Celtics, Robert Williams come up clutch in a 4th quarter! Plus a major fail vs Philadelphia

Locked On Celtics - Daily Podcast On The Boston Celtics With Rainin' J's

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 35:44


The Celtics looked like they were on their way to another soul-crushing loss to an under-manned team, but Robert Williams came up with a clutch stretch and the Celtics actually came back in the clutch to win. John Karalis of Boston Sports Journal has that, the underrated games from Jaylen Brown and Al Horford, and how Jayson Tatum didn't let a rough shooting night take his focus away from his defense. This was the opposite of what happened against Philly, but John explains why the Celtics being so afraid of a shot blocker set themselves up for a turnover-filled mess of a game. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. PrizePicks Don't hesitate, check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Legends of Philadelphia
I fought the PPA and the PPA won

Legends of Philadelphia

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 48:55


The Philadelphia Parking Authority (PPA) is an agency that manages the many parking operations for Philadelphia. This city is fanatical about it's parking and the job of enforcing parking rules is no easy task. The PPA has been the subject of angry op/eds, ugly investigations, and brutal reality tv shows. These guys stir up a lot of strong feelings so, today we want to put it in neutral and take a look under the hood of the Parking Authority.

Good Seats Still Available
246: The Pittsburgh Maulers - With Tom Rooney

Good Seats Still Available

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 74:50


As we continue to debate the general wisdom of resurrecting the intellectual property of the original short-lived 1980s version of the United States Football League - as well as question the viability of launching yet another spring pro football circuit - our attention this week turns to one of the eight chosen "franchises" for the new USFL launching this April.   Of course, memorably well-supported originals like the Tampa Bay Bandits, New Jersey Generals, Birmingham Stallions, and the only two clubs to ever win USFL championships - the Stars (once in Philadelphia, once in Baltimore) and the Michigan Panthers - make some semblance of sense.   But the lamentable one-year Pittsburgh Maulers?   Longtime sports promotions executive Tom Rooney - nephew of famed Pittsburgh Steelers founder Art Rooney, and former Maulers front office executive - joins for a nostalgic trip back to Three Rivers Stadium ("One and Dumb: The Story of the Maulers" from Three Rivers Stadium: A Confluence of Champions) and shares just why this mostly forgotten team from 1984 just might be worth bringing back to life.

DoomThugs.com
Songs That Rip Vol. 11

DoomThugs.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


Hey group! What’s up. Guess what we got for you?! Some frigging songs that totally and completely RIP. You’re gonna love em! Check them out!!!! Wow wow wow! Love ya! The post Songs That Rip Vol. 11 appeared first on Doom Thugs.

Cannon Fire Podcast
Bucs Advance, Crush the Eagles 31-15 - Ep. 247

Cannon Fire Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 53:37


Well that was fun. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers are victorious to start their playoff run, handling Philadelphia 31-15. Tom Brady looked sharp and the defense played one of their best games of the season.

The Philadelphia Sports Table | Philly Sports News & Views
Eagles Postgame, Wild Card Game, 2021-2022 vs. Buccaneers

The Philadelphia Sports Table | Philly Sports News & Views

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 46:25


The Philadelphia Eagles 2021-2022 season is now in the books as the Birds lost to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the Wild Card game down at Raymond James Stadium by a score of 31-15. It was ugly. It was embarrassing. The season is over.We've learned a lot about this team as some changes will be made for the future. Some players will be staying for years to come as well. We've seen those developmental pieces all season, and it's safe to say the Eagles' future and trajectory is certainly moving upward.Our friend of the pod, David Esser (DavidEsser_) from Sportscasting.com jumped on with Jeff to not only discuss the aftermath of the Wild Card game, but the guys discussed where the organization and team directionally need to move this offseason in terms of talent acquisition.As always, we concluded our Eagles postgame podcast by grading the special teams, defense, and offense as we reflected on this season as well. We thank you for listening to our postgame podcasts, and we'll see you back here next season for sure.Head over to our website for more podcasts and more: https://www.philadelphiasportstable.com.Follow the guys on Twitter:Jeff Warren: @Jeffrey_WarrenErik Leonard: @BrickPolittLen Hunsicker: @LenHunsickerFollow the show on Instagram: @philadelphiasportstable"Like" our Facebook Page: facebook.com/PhiladelphiaSportsTable

Stories of Scotland
Merlin of the Tweed: Lowland Legends & Geologic Journeys

Stories of Scotland

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 49:08


Jenny and Annie learn about the geology of the Scottish Lowlands, and travel as a wee grain of sand through half a billion years of geologic movement, ending up within the River Tweed.  In more recent history, we unravel Arthurian legends to explore the story of Merlin, the wizard of the wilds. A real cornucopia of Celtic mythologies and folklore.  This episode is sponsored by Scotland Shop. If you are tempted to check out some of Scotland Shop's beautiful tartan garments and fabrics, please follow this link to Scotland Shop. https://hubs.ly/H0-0fjl0 You can support Stories of Scotland on Patreon! www.patreon.com/storiesofscotland References: Alexander Pennecuik, A Geographical, Historical Description of the Shire of Tweeddale,  Edinburgh, 1715. Francis H. Groome (ed.), Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1901. H. L. D. Ward, Lailoken (or Merlin Silvester), Romania, Vol. 22, No 88. ‘How Tweed Got Its Name: Homespuns that have been famous for a thousand years,' Dundee Evening Telegraph, August 1940.  J. S. Blackie, Merlin and Kentigern, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, 1885.  J. S. P. Tatlock, Geoffrey of Monmouth's Vita Merlini, A Journal of Mediaeval Studies, Vol. XVIII, July 1943. Lauchlan MacLeanWatt, Scottish Life and Poetry, James Nisbet & Co., London, 1912.  ‘Merlin's Grave,' Peeblesshire Advertiser and County Newspaper, January 1992. ‘Merlin's Mysterious Death: His Last Resting Place,' Cambria Daily Leader, July 1890. ‘Obituary: The Tramp Poet,' Aberdeen Press and Journal, August 1925. Walter Scott, J. W. Lake, The Poetical Works of Sir Walter Scott, J. Crissy, Philadelphia, 1835.

Power-Wrestling RADIO
WWE Raw Review (10.1.22): Lesnar zerstört Lashley am Mikro, Titel wechseln!

Power-Wrestling RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 86:14


*** Rund 1500 Podcasts auf Abruf, alle aktuellen Reviews, keine Werbung, 20-30 neue Episoden jeden Monat. Hier anmelden und unterstützen. Jetzt auch Anmeldung per LASTSCHRIFT (neben PAYPAL und KREDITKARTE) möglich: http://www.patreon.com/powerwrestling Im Duell der Worte hatte Bobby Lashley gegen Brock Lesnar nicht viel zu melden. Bei WWE Raw wechselten überraschend die Tag-Team-Titel. Eine Tag-Team-Trennung gab es auch noch. Und Becky Lynchs Gegnerin für den Royal Rumble wurde in einem Triple Threat Match ermittelt.WWE Raw vom 10. Januar 2022 aus Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Mit @HerrBruns und Stefan @KolbWrestling. Raw schriftlich + Videos: https://www.power-wrestling.de/2022/01/11/wwe-raw-10-januar-2022-ergebnisse/

Grace Christian Assembly
Sunday - The Book of Revelation - 12 - The Church at Philadelphia - Rev. 3:7-13

Grace Christian Assembly

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022


Sunday - The Book of Revelation - 12 - The Church at Philadelphia - Rev. 3:7-13

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg
Bridging Philly Highlights Philadelphia's Helping Heroes in time for MLK Day of Service

Flashpoint with Cherri Gregg

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 56:10


This week Bridging Philly highlights some helping heroes just in time for Martin Luther King Day. After the devastating fire killing 12 people including 8 children in the Fairmount community, one organization sprang into action to help support the families involved in the Fairmount fire. Children First Pa's Executive Director joins Bridging Philly to share both how they raised money and provided services to the families, and their inspiration to carry on the bigger fight for health, equity, and opportunity for every child. Our News Maker highlights Todd Bernstein, founder and director of the Greater Philadelphia Martin Luther King Day of Service which will be held virtually at Girard College January 17th. KYW's Shara Dae Howard spoke with Bernstein about the significance of the event and the impact it is meant to have on the Philadelphia community. Our Philly Rising Change Maker is Dr. Tawanna Jones-Morrison who is an educator and school psychologist by trade. Her passion for girls' wellness and empowerment led her to start We REIGN, Inc (Rooting, Empowering, Inspiring a Girl's Nation).  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

This Muslim Girl Podcast
Healing After Divorce and Heartbreak with Self Love

This Muslim Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 63:12


Welcome Back! On this episode I sit with Sabriah Bilal who is an American born Muslim from Philadelphia. A seasoned teacher of 19 years, public speaker, author  and community activist. She is the founder and CEO of breebreespeaks which is a faith based organization that aims at empowering women to love themselves through trauma healing, life coaching and forgiveness. Sabriah began this organization 5 years ago after experiencing a tumultuous divorce and becoming a single mother herself.   https://breebreespeaks.com https://www.instagram.com/breebreespeaks/    

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic
The Mike Missanelli Show 1-14-22

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 170:17


Mike started off today's show talking the differences from the last time the Eagles faced the Buccaneers and what they need to do to put some doubt in Tampa Bay's mind in Sunday's Wild Card Game. (00:00-19:15) Mike went to the phones to get the vibe on the city (19:15-45:00) John Clark, from NBC10,  joined the show LIVE from Tampa to give a firsthand report in setting the stage for this weekend's game with some possibly concerning news about one of the Eagles (45:00-53:43) Back to the Phones for your calls (53:43-1:18:02) What's Brewing With Jen brings us stories of New York Jets Quarterback Zack Wilson  breaking up with his girlfriend, A California woman called 911 because she could not get her adult movies on her TV and a NJ Italian Restaurant is offering two free COVID tests with the purchase of their signature drink (1:18:02:1:24:38) Brian Westbrook joined the show for his weekly segment and his insight on the Eagles / Bucs match up (1:24:55-2:08:10) The rest of the show was your calls and predictions for Sunday up till Sound Off (2:44:41)

Broad Street Hockey: for Philadelphia Flyers fans
Checking out the competition: If you can't be good, be lucky

Broad Street Hockey: for Philadelphia Flyers fans

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 26:04


The Rangers roll into Philadelphia this evening and Tom Urtz of Blueshirt Banter joined the pod again to give some insight into the Rangers' relative success this season. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Beyond Prisons
Community Is The Antidote To Policing feat. Geo Maher

Beyond Prisons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 49:49


This is a companion episode to our interview with Geo Maher. If you haven't listened to that yet, you may want to put this on hold and check that conversation out first. Kim Wilson and Geo Maher dive deep into Chapter 5 of his book, A World Without Police: How Strong Communities Make Cops Obsolete. The chapter is entitled, “Building Communities Without Police,” and this discussion was originally prepared for one of Kim's courses. Geo Maher is a Philadelphia-based writer and organizer, and currently Visiting Associate Professor of Global Political Thought at Vassar College. He is author of four books, including A World Without Police, and his next book Anticolonial Eruptions appears in March.  Episode Resources & Notes A World Without Police Credits Created and hosted by Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein Edited by Ellis Maxwell Website & volunteers managed by Victoria Nam Theme music by Jared Ware Support Beyond Prisons Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well. Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, and Google Play Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information Twitter: @Beyond_Prison Facebook:@beyondprisonspodcast Instagram:@beyondprisons

Beyond Prisons
A World Without Police feat. Geo Maher

Beyond Prisons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 60:01


Geo Maher joins us to discuss his new book, "A World Without Police: How Strong Communities Make Cops Obsolete."  We touch on a number of subjects, including the context in which the book was written, cops and labor unions, and how Geo's experiences in Venezuela influenced his work. We also touch on Alexandria Ocasio Cortez's comment likening abolition to a suburb and rhetorical strategies with the mainstream, as well as examples of bottom-up abolitionist organizing around the world. Geo explains what he means by “strong community," the project of abolishing police and the border as being one in the same, and a whole lot more. Geo Maher is a Philadelphia-based writer and organizer, and currently Visiting Associate Professor of Global Political Thought at Vassar College. He is author of four books, including A World Without Police, and his next book Anticolonial Eruptions appears in March.  Episode Resources & Notes A World Without Police Credits Created and hosted by Kim Wilson and Brian Sonenstein Edited by Ellis Maxwell Website & volunteers managed by Victoria Nam Theme music by Jared Ware Support Beyond Prisons Visit our website at beyond-prisons.com Support our show and join us on Patreon. Check out our other donation options as well. Please listen, subscribe, and rate/review our podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, and Google Play Join our mailing list for updates on new episodes, events, and more Send tips, comments, and questions to beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com Kim Wilson is available for speaking engagements and to facilitate workshops. Please contact beyondprisonspodcast@gmail.com for more information Twitter: @Beyond_Prison Facebook:@beyondprisonspodcast Instagram:@beyondprisons

Turn Leftist Podcast
067: Interview with comrade Diop of the Black Community Control of Police Organization

Turn Leftist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 27:50


https://apscuhuru.org https://apspuhuru.org https://blackisbackcoalition.org Colonialism is the Cause, Black Power is the Solution "On the morning of January 5, 2022, a fire tore through a row house converted into apartments in the Fairmount neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Twelve people died, nine of them children, and two others were injured. Eight additional people escaped unharmed." Then "A major fire in a residential apartment building in the Bronx in New York City on Sunday (jan9) left 19 people dead, including 9 children, in what Mayor Eric Adams described as one of the worst fires the city has experienced in modern times. The blaze sent 32 people to hospitals with life-threatening conditions, Daniel Nigro, commissioner of the New York City Fire Department, said earlier Sunday. A total of 63 people were injured." As incidents of colonial violence, together these two fires forced the question of fire and public safety policy in the Black community onto the forefront of national discussion within the Black liberation movement. The Philadelphia "row house" was actually a building to house public housing residents, all of whom were African. The Bronx fire was essentially the same situation, housing designated by the ruling class for African workers. As is the case in all sectors of the capitalist economy, the conditions that led to the deaths in these fires were created entirely by the colonial capitalist ruling class, which has no interest in spending resources on effective fire safety equipment that would prevent fires from becoming dangerous to life and limb. In addition the insurance industry ensures that there will be no material loss to ruling class in fires. In fact, insurance companies offer compensation for the costs incurred in the replacement, repair or reconstruction of a property that was damaged due to fire. The contents are usually covered for at least 50% to 70% of the policy value. As an instrument to perpetuate colonial capitalist production the institution of firefighting in north America shares the same origins as that of the police. "The United States did not have government-run fire departments until around the time of the American Civil War. Prior to this time, private fire brigades competed with one another to be the first to respond to a fire because insurance companies paid brigades to save buildings." This situation was more graphically depicted in a scene in the movie entitled" Gangs of New York", told from the perspective of an Irish working class colonizer. "The municipal police fought the metropolitan police, the metropolitan police fought the street gangs, there were 37 amateur fire brigades. And they all fought each other." It is clear how the origins of the US fire-fighting apparatus can be found in the police and the state, as an institution to protect private property as well as wield fire as a weapon of the colonialist-capitalist system. All "official" firefighters in the first US were white. And their fundamental task was to protect the private property as employees of the US ruling class; bosses and landlords. for the rest of the text of the press release: ttps://controlc.com/2efcbb8f

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic
Brian Westbrook Joins The Mike Missanelli Show 1-14-22

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 43:13


Brian Westbrook joins Mikey Miss for his weekly segment and the guys give their picks for the playoffs. 

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic
What's BrewingWith Jen 1-14-21

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 6:56


What's Brewing With Jen brings us stories of New York Jets Quarterback Zack Wilson  breaking up with his girlfriend, A California woman called 911 because she could not get her adult movies on her TV and a NJ Italian Restaurant is offering two free COVID tests with the purchase of their signature drink

VSiN Best Bets
Philadelphia CityCast with Ryan Rothstein | January 14, 2022

VSiN Best Bets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 32:35


Ryan Rothstein and Will Hill of the New York CityCast podcast preview Wild Card weekend. The guys give their best bets and favorite props as you finalize your bets! If you're enjoying the Philadelphia CityCast podcast, follow/subscribe wherever you get your podcasts! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic
John Clark Joins The Mike Missanelli Show 1-14-22

Mike Missanelli - 97.5 The Fanatic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 9:02


John Clark, from NBC10,  joined the show LIVE from Tampa to give a firsthand report in setting the stage for this weekend's game with some possibly concerning news about one of the Eagles

The Rich Eisen Show
REShow: Nakobe Dean & Dallas Goedert - Hour 2 (01-14-22)

The Rich Eisen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 50:12


Georgia Bulldogs All-America LB Nakobe Dean, this week's ‘Gorilla Glue Toughest Player on Planet Earth Award' winner, tells Rich when he knew UGA had a special defensive unit, how much joy he took in silencing all the Michigan trolls, his reaction to donning that erroneous “Alabama Champions” cap after Georgia won the title, and if we'll see him at the NFL Combine this year.  Eagles TE Dallas Goedert tells Rich why Philly remains confident in their chances against the Buccaneers despite being the lowest seed in the NFC playoffs, how Jalen Hurts' steady leadership his helped the Eagles improve throughout the season, what he has to say to Philadelphia's doubters and if he'd ever consider using Viagra to stay warm during extremely cold weather games. In his weekly ‘Big-Ass Grab Bag' TJ lists his Top 5 What Ifs including Barry Bonds to the Braves, the Dez Bryant catch, Tim Duncan to the Sixers, and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Queer Arabs
Episode 180 [in English]: Grief Houses

The Queer Arabs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 0:41


Caitlin Abadir-Mullally (kt) is a Coptic-American installation and social practice artist based in Philadelphia. She works to create communities for those who live between spaces. Her research dives into fear, hybridity, queerness, collective thinking, grief, and cultural loss. Caitlin Abadir-Mullally works in sculpture, performance, and relationship building. Caitlin Abadir-Mullally is pursuing a master's degree in library and information science with a focus in archival studies. She is passionate about documenting diasporic queer Southwest Asian and North Afrikan joy and complexity, and the agency of the living to decide how their narratives are preserved. We were so excited to have Caitlin…

Rich Zeoli
Politics is a Vengeful, Dirty Business (Full Zeoli Show 01-14-22)

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 187:17


Today on the Zeoli Show, Rich discussed the failure by Biden and his administration after the Supreme Court ruled against his vaccine mandate for all private businesses with 100 employees or more. Adding to the growing list of his failures. Now we're not just seeing Democrats flee from Biden's agenda but also them swarm against Vice President Harris to block her chances from ever attempting to run for President in 2024. Politics is a dirty business.  6:02-Supreme Court strikes down President Biden's vaccine mandate 6:04-NEWS 6:07-Tom Brady addresses not shaking Nick Foles' hand during Super Bowl LII 6:12-Studies finding COVID lives in fat cells 6:25-Rich's playlist theme today  629-Philadelphia not providing full COVID hospitalization rates 6:40-The most misquoted movies lines ever 7:02-NEWS 7:06-The Supreme Court strikes down Biden's vaccine mandate on employers  7:09-SCOTUS does keep vaccine mandate for healthcare workers  7:30-Biden's failures continue to rise 7:35-Democrats are trying to push Vice President Harris out before 2024 7:38-Politics is the revenge business  7:45- CUT SHEET | Biden starts yelling about counting the votes | Biden wants the media to stop the misinformation on their own shows | Just google how you can find COVID tests | Psaki says Biden will continue to push businesses to implement a vaccine mandate. 8:05-Dr. Oz calls out Dr. Fauci in latest ad for Senate in PA to a debate  8:08-Fauci's failures will be seen and heard at the local election levels  8:12-Tom Brady did not shake Nick Foles' hand during Super Bowl LII 8:17-Western Washington University may cancel their Viking mascot  8:21-NEWS 8:25-What are acceptable pizza toppings?  8:38-Is Philadelphia going to fire unvaccinated first responders?  9:00-NEWS 9:05-Brandon Katz, Entertainment Host & Creator for the Morning Brew, joined to discuss the latest movie in the "Scream" franchise which includes many from the original cast. Hollywood is also see delays again for some of their big movies in early 2022.  9:38-New Jersey town protests against the building of a Chick-Fil-A 9:40-CUT SHEET | Flashback to when the Democrats, including Biden, were against the nuclear option in the Senate | ABC News-This inflation could derail an economy |  Novak Djokovic has visa revoked and faces possible deportation | Jim Belushi believes his brother John suffered from CTE | Buffalo Bills' QB Josh Allen's secret weapon for playing in the cold 9:55-Final Thoughts  Photo by: Pool / Pool

Rich Zeoli
Philadelphia's Mandate Goes into Effect

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 41:58


Zeoli Show Hour 3:  In the third hour of the Zeoli Show, Rich discussed Philadelphia's vaccine mandate for all city workers. A high rate of unvaccinated are with first responders, is Mayor Kenney really going to try and fire any unvaccinated police and firefighter while dealing with record crime waves including the homicide rate? Photo by: Getty Images

Apple News Today
Inside Afghanistan's hunger crisis

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 9:19


The New Yorker reports from Afghanistan, where more than 20 million people are on the brink of famine. NBC News explains how recent deadly home fires in New York City and Philadelphia underscore the systemic racism in urban planning. Sales of vinyl records overtook those of CDs last year, a sign of the changing attitudes of music fans. Quartz looks into what’s going on. A U.S. court ruled that gruyère-style cheeses made in America can be called gruyère. Swiss and French cheesemakers plan to keep fighting in court. Food & Wine has the story.

The Skorpion Show Podcast
Episode 68: That's Not Your Business

The Skorpion Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 76:49


We are back for Episode 68 of The Skorpion Show Podcast. On this episode we discuss Cardi B taking Tasha K to court. The Supreme Court rules that OSHA can't force companies to have their employees to be vaccinated. Kevin Hart & Meek Mill donate 15M to local Philadelphia private and parochial schools. Ask Kevin & Makael returns. If you'd like to submit your question, send to theskorpionshow@gmail.com Please enjoy this podcast

Take It Easy
David Culley vs Houston Texans + Ben Simmons vs Philadelphia 76ers

Take It Easy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 57:41


On today's episode, David Culley got fired by the Houston Texans, which was always going to happen the moment he was fired. And he made $22 million for 1 year of doing damage control the Texans. I discuss how this was the transaction required to get the Texans from an "unhirable job" to "only slightly worse than the NY Giants". Also, I discuss the 3-month standoff between Ben Simmons and the Philadelphia 76ers, and what it says about whether or not he has enough leverage to force his way off the 76ers CKSAML Productions | Linktree This show is presented by BetOnline Sportsbook. Use Code "BLEAV" for a 50% bonus on your initial deposit

Locked On MLB
A's Historian David Feldman Returns

Locked On MLB

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 36:51


Today, Oakland A's historian David Feldman talks with Sully about the 1989 World Series and who was actually going to be starting Game 3 if the earthquake hadn't happened, why the A's should still be in Philadelphia, and the crazy genius that was Charlie Finley. Originally Posted on Locked on A's Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sober Powered
E82: So You Quit Drinking, Now is When the Work Starts with Amanda E. White, LPC

Sober Powered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 43:31


Gill welcomes Amanda E. White to the podcast. Amanda is a licensed therapist and the author of the book “Not Drinking Tonight: A Guide to Creating A Sober Life You Love.” Not drinking is just the beginning of improving our lives. We also have to learn things like how to deal with emotions, how to set and maintain healthy boundaries, and how to take care of ourselves. This episode is your guide to moving forward without alcohol. In this episode you'll learn:Amanda's path to becoming a therapist and struggling with her drinking during grad schoolEmotions: how alcohol stunts our emotional maturity and prevents us from learning basic life skills, how to begin recognizing your feelings if you have no idea where to start, and why you don't have to feel happy all the time- it's not our normal baselineBoundaries: what they are, what they are not, how to set boundaries as a people pleaser or if you've never set them before, how to navigate tough conversations, how to deal with having your boundaries being violatedSelf-care: why alcohol isn't self care and what real self-care isHow to start therapy and find a therapist you connect withAmanda is the founder and owner of the group therapy practice, Therapy for Women Center, based in Philadelphia serving clients across the country. In her clinical work, she specializes in working with individuals with substance use disorders and eating disorders. She has been featured in notable publications such as Forbes, Washington Post, Shape, Women's Health Magazine, and more. Connect with Amanda:Where to get her book amandaewhite.comHer practice's website therapyforwomencenter.comInstagram www.instagram.com/therapyforwomen As a listener of Sober Powered you get special discounts from my sponsors! Thank you for supporting the show by supporting my sponsors!Exact Nature is giving you 20% off all of your future orders with the code SP20.  Visit www.exactnature.com to learn moreCurious Elixirs is giving you $10 your order of $50 or more with the code POWER22. Visit https://curiouselixirs.com/pages/sober-powered?utm_source=sober-powered-podcast&utm_medium=paid&utm_campaign=sober-powered-122 to learn more.Sign up to get emails from me. I send out a preview of the next podcast episode every Thursday.Check out my YouTube channel, new videos every Tuesday at 10 am EST.  Please subscribe! Sources are posted here.Follow Sober Powered on Instagram for more education and inspirationJoin the Sober Powered Facebook Group for extra supportAnd if you're enjoying this podcast, please use this link to leave a review on iTunes. This podcast takes so much effort and work to create, and each review increases the possibility that this podcast can be seen by people who may need it.  Disclaimer: this is not medical adviceSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/soberpowered)

Sports Day Tampa Bay
Bucs-Eagles Playoff Preview

Sports Day Tampa Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 43:45


Rick Stroud and Steve Versnick preview this weekend's Bucs-Eagles playoff game as the Bucs are getting some players back but will have to contain a Philadelphia running game that is a lot different then when they faced each other in October. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Process to Progress
With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

Process to Progress

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 40:04


Sixers snap winning streak against the Hornets but Embiid extends his streak, Rich Paul courtside after a meeting that allegedly went nowhere with Daryl Morey, Eastern Conference teams selling at the deadline, and much more!