Podcasts about Abraham Lincoln

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16th president of the United States

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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
Abraham Lincoln

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Best podcasts about Abraham Lincoln

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Latest podcast episodes about Abraham Lincoln

The Charlie Kirk Show
The Case Against Cancelling Lincoln with Brian Kilmeade

The Charlie Kirk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 38:19


Charlie is joined in this episode by one of the hardest-working and smartest men in media today, Brian Kilmeade, to discuss his incredible new book - ‘The President and the Freedom Fighter' which details the relationship between Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln over the course of the American Civil War. Charlie asks Brian about the current attempts to remove Lincoln from our public consciousness and why that's so dangerous before the two dive in to an impassioned defense of American history and why it's more important today than ever to teach it truthfully. Charlie also offers a preview of what Biden plans to do in order to “fight the Omicron Variant,” which has many worried he will go Full-Mussolini as we like to put it on this show.  Support the show: http://www.charliekirk.com/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

American History Tellers
Traitors | Accomplice or Martyr | 5

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 47:26


Not every case of treason is open and shut. With some accused traitors, questions of their guilt or innocence can linger for generations. That's certainly the case with Mary Surratt. Even before she was hanged in 1865 for her alleged role in the plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln, many argued that she was an innocent widow convicted on false testimony. After her death, she became a martyr to the Confederate cause. To this day, Civil War scholars are divided on whether or not she was an active participant in the Lincoln plot.On this episode, Lindsay speaks with author and historian Kate Clifford Larson. Her book The Assassin's Accomplice attempts to debunk many of the myths surrounding Surratt and the conspiracy to assassinate President Lincoln. They'll discuss not only Surratt, but our general fascination with traitors and their stories of duplicity and betrayal.Simplisafe- Take advantage of extended Black Friday Deals & get 50% OFF your entire security system at Simplisafe.com/TELLERSSleep Number- Quality sleep is life-changing sleep. Special offers available at SleepNumber.com/Tellers!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

We Talk About Dead People
135: Abraham Lincoln | A Song for the Stringbean Stranger

We Talk About Dead People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 97:17


Part one of the tale of the legendary 16th President of these United States, featuring a duel between an Irish manlet and an Angloid slenderman, a rich gnomish wedding, and one very poorly timed infrastructure bill. VENMO TIP JAR: @wtadp PATREON: www.patreon.com/wetalkaboutdeadpeople SOUNDCLOUD: @wetalkaboutdeadpeople FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/wetalkaboutdeadpeople TWITTER: www.twitter.com/wtadppodcast SPOTIFY: open.spotify.com/show/2OJRFxh9MGNb9AhA4JuOeX itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/we-ta…d1282606749?mt=2 #history #comedy #memes #funny #wtadp #wtadppodcast #podcast #true #story

It Ain't Ogre 'Til It's Ogre
Ep. 59: Abraham Lincoln

It Ain't Ogre 'Til It's Ogre

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021


We’re nearing the end of the month and the end of the year. Despite our best intentions, our original plans for this month’s episode fell through, so we have to improvise! The show must go on, etc! As such, Matt, Will, and Chris scramble to put together this season’s penultimate episode in a timely fashion, […]

The African History Network Show
National Day of Mourning 400 years after Pilgrims have the 1st Thanksgiving 1621

The African History Network Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 122:00


Thanksgiving: National Day of Mourning 400 years after Pilgrims have the 1st Thanksgiving in 1621; This tribe helped the Pilgrims survive for their first Thanksgiving. They still regret it 400 years later.; Pres. Lincoln had 38 Sioux Warriors Executed on Dec. 26th, 1862.  Here's what really happened.; Nov. 28, 1898: First National Convention of the Ex-Slave Mutual Relief, Bounty, and Pension Association;  Guilty! Guilty! Guilty! All 3 White men in the murder of Ahmaud Arbery - TheAHNShow with Michael Imhotep 11-28-21   Support The African History Network through Cash App @ https://cash.app/$TheAHNShow or PayPal @ TheAHNShow@gmail.com or http://www.PayPal.me/TheAHNShow or visit http://www.AfricanHistoryNetwork.com and click on the yellow “Donate” button.

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves of Grass - The Moving Elegies For Abraham Lincoln

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 42:06


I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.  And I am Garry Shriver.  This is the How to Love Lit Podcast. This is our second episode discussing the bard of democracy, the great Walt Whitman.  Today we will feature one of his four poems honoring President Abraham Lincoln, but in order to understand why Whitman and many of us admire this great man, we want to revisit the  original 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass and listen to some of Whitman's observations of African Americans and slavery.  Christy, let's start this episode by reading and discussing two extracts from “I sing the Body Electric” , the ones where Whitman describes an African man and then an African woman at auction.    A man's body at auction,  (For before the war I often go to the slave-mart and watch the sale,)  I help the auctioneer, the sloven does not half know his business.    Gentlemen look on this wonder,  Whatever the bids of the bidders they cannot be high enough for it,  For it the globe lay preparing quintillions of years without one animal or plant,  For it the revolving cycles truly and steadily roll'd.  In this head the all-baffling brain,  In it and below it the makings of heroes.  Examine these limbs, red, black, or white, they are cunning in tendon and nerve,  They shall be stript that you may see them.  Exquisite senses, life-lit eyes, pluck, volition,  Flakes of breast-muscle, pliant backbone and neck, flesh not flabby, good-sized arms and legs,  And wonders within there yet.  Within there runs blood,  The same old blood! the same red-running blood!  There swells and jets a heart, there all passions, desires, reachings, aspirations,  (Do you think they are not there because they are not express'd in parlors and lecture-rooms?)  This is not only one man, this the father of those who shall be fathers in their turns,  In him the start of populous states and rich republics,  Of him countless immortal lives with countless embodiments and enjoyments.  How do you know who shall come from the offspring of his offspring through the centuries?  (Who might you find you have come from yourself, if you could trace back through the centuries?)    8    A woman's body at auction,  She too is not only herself, she is the teeming mother of mothers,  She is the bearer of them that shall grow and be mates to the mothers.  Have you ever loved the body of a woman?  Have you ever loved the body of a man?  Do you not see that these are exactly the same to all in all nations and times all over the earth?  If any thing is sacred the human body is sacred,  And the glory and sweet of a man is the token of manhood untainted,  And in man or woman a clean, strong, firm-fibred body, is more beautiful than the most beautiful face.  Have you seen the fool that corrupted his own live body? or the fool that corrupted her own live body?  For they do not conceal themselves, and cannot conceal themselves.  Whitman was raised a New York democrat, but his sympathies were with the Free Soil party that condemned the extension of slavery as a sin against God and a crime against man.  The Republican party would not exist until 1854, and Lincoln would be their presidential candidate in the election of 1860.  Of course, bear in mind, that the issues of those days are different than the issues of today, so the party names shouldn't be taken to represent modern day politics.      For Whitman it was undeniable for anyone with eyeballs that all men are born human and that implies certain things regardless if they are born  free or slave- of any race, creed or gender.  It is obvious to a man so aware of the physical body, that we are of the same atom-  the magnificence of the body proclaims our humanity- and ironically where on earth could this magnificence be most easily seen than at a slave auction like what he witnessed during his New Orleans days. In all of its ruthless degradation it ironically showcased the magnificence of the human body.  It's why Whitman could say, almost sarcastically- I am a better salesman of slaves than the auctioneer-I know and understand the beauty and value of what you are selling and you don't- you fool.   Whitman was the poet of the democratic soul- we are after all leaves of grass, but he was also the poet of the body- that physical form we are all chained to.  For Whitman, to be a human was to understand and be okay with one's physical body- and it is a holy thing. Our souls inhabit a sanctified space on earth- that of the body- be it man or woman- the pigmentation of flesh was just one of many individual and unique features- for Whitman our bodies is the starting point for equality- we are all wedded to one.      It doesn't seem radical to us now, but at that time in history- even talking about the body like that was revolutionary- almost vulgar- Whitman democratically equates the man with the woman with the black with the white.  In 1855, this was not self-evident anywhere else in the United States of America or really anywhere on planet earth.      By 1855, Walt Whitman knew his country was falling apart.  He understood that the ideals on which the great American experiment were founded were being overwhelmed by all kinds of forces, not least of which was plain ordinary corruption.  In his mind, what the world needed was repentance- a total course correction- a return to the original ideals and this was going to happen through conversion to a different set of moral ideals- he wanted to convince America to revisit and embrace all these original self-evident democratic ideals by reading and absorbing Leaves of Grass.  He really truly believed if people would just read his book, they would stop hating each other.    Well, it's a nice thought, however slightly unrealistic…especially in light of the single digit sales of that first edition.  But even if he had gotten everyone to read his book, it was a tall order.  By 1860, any kind of peaceful coming together seemed unrealistic.  America was on the brink of war and violence was springing up.  John Brown is one notable example; in an attempt to free slaves through violence he and a small gang stormed Harper's Ferry.  They were captured, tried and condemned to death, but this event inflamed the country and raised the stakes for the upcoming presidential election.  A few months after Brown was executed, the democratic party, split between pro and- anti- slavery factions, was to confront a new political party- one that had never existed before, the Republican party. It had nominated a Southern born anti-slavery man from Illinois, a lawyer who had never attended school but who was known as honest Abe.  A newspaper in South Carolina put it this way “the irrepressible conflict is about to be vised upon us through the Black Republican nominee and his fanatical diabolical Republican party.”    Walt Whitman did not see Lincoln as an instigator of a conflict.  Whitman saw him almost as an extension of himself- a mediator.  He really believed Lincoln was going to bring healing  and unity through politics something he had tried and failed to do through poetry.      I'm not sure which is the greater challenge= trying to unify  a group of people through poetry or politics!!      Ha! True but Whitman was paying attention to what Lincoln was saying and he identified with him.  He saw himself in Lincoln.  They both came from poor families. Neither had formal education.  One thing that is interesting, Lincoln was from the West, and Whitman believed the hope of America was in the West.  Both men believed in democracy to the core, but also- both believed in unity.  Whitman saw Lincoln as America's hope.    Although, he was likely the most hated man of his age in some corners, but the only hope of America in others.  Lincoln wanted first and foremost to be a unifier.  He had been elected with only around 40% of the popular vote, although he did get a majority of the electoral college votes.  There was no question America was deeply divided.  He wanted not just to save the physical boundaries of America, but he wanted to heal the wounds that were making people hate each other.  Lincoln's father was anti-slavery and raised in an anti-slavery Baptist congregation.   Lincoln But his mother was from a Kentucky slaveholding family.  Lincoln later recalled that the reason his father left Kentucky and the South because of his strong feelings about slavery. Lincoln himself saw many cruel things while visiting his grandparents, not the least of these being once when an African-American family was separated on a boat and sold to different owners.  He later recalled that ‘the sight was a continual torment to me…having the power of making me miserable.”  However, Lincoln's mother's family were people he knew intimately, and somehow he understood how someone could support slavery and not be an evil person.  This sounds crazy to us and difficult to understand, but Lincoln expressed on more than one occasion to men across the North that if they had been born in those circumstances in that place and in that world, they likely would have had those same views.  This way of seeing one's fellow man is more radical than most of us can even comprehend.  It's a strange idea to assert that a person could believe something is morally wrong so strongly that he would be willing to lead a nation to war to end it, but simultaneously judge the perpetrators of this evil redeemable human beings.  95% of humans today can't think like that-       Well, it's something Whitman could do as well.  Whitman didn't fight in the Civil War, but his brother George did.  His brother fought for the Union.  Whitman's significant other fought for the Confederacy at one point.     The first shots of the Civil War were fired by the South on Fort Sumter in Charleston, SC, in April of 1861.  Lincoln had been president for just a few weeks.       In December of 1862, Whitman saw his brother's name on a list of casualities.  He got on a train and headed South to look for him. He ended up in Fredericksburg.  The good news was his brother had only suffered a flesh wound.  But outside the hospital Whitman saw something that struck horror and terror into his being.  Let me read his words after he came to the building being used as a hospital, he saw, “a heap of amputated feet, legs, arms, hands, etc….a full load for a one-horse cart…human fragments, cut bloody, black and blue, swelled and sickening…nearby were several dead bodes each covered with its brown woolen blanket.”  Now you have to remember, think about Leaves of Grass and “I sing the Body Electric”.  This is a man who had been trying to convince America to celebrate our bodies- all of our bodies- we read just the excert about African-Americans, but he celebrated all bodies and wanted us to see ourselves in other people's bodies- to recognize the sanctity in all bodies- and here he's staring at these body parts scattered around, cut off and thrown into piles.  I can't even imagine how things would smell.      Whitman's reaction to what he saw on the battlefields and field hospitals of Frederickburg, led him to a decision that altered the course of his life.  It would lead him to move to Washington DC and honestly, his war actions to me make him something of a saint.  Just in Frederickburg, he stuck around to visit and help bury the dead of the over 18,000 dead soldiers that were just lying on the ground.  But, then he started visiting hospitals.  These visits deeply affected him.  He had planned on going back to New York after he found his brother, but he couldn't do that anymore.  Instead he changed courses and went to Washington DC.  He got a job as a clerk where he would work during the day, but then he would spend the rest of his time in the hospitals.  And he would just sit with soldiers.  He didn't care if they were union of confederate.  He brought  with him bags of candy.  He wrote letters to their parents.  He played twenty questions.  If they wanted him to read the Bible, he read the Bible.  If they wanted a cigarette, he'd scrounge up a cigarette. Many of them were teenagers.  He kissed  and hugged them; he parented them in their final moments of life.  For many, he was the last tender face they would see on this earth.  The numbers range, but documentation reveals he visited and helped anywhere from 80-100,000 soldiers.      Let me interrupt you for a second to highlight how bad it was to be in a hospital during this time period.  No one at this time understood the importance of anticeptics or the need to be clean.  The Union Army lost 300,000 lives in combat.  But, they experienced an estimated 6,400,000 cases of illnesses, wound and injuries.  Hospitals were filthy and dangerous places.      For many of those young men, Whitman was the last touch of kindness they would ever experience on this earth.  He said later that those years of hospital service were and I quote, “the greatest privilege and satisfaction..and, of course, the most profound lesson of my life.”  He usually left the hospital at night and slept in a room he rented but if a soldier needed him or asked him to stay, he would often stay up all night with wounded and dying men and then head from the hospital to the office.  Here are his words "While I was with wounded and sick in thousands of cases from the New England States, and from New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, and from Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and all the Western States, I was with more or less from all the States, North and South, without exception… "I was with many rebel officers and men among our wounded, and gave them always what I had, and tried to cheer them the same as any. . . . Among the black soldiers, wounded or sick, and in the contraband camps, I also took my way whenever in their neighborhood, and did what I could for them.”        Well, let me also say that Washington DC was a nasty place to be living at that time.  Physically, it was a construction zone, nothing like the beautiful collection of buildings and streets designed by the French architect Pierre L Enfant that we see today.   It was muddy; it noisy; it was full of the noises of building and killing.  It was political.  Abraham Lincoln stated that during those days, “If there is a worse place than Hell, I am in it.”      Dang, because DC, the city, was so bad?    Because being president in the Civil War was so bad.  Lincoln had a different view of his role of leadership than most people today understand.  And we need to go back to when he was elected in 1860.  The country was divided- and even if you didn't believe in slavery, the question of how to get rid of it wasn't something people agreed on.  Many thought it should just be abolished. Others thought you should just keep it from expanding and let it die slowly.   Lincoln was surrounded by people on all sides who all wanted him to have “bold leadership”- do radical things- whatever those were to them- but Lincoln liked to respond to his critics by referencing an entertainer who was known for tight walking over water.  Sometimes, he even would push a wheelbarrow across these ropes; one time he stopped in the middle of the river to eat an omelete on his tightrope, sometimes he'd carry someone on his back- all crazy stunts that didn't seem survivable.  Lincoln had seen him perform walking a tight rope across Niagara falls and he thought it was a perfect metaphor for how he saw himself.  Let me quote Lincoln here- the artist went by the name Blondin. Suppose,” Lincoln said, “that all the material values in this great country of ours, from the Atlantic to the Pacific—its wealth, its prosperity, its achievements in the present and its hopes for the future—could all have been concentrated and given to Blondin to carry over that awful crossing.” Suppose “you had been standing upon the shore as he was going over, as he was carefully feeling his way along and balancing his pole with all his most delicate skill over the thundering cataract. Would you have shouted at him, ‘Blondin, a step to the right!' ‘Blondin, a step to the left!' or would you have stood there speechless and held your breath and prayed to the Almighty to guide and help him safely through the trial?”    Lincoln saw himself on a tight rope and going too far one way or the other would make the entire thing collapse.  He wasn't trying to crush and destroy his fellow man, even his Southern brother,  although he was trying to win the war and emancipate the slaves, which he did do.  He was trying to heal a nation- to bring brother back to brother.  And we must never forget that brothers WERE literally killing their brothers.  Uniting and building a country that was this morally divided was a seemingly impossible task- and he could see from his perch in Washington that this was hell.    Whitman would stop to see him going in and out of the White House.  This was in the days when you could do that.  They didn't even have secret service for the president. Whitman looked at Lincoln and saw sadness in his eyes.  But Whitman always believed Lincoln was the right man.  If anyone could bring America together, it was Lincoln. Lincoln didn't hate his enemy.  He loved his enemy.  Just like Whitman.  This was the attitude where Whitman saw hope and a future as he sat with both confederate and Union soldier, black soldiers and white soldiers, mending their wounds, writing their final farewells.      But make no mistake, Lincoln was committed to emancipation and as the war came to the end and reconstruction was in sight, he was preparing America to grant full citizenship that included voting rights to All American males- including African-American ones.  In one letter he said, “I am naturally anti-slavery.  If slavery is not wrong; nothing is wrong.  I cannot remember when I did not think so, and feel so”.     And yet this is the same man who could say during his second inaugural address, one month before General Lee will surrender at Appomatox and 41 days before he will be murdered…     With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan -- to achieve and cherish a lasting peace among ourselves and with the world. to do all which may achieve and cherish a just, and a lasting peace, among ourselves, and with the world. all nations.    There was one man in the crowd that day, who was actually so close to Lincoln he shows up in the inauguaration picture.  This man heard those words and was committed to stopping Lincoln from fulfilling this pledge.  John Wilkes Booth was standing not far from Lincoln that day.  On April 11, what we now know was to be his last speech, Lincoln called for black suffrage.  Booth was in the audience that day as well, after hearing Lincoln make that statement Booth is known to have said, “that is the last speech he will ever make.”    On that fateful day, April 15, 1865 Whitman was visiting his family.  However, his significant other, Peter Doyle was in Washington DC and heard that the president was going to Ford's theater to see a performance of the comedy “My American Cousin.”  It was Good Friday, the sacred day where Christians celebrate the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.  This is what Peter Doyle  said later about what happened that evening.     I heard that the President and his wife would be present and made up my mind to go. There was a great crowd in the building. I got into the second gallery. There was nothing extraordinary in the performance. I saw everything on the stage and was in a good position to see the President's box. I heard the pistol shot. I had no idea what it was, what it meant—it was sort of muffled. I really knew nothing of what had occurred until Mrs. Lincoln leaned out of the box and cried, "The President is shot!" I needn't tell you what I felt then, or saw. It is all put down in Walt's piece—that piece is exactly right. I saw Booth on the cushion of the box, saw him jump over, saw him catch his foot, which turned, saw him fall on the stage. He got up on his feet, cried out something which I could not hear for the hub-hub and disappeared. I suppose I lingered almost the last person. A soldier came into the gallery, saw me still there, called to me: "Get out of here! we're going to burn this damned building down!" I said: "If that is so I'll get out!"     Whitman used Doyle's account to help pen the only poem that I know of where Whitman  used traditional poetic forms.  It is an Elegy for the death of Abraham Lincoln, titled “O Captain My Captain”.  He actually wrote two elegies- one speaking for the nation- in the voice of a common sailor- it he wrote in a formal style of poetry acceptable to the people of his day.  The second, in some ways more personal because it is in a style similar to what we see in the rest of Leaves of Grass.  The second poem, When Lilacs …”is often thought be be written after O Captain” Although I'm not sure it is.  It is more epic in its feeling- it uses symbols that are more archetypal and timeless- although that term wasn't invented in his day.  In O Captain my Captain, Whitman takes on the persona of a soldier, a sailor.  In the second, he uses his own voice- that universal “I” like we see in Song of Myself.  We don't have time to read the entirely of “O Lilacs When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom' , it has over 200 lines, but we can Read a little bit of it.  Instead we will focus on the only poem anthologized during Whitman's lifetime- O Captain my Captain.    The one I know from that famous scene in Dead Poet's Society where the students stand for their fallen teacher, John Keating, immortalized by Robin Williams.     Agreed- I can't read this poem without thinking of Robin Williams, but we should probably try since we spent quite a bit of time setting up the image of Lincoln.       O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,  The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,  The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,  While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;                           But O heart! heart! heart!                              O the bleeding drops of red,                                 Where on the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;  Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,  For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,  For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;                           Here Captain! dear father!                              This arm beneath your head!                                 It is some dream that on the deck,                                   You've fallen cold and dead.    My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,  My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,  The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,  From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;                           Exult O shores, and ring O bells!                              But I with mournful tread,                                 Walk the deck my Captain lies,                                    Fallen cold and dead.    As we have clearly expressed, Whitman the defender of the common man, does not usually elevate one person over another- but For Lincoln he makes a notable exception.  O Captain my Captain is written from the point of view of an insider. We can imagine a young soldier, a sailor.   He's on the ship- Of course, the captain is President Lincoln- the ship is the country.  The tone is one of exultation then distress.  We had finished- the fearful trip was done!!!  We had made it then….    Christy, and it's important to note that it WAS done.  Lincoln did bring that ship to harbor.  On April 2, right before he died on the 11th The confederacy vacated Richmond.  On April 4, President Lincoln together with his ten year old son Tad walked through the streets and into Jefferson Davis' office.  “Admiral Porter who was with him had this to say, “No electric wire could have carried the news of the President's arrival sooner than it was circulated through Richmond.  As far as the eye could see the streets were alive with negroes and poor whites rushing in our direction, and the crowd increased so fast that I had to surround the President with sailors with fixed bayonets to keep them off.  They all wanted to shake hand with Mr. Lincoln or his coat tail or even to kneel and kiss his boots.”  Later on Admiral Porter said this, “I should have preferred to see the President of the United States entering the subjugated stronghold of the rebel with an escort more befitting his high station, yet that would have looked as if he came as a conqueror to exult over a brave but fallen enemy.  He came instead as a peacemaker, his hand extended to all who desired to take it.”  Christy, at one point, it is said that an older African American gentleman bowed before Lincoln and Lincoln went to the man, took him by the hand and raised him up and told him he didn't need to kneel to anyone, he was a free man.  I cannot imagine the emotion.    And so we try to imagine the emotion – after so much carnage, who could walk the tightright and heal the utter hatred still inherent in the heart of both victor and defeated.  Notice there is meter, each stanza is composed of iambs which may or may not mean anything to you.  It just means there's a beat- like a drum beat, like a heart beat- “The ship has wethered every rack, the prize we sought is won.  The people are exalting.    But then he dies…in the first two stanzas, the boy addresses the captain as someone still alive, but by the third stanza he has accepted the reality.  And of course, this is exactly has grief strikes.  We never accept it initially, at least I have that problem.  I'll share my personal experiences in a different episode, but it's natural.  He says, “Rise up, Father.”  We feel a sense of desperation- the idea- of = no,  no, no, this can't be happening.  It's not possible.  Not now. Not after all of this.   But by the third stanza, the sailor unwillingly switches to the third person.  My captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still.”   There is a sense of intimacy, “MY father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will”.  We also see that that formality of the meter breaks down in that last line, “Fallen cold and dead”.  The sailor has broken down.   America is not just devastated because their leader is dead, but they are now vulnerable- what's going to happen to us.  Who can lead us?  Who can walk the tightrope?    And that of course, is the ultimate tragedy.   We will never know what might have been had he lived to complete his second term, but one statesman grasped fully the tragedy when he predicted that “the development of things will teach us to mourn him doubly.”  And of course he was right, even Jefferson Davis, the leader of the conferederacy, although I point out that Lincoln never one time acknowledged him as preside,  bemoaned Lincoln's death after losing the war and for good reason.  After Lincoln''s death, profiteers, corruption and all kinds of chaos descended on America.  Grant, who was a sincere and an incredible advocate for African Americans, was able to defeat the confederate armies but not able to contain the host of corruption that plagued our nation during reconstruction.    And so we end with Whitman's final poem- his most personal tribute to Lincoln and the one that many consider the better if less famous work, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom”.  In this poem, Whitman reverts to his usual style of free verse and strong metaphors.  It's beautiful and for me, it's where we see the universal truth of lost moral leadership and grief emerge- he expresses loss well beyond the moment of Lincoln.  Let's read just the first little bit.  It's long, and references the journey of Lincoln's casket to its final resting place without ever mentioning Lincoln's name.     When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom'd,  And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night,  I mourn'd, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.    Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,  Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,  And thought of him I love.    2  O powerful western fallen star!  O shades of night—O moody, tearful night!  O great star disappear'd—O the black murk that hides the star!  O cruel hands that hold me powerless—O helpless soul of me!  O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.    There are three big symbols in this poem= the lilacs, the sun and then a bird.  But since we read only the first two stanzas, I want to focus on those.  Lilacs are flowers that have a strong smell and were blooming at the time of Lincoln's death.  They are beautiful, but they also return every spring.  The star is an obvious symbol for Lincoln.  I want to point out that Whitman never really used stars as positive images for leaders because he didn't like the idea of a ruler just hoarding over us- but again, in this case, he made an exception.  Lincoln was the powerful star- and of course, we are left to answer, why would a man, so bent on equality of humans, elevate this one man- the only man he would elevate- it wasn't just because he was the president.  It was because he embodied what a great leader truly was- and this is the nice idea that I think resonates through the ages.      Agreed, average leaders and I will say most leaders give lip service to serving all people, but we can see by their actions, that a lot of that is propaganda.  Most are in it to win it.  It's easy to get to the top and view oneself as better than the rest of us.  It's just natural to do what's best for me or my team, so to speak.  It's natural to want to put enemies in submission- prove own own power and greatness.  But Lincoln was different- his compassion for his enemy, his unwavering commitment to integrity, his ability to see beyond his current moment, is a star- something that outlasts us all.  The South as well as the North mourned deeply Lincoln's loss.  The procession described in this poem where the casket was taken from Washington DC back to Illinois was something that had never happened in the history of the United States and has not happened since.      It is a legacy of leadership that Whitman not only admired but also immortalized.  It's also a legacy that I find inspiring no matter how great or small our little ships are, if we are ever called to be a captain.  It's something to think about when we smell lilacs in the Spring.  For Whitman every time we smelled those flowers, we grieve, but also we remember- because just as lilacs return every Spring, so does a new opportunity- the end of the Lilac poem looks to the future.  In another of Whitman's great poems, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” he says this, “We use you, and do not cast you aside-we plant you          permanently within us,       We fathom you not-we love you-there is perfection in          you also,       You furnish your parts toward eternity,       Great or small, you furnish your parts toward the soul.”  It's a nice idea, Lincoln was a man, but for Whitman he embodied an ideal we can all aspire to: integrity, humility, compassion and grace- in defeat and death but also in victory.  Whitman believed in those ideals in leadership- leadership that embraces those things can lead a ship to harbor in scary waters.  Perhaps, when we smell the lilacs, we can be reminded that those ideals are also planted in us.     Thanks for listening.  We hope you enjoyed our discussions of Walt Whitman.  Next episode, we will look farther into the American past to even deeper roots of democracy on the American continent, the Iroquois constitution.  So, thanks for listening, as always please share a link to our podcast to a friend or friends.  Push it out on your social media platforms via twitter, Instagram, facebook or linked in.  Text an episode to a friend, and if you are an educator, visit our website for instructional resources.  Peace out.                 

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
A Long-Running Religious Liberty Case Comes to an End

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 41:36


Townhall Review – November 26, 2021 Hugh Hewitt talks with Kristen Waggoner, of the Alliance Defending Freedom, and Baronnelle Stutzman about the relentless legal attack on her Biblical convictions by the ACLU. Hugh Hewitt and retired Naval Admiral James Stavridis talk about the revelation that China launched a hypersonic weapon which was of little interest to the media. Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Wisconsin Congressman Bryan Steil about the verdict in the Rittenhouse trial and the bias of the media. Hugh Hewitt talks with Josh Kraushaar, of the National Journal, about the nasty little details in President Biden's Build Back Better plan. Dennis Prager on the meaning of Thanksgiving in the words of our first president, George Washington, and President Abraham Lincoln's proclamation during the Civil War that created the holiday. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Kim Monson Show
Lincoln's Life

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 58:05


Our 16th President, Abraham Lincoln, issued A Day for Thanksgiving Proclamation (recited by Kim) and the Gettysburg Address (November 19, 1863) within a few weeks of one another.  How does a childhood such as Lincoln's produce the man that he became?  On this day we are thankful for our friends and family, and the American Idea, which we have a duty to preserve for future generations.  We also must set aside the government's propaganda of fear and instead follow in the paths of our American heroes. Guest Harold Holzer, leading authority on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era and co-chair of the Lincoln Forum, joins Kim to discuss Lincoln's life.  Harold begins with the tragedy of Lincoln losing his mother at a very early age.  His father left him and his sister for three months, in the middle of winter, to find a new wife.  Lincoln's step-mom favored him over her own son.  She educated Lincoln with an emphasis on reading.  Lincoln was an amazing commentator and his wit added to his effectiveness.  It has been rumored that Lincoln wrote the Gettysburg Address on the train to the event and Harold clarifies that this has proven to be false.  The Gettysburg Address is one of the most famous and impactful speeches ever delivered.  Harold's recent book, The Presidents vs. the Press: The Endless Battle between the White House and the Media–from the Founding Fathers to Fake News, is a testament to Presidents dating back to Washington having a difficult time dealing with the press and their mis-truths.  Harold discusses Lincolns' reasoning for and the ramifications of suspending the writ of habeas corpus. Karen Levine, award winning realtor with RE/MAX Alliance (303-877-7516) and valued sponsor of both of Kim's shows, expresses what she is thankful for this Thanksgiving weekend.  She includes friends, family and God's beauty seen throughout the state of Colorado.  Karen is especially thankful for the ability and opportunity to help people become homeowners, whether buying a home for their family or buying a home for others to live in. This week's America's Veterans Stories will feature an interview with Bear Owen, a Marine Vietnam Veteran pilot, at 3pm on Sunday afternoon.  Additional shows featuring other veterans will broadcast, Saturday and Sunday evenings at 10pm.  All shows air on KLZ 560 AM, KLZ 100.7 FM and the KLZ app.

Focus on the Family Commentary
Giving Thanks in Times of Trouble

Focus on the Family Commentary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 1:30


Thanksgiving can be hard if you're going through a tough time. Jim Daly shares a story about Abraham Lincoln that illustrates why thankfulness is at its most profound in the midst of difficulty. Support family ministry: https://store.focusonthefamily.com/singleitem/checkout/donation/item/panele?refcd=1178401 If you've listened to any of our podcasts, please give us your feedback: https://focusonthefamily.com/podcastsurvey/

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary
Three Tips to Unify this Thanksgiving (ep. 414)

Live Inspired Podcast with John O'Leary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 17:08


“History teaches us that unity is strength, and cautions us to submerge and overcome our differences in the quest for common goals.” -Haile Selassie While the tradition of Thanksgiving began around 1621, it wasn't declared a national holiday for another 242 years. And why is this significant? In 1863, Abraham Lincoln was President in the middle of the Civil War, a chaotic crisis with profound divisiveness and great uncertainty of our nation. It was then he declared a day to pause and give thanks for the many blessings in our lives that we share. In a season where it's easy to further build the walls that divide us, tune in to hear three simple tips that will allow us to focus on the things that unify, bind and heal. SHOW NOTES: Read Abraham Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation here. Three ways to build connections: Own the conversation from the start. And I'm not suggesting to get the first word in, be more adamant, and set the stage for winning the debate. Instead, start conversations by speaking (or silently if you prefer!) these words: “I love you. And, no, there is nothing you can do about it.” Actively listen as if they are the only person. Busy with the unimportant, we lessen our ability to connect in positive ways with our children (negatively affecting their self-esteem), with our partners (negatively affecting intimacy and connectivity), and with ourselves (negatively affecting our sense of who we are and what actually matters). Be passionately curious as if their opinion actually matters... because it does! Ask elucidating questions if you need clarifying information or perspective from another point of view. This allows for the opportunity to elaborate, be heard, educate and perhaps even persuade another. Far from dividing, it actually serves as an awesome opportunity to unite. If you enjoyed today's episode, you'll love learning the longstanding tradition Live Inspired community member Rona's family does before their Thanksgiving meal. Listen to ep. 206 here.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Presidential Thanksgiving Proclamations

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 7:25


That Wasn't In My Textbook
REWIND| 5 Things We Should Know About Thanksgiving: Debunkin' the BS

That Wasn't In My Textbook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:11


Many of our textbooks tell this beautiful story of Thanksgiving Day being a historic fest that took place in America in 1621 where Pilgrims and colonizers broke bread together in peace and harmony. While it sounds beautiful many Historians have pointed out that the events surrounding the real Thanksgiving don't match up with the stories in our textbooks. In this episode, we debunk 5 myths of that textbook Thanksgiving story to uncover the truth. This episode is not going to make you feel bad about enjoying eatin', drinkin', and celebratin' with your fam. It's just going to help you have a more woke and informed celebration that acknowledges the Indigenous groups aka the original occupants of this land. Listen to this episode to find out:5 lies our teachers told us about Thanksgiving like there wasn't a damn Plymouth rockLearn about one of the 1st Pandemics here in AmericaFigure out the real reason leaders of Indigenous groups helped out the Pilgrims aka colonizerUncover why Abe Lincoln declared the 3rd Thurs. In November ThanksgivingFind out 1 thing you can do on Thanksgiving that celebrates Indigenous groupsAvailable wherever you listen to podcasts!Sources:Loewen, James W. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. "The Truth About Thanksgiving". p 70-92.New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996.9 Myths About Thanksgiving & The Real Facts Behind ThemA few things you (probably) don't know about ThanksgivingThe Myths of the Thanksgiving Story and the Lasting Damage They ImbueThanksgiving 2020Follow and SupportTo learn more about the podcast hostToya, visit ToyaFromHarlem.com. Connect with Toya on Instagram, Twitter,and LinkedInVisit our website. Follow the podcast on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook and watch episodes on Youtube

The Rubin Report
Historian Debunks the Most Common Thanksgiving Lies | Melanie Kirkpatrick

The Rubin Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:47


Dave Rubin of The Rubin Report talks to Melanie Kirkpatrick, author of “Thanksgiving: The Holiday at the Heart of the American Experience,” about the truth about Thanksgiving and what the first Thanksgiving was actually like. She explains why Abraham Lincoln and Sarah Josepha Hale should receive the majority of the credit for creating the Thanksgiving holiday as we know it. She also explains how the real Thanksgiving story is much different from the modern version influenced by progressive politics. She also shares a variety of lesser-known historical facts, like the time that Franklin Delano Roosevelt made a decision that resulted in Democrats and Republicans holding two separate Thanksgivings. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Booknotes+
Ep. 37 Jason Emerson, "Giant in the Shadows"

Booknotes+

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 68:04


Abraham Lincoln and his wife Mary were the parents of four boys. Only one – Robert – lived beyond his eighteenth birthday. Author Jason Emerson spent nearly a decade researching the 82-plus years of Robert Lincoln's life, including his time as a Union soldier, minister to Great Britain, Secretary of War, and president of the Pullman Car Company. Mr. Emerson is the author of "Giant in the Shadows: The Life of Robert T. Lincoln."   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling
Gee, Your Hair Smells Terrific (with Margaret Cho)

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 110:51


Legendary standup Margaret Cho joins Tom and Julie to rank bread baskets, talk shampoo bottle aesthetics, and watch GWAR on Joan Rivers. Plus a certified legendary segment in which Tom and Julie teach you how to successfully pitch a TV show. Also Julie's review of Clifford the Big Red Dog, can presidents drive, Uber Scooch, I'm Surrounded By Morons, ROFL, Todd Phillips' iPod, Woody Allen's Subterranean Homesick Blues, microwave popcorn tips, The 100 Laugh Guarantee, basic bitches, relatable references, Yellowstone, Yogi Bear, Geordi La Forge and Abraham Lincoln, Rogan the Rocky Snowman, James Hetfield's hair vs Dave Mustaine's hair, and Word-A-Day desktop calendars.SEE MARGARET CHO LIVE:https://margaretcho.comLISTEN TO DOUBLE THREAT AD-FREE ON FOREVER DOG PLUS:http://foreverdogpodcasts.com/plusDOUBLE THREAT MERCH:https://www.teepublic.com/stores/double-threatSEND SUBMISSIONS TO:DoubleThreatPod@gmail.comFOLLOW DOUBLE THREAT:https://twitter.com/doublethreatpodhttps://www.instagram.com/doublethreatpodDOUBLE THREAT IS A FOREVER DOG PODCAST:https://foreverdogpodcasts.com/podcasts/double-threatTheme song by Mike KrolArtwork by Michael KuppermanSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Sons Of History
Holiday Special: Celebrate with Thanksgiving Letters and Speeches from America's Past

The Sons Of History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 20:37


This week's episode is very different from any other episode we've done before. Dustin Bass reads letters and speeches from some of our American ancestors, including Ben Franklin, Daniel Webster, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Listen to the perspectives of what those from long ago thought about the meaning of Thanksgiving, including a speech from a Wampanoag Indian. We hope that you enjoy this Thanksgiving Special and that you and yours enjoy a very Happy Thanksgiving.

Tell Me What to Google
Jailing Political Opponents: Abraham Lincoln and Habeas Corpus

Tell Me What to Google

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 32:40


Abraham Lincoln is known as "The Great Emancipator." But not many people know that during the Civil War, he jailed as many as 2,000 political opponents without charges or trial. The story in this episode revolves around what happened in Baltimore, Maryland in 1861 and why it led to the Mayor, the Police Chief, the entire City Council and many more being jailed indefinitely in a suspension of the writ of Habeas Corpus. Then we chat with entertainer Brandon Anderson and play the quick quiz! Review this podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-internet-says-it-s-true/id1530853589 Bonus episodes and content available at http://Patreon.com/MichaelKent For 15% at SCOTTeVEST, visit http://scottevest.cwv7.net/a3VBZ

Jim and Them
Pedos In Heaven - #703 Part 1

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 112:28


Saturday Night Jim And Them: A special Saturday night episode brings in even more UNHINGED activity from the boys as we unmask the sequel that pedos have gone to heaven.Lagwagon: Jim has tales of being an old man at the old man punk rock show.Young Dolph: We discuss the recent passing of Young Dolph and then we get into the world of Jacksonville rappers getting shot and mocked on rap songs.TALK TO ME DAMMIT!, STUPID BITCH!, FILTHY SLUT!, CHUCKY!, CHILD'S PLAY!, SATURDAY SHOW!, JAKE SPRAGUE CELEBRATION!, BIRTHDAY!, DINNER!, SPAGO!, KNUCKLE DEEP!, SUPERBRAWL SATURDAY!, UNHINGED!, SNL!, SATURDAY JIM AND THEM!, GHISLAINE MAXWELL!, PEDOS IN HEAVEN!, JEFFREY EPSTEIN!, GODS LIKES PEDOS!, GOING TO HELL!, KEVIN SPACEY!, ABRAHAM LINCOLN!, MALCOLM X!, MARK TWAIN!, MOTHER THERESA!, TROMBONE!, GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER!, CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS!, TOM HANKS!, BURPH IN THE MIC!, FART IN THE MIC!, HENDERSON!, HENDERTUCKY!, YOCALS!, REDNECKS!, GIFT OF THE MAGI!, PATREON!, TOTS TURNT 2021!, HIT THE BELL!, SANTA!, ONE PRESENT!, SINGULAR!, PRESENTS FROM YOUR PETS!, POKEMON!, NEW RELEASE!, POKEFLU!, EVERY YEAR!, OFF YEAR!, POKEMON UNITE!, HALF ASLEEP!, XBOX!, SICK!, PUNK ROCK SHOW!, LAGWAGON!, TICKETS!, SEATTLE!, THE BROOKLYN BOWL!, 25 YEARS!, DOORS!, MERCY MUSIC!, RED CITY RADIO!, OPENERS!, DRINKING!, RUM AND DIET!, YO!, DATING APPS!, JABBA!, WEAK DRINK!, GIRLY DRINKS!, MALT!, ROCKING WITH STRANGERS!, CIRCLE PIT!, SKA PITS!, RANCID!, BROCKTON HARDCORE!, XXL!, PUNCH THE KLOWN!, RONNIE RADKE!, ABINGTON!, BING TOWN!, STATIC X!, PRESCRIPTION DRUGS!, YOUNG DOLPH!, RIP!, SHOOTING!, MEMPHIS!, SOULJA BOY!, YELLING!, TALKING SHIT!, BREAKFAST CLUB!, CHARLAMAGNE!, PUPPET THAT CAME TO LIFE!, SOUTH MEMPHIS!, JACKSONVILLE!, ATK!, KTA!, SITCOM!, RIVALS!, SEINFELD!, JERRY!, GEORGE!, VANESSA CALRTON!, 1000 MILES!, BIBBY!, KSO!, CORBIN!, POLICE RAPPER CONFIDENTIALITY!, FATHER OF 12!, CUM IN A PUSSY!, WHOPPA WIT THE CHOPPA!, WHO I SMOKE!, FAST MONEY GOON!, BEATBOX!, SPOTEMGOTEM!, JULIO FOOLIO!, #585!, LITTLE MOMENTS!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Breaking Walls
Thanksgiving 1947 With George Washington And Van Heflin

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 23:29


This is a snippet from Breaking Walls Episode 97: Thanksgiving 1947—The Most Popular Season in Radio History ___________ At 10PM eastern time on Thanksgiving Day 1947, as families put their young children to bed, ABC broadcast Mr. President from its Los Angeles KECA affiliate, starring Edward Arnold and Betty Lou Gerson. Mr. President first signed on June 26th, 1947. Producers picked Arnold to star because his voice had the “aggressiveness of Teddy Roosevelt, the humility of Abraham Lincoln, and the tenacity of Andrew Jackson.” Listeners were challenged to guess the president's identity before it was revealed at the end. Fittingly the 1947 Thanksgiving episode featured a tale from the life of George Washington. Opposite Mr. President, live from Hollywood over all CBS stations Radio Reader's Digest signed on, guest-starring Van Heflin. 1947 was a good year for the thirty-eight year-old actor. That summer he co-starred with Joan Crawford in Possessed and brought Philip Marlowe to radio as a summer replacement for Bob Hope. His latest film, Green Dolphin Street, just hit theaters. It co-starred Lana Turner and was that year's biggest MGM hit. Radio Reader's Digest debuted on September 13th, 1942 on CBS. The famed magazine actually didn't sponsor the show. They provided the material. Hallmark Greeting Cards was sponsor. In 1947 Les Tremayne was the host.

The Tinsel Factory: A Film History Podcast
History 101: Abraham Lincoln

The Tinsel Factory: A Film History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 35:35


This week on The Tinsel Factory, we compare the life of 16th President of the United States Abraham Lincoln On two sentence movie reviews: Spencer and House of Gucci. Support This Podcast: https://anchor.fm/tinselfactorypod Merch: https://shop.spreadshirt.com/the-tinsel-factory/all Venmo: @tinselfactorypod Sources: https://www.biography.com/us-president/abraham-lincoln https://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2013/02/mississippi-officially-abolishes-slavery-ratifies-13th-amendment https://www.mic.com/articles/26646/lincoln-movie-review-10-ways-it-distorts-history https://www.thedailybeast.com/whats-true-and-false-in-lincoln-movie?ref=scroll https://slate.com/culture/2012/11/lincoln-historical-accuracy-sorting-fact-from-fiction-in-the-steven-spielberg-movie.html https://slate.com/culture/2012/11/lincoln-historical-accuracy-sorting-fact-from-fiction-in-the-steven-spielberg-movie.html --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tinselfactorypod/support

How To Love Lit Podcast
Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 41:53


Walt Whitman - Leaves Of Grass - The Poetry Of Young America!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This episode and next, we tackle one of the most intimidating poets in the American Canon- Walt Whitman.  He is the generally accepted and almost uncontested greatest contribution America has made to the great canon of World Literature- the ones comprised of those that really intimidate- William Shakespeare,  James Joyce, Gustave Flaubert, Vladimir Nabokov, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Pablo Neruda, Ovid, Goethe, Neitche-, Dante- people like that- there are not too many Americans that make that list.    And he does intimidate me- truly.  And honestly he baffles me.  The things he says seem easy to understand except I don't actually understand them.  They are beautiful and interesting but also uncomfortable.  People love his writing and always have, but he's also very offensive- and he offends all equally- the prude and the religious, but also the secular and intellectual- he offends the socialist as well as the capitalist.  Name an identity- he references it and somewhat dismantles it.  Primarily because he absolutely rejects group identities as we think of them today- even in terms of nations but in every sense.  To use his words, “I am large; I contains multitudes” that's a paraphrase from my favorite selection of his work which we'll read today.      For me he's such a curious person in part because of the time he emerged in what was called then the American experiment- and I honestly think his perspective has a lot to do from this unique time period, of course this is not different than how I feel about all of the writers we discuss.  But being born in 1819, the United States of America is only 36 years older than he is.  His parents were present during the Revolutionary War and have a real respect for what people were trying to do here, and how unusual and fragile democratic government actually was or really is.  We, at least we here in the United States, live with the feeling that this country just always has been- that democracy just happens.  That elections are just things that have always happened.  Most students today in this country don't even think about it. Democracy is the normal order in how things occur; equality and liberty are just virtues that everyone agrees are important- by one definition or another.  But None of this was reality and common understanding in 1819 in almost any part of the planet Earth.  And most of the world looked at the United States with contempt- a bunch of non-educated hillbillies living in some weird schemata that wouldn't stand the test of time.  There was no culture in this country, by international standards.  We had no great art, no history to speak of, we weren't writing great philosophies or composing great music.  We had not produced a Voltaire, or a Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We had no Catherine the Great or Cosimo De Medici sponsoring great artistic ventures.        And so enters Walt Whitman- to which he would say, and did say- whoopdeedoo Europe- you are correct- we have none of that, and I celebrate that we don't.      I want to begin with this famous poem by Whitman.  Of course, it's from Leaves of Grass which we'll introduce in a second, but if you are reading the Death bed edition which is the one I have- again I'll explain all that later, it's in the beginning, that very first part called “Inscriptions”.  Let me read Whitman's famous words on America.     I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,  Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,  The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam,  The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,  The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck,  The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands,  The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown,  The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing,  Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else,  The day what belongs to the day—at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly,  Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.      Garry, I want to hear your first thoughts when you read this poem.  Let me start by saying, notice how celebratory it is.  America is singing carols- not dirges- and the song of the American is the song of hard work- not the Vienna Philharmonic- which by the way was founded in 1842.  America was not building art, as commonly understood- we were building lives- free lives- lives where people lived with the choices they made, but they got to make their own choices.  This is very different than anywhere else- places more cultured, more sophisticated, more idealized.  We don't have serfs working for great lords or ladies.  We have no jet-setters so to speak- or people of privilege or high cultural standing- In America we work hard,  but we work for ourselves-and everyone does it- and that is something we're proud of.  There is no shame in labor.  There's a song to that.      Yes, it's very much about homestead.  It's about individualism and taking responsibility to create it- About creating your own little corner of the world.  This is exactly the idea that Alexis DeToqueville referenced in his important work Democracy in America.  As a Frenchman, he was totally surprised and impressed with this very thing that Whitman is talking about.  This poem is a complete refutation of the English feudal system and that's what Northerners loved about it.  In the South, and what was so offensive to Whitman when he spent time in New Orleans was that they were trying to recreate that hierarchal system where some people outrank others to the point of claiming they weren't even human- and that, to Whitman, was the complete opposite of what the entire American Experiment was about.      His parents were clearly on team America- he had one brother named George Washington Whitman, another named Thomas Jefferson Whitman and a third named Andrew Jackson Whitman.       Ha- I guess that IS a statement.  This unique time of history in which he lived allowed Whitman to see such great contrasts in America- he saw democracy and success found in personal effort.  He saw vast amounts of unpolluted natural beauty, but he also saw evil at its most deranged, and pain and loneliness at its most intense.  We have to remember that his parents lived through the glorious revolutionary war, but he lived during the treacherous Civil War- and his perspective and life experience is very different. He admired the expanse of the West. He loved the natural beauty of this continent, but he also was horrified and despised to its core – the. National plague that has defined and still defines so much of the American story- this legacy of slavery- his views on such, btw- got him fired by more than one employer, btw.  At this time, newspapers were owned and operated by political parties, and he was always slipping in views that the political operatives didn't like- so he got fired.       HA!  Well, I guess some things never change.    One thing that baffles and almost offends most academics is Whitman's absolute nothing of an academic background.  His parents were basically illiterate, his family was excessively large and chaotic; today we would say dysfunctional.  He had one sibling that actually had to be committed to an insane asylum.   His formal education was inadequate because his father sent him out to work.  It's so ironic that the greatest American poet had no formal tutelage to except what he scrounged up for himself in his own self-taught way by reading in libraries and attending operas.  He didn't have that option.  His father was also pretty much a financial failure.  He was a carpenter by trade, but had also had a little property.  His father speculated in real estate after moving to Brooklyn, NY, but wasn't all that great at business and ended up losing most of it.      And of course, that's the problem with the land of opportunity- you are kind of out there on your own to make it or break it.  And people were very aware of this.  There was no guarantee, at all, that America would even survive as a country.  It was still an experiment.  No one else was living like this.  Europeans had monarchies; the South American countries were colonies.  Our neighbors to the East were living in empires.  Only this little backward nation in a corner of North America was trying to do this weird thing.    And Whitman loved it.  He really did.  He loved the land.  He loved the cities.  He loved the people.  He spent the first 36 years of his life walking around and observing life, mostly in New York City and Long Island (which was NOT a suburb of New York at that time).    He loved the libraries and spent tons of time there reading.  He loved music, especially opera, which we'll notice has a strong influence on how he writes.  He loved learning, listening and observing, and this is what he wrote about.  I heard one lecturer say that he was the first non-blind poet- which I thought was weird and what made it stand out.  But what the professor meant was that most poets were writing about their inner life, things from their imagination- think Edgar Allan Poe and “The Raven”, but Whitman, in many cases, was transcribing things that he was seeing and hearing in urban life- and this was very different.  He would catalogue it- to use a word that is often used to describe this thing that we just saw him do in the poem we just read, make these long lists of details in these long sentences.         I also want to point out that it was this desire to self-educate that led him, like many of his day, to be influenced and challenged by the great Ralph Waldo Emerson. We'll do an entire episode or more than one of him, but Emerson's non-conventional ideas about nature and the soul and our inter-connectedness, although ideas that were commonly accepted in the far East, were new on this continent.      True- well, In 1855, something happened.  Whitman self-publishes the book Leaves of Grass.  This first version was only 95 pages long- that's compared to the death bed one which has 415 in my copy.   There was no author's name on the cover.  Instead, on the first page there was this image of a man in laborer's clothes.  Whitman only reveals that he's the author through one of the first unnamed poems calling himself, “Walt Whitman, an American, one of the roughs, a kosmos.”    If you look up the word Kosmos in the dictionary it will tell you that that word means- a complex orderly self-inclusive system- which is interesting to think about someone describing themselves as- but it's a Greek word.  It's also a Biblical word- which is how I believe Whitman would know it.  It is used in the New Testament to mean the universe or the creation as a whole- that's how Whitman defines himself in this poem “Song of Myself”  and the context of how he wants us to understand his work and who we are as individuals.  We too are kosmos.      Well, it didn't start out very cosmic- that's for sure.  It's a miracle Leaves of Grass came to be read by anyone.  He self-published it, literally type-setting it himself.  He printed 795 copies and sold almost none of them.     Don't you wish you had one of those originals?    I know right, well, people do.  In case you're in the market, there are 200 that are still around, and in 2014, one sold at Christie's for $305,000.  It's so ironic- Whitman struggled financially until the day he died and celebrated working people in everything he wrote.  What do you think he would think of that, Christy?    I have zero doubt, he would love it.  Totally.  Beyond being the book's publisher, he also was the book's publicist.  He sent copies to the leading poets of the day trying to drum up some good reviews.  Whittier was said to thrown his copy into the fire he was so offended and outraged- the homoerotic imagery was more than he could handle, but Ralph Waldo Emerson saw it for what it was and wrote Whitman back an amazing letter of encouragement.  Let me quote Emerson, “I am not blind to the worth of the wonderful gift of Leaves of Grass. I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”  And of course, to this day, many world class literary scholars still think this about Whitman.       What I find humorous about Whitman is that he wrote glowing reviews of his book himself secretly and published them as if they were written by other people.       Yeah, he was working the influencer thing way back before that was a thing- He also, printed Emerson's actual glowing review when he reprinted the book in 1856, except he didn't get Emerson's permission to do so.  He put Emerson's words, “I greet you at the beginning of a great career” on the spine of the book and he published the entire letter with a long reply andress to Dear Master.”  It was NOT received well by Emerson.      I can see that as being slightly presumptuous.      Of course it was, but I would be tempted as well.  He really admired Emerson, in fact this is what he said about Emerson's influence on his writing.  “I was simmering, simmering, simmering; Emerson brought me to a boil.”    I want us to read the very first part of Song of Myself which was the first poem    I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  This is what I mean when I say, it seems like it's very simple to understand except I've read this poem hundreds of times and am still slightly confused as to what he means.  The term for this is ambiguous- he makes you, as a reader, put your own interpretation, put yourself into the lines to force the meaning out of it.      True, and if you take it at face value just superficially, it may seem that this is a narcissist celebrating egotism, but it clearly doesn't.  It also could be misunderstood to mean he celebrates idleness and laziness, but that doesn't seem to be right either.    Exactly- I love these first lines.  First of all, they are so iconic.  One thing Whitman is known for besides the cataloguing which I mentioned when we read I Hear America Singing, is this thing that today we call Free Verse. Whitman is often given credit for inventing the concept, although that is debatable.  But what is obvious is that there is no rhyme or meter of any kind at all and there isn't supposed to be.  He doesn't want anything to rhyme.  Instead, he wants to write in these really long sentences.  Every stanza is a single sentence, and he is going to do that through the entire poem.  Whitman felt you couldn't get your idea out in these little short phrases of iambic tetrameter like his Whittier, the guy who threw his book in the fire, was doing.  Whitman wanted, above all else, to create a sense of intimacy between himself and the person reading- and so he wanted to make sure you could follow his idea- from idea to idea.  He got this idea from two places- first he copied the idea from the one book he had been familiar with since his childhood- the King James Version of the Bible.  He copied the style like you see in the Psalms or even the Sermon on the Mount.  He also got the idea from the opera- if you think about opera- you also have these long phrases- that end with things like figaro figaro fiiiigaro-     Is that your impression of the opera?    Well, as you know, I enjoy the opera.  I haven't always, to be honest.  A few years ago, my good friend, I've mentioned her on the podcast before, Millington AP Literature/ Lang teacher Amy Nolette, coerced me to attend with her- and I did.  She is an accomplished musician so she really taught me how to admire what was going on- and we went every year for several years until Covid hit.  But, having said that, I'm fairly sure, that's my best attempt at singing opera.      But back to Whitman, so one of the first things that Whitman is famous for today is this concept of Free Verse- it was innovative then, but now, it doesn't seem that big of a deal.  That was a big deal, but a bigger deal to Whitman were the ideas he was putting out there.    I celebrate myself- not because I'm so important- not because I have all this amazing heritage or skill or anything- I celebrate myself because I have an essence that is 100% unique to me.  Let's read it again.     I Celebrate myself, and sing myself,  And what I assume you shall assume,  For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.  It's not accidental that he throws in there that scientific language.  And this is where he will offend the capitalist or competitive side of us.  He makes this bold assertion- in this poetic way- to say- what, do you think you're that much better than me- you are made of the exact same material I am- we're both made of atoms- science teaches us that- and for every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you.      In some sense it's the I'm okay- you're okay attitude, but taking it up a notch- I celebrate myself- you celebrate yourself.      For sure, and something we all give lip-service to today but no one actually really believes.  I have a creative writing assignment that I ask my students to do every year.  We take another Whitman poem called “There was a Child Went Forth” that talks about identity and the physical objects and places that influence who you are- it's a wonderful poem, anyway, I ask my students to write a poem using Whitman's style and technique about THEIR lives.  I tell them we're going to read them in small groups, and if they like what they wrote and feel comfortable,  we are going to print them and put them outside my door in the hallway for everything to read.  At first they are very very resistant to the idea.  They all hate it- first because it's writing, secondly because it's poetry- but mostly because they don't think they want their lives sprawled on the hallway of the school.  I had a sweet darling child, actually a quiet student, raise her hand in protest and literallty say, I don't want to do this.  I can't do this.  All I do is go to school and work- there is nothing interesting at all about my life.      Ha!  She seems to have missed the point.  She didn't want to celebrate herself and she's exactly the kind of person Whitman loved celebrating.    Exactly- and lots of my kids are like that- they work at Sonic, Chick-Fila- the mall- mowing lawns- but in her case, it turns out she is way more interesting and her poem is on the wall right now.  I may take a picture and post it on our website, so you can see them all.  I'm very proud of my kiddos- not just because they produced good poems but because lots of them are hardworking.       I will say, that next phrase leads us to think that Whitman is a lazy person.  He extols the virtue of loafing.  But of course, what I know about his biography which we'll get more into next week when we talk about his experiences in the Civil War and all of that, but Whitman was the very opposite of lazy.  He was an extremely physical hard worker.      True- Let's read the lines you're talking about..    I loafe and invite my soul,  I lean and loafe at my ease observing a spear of summer grass.  When he says I loaf and invite my soul- he's getting into the philosopher side of him that is so complex and we really don't even have time to go there today, but it's that old idea of contemplating- today what we call mindfulness.  And I have to admit, I'm not good at this.        He really believes in mindfulness although he didn't know we renamed his concept for him.  Loafe- meaning chill out- turn off the phone, turn off the tv, turn off the computer and invite your soul into yourself.  Chill out!!!  Stop and observe a spear of grass.  Just look at it- let your mind go there- let it focus on something small- it's the kind of thing the yoga instructors keep telling us to do, that we rarely heed but we all know we should.      Exactly- attention and silence- he things they are indispensable to a sane existence- and two things I'm not all that good at.  And then we get to these last two sentences in this opening little poem-    My tongue, every atom of my blood, form'd from this soil, this air,  Born here of parents born here from parents the same, and their parents the same,  I, now thirty-seven years old in perfect health begin,  Hoping to cease not till death.  Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  There's a lot to say- but he's going to say- I'm proud to be from this place- my parents are from this place.  I'm 37- that is not young.  He is not a child prodigy- he's writing his first book late in life, relatively- he knows that- but he says I'm in good health and I begin- and I'm not going to stop until death- I'm going to live well all the way til the end- I'm not going to give up on myself.  Ever.      I can see why he's inspiring.  And I to get back to this idea of origins.  You know being an American today is something lots of people are proud of (although it is very American to trash our own country) but that's part of our national ethos- but even these same people proudly display their passport.  America is a powerful country and a rich country.  At that time it was a new country- and new countries don't have the safety of heritage and sometimes the people who come from them have trouble taking pride in their heritage.    I totally know what you're talking about.  There was a listener who connected with us through our Instagram page and showed us some beautiful pictures he had taken.  They were truly amazing- not only were the mountains breathtakingly gorgeous in their own right, but his eye for framing was genius.  I messaged him back and told him what I thought of his art.  We went back and forth and I finally asked him.  Where are you from? And he would never tell me.  He said he was from Central Asia and so fort which I eventually gathered he is from one of the new countries formally part of the USSR.   I'm not saying he was ashamed of where he was from, I didn't get that sense, but he seemed intimated that we were from America- a place that seems so far away and idealized from his point of view.  Whitman would tell this young man- you're from that wonderful air,  from wonderful heritage, from atoms just like ours- not just accept it celebrate it.    Because, as I read onward, he seems to imply, this is the attitude that breeds great things that breeds beautiful things but if it doesn't- that's okay as well- keep going all the way til death- compete not with others but with yourself- as he goes to self- publish the same book 8 more times until he does .    Ha!  I guess that's true.      I want to read the last sentence again of that opening because he sets up a lot of the rest of his writings with something of a warning-    Creeds and schools in abeyance,  Retiring back a while sufficed at what they are, but never forgotten,  I harbor for good or bad, I permit to speak at every hazard,  Nature without check with original energy.  Again- that language seems simple but at the same time I have to really work at what he's going to say.  But I have an interpretation- he's going to say this- put away your school learning and your religious training when you read this.  Sit back because I'm going to say some really hard things- that's what he means with that word “hazard”- but they are not mean- they are natural- it's about the energy of being alive.  It's the beauty of being you, of being a physical body, of being an inter-connected spirit with connections to other people and part of this physical space.      And of course, it's that celebration of the physical body that kept getting him censored. Even Ralph Waldo Emerson later when he was reproducing his book begged him to self-censor what was thinly veiled homo-erotic passages, but he just wouldn't.  He didn't see them as erotic- he didn't even see sex like that.  For him sexuality and the physical body had a self-evidence important place in our lives and had to be brought out in the open- be it a hazard or not.  And again, it kind of was a hazard, he lost a really good job in Washington at one point because his boss found a copy of leaves of Grass in his desk and found it obscene.      Poor guy- well, that takes us to the title- Leaves of Grass- and what that even means.  I mentioned that Whitman was famous for his style or innovative literary technique, he has been increasingly praised for his innovative ideas about the body, the self, consciousness- he was one of the first America poets to even write about consciousness- the other one btw is Emily Dickinson.  But probably the thing I like the best about Whitman, and this is me, personally, is his ability to really capture a wonderful metaphor.  He could just say things in an understandable and pretty way- and this is what poetry really is all about- for my money.    This phrase that is the title – Leaves of Grass- it means something.  First let's read the first part of Song of Myself that talks about grass- I'd ask you to read all of it but I think we might get lost. Song of Myself number 6.      A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands;  How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.  I guess it must be the flag of my disposition, out of hopeful green stuff woven.    Or I guess it is the handkerchief of the Lord,  A scented gift and remembrancer designedly dropt,  Bearing the owner's name someway in the corners, that we may see and remark, and say Whose?    Or I guess the grass is itself a child, the produced babe of the vegetation.    Or I guess it is a uniform hieroglyphic,  And it means, Sprouting alike in broad zones and narrow zones,  Growing among black folks as among white,  Kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congressman, Cuff, I give them the same, I receive them the same.  And now it seems to me the beautiful uncut hair of graves.  When Whitman loafs around and stares at grass- he sees a picture of America- or a picture of any democracy any group of people that understand that they are one poeple- of which America was the example he knew, but he's not exclusionary by any means.  He says, look, every single blade of grass is totally different and yet in some sense the same.  He calls it a uniform hieroglyphic- what an interesting turn of phrase.  It's and I use his words here “black folks as among white, kanuck, Tuckahoe, Congreeman, Cuff, I give to me the same, I receive them the same.”    For Whitman, the picture of America was a field of grass.  If we look at it, we see hopeful green woven stuff. The handkerchief of the Lord- but if we look at it closely we're all so different- and both things are truly beautiful.  It's a paradox.   He goes on to say, it's from the land, it's made up of the dust that is made up of the people of the land- I know it gets philosophical- and you can take it as far deep as you want to plunge with him.   But you don't have to get all that deep or esoteric if you don't want to.  You can just lay on the grass, and smell it and enjoy it- loaf on it- to use his words.    You know what I like about that entire image and about Whitman's entire philosophy.  He absolutely spoke of diversity, but he did not celebrate diversity- not like we think of doing that today.  He celebrates unity- and that's why this metaphor is the title.  Whitman had a very refined understanding of how easy we can rip each other apart- there is not more divisive time in American history than the 1850s and of course the 1860s- which are the war years.   He lived through the most divided time in American history and he could see it coming even in 1855.  But during his life time, he would see 2.5% of America's population die killing each other that was 750,000 people- if we would compare it to the population of America today- that would be over 7 million people.  Next week we will see how much he admired Lincoln and what he stood for, but as he understood the American experiment,  he believed in admiring differences and loving them, but identifying as a single group- first and foremost.  The dominant image here is of a single landscape- beautiful and united across time and space respecting the past not judging or condemning it- allowing ourselves to spring from it renewed and refreshed.   And I think that's where the universal appeal comes from.  If Whitman was just about American patriotism, maybe we'd like him in this country, but it would feel propagandistic.  His ideals are universal and apply to any group of people- anywhere.  And he's not afraid to admit-some of thing may be self-contradictory.  The first time I ever read Whitman was in college.  I went to school studying political science, but in my junior year I decided I didn't want to do that anymore and I was going to get an English major, well this meant I had to take almost exclusively classes that demanded intense reading- and all at the same time.  I read so much that they all ran together and my grades were not as good as they could have been had I had a healthier pace.  And in all that reading, not a whole lot stood out- but this little poem by Whitman actually did- I underlined it, and I kept the trade book I purchased at the time.  I actually still have it after all these years and so many moves.  In this little section, Whitman is talking in that intimate way that he talks to his reader- it's personal- it's in the second person- and at that time of my life- it was a very chaotic time to be honest- I had no idea what I was doing in my life, my mother had recently died, I had very little idea what I should do in the future- I had changed directions at the last moment- and these famous words just stood out.  Will you read them?  51  The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them.  And proceed to fill my next fold of the future.  Listener up there! what have you to confide to me?  Look in my face while I snuff the sidle of evening,  (Talk honestly, no one else hears you, and I stay only a minute longer.)  Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict myself,  (I am large, I contain multitudes.)  I concentrate toward them that are nigh, I wait on the door-slab.  Who has done his day's work? who will soonest be through with his supper?  Who wishes to walk with me?  Will you speak before I am gone? will you prove already too late?  Christy- what did that mean to you.      I really have no idea.  I think the line that I liked is the line everyone likes, “Do I contradict myself?  Very well then I contradict. Myself.”   It just made me feel better.  I knew I was full of inconsistencies. And Whitman just seemed to be saying- of course you are- everyone is- to understand that is just being honest.  Let it go.  Just concentrate on what is near- what you're doing today, supper- that sort of thing.  If you're successful- that's great- if you're a failure- what difference does it make- we're all the same atoms, we're all just leaves of grass.   He just made me feel okay.    Which I guess that would probably have made him happy- the bard of democracy- known as the good gray poet- speaking across time and space about what it means to be a human- to be a leaf of grass.  Thanks for listeninging- next episode- we will delve a little more into his adult life, read some of his most famous poems – those tributes to Abraham Lincoln- and finish our discussion of this amazing American.  AS always, please share about us with a friend or colleague- push out an episode on your social media feed, text an episode to a friend.  Connect with us on our social media at howtolovelitpodcast on facebook, Instagram, twitter, or Linkedin.  If you are a teacher, visit our website for teaching materials that provide ideas scaffolding for using our podcasts as instructional pieces in your classroom.      Peace out.      

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Lincoln, RFK, and Having the Needed Conversations

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 11:14


On the 158th anniversary of The Gettysburg Address, Boyd looks at another speech given by another legendary politician in difficult circumstances. What can we learn from them about how to confront the challenges of today and have the conversations that matter? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sean Hannity Show
The First True Freedom Fighters - November 19th, Hour 3

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 37:01


Brian Kilmeade, Co- Host of Fox and Friends in the Morning on the Fox News Channel and author of the new book The President and the Freedom Fighter, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle to Save America's Soul, out earlier this month, is here to discuss the news of the day and how far we have come from true freedom fighters like Abraham Lincoln.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Your Maryland
"The Orator"

Your Maryland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 4:33


On November 19th, 1863, at the dedication of the cemetery at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, one of America's greatest orators of the time, Edward Everett, gave a grand speech. But it was Abraham Lincoln's brief address, consisting of only 272 words, which will be remembered forever. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
HOW THE GOP SAVED AMERICA

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 58:20


In this special episode, Dinesh focuses on the big mess in which the Republican Party finds itself, amidst its moment of unparalleled opportunity.  Dinesh reviews the glorious history of the Republican Party, focusing on three of its great leaders: Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, and Ronald Reagan.  Trump, Dinesh argues, shows the GOP the way forward, and yet to be an enduring majority party the Republicans need to broaden its base to include rural and suburban voters, working class Hispanics and soccer moms, entrepreneurs and social and religious conservatives. Dinesh candidly discusses why the current Republican Party is so timid and weak, and he shows how, in this time of national crisis, it can become what it once was, a party that successfully represented and fought for what is best about America. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Kim Monson Show
The Civil War of Ideas

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 58:53


Happy 158th Anniversary Gettysburg Address!  Allen Thomas, frequent guest and author, is in studio with Kim to talk about Lincoln's famous speech.  Kim encourages listeners to tune in to the America's Veterans Stories this weekend.  There will be three separate shows featuring our veterans.  Sunday at 3pm Kim interviews Nellie Paler, a Vietnam Veteran Marine pilot.  Saturday and Sunday at 10pm features other veterans.  Each show broadcasts on KLZ 560 AM and KLZ 100.7 FM. The Gettysburg Address is one of the most important speeches from our 16th President Abraham Lincoln.  Lincoln spoke of human equality, sacrifices of the many, union of the nation, rebirth of our nation and a nation of liberty.  Lincoln and George Washington are giants in history as they were committed to the founding principles of America:  that all men are Created Equal with Rights from God of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.  Kim reminds listeners to give Karen Levine (303-877-7516), with RE/MAX Alliance, a call if they are interested in their family visiting Santa on Saturday, December 11th, 10-noon.  Karen has reserved three spots for Kim's listeners. Steve Cruice with Three Points Financial explains the advantages of working with Three Points Financial.  As a fee only firm, they offer tax planning, investment strategies and retirement counseling.  Tax planning is vitally important with all that is happening in Congress.  One massive infrastructure spending bill has been signed by Biden while the “social infrastructure” bill is working its way through the House and Senate.  The potential for negative consequences to investment portfolios is high at this time.  Steve emphasizes that inflation is a tax on everyone. Lesley Hollywood, grassroots activist, invites everyone to a “No Jabs For Jobs” rally Saturday, November 20th, 1-3pm on Thornton Parkway.  The vaccine and mask mandates are government overreach using force and coercion.  We must stand up to protect our rights, including our privacy rights.  This tyrannical force must be stopped. Hal Van Hercke, owner of Castlegate Knife and Tool and sponsor of both shows, announces the opening of a pop-up store at the Castle Rock Mercantile.  The store is fully stocked with kitchen related tools, steak knife sets and carving sets, and other merchandise.  Hal notes that they have trained knife sharpening technicians for any dull knives that may be in your home. Allen and Kim continue their conversation highlighting Allen's new op-ed, The Civil War of Ideas.  Our country is divided due to the COVID-19/Wuhan-China virus disruption.  We have gone from “two weeks to flatten the curve” to “coerced jabs for jobs.”  This is pure tyranny.  As a nation we must acknowledge that this will not work.  We are fighting the same battle as the Civil War where some people are considered inferior to others.  Looking at the past we know that we have fallen short many times, including in the equality of freedom.  However, we have worked to rectify our shortcomings.  We paid our penance with the death and destruction of the Civil War.  Humans and human nature are not perfect however the American Idea is perfect and we must preserve it.  Tyranny is not the answer.  Reason over emotion must persevere.  In conversations over the holidays do not lay blame but be persuasive in your defense of liberty.

Trumpet Bookshelf
#129: Give Thanks in Everything

Trumpet Bookshelf

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 24:55


Abraham Lincoln's Thanksgiving Day proclamation is a prime example of gratitude toward God—no matter the circumstances. “Proclamation of Thanksgiving” “The Power of Grateful Prayers”

The Writer's Almanac
The Writer's Almanac - Friday, November 19, 2021

The Writer's Almanac

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 5:00


On this date in 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

History Daily
The Gettysburg Address

History Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 18:59


November 19, 1863. In the midst of a bloody Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln delivers one of the most famous speeches in American History. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

This Day in History
This Day in History - November 19, 2021

This Day in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 1:09


Abraham Lincoln delivered 272 of the most famous words in history on this day in 1863.

The Rhino Daily Podcast
2450 - 7 Score And 18 Years Ago

The Rhino Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 3:45


Abraham Lincoln gave one of the most famous speeches of all time, teaching an important business lesson along with his central message. Steve Sipress, entrepreneur, marketing, sales, tips, ideas, help, strategy, small business owner, direct response, tactics, success, profits, growth, results, marketing consultant, Lincoln, Gettysburg, address, selling, close, closing, communication

We the People
The Gettysburg Address

We the People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 67:56


November 19, 2021 marks the 158th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. This week's episode highlights the landmark speech, its historical and constitutional significance, and its continued relevance today. Host Jeffrey Rosen is joined by historians Kate Masur of Northwestern University and Sean Wilentz of Princeton University. Through a close, line-by-line read of the speech they analyze its rhetoric, highlight its references to other founding documents including the Declaration of Independence, and illuminate its dire historical context memorializing the Civil War's bloodiest battle at a crucial turning point. Additional resources and transcript available in our Media Library at constitutioncenter.org/constitution. Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

We The People
The Gettysburg Address

We The People

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 67:56


November 19, 2021 marks the 158th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. This week's episode highlights the landmark speech, its historical and constitutional significance, and its continued relevance today. Host Jeffrey Rosen is joined by historians Kate Masur of Northwestern University and Sean Wilentz of Princeton University. Through a close, line-by-line read of the speech they analyze its rhetoric, highlight its references to other founding documents including the Declaration of Independence, and illuminate its dire historical context memorializing the Civil War's bloodiest battle at a crucial turning point.   The National Constitution Center relies on support from listeners like you to provide nonpartisan constitutional education to Americans of all ages. In honor of the 234th anniversary of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution, every dollar you give to support the We the People podcast campaign will be doubled with a generous 1:1 match up to a total of $234,000, made possible by the John Templeton Foundation! Visit constitutioncenter.org/wethepeople  and thank you for your crucial support.   Additional resources and transcript available in our Media Library at constitutioncenter.org/constitution. Questions or comments about the show? Email us at podcast@constitutioncenter.org.

Chasing History Radio
Chasing History Radio: Is Every Artifact ever made Still out there?

Chasing History Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 13:17


In this episode, we will look at the reality of human history objects - like all of the buttons that were on continental army uniforms during the American Revolution to every bullet made out of lead that was fired during the Civil War. Are all those things that were made in the past is it still out there somewhere? The answer is... Yes, most of them are. We talk about the details of the tangible artifacts that are still out there waiting to be discovered.  Please help us out by taking 20 seconds and giving us a rate and review or tell us how we can make a better show. We Appreciate Youz Guyz!   Please help us out by leaving a comment and sharing our show with others!    Don't forget to Subscribe, Comment & leave us a rating and review. We also have a YouTube Channel "Chasing History" where we take you into the field with the men & women who discover history!

Comedy Fight Club
CFC - 139 Eminem vs MM

Comedy Fight Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 99:42


UNDERCARD BATTLES: Gavin Newsom vs Kamala Harris Derek Jeter vs The Covid Vaccine  Violent J Leno vs Sonic and Tails  Kanye West vs Helen Keller Napoleon Bonaparte vs Abraham Lincoln    MAIN EVENT: Eminem vs M&M   JUDGES: Chris from Bk, Robbie Bernstein, Scott Chaplain, Calise Hawkins, Danny Polishchuk, Ryan Long   OFFICIALS: Mark Henely, Niko Pav, Patrick Haggerty   DJ: Derick Gonzalez   HOST: Matt Maran   This episode was recorded on October 31st, 2021. This show is usually recorded LIVE at The Stand Comedy Club in NYC. Not in the NYC area? You can still watch Comedy Fight Club on youtube and follow us on Instagram and Twitter @comedyfightnyc   If you want access to old episodes and bonus content subscribe to our Patreon page! https://www.patreon.com/comedyfightclub   Follow this week's battlers on Social Media: Gavin Newsom: @robbiegoodwin, Kamala Harris: @ohdamnthatsdori, Derek Jeter: @brittonuscardwell, The Covid Vaccine: @thisisbenmiller, Sonic and Tails: @smoopiedoopie @flukehuman, Violent J Leno: @saltydalty69420, Helen Keller: @clairebearpears, Kanye West: @iamphilhunt, Abraham Lincoln: @jakevevera, Napoleon Boneparte: @patrickhaggertycomedy, Jesus Christ: @ironicpunhere, Eminem: @bobbysheehanlol, M&M: @justfeeney, Chris from BK: @chrisfrombklyn, Robbie Bernstein: @robbiethefire, Scott Chaplain: @scott_chaplain, Calise Hawkins: @calisehawkins, Danny Polishchuk: @dannyjokes, Ryan Long: @ryanlongcomedy, Mark Henely: @markhenely, Matt Maran: @realmattmaran, Nikola Pavlovic: @ironicpunhere, Derek Gonzalez: @officiallyderickgonzalez, Ben Miller: @thisisbenmiller

Offshore Explorer with Scott Dodgson
American Maritime Pilot: The Robert Smalls Story

Offshore Explorer with Scott Dodgson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:59


Robert Smalls (April 5, 1839 – February 23, 1915) was an American politician, publisher, businessman, and maritime pilot. Born into slavery in Beaufort, South Carolina, he freed himself, his crew, and their families during the American Civil War by commandeering a Confederate transport ship, CSS Planter, in Charleston harbor, on May 13, 1862, and sailing it from Confederate-controlled waters of the harbor to the U.S. blockade that surrounded it. He then piloted the ship to the Union-controlled enclave in Beaufort–Port Royal–Hilton Head area, where it became a Union warship. His example and persuasion helped convince President Abraham Lincoln to accept African-American soldiers into the Union Army.After the American Civil War he returned to Beaufort and became a politician, winning election as a Republican to the South Carolina Legislature and the United States House of Representatives during the Reconstruction era. Smalls authored state legislation providing for South Carolina to have the first free and compulsory public school system in the United States. He founded the Republican Party of South Carolina. Smalls was the last Republican to represent South Carolina's 5th congressional district Please buy my new book"Mosaic Artist" from my Dry Port Series: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09KQ6R34R  Listen to past episodesFollow us on FacebookBuy us a coffeeSupport us on Patreon

Millennial Mentorship
MQ Ep. 468: Be a Believer

Millennial Mentorship

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 7:00


Today on Mentorship Quest, we have a quote from The Great Emancipator himself, Abraham Lincoln. He says, “ "I'm a success today because I had a friend who believed in me, and I didn't have the heart to let him down." Turn in to hear our thoughts on the positive power of belief.

The Federalist Radio Hour
How Abraham Lincoln And Frederick Douglass's Unlikely Friendship Changed America

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:23


Fox News’s Brian Kilmeade joins Emily Jashinsky to discuss the little-known story of how two American heroes put their differences aside for the sake of democracy and friendship. The historical context found in Kilmeade’s new book, “The President and the Freedom Fighter: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle to Save America’s Soul,” sheds new light on today’s complex discussion of politics and race.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Federalist Radio Hour: How Abraham Lincoln And Frederick Douglass's Unlikely Friendship Changed America

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:23


Fox News’s Brian Kilmeade joins Emily Jashinsky to discuss the little-known story of how two American heroes put their differences aside for the sake of democracy and friendship. The historical context found in Kilmeade’s new book, “The President and the Freedom Fighter: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle to Save America’s Soul,” sheds new […]

Becoming Your Best | The Principles of Highly Successful Leaders
Episode 303 - Turning Defeat into Triumph

Becoming Your Best | The Principles of Highly Successful Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 30:00


Celebrating success makes sense only if we look at the path we went through to get there. It is not about the victory itself; it is about the breakthroughs, the sensation of overcoming setbacks, of crushing challenges, the sensation of gratitude for not having given up in the darkest moments.  Today's episode is about not giving up; it is about discovering that our best often is realized through a spirit of determination, endurance, and faith in ourselves, our skills, and our strength. We go through the stories of famous personalities who achieved great success, changing the course of world history, literature, sports, and politics. We also discuss the importance of removing negative thinking from our vocabulary and the four essential habits to achieve our triumphs.  Tune in to Episode 303 of Becoming Your Best, and learn about the magical power of turning the darkest moments into the fuel to achieve our goals. In This Episode, You Will Learn: Never give in. About Churchill's inspiration and inspiring speech during World War 2 (2:33) The incredible story of J.K. Rowling (7:03) The astonishing story of Roger Bannister (12:09) The most miserable man alive. Abraham Lincoln's story (18:26) Four essential habits to achieve your triumphs (22:23) Becoming Your Best Resources: Becoming Your Best Website Becoming Your Best University Website Becoming Your Best Library Email: support@becomingyourbest.com  Book: Becoming Your Best: The 12 Principles of Highly Successful Leaders Book: Conquer Anxiety: How to Overcome Anxiety and Optimize Your Performance Facebook Group – Conquer Anxiety See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Advisory Opinions
5th Circuit Extends Stay of Vaccine Mandate

Advisory Opinions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 56:08


On today's podcast, David and Sarah dive into vaccine mandates, religious exemptions, and the Civil War. They analyze a recent court ruling blocking the Biden OSHA mandate, and then discuss what a “sincerely held religious belief” is in the eyes of the law. Finally, they conclude with a discussion of the Constitution, Abraham Lincoln, and whether he was an authoritarian who “broke” the Constitution before it was rebuilt by the Civil War amendments.   Show Notes: -5th Circuit extends stay of OSHA vaccine mandate -Noah Feldman: “This Is the Story of How Lincoln Broke the U.S. Constitution” -New York Times review of Feldman's “The Broken Constitution” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Comedians Vs Humanity
Episode #52: Metaverses

Comedians Vs Humanity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 78:51


What was Abe Lincoln's pick up line to Mary Todd? Would it work today? We discuss what era is the worst for hookups. And with the Bitcoin Boom we talk about two new alt coins that are soon to take over the market.    "Girl that ass a bowl of oatmeal"- Honest Abe

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast
Kevin McGary: Every Black Life Matters & the Cancer of Critical Race Theory

Stand Up For The Truth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:54


We discuss Kevin's background and the focus of Every Black Life Matters, as well as the dangerous and cancerous Critical Race Theory which has not only spread throughout education but is now creeping into churches! Kevin also shares some forgotten history about Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the battle over slavery - who supported racism and who did not. Fascinating and informative conversation with Kevin McGary! Daily podcast, relevant articles on issues pertaining to Christians and more can be found on Stand Up For The Truth.

Dialogues with Richard Reeves
Philip Collins on how words can save democracy

Dialogues with Richard Reeves

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 73:55


If you find yourself saying, perhaps of a political speech, “Well, that's just rhetoric”, you are getting things exactly wrong. That's according to my guest today, Philip Collins, former chief speechwriter to Tony Blair and author of “When They Go Low, We Go High: Speeches That Shape the World - and Why We Need Them”. Phil is an old friend of mine and irritatingly good at very many things: he's a philosopher, lecturer, policy wonk, journalist (now for both the New Statesman and the Evening Standard), and much else besides. I think of him now as “Mr. Rhetoric”. Phil believes that rhetoric is essential to the functioning of democracy and, now, to its saving. We talk about Donald Trump, Tony Blair, Boris Johson, Barack Obama, Martin Luther King, Abraham Lincoln, Pericles, sophistry, the role of emotion in political persuasion, the need for enchantment - and the importance of paying our respects. Philip Collins Philip Collins is a British journalist, author and academic. He served as the chief speechwriter for Prime Minister Tony Blair from 2004-2007, after serving as the director of The Social Market Foundation, an independent think tank in the UK. Collins is the founder and writer-in-chief at The Draft, a writing and rhetoric agency, and he also teaches a course on rhetoric at the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University. He is a contributing editor at The New Statesman, and a columnist for the Evening Standard.  More Collins We discussed Collins' vastly interesting book, “When They Go Low, We Go High: Speeches That Shape the World - and Why We Need Them” He also authored “Start Again: How We Can Fix Our Broken Politics” and “The Art of Speeches and Presentations,” among other books.   You can follow more of his work on Twitter: @PhilipJCollins1 Also Mentioned  I mentioned the book, “The Liberal Mind,” written by Kenneth Minogue Collins mentioned JP Stern's book “Hitler: The Führer and the People”  Collins also referred to the book “How Democracies Die” written by Levitsky and Ziblatt  The Dialogues Team  Creator: Richard Reeves Research: Ashleigh Maciolek Artwork: George Vaughan Thomas Tech Support: Cameron Hauver-Reeves Music: "Remember" by Bencoolen (thanks for the permission, guys!)

A Quest for Well-Being
Authentic Leadership & Expressing Your Passion

A Quest for Well-Being

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 42:37


— Creating a vision that goes beyond your life connects your present actions not only with current but also future generations. Your vision can be a source of courage that energizes and motivates you to continue to move forward. Creating a vision of a compelling ‘bigger future' then looking backward will provide you with the energy, focus and clarity to make decisions. There is no such thing as failure; there are only actions and results. The results of your Authentic Leadership™ in developing planning strategies will be understood and have its greatest impact on generations yet to be born. Great leaders such as Abraham Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, Tiger Woods, Walt Disney, Thomas Edison, Martin Luther King, Oprah Winfrey and Barack Obama have always known this truth. Valeria Teles interviews Ron Tabachnick —  an Author, Strategic facilitator, Coach, and speaker Ron Tabachnick, aka “The Swamp Doc” helps individuals clear off their plate. Over the past 25 years, “Ron has developed an uncanny innate ability to help clients understand the current state of their personal and business relationships, to create a picture of what they want to achieve, and to create a plan ‘from' success. His comprehensive programs are professional, informative and insightful. His capabilities at bringing out the understanding of issues, and the creation of a plan are extremely valuable to benefit business, personal and interpersonal relationships". Positive, energetic with a wonderful sense of humour, Ron has been featured in Fast Company Magazine, The Globe and Mail Report on Business, The Toronto Star, The Toronto Sun, Toronto Business, Business Edge and Small Business Magazine. He has appeared on Rogers Cable #10, Linda Leatherdale's Money Show, and as a regular guest over 45 times discussing planning productivity on Cable Pulse 24. He has worked with the senior management of FedEx Canada, the founding president of The Ontario Energy Association, The Tourettes Syndrome Foundation, numerous other presidents and individuals. As the author of A Breakthrough in Strategic Planning, his claim to fame is as the world's first and foremost expert at applying Visual Dialogue to strategic planning on the internet. To learn more about Ron Tabachnick and his work, please visit: insightacall.com       — This podcast is a quest for well-being, a quest for a meaningful life through the exploration of fundamental truths, enlightening ideas, insights on physical, mental, and spiritual health. The inspiration is Love. The aspiration is to awaken new ways of thinking that can lead us to a new way of being, being well. 

The Book Review
Alan Cumming Talks About ‘Baggage'

The Book Review

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 75:47


The actor and author Alan Cumming was happily surprised that his best-selling first memoir, “Not My Father's Son,” inspired many readers who had suffered their own childhood traumas. But he was disappointed, he says on this week's podcast, when people characterized him as having “triumphed” or “overcome” his adversity. “I haven't, I haven't, I absolutely haven't,” he says. And he stresses that point in his new memoir, “Baggage.”“We all have baggage, we all have trauma, we all have something,” he says. “But the worst thing to do is to pretend it hasn't happened. to deny it or to think that you're over it. And that's what I felt was in danger of happening with the way that my first book was reacted to. So in this I'm trying to say: You never get over it, it's with you all the time.” He adds: “You have to be very vigilant about your trauma. If you deny it, it will come back and bite you in the bum.”Allen C. Guelzo visits the podcast to discuss “Robert E. Lee: A Life,” his new biography of the Confederate leader.“Since it had been at least 25 years since another serious biography of Lee had been published — this was by Emory Thomas, in 1995 — it seemed to me that the time was right to begin a re-evaluation of Lee, and especially to ask questions about Lee from someone like myself coming from what was, quite frankly, a Northern perspective,” Guelzo says. “After all, all the books I've written up to this point have been about Abraham Lincoln and the Union cause in the war, and I thought it might be productive to look at Robert E. Lee through the other end of the telescope.”Also on this week's episode, Alexandra Alter has news from the publishing world; and Alexandra Jacobs and Molly Young talk about books they've recently reviewed. Pamela Paul is the host.Here are the books discussed by the Times's critics this week:“Our Country Friends” by Gary Shteyngart“Solid Ivory” by James Ivory

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Brian Kilmeade on Abraham Lincoln, Comedians Speaking Up, and Biden's Terrible Policies (ACS Nov 10)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 66:23


Adam and Brian Kilmeade have a 1-on-1 conversation in Part 2 of today's podcast. Adam begins by asking Brian what inspired him to write his new book, ‘The President and the Freedom Fighter: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle to Save America's Soul'. They also talk about grit, ‘white priveledge', and why you shouldn't expect politicians to do anything for you. From there, the guys discuss the failures of the Biden presidency, and they go on to chat about cries of racism, and what our country needs to breakthrough and succeed again. In the last part of the show, Adam and Brian talk about comedians beginning to speak up, and why we all need to stop apologizing. Please support today's sponsors: BlindsGalore.com let them know ADAM sent you Lifelock.com enter ADAM SimpliSafe.com/ADAM TRICOCatsAndDogs.com Geico.com BlockTraffik.Org

Adam Carolla Show
Part 1: Backpacks, Unicycles, Listener Calls, and The News (ACS Nov 10)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 69:22


At the top of the podcast, Adam complains about backpacks that have too many flaps and pouches for things to disappear into. The guys then listen to a mashup featuring Jim Carolla, followed by the Elvis version of the 2001 theme. Adam also talks about the people that his parents looked up to, and the guys take some listener calls. Later, Adam talks about the odyssey of getting his own unicycle as a child. Before the break, Gina reads news stories about more problems on the set of ‘Rust', Oscar Pistorius becoming eligible for parole, the fight against Texas' new abortion law, and more on Jeff Bezos and Leonardo DiCaprio. Please support today's sponsors: BlindsGalore.com let them know ADAM sent you Lifelock.com enter ADAM SimpliSafe.com/ADAM TRICOCatsAndDogs.com Geico.com BlockTraffik.Org

American History Tellers
Traitors | The Widow and the Assassin | 2

American History Tellers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:37


On the night of April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth stepped into the presidential box at Washington's Ford's Theatre, raised a pistol at President Abraham Lincoln, and squeezed the trigger. Lincoln would soon die of his wounds, making him the first president to be assassinated in American history. As the nation plunged into mourning, the hunt for Lincoln's killer began.But authorities soon revealed a conspiracy much bigger than just one man. The investigation would focus on an unlikely accomplice: a widow and boarding house owner named Mary Surratt. In the months leading up to the assassination, Booth and his men met frequently at Surratt's boarding house, and her tavern was their first stop on their escape. But her exact role in the plot and subsequent military trial led to controversy and conflict that would rage for years to come.Listen ad free by subscribing now to https://wondery.app.link/historytellers!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sick and Wrong Podcast
S&W Episode 816: Firefighter Psychic Medium

Sick and Wrong Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 87:52


Kate Rambo receives a 10% off coupon to Adamandeve.com to commemorate her one-year anniversary as cohost of this fine podcraft. Dee interviews Andrew “Raz” Radziewicz, an FDNY firefighter and psychic medium who regularly makes contact with extraterrestrials and ghosts, including President Abraham Lincoln. Listeners phone in with belated spooky Halloween stories. Sign up for the...