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Academic institution for further education

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  • 4,876EPISODES
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  • Oct 25, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about universities

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Latest podcast episodes about universities

Texas Tribune Brief
Universities in Texas with federal contracts are grappling with competing vaccine mandates from the state and federal government

Texas Tribune Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 2:30


Many of Texas' higher learning institutions, which have collectively received billions of dollars in federal contracts, are trying to figure out whether they need to require employees to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. An executive order from President Joe Biden that requires all federal contractors to get a shot goes into effect soon but Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has already banned such directives in the state.

Path 11 Podcast
358 Our Spiritual DNA with Carmel Niland

Path 11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 53:10


Carmel Niland graduated from the Universities of New South Wales and of Illinois and began her career as a teacher in Sydney, Australia, and Ithaca, New York, USA.  She worked for thirty years for the NSW Government leading agencies on gender, racial equality, human rights, child protection, and disability services. She was elected as the Deputy Chancellor at the University of New South Wales. Carmel was honored by the Medal of Australia for her work.  She is married to John and they have two children, and live in Sydney. Her first book, A Darker Magic This Way Comes has received critical acclaim, earning Honourable Mentions at the 2017 Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York Book Festivals. Our Spiritual DNA is a guide to deciphering your spiritual lineage After examining the lives of thousands of individuals across five thousand years, Carmel Niland saw patterns that allowed her to connect each individual to 12 specific Ascended Masters https://www.ourspiritualdna.com/ ------------------------------------ Check out Molly Mandelberg's Wild Hearts Rise Up Oracle Deck & Guidebook ------------------------------------

Pariah Nation
S18EP4: UK Universities...you have a racism problem

Pariah Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 26:00


In this episode I looked at the main ways in which racism manifests itself in the UK during University. I drew on the anonymous experiences of students from my campus as well as data collected around the UK to evaluate the problem of racism in Universities as well as how to solve them. Listen in to find out more!

Women in Sports UNFILTERED!
Season 2 Ep. 1: NIL - The Future of College Athletics

Women in Sports UNFILTERED!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 40:51


Guests: Raymond Anderson (VP, College Athletics & Athletic Director // ASU) Jaila Tolbert (Student-Athlete Spokesperson // NCAA) A New Era is Here. N...I...L, it's everywhere and here to stay. Brands and players are eager to enter this rapidly evolving space, allowing brands to build relationships with collegiate athletes as young influencers and providing college athletes compensation opportunities for their name, image, and likeness. Today we'll dive into NIL from the perspective of a student-athlete and collegiate Athletic Director – sharing the current landscape, the internal infrastructure modifications for Universities and the NCAA, and current NIL deals.

The Sean Hannity Show
Powerful Universities - October 22nd, Hour 3

The Sean Hannity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 37:49


Ami Horowitz, Satirist and Documentarian, joins us to discuss his latest video on the power of American Universities. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

MPR News with Angela Davis
What declining community college enrollment means for higher education

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:00


Enrollment at colleges across the nation decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic, and community colleges have seen the steepest declines. Overall college attendance decreased by 5 percent last spring compared to the year before. At community colleges, enrollment was down by 9.5 percent. Enrollment at Minnesota's community colleges has declined steadily over the past decade. But during the COVID-19 pandemic, those declines became more sharp. Last fall, enrollment decreased 5 percent, according to data from Minnesota State Colleges and Universities.  Host Angela Davis discussed enrollment trends at community colleges in Minnesota with Minnesota State Colleges and Universities chancellor Devinder Malhotra, and asked a higher education reporter what community college enrollment says about higher education.  Guests:  Devinder Malhotra is the chancellor of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities.  Lee Gardner is a senior writer for the Chronicle of Higher Education.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Angela Davis podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or RSS.

The Pete Kaliner Show
Pete Kaliner: We've Talked About CRT In K-12 Schools...But What Happens When It Invades Your State Universities?

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 33:48


In the final hour of the show, Pete talks about funding that both UNC Charlotte and NC State have received to alter curriculum about racism and diversity in both schools.   Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/petekalinershow See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Realignment
169 | Johns Hopkins University President Ronald Daniels: What Universities Owe Democracy

The Realignment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:22


Subscribe to The Realignment's Substack Newsletter: https://therealignment.substack.com/ Visit The Realignment's Bookshop to support the show: https://bookshop.org/lists/the-realignment-bookshop Ronald Daniels, President of Johns Hopkins University and author of What Universities Owe Democracy, joins The Realignment to discuss the role of the university system in American democracy, the degree to which it does (or doesn't) live up to its promise, and answers the critiques of skeptics of the American higher education system.

Talk Dairy to Me
Talk Dairy to Me - Innovation at Universities

Talk Dairy to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 27:46


This month on Talk Dairy to Me, DFA's podcast about all things innovation, our host Doug Dresslaer, director of cultural innovation, highlights some of the great academic work that is happening in the dairy industry, specifically at Cornell University and University of Wisconsin-Platteville. Listen in to learn more about these schools' innovation programs, fully functioning dairies on campus and even ice cream for sale!

The Kim Monson Show
Vote No on 2E!

The Kim Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 57:13


George Allen, founder of Citizens for Tax Fairness, joins Kim in studio to discuss taxes, specifically the vote NO on the Lone Tree city retail tax increase of 55%.  Kim encourages listeners to visit The Kim Monson Show website to view We the People Voter's Guide.  While you are there, Brad Beck has a new op-ed, Help Wanted, along with Patti Kurgan's, Proposition 119:  Cronyism's LEAP “For the Children.”  Vote No on Prop 119.  Prop 119 is a new retail marijuana tax that establishes an unaccountable and unelected board “for the children.”  Press Secretary Jen Psaki gives Biden and his wife cover as the couple are spotted inside a posh Washington, D.C area restaurant without masks.  Psaki states, “Don't overly focus on moments in time.”  Universities deputize students and distribute yellow shirts to snitch on their fellow students regarding mask wearing and unsocial distancing.  Steven Rosenblum, candidate for Boulder City Council, is stepping forward because of the decline in public safety and infrastructure challenges in Boulder.  He believes politics has corrupted the community and that a respectful conversation must happen between those with opposing views.  There is so much more that unites our communities than divides us.  Steve is readily available to have the conversation to ensure a safe environment for today and future generations. George Allen has been involved in analyzing tax situations for quite some time.  He has saved Colorado taxpayers over $300 million through his advocacy work.  George understands it's best for individuals to keep their hard-earned money in their own pocket and not hand it over to the overreaching government.  When the government is big, the individual is small.  As Milton Freidman said, it is best to contain the public sector and let the private sector innovate and produce.  The Lone Tree City retail sales increase of 55% is built on many false premises.  Vote NO!  There is no historical financial crisis.  There is no need to purchase the Wildlife Experience.  There is no data to support the premise that the tax growth will be static for the next 14 years.  Lone Tree has an excellent economic base that will grow.  Looking at the increase in taxes in dollars, it is projected to collect and additional $15 million per year, $150 million over a ten-year span.  Interesting that the city of Lone Tree has a projected $60 million deficit if the tax is not implemented.  At a $150 million minimum new tax revenue increase, it is about two and a half times more than the projected deficit.  Vote NO on Lone Tree Question 2E.

Innovators
The Challenged Authority of Science: Research, Public Health & Public Policy (with Dr. David Allison, Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington)

Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:10


Dr. David Allison – Dean of the School of Public Health at Indiana University Bloomington – joins Innovators to talk about what perceptions and trust are like today in fields like research, public health, and public safety, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Allison became Dean and Provost Professor at the Indiana University-Bloomington School of Public Health in 2017. Prior to assuming his current role as Dean, he served as Distinguished Professor, Quetelet Endowed Professor, and Director of the NIH-funded Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Allison received his Ph.D. from Hofstra University in 1990. He then completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a second post-doctoral fellowship at the NIH-funded New York Obesity Research Center at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center. He was a research scientist at the NY Obesity Research Center and Associate Professor of Medical Psychology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons until 2001.  Innovators is a podcast production of Harris Search.  *The views and opinions shared by the guests on Innovators do not necessarily reflect the views of the interviewee's institution or organization.*

Class Dismissed
Stanford sailing coach speaks out about college admissions scandal

Class Dismissed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 32:54


The Operation Varsity Blues investigation is a landmark moment for college admissions. More than 50 wealthy parents have been revealed to be participating in an expensive fraud scheme orchestrated by William "Rick" Singer that nets them their kids' spot at some of America's most elite universities. One of those universities is Stanford. John Vandemoer is a former Stanford University sailing coach, and he was the first person sentenced in the Varsity Blues college admissions scandal.  He is our guest in Episode 206 of Class Dismissed. His interview comes on the heels of the release of his new book, "Rigged Justice." The book is the candid and true story of how Vandemoer was drawn unwittingly into a web of deceit – it outlines the sophisticated scheme designed to take advantage of college coaches, which plays to the endless appetite for university fundraising. John Vandemoer, Stanford University's former head sailing coach Vandemoer admits he took money for the university sailing program, but he maintains he never took money for his personal use. A distinction that separates him from many of the other coaches linked the scandal.  "I was sentenced to a $10,000 fine. Two years of supervised release, and the first six months of that, I had an ankle monitor. I was on house arrest," says Vandemoer.   In Episode 206 of Class Dismissed, Vandemoer walks us through his first encounter with FBI and IRS agents and offers his perspective on how we may be able to get the University admissions process back on track.  He says it's essential for students and parents to realize that there are a lot of great Universities for students. "We have to stop being obsessed with working on going for the same schools all the time and focusing on the US News and World Reports List," he says. "And also taking financial considerations out of the US News and World Reports List, I think would be really helpful."  To hear our full interview with Vandemoer listen to Episode 206 of the Class Dismissed podcast. You can listen to the latest episode of Class Dismissed on your favorite podcast app or iTunes. All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2021

The Startup Junkies Podcast
265: Show Me the Money: Exploring NIL with WLJ & Friends

The Startup Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 74:03


Summary   This is the Startup Junkie's Podcast, welcome back!   Episode 265 gathered a lot of incredible people around the Startup Junkie table! Alongside our hosts, Jeff Amerine, Caleb Talley, and Davis McEntire, we sat with Meredith Lowry and Judy Henry of Wright Lindsey Jennings Law Practice, and Sarah Goforth and Cari Humphry from the University of Arkansas' office of entrepreneurship and innovation. The NCAA, the U of A, and the NIL are some big buzz words for any collegiate sports fan and we got to discuss the legal ramifications alongside with the U of A's response to the matter.    Don't miss this episode!    Thanks for tuning in!    Shownotes   (0:49) Introducing WLJ and UARK guests (3:13) Pressure of NIL with the NCAA and UARK (13:07) UARK Programs to Empower Athletes with New NIL Procedures (22:12) The Need for Financial Advisement and Education (26:29) Legalities of This Transition (35:36) UARK Vs. Other Universities (41:20) Relationship with Businesses and Universities and NIL Procedures (48:17) Changing Marketplace and Changing Regulations (1:02:55) Growth of Sports Management (1:10:45) Closing Remarks & Wrap Up   Links   Jeff Amerine Caleb Talley Davis McEntire Meredith Lowry Judy Henry Wright Lindsey Jennings Law Practice Sarah Goforth Cari Humphry UARK Office of entrepreneurship and Innovation Quotes   "​​This has been a pressure point boiling up to the surface for a couple of years. And finally became reality when states went ahead and had statutes that immediately came into effect this summer. The NCAA couldn't ignore it any longer and had to take some action." (7:24) - Judy Henry   "A lot of them are not equipping themselves because they devote so much time to their sport.. [they have no time to ] to really be successful and negotiate and go after opportunities and start their own businesses." (15:27) - Sarah Goforth   "I feel we've [UARK] differentiated ourselves with the wide variety of mentors and community partners involved who are giving their time and their expertise. And then secondly, taking that wider entrepreneurial lens." (35:36) Sarah Goforth   "Student-athletes have some really great ideas and there is some grit involved and some determination and commitment." (37:19) - Cari Humphry   "I really hope that it keeps them engaged in school longer. Taking advantage of the resources that they have as student-athletes and on campus." (1:09:50) - Cari Humphry   startupjunkie.org wlj.com

New Books Network
How to Write a Better Book: The Minority-Serving Institution Virtual Book Workshop Project

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 26:25


Book workshops produce great books, but too few scholars have access to the resources needed to organize and execute one, especially scholars at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Asian American and Pacific Islander Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges and Universities. The 2021 American Political Science Association Annual Meeting in Seattle, launched a new initiative, The Minority-Serving Institution Virtual Book Workshop Project, to provide book workshops for scholars (tenured, untenured, VAP, term appointments) at Minority-Serving Institutions. In the podcast, the co-directors of the Project discuss the importance of supporting MSI faculty, how to successfully apply, and what other authors, editors, and administrators can do to make this project a success. Niambi M. Carter, Associate Professor of Political Science at Howard University, published American While Black: African Americans, Immigration, and the Limits of Citizenship (Oxford 2019) and listeners may remember her New Books in Political Science podcast. Heath Brown, Associate Professor of Public Policy at John Jay College of Criminal Justice City University of New York (and former host of New Books Political Science), published Homeschooling the Right: How Conservative Education Activism Erodes the State (Columbia 2021) and Lilly Goren interviewed him for NBPS. Minority-Serving Institution Virtual Book Workshop | Deadline: January 14, 2022 | Apply Now! Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Last Born In The Wilderness
Rune Rasmussen: Animism, Conspiracism, & Songs Of Power

Last Born In The Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 11:11


This is a segment of episode 306 of Last Born In The Wilderness “Raven Age: Animism, Conspiracism, & Songs Of Power w/ Rune Rasmussen.” Listen to the full episode: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com/episodes/rune-rasmussen-2 Learn more about Nordic Animism and subscribe to the Youtube channel: https://nordicanimism.com / https://www.youtube.com/user/Runehr Rune Hjarnø Rasmussen, historian of religion and founder of the Nordic Animism project, returns to the podcast to discuss animism and the Raven totem flag project he, and others, have created to define and symbolize humanity's role in the climate disrupted present we find ourselves in. Through years of in-depth research into the history and contemporary practice of animist religious/spiritual traditions the world over, Rune has unique insight into the nature of the numerous crises the world finds itself in presently. In our first discussion on this podcast, he framed the global climate crisis through the myth of Ragnarök, famously depicted in the Old Norse poem Völuspá. In this interview, I ask him to help us understand, though a mythic lens, the roots of the widespread proliferation of conspiracist thinking (endemic within the United States) in our “post-truth” era. How has modernity produced this crisis of meaning in the Western world today? What value can animism provide, not only in identifying the source of this crisis, but also in rooting ourselves in a world that is undergoing climate cataclysm and civilizational rupture? Rune Hjarnø Rasmussen, Ph.D., is a historian of religion, educated from the Universities of Uppsala and Copenhagen. He has lived in many countries and done fieldwork in a number of contemporary (primarily Afro-descendant) religions, but since childhood he has had Nordic religion as a strong field of interest. Today Rune is working on applying contemporary developments in anthropology to rethink the way we address Nordic religion both in terms of scholarship, but also as a reservoir of cultural knowledge for environmental activism and sustainability sensitization. WEBSITE: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/lastborninthewilderness DONATE: https://www.paypal.me/lastbornpodcast / https://venmo.com/LastBornPodcast BOOK LIST: https://bookshop.org/shop/lastbornpodcast EPISODE 300: https://lastborninthewilderness.bandcamp.com BOOK: http://bit.ly/ORBITgr ATTACK & DETHRONE: https://anchor.fm/adgodcast DROP ME A LINE: Call (208) 918-2837 or http://bit.ly/LBWfiledrop EVERYTHING ELSE: https://linktr.ee/patterns.of.behavior

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio
Major universities in Arizona announce vaccine requirements for staff

Mac & Gaydos Show Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 30:26


The three major universities in Arizona announced vaccine requirements for staff.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast
E34. Lawrence Krauss on The New Religion

The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 82:45


Ayaan speaks with Lawrence Krauss about the new religion of wokeism and how it spread throughout academia. They discuss the impacts that political correctness and cancel culture have on science, and what it means for the future. Lawrence Krauss is an internationally known theoretical physicist. He is President of The Origins Project Foundation and host of The Origins Podcast with Lawrence Krauss. He has written over 500 publications, including for The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Quillette, The New Yorker, Prospect Magazine, and The Economist. Lawrence has written numerous popular books including NYT bestsellers: The Physics of Star Trek; and A Universe from Nothing. His newest book is The Physics of Climate Change. He received his PhD from MIT and then moved to the Harvard Society of Fellows. Following eight years as a professor at Yale University, he was appointed as a full professor with an endowed chair while still in his thirties. During his career, he has held endowed professorships and distinguished research appointments at numerous institutions. Between 2006 and 2018, he was Chair of the Board of Sponsors of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Follow him on Twitter @lkrauss1. Follow Ayaan on Twitter @ayaan.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Ayaan Hirsi Ali Podcast: Lawrence Krauss on The New Religion (#34)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 82:45


Ayaan speaks with Lawrence Krauss about the new religion of wokeism and how it spread throughout academia. They discuss the impacts that political correctness and cancel culture have on science, and what it means for the future. Lawrence Krauss is an internationally known theoretical physicist. He is President of The Origins Project Foundation and host […]

Live Hour on WNGL Archangel Radio
Episode 363: 10-14-21_Thursday_LACM_Donald Prudlo_Professor Dorian Abbot_Ellen Taylor

Live Hour on WNGL Archangel Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:33


Donald Prudlo continues our Church history series talking about the medieval inquisitions. Professor Dorian Abbot discusses cancel culture at Universities and Ellen Taylor shares about the miracle of the sun.

The Tailgate Society
Sports & Corks 3.27: Texas Forever

The Tailgate Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 63:00


Emily C is joined by guest host Mary Horn to talk all things Texas. Universities, NFL teams, and many things in between. It's a Texas sized episode with wine picks, hot takes and games of the week that of course feature a Texas team. Mary Twitter - https://twitter.com/maryshorn Emily Twitter -https://twitter.com/emilproblems Sports & Corks Twitter -https://twitter.com/sportsandcorks The Tailgate Society Twitter -https://twitter.com/tgatesociety You can email Emily and Emily at sportsandcorks@gmail.com

Hack
The future of universities

Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:00


From online learning, to vaccine mandates, to fewer international students - there's no doubt the university sector has taken a hit due to COVID. We look at how the student experience has changed, and what the revenue shortfall from fewer international students will mean for the sector going forward. Plus, we speak to the Education Minister on why the uni sector wasn't eligible for JobKeeper, and if freedom of speech on campuses is under threat. Live guests: Alan Tudge, federal Education Minister

Sports & Corks
Sports & Corks 3.27: Texas Forever

Sports & Corks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 62:32


Emily C is joined by guest host Mary Horn to talk all things Texas. Universities, NFL teams, and many things in between. It's a Texas sized episode with wine picks, hot takes and games of the week that of course feature a Texas team. Mary Twitter - https://twitter.com/maryshorn Emily Twitter - https://twitter.com/emilproblems Sports & Corks Twitter - https://twitter.com/sportsandcorks The Tailgate Society Twitter - https://twitter.com/tgatesociety You can email Emily and Emily at sportsandcorks@gmail.com

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman
'BradCast' 10/13/2021 (Guest: Dr. Matthew Boedy of Univ. of North Georgia on the faculty fight for mask mandates)

The BradCast w/ Brad Friedman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 58:09


Tech Story
Episode 43 - Mark Metry

Tech Story

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 35:36


I have the great honor to talk with Mark Metry. We talk about a lot of things.How he overcame a paralyzing fear of talking to people to becoming a Top 100 podcast host.Nutritional Psychology - I didn't even know that was a thing.The peace he feels finally being at a point where he can share his tales of struggle and ultimate success over social anxiety.Some of Mark's accomplishments:1997 - Mark comes to this planet July 22nd, in a hospital in Cambridge, MA2004 - Mark begins experimenting with entrepreneurship at the age of 7.2007 - Mark moves schools and begins to face racism & bullying. Also begins to develop autoimmune health conditions & social anxiety, insomnia.2008 - Mark goes on the internet and begins creating ventures like websites & apps, after saving up enough money to buy a phone from a summer job.2010 - Mark starts a Youtube channel about Video games that eventually has 35,000 subscribers.2013 - Mark eventually starts the World's #1 Minecraft server and turns in a 6-figure business by age 16.2015 - Mark goes to college and faces rock bottom via depression, obesity and social isolation.2016 - Mark step by step, day by day begins to gain control over his life and mind, also starts a marketing business.2017 - Launched his Humans 2.0 podcast.2018 - Apple ranks Humans 2.0 in the global top 100 and Mark gets invited to start speaking on stages and interviewing successful people.2019 - Mark speaks in almost every major city in America about his mission, and gets invited by Forbes to do a 2 hour interview...2020 - Mark launches his first book "Screw Being Shy" & TEDx talk2021 - Let the adventure continue :)Mark Metry is a 23 year old entrepreneur, author, creator, mental health advocate, coach, teacher, keynote speaker, podcast host, and loving human being.Mark has interviewed over 300+ top leaders around the world from billionaire philanthropists, to neuroscientists, professional athletes, New York times bestselling authors, philosophers, and innovative disrupter's on his Top 100 Humans 2.0 podcast, which NASDAQ, and Yahoo Finance placed in the "Top 21 Growing Podcasts you must listen to..”Now, Mark hosts the Social Anxiety Society podcast, and is the bestselling author of Screw Being Shy: Learn How to Manage Social Anxiety and Be Yourself in Front of Anyone!Mark has been featured in Forbes, TEDx, HuffPost, Mindvalley, Inc and many more. Mark‘s been mentioned alongside Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos and can be found speaking at Universities like Rutgers to Nonprofits like Coptic Orphans, to conferences and high schools across the nation.Mark has spoken alongside Olympian Athletes, New York Times Bestselling authors, and Fortune 500 CEO's. Mark's story has been featured in 3 books, including Ditch the Act by McGraw Hill, Standing O! alongside Billionaires and other mavericks, and We're All Marketers. Mark has also been a guest on over 250+ podcasts, radio stations, and television.Additionally, Mark advises startups, and volunteers his time as an advisory board member at an education based nonprofit.https://www.markmetry.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-metry/

Husband In Law
Finding Happiness with Elia Gourgouris

Husband In Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:17


This week we interview a blast from our past, Dr. Elia Gourgouris. If you want to find more happiness in your life, this episode is for you!Dr. Elia Gourgouris is the president of The Happiness Center, an organization of world-leading experts in the field of Positive Psychology dedicated to creating personal success and happiness. He is also Founding Partner at The Global Institute of Thought Leadership, an organization that brings together bestselling authors, world-renowned speakers, industry experts and pioneering thinkers who all share a common goal: Changing the world of ideas.Dr. Elia is the author of the #1 best-selling Amazon book, 7 Paths to Lasting Happiness, which has been translated in 5 languages. He recently co-authored the highly acclaimed book 7 Keys to Navigating a Crisis: A Practical Guide to Emotionally Dealing with Pandemics and Other Disasters. His message is featured in respected publications and media around the world.With his Positive Psychology background, he has helped thousands of people both in their careers and in their relationships to achieve success and better work-life balance. As a keynote speaker, he frequently presents at international conferences and Universities focusing on corporate wellness, mental health, positive leadership, building trust & loyalty, and building resilience and agility. He coaches leaders and their companies to help them build a culture of trust, accountability, and empowerment. The result is that happily engaged employees are more productive, collaborative, and innovative. He co-hosts the weekly The Kindness and Happiness Connection podcast and was the Executive Producer of the Reality TV show Cash Cowboys and is currently working on a new Reality TV show called The Kindness Givers!Dr. Elia was born and raised in Athens, Greece, where he became a National Swim Champion. He moved with his family to Santa Monica, CA when he was ten. He received his BA in psychology from UCLA, and then went on to receive his MA and PhD in psychology.If you want more from Elia be sure to connect with him here and pick up your FREE copy of his Personal Health Assessment!https://drive.google.com/file/d/1PUGlj2OvSkCG5QqXpY0yXlQaDMsLoco5/view?usp=sharinghttps://www.instagram.com/dr.eliag/www.dreliagourgouris.comhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/thehappinessdoctor/If you want to work on changing the story you are telling yourself about your past, your life right now, or your relationships pick up your FREE Workbook "Change Your Story, Change Your Life" by clicking here.

Last Born In The Wilderness
#306 | Raven Age: Animism, Conspiracism, & Songs Of Power w/ Rune Rasmussen

Last Born In The Wilderness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 96:56


[Intro: 12:50] Rune Hjarnø Rasmussen, historian of religion and founder of the Nordic Animism project, returns to the podcast to discuss animism and the Raven totem flag project he, and others, have created to define and symbolize humanity's role in the climate disrupted present we find ourselves in. Through years of in-depth research into the history and contemporary practice of animist religious/spiritual traditions the world over, Rune has unique insight into the nature of the numerous crises the world finds itself in presently. In our first discussion on this podcast, he framed the global climate crisis through the myth of Ragnarök, famously depicted in the Old Norse poem Völuspá. In this interview, I ask him to help us understand, though a mythic lens, the roots of the widespread proliferation of conspiracist thinking (endemic within the United States) in our “post-truth” era. How has modernity produced this crisis of meaning in the Western world today? What value can animism provide, not only in identifying the source of this crisis, but also in rooting ourselves in a world that is undergoing climate cataclysm and civilizational rupture? Rune Hjarnø Rasmussen, Ph.D., is a historian of religion, educated from the Universities of Uppsala and Copenhagen. He has lived in many countries and done fieldwork in a number of contemporary (primarily Afro-descendant) religions, but since childhood he has had Nordic religion as a strong field of interest. Today Rune is working on applying contemporary developments in anthropology to rethink the way we address Nordic religion both in terms of scholarship, but also as a reservoir of cultural knowledge for environmental activism and sustainability sensitization. Episode Notes: - Learn more about Nordic Animism and subscribe to the Youtube channel: https://nordicanimism.com / https://www.youtube.com/user/Runehr - The Raven totem flag: https://nordicanimism.com/raven - Support Nordic Animism on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/nordicanimism - Rune recommends the book ‘Animism: Respecting the Living World': http://animism.org.uk - This episode is dedicated to Ed Coffman. Rest in peace, Ed. Listen to his interview on the Freedom of Mind podcast: https://freedomofmind.com/the-moon-organization-extremism - Music was produced by Epik The Dawn WEBSITE: https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/lastborninthewilderness DONATE: https://www.paypal.me/lastbornpodcast / https://venmo.com/LastBornPodcast BOOK LIST: https://bookshop.org/shop/lastbornpodcast EPISODE 300: https://lastborninthewilderness.bandcamp.com BOOK: http://bit.ly/ORBITgr ATTACK & DETHRONE: https://anchor.fm/adgodcast DROP ME A LINE: Call (208) 918-2837 or http://bit.ly/LBWfiledrop EVERYTHING ELSE: https://linktr.ee/patterns.of.behavior

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
The University Crisis

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 54:08


Universities in the 21st century face a host of challenges, from bloated budgets to overworked contract faculty. And in a competitive economy, many students are wondering if a B.A. is still worth the time and money. IDEAS considers the idea of universities in crisis, what can be done to make them better and whether the system — as we know it — is worth saving.

SAP Experts Podcast
Episode 86: Cybersecurity: Building a culture of trust – Elena Kvochko

SAP Experts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 31:22


October is the Cybersecurity month here at SAP, which is why, Chief Trust Officer, Elena Kvochko, is joining me today to share the importance of staying ahead in the security curve and how companies can build a culture of trust their customers. The Chief Trust Office team spans four continents enabling secure digital transformation of clients across global cloud products. Prior to this, Elena served as Senior Vice-President and Technology Executive at Bank of America. Previously, she worked as a divisional Chief Information Officer at Barclays Bank. Her focus was on delivering the highest degree of privacy and security of customers and employees globally. Elena also served as an affiliate fellow at Harvard Law School and worked at the World Bank headquarters in Washington DC. Her published work appeared in Forbes, Harvard Business Review, featured in the Wall Street Journal, the White House cybersecurity report, The New York Times, and multiple industry media. She has invented patent-pending technologies in cybersecurity, privacy, and secure financial technologies, and with 30+ pending patents named a top inventor at Bank of America. Throughout her career, she has been a strong advocate in national cybersecurity and technology diversity programs, and a lecturer and speaker at national and international Universities. Elena is a member of the Board of Directors of Refugees International and a Patron of Carnegie Hall in New York. I am your host Akshi Mohla, and you're listening to SAP Experts Podcast.

RNZ: Morning Report
Tertiary providers given deadline to fix persistently low pass rates for Māori, Pasifika

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 3:51


Universities, polytechs and wananga have been given ten years to end the persistently lower pass rates for Māori and Pasifika students. It's the third time in the past decade the Tertiary Education Commission has set a deadline for parity.  This time it wants tertiary institutions to make large-scale changes and is hinting at fines for failure. Education correspondent John Gerritsen reports.

Unpack the Facts Online Radio
#UNPACKTHEFACTS EP. 60. || SEASON 2|| Facebook Outage|| #Worldwide Demonstrations|| Nicki Minaj & Chris Brown|| Elections in South Africa

Unpack the Facts Online Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 64:41


UNPACK THE FACTS IS BACK FOR SEASON 2 — Come along and let's get this Season started  So much has happened since our Season 1 – We talk Nicki Minaj, Chris Brown, World-wide Demonstrations, Universities, and COVID-19 stand and Elections #Elections2021 and FACEBOOK OUTAGE Be a part of our Sponsoring Family, sponsor an Episode. Follow us: @unpackthefacts,  https://linktr.ee/Unpackthefacts  

daily304's podcast
daily304 - Episode 10.9.2021

daily304's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 3:13


Universities receive grants to support mine safety education and training … explore West Virginia's bewitching landscape at WVU Core Arboretum … and grab your copy of the new 2022 WV Wildlife Calendar, on sale now! – on today's daily304, listen here…

John Solomon Reports
Alarming amount of anti-Semitic, anti-Zionist ‘conspiracy theories' veiled as academia on college campuses, Case Study

John Solomon Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 32:16


Scott Shay, Author of Conspiracy U: A Case Study, a book that looks at the recent permeation of conspiracy theories on colleges campuses, most targeted towards ‘Zionist, Jews, and others' which ‘are masqueraded as scholarship in academia' ultimately leading to the ‘degradation of academic standards'. Shay says, Universities have ‘sacrificed academic integrity and trustworthy scholarship in favor of conspiracy theories', commenting that the amount from Ivy League and well-respected Presses like Stanford, Duke and Northwestern is ‘worrisome' as as throughout history Jews have been ‘the canary in the coal mines'.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad
S2 Ep. 3: To go to College or not to to College

BS3 Sports & Music #XSquad

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 35:52


Did you go/graduate from college or did you decide to take another path? We dive into the pros and cons, in an depth discussion about going or not going to college. Stay Royal

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters
The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters #236

The Podcast of the Lotus Eaters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 91:04


Callum and Thomas discuss the end of Labour and the future of the conservatives, black history month cringe, and Universities' social terrorists.

Future of Marketing In Esports
Why Schools and Universities Need To Be Thinking More About Esports

Future of Marketing In Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 63:22


If you didn't already know, the future for esports is extremely bright, and it's only going to get brighter. Schools are seeing the opportunity to not just get kids excited about education in a different way, but they also see an entirely new opportunity to help get kids prepared for careers in a new way. Lenovo is helping get schools set up and making strides from elementary to colleges, and today Jeff Palumbo, Lenovo's Global Esports Solution Manager is talking to Rebecca on The Future of Marketing in Esports to discuss how schools can get their programs they started. They also talk marketing, and what brands can do today to get in, and why staying on the sidelines is only costing them more money! If you're interested in connecting with Jeff, you can email him at: jpalumbo {at} lenovo.com

Innovators
Good News for Children and the COVID-19 Vaccine: The State of Pediatric Research

Innovators

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 15:50


Very soon, the likelihood is that one or more of the COVID-19 vaccines will be approved for use with children under age 12 and for the first time in the pandemic, children will be afforded the protection provided adults.    Listen to a special Innovators podcast of excerpts from three guests — leaders in pediatric research — Dr. Tina Cheng (Chief Medical Officer at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center), Mark Wietecha (CEO of Children's Hospital Association), and Dr. Mark Batshaw (former Chief Academic Officer at Children's National Hospital) in a short summary.   We encourage you to listen further to their full discussion on any one or all of our featured guests' Innovators podcast episodes. All three full episodes are available on all podcast platforms and also at HarrisSearch.com. Innovators is a podcast production of Harris Search.  *The views and opinions shared by the guests on Innovators do not necessarily reflect the views of the interviewee's institution or organization.*

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
October 5, 2021 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 53:15


Tuesday on the NewsHour, a former Facebook employee testifies to Congress about the tech giant's harms and lack of accountability. President Joe Biden visits Michigan to sell his trillion dollar spending bills to moderate Democrats by wooing voters in the key swing state. Universities nationwide begin another school year amid the pandemic, facing tough decisions and hoping to avoid big outbreaks. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Testing wastewater and other ways universities are trying to stem campus COVID outbreaks

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 8:34


Millions of students returned to campus this fall for the in-person college experience, as the delta variant continues to impact parts of the U.S. Some schools have strict mandates for vaccination, testing and masking. In other places, that's not an option. Hari Sreenivasan begins the latest in our "Rethinking College" series at two of America's flagship universities. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Chad Benson Show
Raising the debt ceiling again

The Chad Benson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 110:15


Raising the debt ceiling again. Oil spill off the coast of California. Diversity exams at Universities. NFL scores. Another migrant caravan making its way to the US border. Leak of "Pandora Papers". Americans angrier than ever.

The Pakistan Experience
Exposing HEC Corruption, His removal and the Philosophy of Education - Dr Tariq Banuri - TPE # 133

The Pakistan Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 129:57


In March, Tariq Banuri was removed as the chairman of HEC by the Federal Government, a move that is being challenged in the courts. Dr. Tariq Banuri joins us on The Pakistan Experience to discuss why he was removed by the Government as the Chairman of HEC, exposes the corruption within the HEC, and discusses his philosophy of Education, and his vision for the HEC. How should Research grants be awarded? Do HEC rankings make any sene? Why do we need the HEC to verify our degrees? What are his thoughts on the SNC? Should HEC have a sexual harassment mechanism for Universities? Join us for all this and more on this week's episode of The Pakistan Experience. HEC Sexual Harassment policy: https://www.hec.gov.pk/english/services/Documents/SEXUALHARASSMENT-POLICY.pdf Tariq Javed Banuri is a Pakistani academic, development economist, environmentalist, climate scientist, educationalist, human rights advocate, and author who holds a PhD in economics from Harvard University and who is the fourth and current Chairperson of the Higher Education Commission (HEC), a statutorily established regulatory agency whose mandate is to improve and promote higher education and research & development (R&D) within Pakistan. Chapters: 0:00 Why was he removed as the chairman of the HEC? 8:00 Corruption in the the HEC 17:25 Research Grants 22:10 Using NAB against the Chairman of the HEC 27:50 The vision for Research and Research Programs 38:00 Why do we not see great research coming out of Pakistan? 43:10 Are most research journals in Pakistan fraudulent? 51:30 Digitizing archives in Pakistan 57:00 Fixing Higher Education in Pakistan 1:10:10 HEC Rankings 1:18:20 People being jobless after M.Phil 1:33:20 Government opening Universities just to score points 1:35:30 HEC's verification of degrees 1:43:00 PECs 1:48:00 Government spending in education is very low 1:52:00 Ed Tech 1:55:00 Single National Curriculum 1:57:00 Adil Najam 1:58:30 Governance structure of Universities 2:01:40 Mechanism for Sexual Harassment Please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thepakistanexperience And Please stay in touch: https://twitter.com/ThePakistanExp1 https://www.facebook.com/thepakistanexperience https://instagram.com/thepakistanexpeperience The podcast is hosted by comedian and writer, Shehzad Ghias Shaikh. Shehzad is a Fulbright scholar with a Masters in Theatre from Brooklyn College. He is also one of the foremost Stand-up comedians in Pakistan and frequently writes for numerous publications. He can be found on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Tinder. https://www.facebook.com/Shehzadghias/ https://twitter.com/shehzad89

Science Friction - ABC RN
My Afghanistan escape - just a body, not a soul, or a heart (Part 2)

Science Friction - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 25:44


Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders
Dr. Elena Antonacopoulou - Phronesis

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 39:21


Dr. Elena  Antonacopoulou is the founder and director of GNOSIS an international, interdisciplinary, and independent research and leadership development Institute. She has held full-time Professorial appointments at the Universities of Liverpool, Manchester, and Warwick and currently holds Visiting Professorial appointments at Western University, Canada, University of Lincoln (UK), and the Royal Norwegian Airforce Academy (Norway). Her scientifically rigorous collaborative research in management and organization studies has earned her many research grants, awards, and accolades recognizing the impact of the ideas developed. Her principal research expertise lies in the areas of Strategic Change, Organisational Learning and Resilience, Knowledge, and Crisis Management with a focus on leadership implications. Elena's work is published widely in international journals including Academy of Management Learning and Education Journal, Journal of Management Studies, British Journal of Management, Journal of Management Inquiry, Management Learning. She has co-edited 5 books including two new volumes (Sensuous Learning for Practical Judgment in Professional Practice) advancing innovative learning modes that enhance the impact of management practice. She has been elected and served in multiple leadership roles in the top professional bodies in the management field and has received several awards for her outstanding leadership and service contributions and teaching excellence. She is frequently invited to deliver keynote speeches at international conferences, and deliver workshops that inspire and promote action choices that serve the common good. She is a certified coach from the International Coaching Federation.Connecting with ElenaGoogle ScholarLinkedInQuotes From This Episode"Phronesis is a creative act, especially when navigating the unknown...It's not just what happens when we're faced with dilemmas, paradoxes, and crucible moments. Of course, that's where our strength of character shines and guides our action choices, which is why we mark it as an act of practical wisdom.""Practise is about repetition, not replication. I emphatically highlight in my work the distinction between repeating and replicating. I draw on Deleuze, who asserts that repetition is always about the difference. Hence, for me practising is about the leap of faith.""Reflexivity is this moment where we are in a situation fully present. So we show up, and we are experiencing it by allowing ourselves to feel and participate as an insider, at the same time, simultaneously, as we have the capacity to extrapolate and see it from an outsider's perspective.""Sensuousness is the secret intelligence that I don't think we've even begun to tap into, which is so important to phronesis. I call it CORE (Centeredness, Oneness, Reflex and Energy) Intelligence (CQ) because it is about tapping beyond our sensibility and sensitivity into our sentience".Resources Mentioned in This EpisodeEikeland, O. 2008. The ways of Aristotle: Aristotelian phrónêsis, aristotelian philosophy of dialogue, and action research. Shotter, J. & Tsoukas, H. 2014. In search of Phronesis: Leadership and the art of judgment. Academy of Management Learning & Education, 13: 224-243The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho About The International Leadership Association (ILA)The ILA was created in 1999 to bring together professionals with a keen interest in the study, practice, and teaching of leadership. Connect with Scott AllenWebsite

Interviews: Tech and Business
How to Prepare for the Future of Work?

Interviews: Tech and Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 43:37


What is the future of work? It's a question that's important to Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer of SHRM, the Society for Human Resource Management. Today's workforce is more mobile, transparent, collaborative, and inclusive than ever before, making leadership a challenging and crucial priority for HR professionals.Subscribe to our newsletter: https://www.cxotalk.com/subscribeRead the complete transcript: https://www.cxotalk.com/episode/how-prepare-future-workIn episode #720 of CXOTalk, Taylor discusses how business leaders, government policymakers, and HR professionals can navigate the evolving future of work.We discuss the following topics:-- SHRM and the book “Reset”-- Future of work trends: What are the key issues?-- HR, innovation culture, and talent strategy-- How to create a culture of innovation?-- Who can be an organizational change agent?-- How to create a culture of empathy?-- Equality, equity, and fairness-- Diversity and inclusionAbout Johnny C. Taylor. With over 300,000 members in 165 countries, SHRM is the largest HR professional association in the world, impacting the lives of 115 million workers every day.Mr. Taylor's career spans over 20 years as a lawyer, human resources executive and CEO in both the not-for-profit and for-profit space. He has held senior and chief executive roles at IAC/Interactive Corp, Viacom's Paramount Pictures, Blockbuster Entertainment Group, the McGuireWoods law firm, and Compass Group USA. Most recently, Mr. Taylor was President and Chief Executive Officer of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. He was appointed chairman of the President's Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities and served as a member of the White House American Workforce Policy Advisory Board during the Trump Administration. He is a Trustee of the University of Miami, Governor of the American Red Cross, and member of the corporate boards of Guild Education and iCIMS. He is author of the book Reset: A Leader's Guide to Work in an Age of Upheaval.

Yang Speaks
The Moral Absolutism of Elite Universities, Flying Cars, New Crypto Calls, and What's Next for Yang Speaks

Yang Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 36:23


How much do colleges actually mold their students' viewpoints? Plus, a new electric flying car, and what's next for this podcast. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/juUrD2m2HqQ Flying Cars - https://newatlas.com/aircraft/urban-evtol-leo-air-hypercar/ Creature World - https://opensea.io/collection/creature-world-collection Learn more about NFTs with Crypto Carly - bit.ly/3liFydq Follow Carly Reilly: https://twitter.com/carlypreilly | https://www.instagram.com/carlypreilly Follow Zach Graumann: https://twitter.com/Zach_Graumann | https://instagram.com/zachgraumann Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ten Cent Takes
Issue 16: Superman and RadioShack

Ten Cent Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 65:03


What happens when you combine two of the biggest brands of the early 1980s? You get RadioShack's TRS-80 Whiz Kids comics, with special guest stars from the DC Universe. Marvel at snarky teens sassing the Man of Steel, then laugh at how he makes them perform complex math with mediocre computers! ----more---- Episode 16 Transcript Mike: [00:00:00] I used to go into an office, and when I did that, I had a dog that everybody loved and I baked cookies every day. Hello, hello, hello, welcome to Ten Cent Takes, the podcast where we sell out as superheroes, one issue at a time. My name is Mike Thompson and I am joined by my co-host, the talk show host of terror, Jessika Frazer. Jessika: Bwahahaha! I like when you give me nicknames that are a little mischievous and/or villainous, by the way. Mike: I mean, villains are always the most fun. Jessika: They really are. They get to do all the cool shit.  Mike: Yeah. You need a strong villain in order to have a good story. Jessika: Absolutely.  Mike: The purpose of this podcast is to look at notable moments in comic book history. [00:01:00] They can be big or they can be small, but we always hope that they're interesting, and we like to talk about them in ways that are both fun and informative. Today, we are going to be going back back back to the eighties and talking about the time that Superman sold computers for Radio Shack. Jessika: Fucking sellout.  Mike: Man, I don't. Can you blame him though? I mean, he was a reporter, like he needed the extra cash. Jessika: That's true. That does not pay all that much, from my understanding  Mike: Uh, speaking as someone who worked as a journalist for a decade, I can tell you it does not.  Jessika: Confirmed, everyone.  Mike: Confirmed. Before you freak out and think that you've missed an episode or that things are airing out of order, we are actually still doing the Sandman book club series, but we have decided to break it up, so it's not just one giant slog for people who aren't interested in Sandman. So that way there's a little something for [00:02:00] everybody, even as we're doing that prolonged experience. So every other episode will be the Sandman book club. Before we get to that though. What is one cool thing that you have read or watched recently? Jessika: Just last night, I watched the first episode of the Amazon Prime, let me just say it's 18+, animated series, Invincible.  Mike: Hmm.  Jessika: Have you seen that yet?  Mike: I haven't, I read the comic for a while and I really liked it, but then it just kind of felt very repetitive. And also, I didn't like how the comic got very women in refrigerator-y. Jessika: Oh, okay, fair enough.  Mike: Like yeah. Um, I hear it's great. I just, it's kind of, it's kind of like The Boys where like, I read the comic and, and then when they announced they were making a TV [00:03:00] show, I went, eh don't know. I like, I'm not sure. I really want to see that translated to the screen and then it was great. And so I'm sure that Invisible will be great. Jessika: I will be talking about The Boys later, in fact.  Mike: Oh okay. Well, then. Jessika: But for now, yeah, I know, spoilers. So for those of you who hadn't seen it yet, it's about a teenage boy whose father is a famous superhero and the kid himself has also potentially expected to get powers, which he, not spoiling anything, he does, and very early on in this episode. And when this happens, his father starts teaching them how to use them properly, even though he seems a little disappointed, even, that his really did have powers, which was kind of strange, but we'll see where that goes. But what I really liked about this series, is that they make fun of our well-known superheroes with a character like Batman and one that's very much like Wonder Woman, et cetera. And again, I don't want to give too much away, but the ending is [00:04:00] super intense, and I'll definitely be watching more of it tonight after we've finished recording this.  Mike: Yeah. And I will say that the comic itself has moments that are shockingly intense too. And it's really interesting because there are these moments that feel very wholesome and playful, and then there are other scenes that are complete 180 and it's really, it's kind of whiplash.  Jessika: That was how it felt in the show as well. So I mean, that translated definitely.  Mike: Yeah, it's one thing that's actually really neat is that it's the guy who wrote the comic, Robert Kirkman, is also the guy who created the walking dead.  Jessika: Hm.  Mike: So, you know, dude knows how to write a hit.  Jessika: Yeah.I guess so, huh. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Well, what about you? What have you been reading or watching?  Mike: You mentioned a couple of weeks ago that you had read the first issue of a series called Die, by Kieron Gillen.  Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: I'd heard about it. I thought it looked [00:05:00] interesting. And then you mentioning that, threw it back on my radar, and so I found the first three volumes on Hoopla and I wound up bingeing through all of them in a couple of hours. And it's really good. I really like how it matches up a bunch of D & D tropes along with other things. And I just, I really, really enjoyed it. And so I want to say thank you for putting that on my radar. Jessika: Oh, that's awesome. Yeah, absolutely. You're welcome. And I'll have to go on Hoopla and check out more myself because I'd been wanting to, I just haven't gotten around to it yet.  Mike: No, shall we, uh, shall we mosey along?  Jessika: Mosey let's do it.  Mike: What do you remember about Radio Shack when you were growing up? Jessika: Good old Radio Shack. Radio Shack was huge, when I was growing up. It was [00:06:00] definitely a household name and it had a reputation that it carried most electronics related items that you may want or need to purchase. So just on my memory block here in particular, they used to carry a radio that was pretty easy to alter, to be a scanning radio, to use for ghost hunting. And for a while, it was a great cheap alternative to buying something made for that purpose. And it was priced really low and like affordable versus like buying something that was made for that purpose.  Mike: Mm. Jessika: And I've trying to find one of those radios for years now, but honestly, it's probably a dead end at this point, and I should just pony up the money to buy actual ghost hunting equipment. I mean, honestly, I should probably, if I want it, like I'm a full ass adult, I can afford the expensive things, maybe.  Mike: We have credit cards now, Jessika. Jessika: Just charge it.I say I can afford the expensive things, like I really can, which isn't actually true.  Mike: All right.[00:07:00]  Jessika: I can afford the mid-level things.  Mike: Yeah. I dunno. We used to have money and then we got air conditioning, and we're poor now. Jessika: I'm safe. I'm squirreling it away, man. Trying to buy a house, it's expensive.  Mike: Yeah. Especially where we live. Jessika: I don't recommend it. Folks.  Mike: Yeah, no, just. Jessika: Just stay away.  Mike: Yeah. Welcome to the Bay Area. The dystopian capitalist apocalypse. Jessika: Everything is overpriced, and on fire.  Mike: We're not making this up. Everything is literally on fire these days.  And, and over priced, but that's just California in general. Yeah. Well, I mean, I had a similar experience to you, in different ways, but like, you know, it was the same brand awareness of Radio Shack. I didn't realize until I was doing the research for this episode, that Radio Shack is actually a hundred years old [00:08:00] as of this year. Jessika: What? How? Mike: Yeah. It was founded in 1921 by these two brothers, Theodore and Milton Deutchman. They set up a mail order business and a single retail location that was focused on providing parts for ham radio, which was a field that was still pretty new back then. And they wound up doing pretty well for a while, but they basically were bankrupt by the early 1960s. But you know, like 40 years is not a bad run. Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: And then they got acquired by the Tandy corporation in 1960 for $300,000. Up until this point, Tandy had been this leather goods company and they were looking to basically get into the business of appealing to hobbyists, which they felt Radio Shack would be able to do. So, in order to do this, Tandy basically performed a complete overhaul of the unprofitable company it had just acquired, and the Wikipedia page has a really solid [00:09:00] summary of what happened. Jessika: Tandy closed Radio Shack's unprofitable mail order business, ended credit purchases, and eliminated many top management positions eating the salespeople, merchandisers and advertisers. The number of items carried was cut from 40,000 to 2,500, as Tandy sought to identify the 20% that represents the 80% of sales and replaced Radio Shacks handful of large stores with many little holes in the wall, large numbers of rented locations, which were easier to close and reopen elsewhere if one location didn't work out.  Mike: Yeah. So basically they were just going for a strategy that made Radio Shack into a much leaner, more nimble operation, which that's like the goal these days, those are kind of the golden buzzwords, but they were actually trying to do that. Charles D. Tandy, who was the guy who actually ran Tandy corporation back then, said that they were [00:10:00] basically not looking for the guy anymore, who wanted to spend his entire paycheck on the sound system, and instead they were looking for customers who wanted to save money by buying cheaper goods and then like improving them through modifications and accessories. So now they were really appealing towards nerds, and aiming at kids who are going to like work on stuff for the science fairs. And honestly it, it worked. I mean, when I was growing up Radio Shack was that store you went to, when you needed some small part a replacement, there was always one nearby. And even if they didn't have a name brand part, they usually had an off-brand version of whatever you needed. And, I never went there thinking that it was going to break the bank. It was always a fairly affordable thing. Jessika: Yeah. Agreed. I can think of like four different locations where they had a Radio Shack, just like in our area here.  Mike: Yeah. And I mean, like, I grew up in San Francisco in the eighties, and they were all over the place.[00:11:00]  So now, what's interesting is that the whole rise of personal computers happened to coincide with this period of success for Radio Shack. The late seventies was when personal computers with microprocessors started to actually be a thing on the consumer market, but typically if you wanted one, you had to build them from a kit. Like you, you physically had to, like, buy the kit and then assemble it, following the instructions, which, I mean, I'm not going to lie. That is terrifying to me. Jessika: That is terrifying. And it's total nerd shit too. They were right.  Mike: Right. Fucking nerds. Jessika: Nerd bait. Mike: Radio Shack actually wound up introducing the TRS 80 in 1977. And it was a game changer for the company because it was one of the first pre-built computers. And it was simultaneously backed by a national retail chain.  It was this super basic computer that sold for $600, which adjusting for inflation is like $2,700 nowadays. [00:12:00]  Jessika: Holy shit. There's no way. There's no way the average family is like, let's get one of those right away. Mike: No, it was, I mean, you know, this was for people who were super enthusiast, or had a lot of disposable income, which the middle-class used to have back then.  Jessika: Different times.  Mike: The salad days. But yeah, so the TRS 80, even though it had a fairly high price point sold like hotcakes, like gangbusters. I found this book and it's called, Priming the Pump: How the TRS 80 Enthusiast Helped Spark the PC Revolution, by Teresa Welsh and David Welsh. It has this really interesting history about that point in time, which, I mean, I'm not going to lie, I was waiting for her to be really dry, but it's full of a lot of really personal stories and anecdotes and it's cool, I really dug it. Basically, when they started manufacturing this computer, they were only expecting to sell 50,000 units. There's this great quote, talking about how [00:13:00] much of a surprise the first TRS computer sales were. Jessika: Both Charles Tandy and John Roach may have been skeptical about such a large. But it turned out to be an underestimation. When the first anniversary of the products came, the company found the, had sold many more than the prediction and taken a whopping 250,000 orders for TRS eighties. Most of them still undelivered. Actually we've seen various numbers in different sources, so we can't verify this number, but they certainly sold considerably more than 50,000. Don French said they received a number of threatening phone calls from people who demanded delivery of their TRS 80 right away. Ooh! Mike: Yeah, so after this huge success, they then ended up following the TRS 80 with the TRS 80 Color in 1980. And basically the first TRS computer was kind of like a full, complete unit with a built-in monitor and everything. [00:14:00] The TRS 80 Color, in turn, was just the computer itself, and then you would plug in a color TV instead of using this built-in monitor. The TRS computers wound up selling well enough that Radio Shack really leaned hard into the computer business, and they even started offering computer camps for pre-teens in the early eighties, which was kind of an extension of that mission that they wanted to appeal to kids who wanted to excel at science fairs, because I mean, you know, those were the new nerds. So if you want to learn more about the TRS computers, by the way, there's this really great site called MatthewReadsTRS80.org. That helped me kind of learn about a lot of this stuff. I'll put it in the show notes, but it's really kind of an interesting walk-through, this particular venue of history. Anyway, this was the high point for Radio Shack, to be perfectly honest. By September of 1982, the company had more than 4,300 stores just in America and [00:15:00] more than 2,000 independent franchises and towns that were not large enough to have a company owned store. So, for comparison, there are fewer GameStops worldwide today than there were Radio Shacks in the early eighties.  Jessika: Wow.  Mike: Like, I realized that GameStop has been having a rough go of it lately, but there's still a lot of them around. Jessika: Yeah. Huh. Mike: And during this period of unmitigated success, that's when the Whizkid's started to show up in comic books. The early eighties were right around the time when computers were starting to get a lot of prominent, you know, quote unquote roles in media. If you're listening to this and you want to learn more, there is a site dedicated to media prominently featuring computers and storylines, and it's called Starring the Computer, that tracks stuff like this all the way back to the fifties. It's an incomplete list, but it's really interesting, and they have a whole section devoted to Tandy computers.[00:16:00] Like, I remember there was an episode of Murder, She Wrote very early on where she moves to New York and there's this whole plot about how she's gotten a computer to write her novels on. And then evidence is falsified with a modem. It's really interesting. And you know, the computer was this suddenly viable object that could play a part in people's everyday lives and could serve as a driving narrative device. But as far as I can tell the first time anyone made comics specifically focusing on educating people about personal computers was when Radio Shack started to do these comic books. And I think that's just because it was such a new thing, especially on the personal consumer market, because, you know, up until recently computers had been these huge things that took up buildings on their own.  Jessika: Yeah. And they had to be, like cooled, professionally, and I mean, it was just this whole thing.  Mike: Yeah. I mean, there [00:17:00] is a movie right now on Disney plus called The Computer That Wore Tennis Shoes.  Jessika: Oh, yeah! Mike: A very early Kurt Russell, and it's one of those things where the whole he's in college and he winds up getting shocked, I think, and there's this whole thing, this computer gets basically downloaded into him. So he has the processing power and knowledge of this computer, but they show you the computer and it like, it is a giant monstrosity of a thing that takes up, I think, an entire lab.  Jessika: It does. I remember that movie. Mike: And I mean, our phones, these days are more powerful than those. So RadioShack started making comics in 1971. They were putting out a series of educational comics called the science fair story of electronics via the Radio Shack education comic book program. But, then in 1980, they pivoted and they started giving away these new comics in stores. You could also, [00:18:00] if you were a teacher, you could send in a request to Radio Shack on school letterhead and get a free pack of 50.  Jessika: Oh, wow. Mike: And yeah, like, you know, they were really pushing that hard because these comics were educational, but they were also advertisements.  Jessika: Very much so. Oh, that was something I messaged you earlier,  was like, wow. I was reading just an ad there, wasn't I?  Mike: But, I mean, I will say they were, they were educational.  Jessika: Yeah, absolutely.  Mike: Yeah, so the Superman Radio Shack giveaway comics starred the aforementioned Whiz Kids, Alec and Shanna, along with their teacher Mrs. Wilson, but for the first three issues, which were published in 1980, 81 and 82, they also starred Superman and other characters from the DC Universe.  Jessika: I need to correct you for a second, because you said Mrs. Wilson, and it definitely was Ms. Wilson.  Mike: Oh, I'm sorry. That's right.  Jessika: It was Ms. Wilson, and I think that will come into play [00:19:00] later.  Mike: That is true. She did not have a ring on her finger. Jessika: She did not. She looked a little close to all the superheroes that waltzed right up in there, half naked into her classroom.  Mike: I mean, can ya blame her? Jessika: No, she was hot too.  Mike: Right? We're going to talk about each of these specific issues, but first up is the Computer That Saved Metropolis, which was published in July of 1980. So, even though this was a promotional giveaway, DC committed some pretty serious talent to the book. The first two issues were written by Cary Bates, who was this long-term writer for DC. He wrote a ton of action comics, Superman, and the New Adventures of Superboy, as well as being the head script writer for the live action Superboy series in the 1980s that we discussed a couple episodes back.  Jessika: Totally. Mike: He also worked as a script writer for various cartoons, including Gem and Gargoyles.  Jessika: Oh, hell yeah.  Mike: Right. [00:20:00] But then also his name might sound familiar to some people listening to the show because we mentioned him on the New Guardians episode where, it turns out he wrote issues two through 12 of the New Guardians. The art for this issue, meanwhile, was handled by Jim Starlin and Dick Giordano. Both of them are pretty big deals too. Starlin became a big name in comics during the seventies. He garnered a lot of acclaim for his cosmic space opera stories. He co-created characters like Shang-Chi and Thanos. Giordano in turn was an artist who had recently come back to DC comics and was serving as the Batman editor at the time. He actually got promoted shortly after this to be the company's managing editor in 1981. And then he was promoted again to executive editor in 83, and then he stayed with the company until the mid nineties when he retired, after his wife died. And then, aside from being a giveaway issue, this comic actually ran as a backup story in the July, 1980 ssues for Action [00:21:00] Comics, Legion of Superheroes, House of Mystery and Superboy. So Superman schilling Radio Shack computers, and forcing children to perform complex math for him, and definitely, probably schtupping Ms. Wilson, like, I think we need to agree that, that those two totally smashed. Jessika: Oh, absolutely. And I have my theories about her and Supergirl as well.  Mike: Yeah. Yeah.  Jessika: They had a moment.  Mike: Right? Jessika: We both took the same picture of that same shot and I sent it to you and you were like, no way. Mike: I thought that was so funny.  Jessika: Don't worry, we'll post that one.  Mike: I, oh God. Like, I just, that was great. It was like great minds think alike. But yeah, all of this is officially a canon part of DC comics lore, which is wild. Like [00:22:00]  Jessika: It's bat shit bananas.  Mike: Yeah. Now weirdly it looks like this is the only issue that actually made it into other DC comics. So, you know, the other two or their own standalone things. And aren't officially cannon, I guess. All right. How would you describe the 1980 issue? The Computers That Saved Metropolis? Jessika: Well, these were like both very advertisey and complex at the same time in their narrative, which was interesting. So, this first one, I'm going to give you a little bit of backstory about these bitches. I say these bitches, because I'm going to be talking about a whole classroom full of children. So I obviously really like children. I have a bachelor's in French and everyone's like, you should teach. And I'm like, no, I shouldn't.  Mike: Oh, oh no. Let's talk about that for a sec. I majored in history my first time through college, and everyone also said I should teach. And I was like, I fucking hate [00:23:00] children. I worked at Disneyland it poisoned me again. And don't get me wrong. I have, I have two stepchildren now. I love them. I would die for them. They're great. But kids in general, not a fan. They're sociopathic little monsters. Jessika: Mm hmm. So the comic starts off with Superman doing patrols around Metropolis, and apparently he just does that. And he just jets off to a sixth grade classroom at the whim of Ms. Wilson.  Mike: I have my own theory about this. Jessika: Oh my goodness. He's supposed to be a guest teacher about computers, apparently. Like, First of all, for some reason, along with his super abilities, he's also a super computer genius. And is he accredited? Like is he allowed to be teaching students?  Mike: No. Okay. There, there are two things to discuss here. So you have [00:24:00] to remember that Superman from the Golden Age through the modern age was largely a weird sci-fi series where the main character was this alien who had all these powers that constantly changed. There wasn't really any editorial control until they streamlined it with Crisis on Infinite Earths. But on top of that, he was generally shown to be an amazing genius, like just whenever they needed it. But ,he built the Superman robots. He. I can't remember if he made the Phantom Zone Projector or if the Phantom Zone Projector was on artifact from Krypton, he was constantly trying to restore the city of Kandor, which was basically shrunk down to the size of a bottle, and it was a Kryptonian city, to restore it to its full size. Like in that issue of Super Boy, we read, he like put all those chemicals together and created the pools that granted the dogs, various powers.  Jessika: Yeah, no, I guess you're, I guess he's always been [00:25:00] smart.  Mike: Yeah. But then the other thing is that Superman is a little bit too earnest in this issue. Like, he shows up exactly on time. And then he is clearly trying to impress these kids to make a good impression with Ms. Wilson. And everything about this reeks of a dude who had a one night stand and is now desperate to hook up again. So what he's doing is he's trying to prove that A) he is reliable and B) he is good with kids. Jessika: Yep. No, that's totally how it felt.  Mike: I'm not speaking from experience. Jessika: Oh, so anyway, Superman creepily knows all the students' names, I guess, because he used his x-ray vision to look at the teacher's seating chart, even though that's not how x-rays work. That's always bothered me. I'm sorry, we don't have time for this.  Mike: [00:26:00] Thomas Edison would like a word. Jessika: Seriously. Also, I have to mention that the whole class was bored as fuck even after Sups flew in. And I don't know about you, but every kid I knew, wanted to know about computers and have a turn on the computer when we got them in the library at school or when someone got one at home.  Mike: Oh, yeah. Jessika: So the idea that one of the kids in his class is being dismissive of the whole idea of not doing normal schoolwork and just doing computer class instead with fucking Superman of all people. It's just ridiculous.  Mike: Oh yeah. And that kid actively shit talked Superman repeatedly.  Jessika: Oh, he's a shit heal. Oh. And he still gets to be the fucking like, protagonist. Fuck. Mike: Oh, it was so funny. I like, my favorite was when he beats Superman at a math problem later on and like the shit talking starts immediately, and I'm like, my dude, this is possibly not a good move to irritate a guy who could literally vaporize you with a [00:27:00] glare. Jessika: That's just it. That is just it. Yeah. No. Why would you try to piss this guy off? And then Shanna's like, Ooh, Superman. You better tell him. I was like, dude, Shanna, you, you need to shut the fuck up immediately and not goad this situation.  Mike: You know, that was probably the most realistic part of this entire comic, because speaking as someone that lives with an 11 year old, they are shit stirrers. Jessika: Oh my gosh. So, Supes takes the kids up to the roof because of course he does, and he proceeds to give the class some very long-winded exposition about the history of computers and their size and what they do and how they've evolved from the first computers, and moving into how they're used in society today from space travel to transistor radios, which what a time capsule of a callout.  Mike: [00:28:00] Yeah. Jessika: This whole thing was a whole time capsule.  Mike: Yeah. Very much is. Jessika: Of course, there was also some lovely product placement throughout and some not-so-subtle comments on affordability versus common household items. Tangent that always cracked me up to say, this computer is less expensive than a TV. Well, okay, but maybe I need a TV and I don't need a computer. They do vastly different things, or they did at that point.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: It kind of reminds me of saying like this China set costs less than a month of gross. Okay, well, I need to eat and I don't necessarily need a China set, so.  Mike: Yeah, I mean, he was hard selling those kids. Jessika: Oh yeah. He was like, you should ask your parents to go out and buy you one.  Mike: Yup. Jessika: So, of course, Supes hears with his super hearing a tornado and he like jets the fuck out of there. And, he defeats it by [00:29:00] blowing the wind or something like that. And then he feels all sick and shit, and comes across a villain named Major Disaster who, you know, just as his name implies, causes quote unquote natural disasters like there's floods and shit. It was a little ridiculous.  Mike: Yeah, he was always kind of like a C- to D-list villain who would use weapons and equipment to make natural disasters. My knowledge of this character is hazy at best, but I think eventually he gained the ability to manipulate probability. He didn't appear a lot and he's been dead for a while, I think. Cause I remember him showing up as a zombie in Blackest Night. Jessika: Oh.  Mike: But, I mean, I remember reading this stuff and I was like, this is kind of a cool, like off-the-wall villain. I dig him. You know, I certainly liked them a lot better than other villains that I've seen in Superman books where it's like, you know, generic alien warlord number five. Jessika: Seriously. Well, and when I read the name, Major Disaster, I was like, [00:30:00] same, girl. So, of course Superman needs the help of these children that he like, makes them perform these, like, high-stress situational calculations on the computer for him. Instead of like asking the adult he's banging in the room. Mike: I mean. Jessika: Honestly, come on, like, get the adults involved, like, Alec and Shanna don't need to save the day. They're supposed to be in sixth grade, even though they look way older than that. Mike: Like, yeah, they looked like kind of like eighth or ninth graders. Like they were a little bit older, it seemed.  Jessika: The second one, they looked older than that, they looked like they were teenagers in the second one, for some reason, I was like, what's that? And then the third one, they got young again. And I was like, I don't know what's happening with you guys, but. Mike: Yeah. I mean, I will say that I was willing to believe that Alec was in sixth grade just because he had that awful fucking bowl haircut that like.  Jessika: My brother had that.  Mike: Right. Yeah. But [00:31:00] when did he stop having it? Jessika: No, no, you're right. Probably after he was like in, probably after middle school.  Mike: Yeah. It's, you know, it's that thing where suddenly you realize, oh, I can go to a barber instead of having my parents cut my hair.  Jessika: Oh. So the kids basically do a bunch of calculations, and they double check each other's work by doing the same calculation on two separate computers that Supes and flown in prior and just left there. Apparently.  Mike: Yeah. And there's a whole thing about how Major Disaster had knocked out all the other computers in town, but he didn't know about these two personal computers because personal computers were a new thing. And that's the other reason that they're the ones who were performing the calculations and then they're on radio headsets with Superman providing this information. Jessika: I still say you're in a school that has way more adults than just the one standing in that room, and even that one's not involved. So. Mike: I mean, well, and the other thing is that the math equations that he's throwing at them are like this jet is falling out of the sky at this speed. [00:32:00] The wind is this fast. They're going at this angle. How fast do I need to go to catch them without doing damage to the plane or the people inside. And it's like, first of all, of course, yes, as you said, it's high stress, but second, like I still don't know how to do that math equation. I don't know how these sixth graders did because they looked like they were in a pretty shitty school that Superman made worse at one point when he liked tunneled up through the floor and just left a giant hole. Jessika: He was like, I'll fix that later.  Mike: Sure you will, sure you will, Clark. Jessika: It's awful. Uh. So he finally of course finds the villain, defeats him, whatever. Then the kids are hailed as heroes and as a reward, I guess they get to be at a Radio Shack commercial about the computers they used. I mean, cool. I guess.  Mike: Yeah. It was kind of a, a, meh ending, but, but yeah. Like, I dunno. Did you [00:33:00] like the issue overall? I'm curious. Jessika: It got really in the weeds playing up the computer aspects, which okay. I get it. You know, again, I get it. This is an advertisement, but dude, snooze fest, I put it down a few times and had to pick it back up, during those computer exposition parts. And you know, I'm slightly bothered by a vague plot line, but all in all, like it was, it was fine.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: To use your line.  Mike: Yeah. I mean, reading through it, some of the computer history stuff I thought was actually pretty interesting  Jessika: Yeah. Yeah.  Mike: Like, when they went up on the roof and he was saying, you know, so the space that we're sending in actually is the size of what computers used to fill. And yeah, it does get a little too in the weeds because they're trying to get a little too much exposition in there at the same time. I felt like overall it walked a relatively fine line of providing action that was kind of [00:34:00] interesting. And, and the plot line of, oh, well, yeah, his powers were on the fritz because there was microscopic kryptonite particles in the tornado and he inhaled them when he was getting ready to blow it out. Like, I thought that actually was surprisingly well thought out for basically a licensed advertisement. You know, this was, this was effectively a full length version of one of those like hostess, Twinkies ads that they used to do.  Jessika: Right?  Mike: Yeah. But like, I didn't hate it. I found it charming. Jessika: It had its moments.  Mike: Yeah. I'm not going to lie, I found the undeniable sexual attention between Superman and the kid's teacher really entertaining. Jessika: Yeah, definitely it was palpable. I thought it was even funnier too, that the kids were even, like Ms. Wilson, how do you know Superman?  Mike: And she doesn't answer! Jessika: And she was like, She like side eyes.[00:35:00] How do I know Superman?…Biblically.  Mike: Well, and that was the funny thing was when we were talking about this ahead of the episode, I was like, so yeah, they, they totally smashed, right? Like, like that's not up for debate. Jessika: No, it's really not. It happened.  Mike: All right. let's move on to the next issue. So. Clearly, this was a successful marketing tool because in 1981, DC and Radio Shack released a brand new book that was called Victory By Computer. So this time the main story was illustrated by a couple of legendary artists. There was Curt Swan and Vince Colletta. Coletta started as an artist and anchor from the Silver Age of comics. He frequently collaborated with Jack Kirby who is known as, you know, the king of comic books, and a lot of folks considered their run on Thor to be the definitive take on the character.  Kurt Swan's involvement, on the other hand, is especially noteworthy. [00:36:00] He is considered by many comic book artists to be the Superman artist. He started penciling Superman and Superboy comics in the late forties. And he didn't stop until DC put them out to pasture in the mid eighties because they were rebooting Superman via Crisis on Infinite Earths.  Arlen Schumer, who's this major comic book historian, says Swan penciled over 19,000 covers and pages of interior art for Superman comics.  Jessika: Whoa! Mike: Yeah. Like again, they were putting some serious talent behind these books. Jessika: They were pumping out a lot of content, to be fair.  Mike: Yeah. How would you summarize Victory By Computer? Jessika: We find ourselves, yet again at the elementary school, I put in heavy quotations of kids that look like they're about 17 years old, this issue. So Shanna and smartass Alec are back at it. This time, Supergirl joins the class to [00:37:00] teach them about the pocket computer. What a fucking throwback.  Mike: Like, that's something that we need to explain. Like the pocket computer was, basically kind of like a smart calculator that could perform basic functions and had a little keyboard in there. And I don't know how much they sold for, but they couldn't have been cheap. Jessika: I can't imagine so, yeah. Well, and by the way, at this point in the scene where Supergirl pulls out, her pocket computer, she pulls out of a pocket on her cape. So canonically, there are pockets in the capes. Mike: Yeah. They can't get them on the rest of their costume, but they can get them in their capes.  Jessika: Which means that there's just stuff like weighing down the cape, so it shouldn't even be moving like it does.  Mike: I remember in an early issue of Superman, the eighties series that John Byrne was doing, there is a bit where he stops by a balloon vendor because he's got a drone pursuing him and he winds up like [00:38:00] thinking, oh, it's lucky that I always carry a few spare dollars in like my belt buckle because he had that yellow belt back then, which side note I miss the yellow belt. I don't know if it's back, cause I haven't read any Superman comics for a while, but they got rid of it for quite some time. Like, I mean, you know, it's the Henry Cavill look now or it's the full blue suit. I miss the red trunks in the yellow belt. Jessika: Yeah. the good old days. Mike: Yeah. Jessika: So Supergirl decides to use her super powers to show the class they are able to find information on the TRS 80's as fast as she was able to find it, like physically with her super powers looking for it. And it was like, okay, sure.  Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: When an odd comparison, but fine.  Mike: Yeah, it was really weird, there was a bit where they, like, it almost felt like they were hacking into the newsfeed of, I think the Daily Planet to get headlines, even though I'm sorry, but like, come on really, you think that a [00:39:00] print journalistic outlet is going to have top of the line technology back then come on. Jessika: No they're not putting any of that into a computer. They're still handwriting everything.  Mike: Yes. I think back then they were still using, the electric typewriter that had like the built-in, it was quote unquote memory, but it was, you know, not really. Jessika: Not as we know it now, at least. And there was some definite sexual tension with Ms. Wilson at Supergirl as well. We will post the picture. Um.  Mike: Right. It's this whole bit where Supergirl is like, oh, don't worry. I'm a school teacher in my secret identity. And I'm like, I don't know. Like, Are you just trying to impress her with this? What's the end goal of revealing this crucial information about your secret identity, Supergirl? Jessika: I know, right. She's just trying to connect with another human. She's like I'm also a school teacher. We should talk about it over dinner sometime.  Mike: And then maybe move in together after three weeks of dating, and adopt three cats. Jessika: Oh, my gosh. So, Super girl basically [00:40:00] teaches the class and then she I'll bet she just left those fucking pocket computers too, because you know, just like Superman just left the computers there. He was like, have fun kids.  Mike: Okay. Yeah, but here's the thing, like, you really think that some middle school kids or elementary school kids, however old they fucking are. You really think that they're going to sit there and try to steal the computers that the literal alien gods from other planets dropped off and taught them about? Jessika: Oh, I'm not, I'm not worried. Oh, that's funny. Yeah, no, I'm not worried about them stealing it. I'm just like Superman just apparently has like the extra spending cash that he can just like drop off two computers to a school and just like fuck off. Like really?  Mike: No, I mean, I, I viewed it the other way of just like, they're like, they're not worried about it. They're like, yeah. We'll, we'll get those back. Don't worry.  Jessika: Oh, so Supergirl apparently gets asked to go on [00:41:00] patrol by Superman and she spots something fishy. And so she goes to check it out, but it was a trap, of course. Mike: Yeah, but I mean, it wasn't even a very good trap. Jessika: Is a stupid trap. It was like, if you're a superhero and you happen to get curious, because you happen to be going near this location, maybe. And she like fell right into maybe a four foot by four foot hole in the ground. So I'm not really sure how that worked either. They just were like, nah, she's going to fall right here.  Mike: Yeah. Like she fell through the skylight after getting hit with like a blast of red sun radiation, or whatever it is.  Jessika: You know what it was, they used their TRS 80 to calculate where she was going to fall. So she gets stuck in what's basically like, it's like a lounge. It's like somebody's living room, and they have a computer there with a phone. So it's like, they weren't even trying that hard to keep her [00:42:00] there.  Mike: No, it was, it was absolutely the, like what a seventies swinger house looks like in all the movies that we see now where you're just like, oh, oh, okay. Jessika: It basically had a conversation pit.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Yeah. So of course, she remembers the phone number from Ms. Wilson's classroom. Mike: Yeah, because the rotary phone had the phone number printed on the front of it, because that was a thing that used to happen. Jessika: I feel like that's a little more explaining than she needed to give. I think she is making up for the fact that she just knows that number by heart.  Mike: I was going to say, I think she really wanted to get Mrs. Wilson's phone number, and then it just happened to actually be helpful in a way other than getting her a date. Jessika: Gosh, Ms. Wilson, man. And canonically bisexual? Question mark? Mike: I don't see why not. I think we can, I think we can [00:43:00] officially declare it. Jessika: Someone's going to @ us, I hope they do. So at any rate, she gets in touch with the class. She makes them do all these weird wacky calculations, has some get in touch with Superman. And by the time Superman gets there, like she's gotten out of it because she also used the computer to find out that there were like underground tunnels. And so she's like, I'll just walk out of these tunnels.  Mike: Yeah, basically it turns out it was like an old mob hide out and the students were able to look up some articles, which again, like, I don't know, because I was born in 81 and I don't have a good idea of what computer and internet adjacent technology was like back then. But they apparently look up articles about this hideout that got busted and they learned from the articles that there were underground tunnels that. Whatever, it was dumb, they don't even show her getting out. It was dumb. Jessika: No, she's just like walking out afterwards and Superman's, like, [00:44:00] oh, I was here to save you. And she's like, I just took the tunnels dude. And then like the bad guys are just, they just happened to be driving by. So they were like, well, let's just go get the bad guys. What do you think? It looks like, oh those are Lex Luther's dudes. Let's just go get the bad guys.  Mike: Yeah. And there's a whole thing where like, Lex Luther has announced from jail that like Superman is going to break him out and it's a much looser plot than the first issue was. Like the first issue, there was like, I felt like a much tighter story, you know, in between the educational bits, this one, it felt like they were kind of stretching to figure out a way to connect all this stuff. Jessika: For sure. Yes. Mike: Yeah. Yeah. So I think we can safely say that this was not our favorite of three books. Jessika: No, this one was so ridiculous. I mean, I loved the heavy, heavy [00:45:00] gay overtones. Mike: I mean, when do we not love the heavy gay overtones? Come on. Jessika: It's the agenda after all: brunch for everyone.  Mike: Yeah. So like, do you have any final thoughts on this, or should we move on to the last of the three books? Jessika: Ugh. That's just once mosey.  Mike: Okay. All right. So 83 was when we got the final book, which is the Computer Masters of Metropolis. So, this time Paul Kupperberg wrote the script for the comic. Kupperberg, he's not exactly a household name in terms of comic books, but he is actually pretty prolific. He's written over a thousand comics during his time as a writer, including the first appearance of He-Man and then he wrote the subsequent Masters at the Universities for DC. Yeah, like, you know, so I've read some of his stuff and I didn't even realize it. Also like, this is actually my favorite factoid about him. He served as the senior editor of the Weekly World News shortly [00:46:00] before it got shut down in 2007. Jessika: What? Mike: Yeah. And like that automatically makes me like the dude, because the Weekly World News was one of my favorite things when I was in college, and because I was so good at Photoshop in high school and college, and I was interested in journalism, but I also love the weird stuff, I actually wanted to apply to the weekly world news for a job just for like a little while. And be like, yeah, like I Photoshop pictures of bat boy. Like, I really was hoping that that would be a thing, and then they shut down right after I graduated college and broke my cold black heart. Jessika: It's a damn shame.  Mike: But yeah. So, meanwhile, the art was handled again by Curt Swan and then he was also assisted by Frank Chiaramonte. Chiaramonte was Swan's regular anchor on the main Superman book from 1978 to 82. And then this is one of his last books that he worked on because he died really young in January of [00:47:00] 83. He was only 40 years old. Like.  Jessika: Oh.  Mike: Yeah, it's really weird too. I was trying to figure out what happened and all I could find was that just, he died young. But, he was regarded pretty well and he worked on a lot of stuff. So I think if he hadn't died, he probably would've, you know, gone on to great things. But the Computer Masters of Metropolis doesn't have a publish date other than 1982, which means it came out less than a year before his death, because he died in January of 83.  Jessika: Oh, dang.  Mike: Yeah. All right. So what happened in the Computer Masters of Metropolis?  Jessika: So, those are some lucky kids studying at whatever outskirts elementary school this is. Cause it's not in Metropolis proper, it's like in the suburbs of Metropolis somewhere.  Mike: Yeah. You know, it's superhero-adjacent to the city. Jessika: Yeah. Yeah. Right. And again, not sure why Ms. Wilson seems to be on really, really [00:48:00] friendly terms with all the superheroes in the area, but Wonder Woman shows up to take them to the World's Fair, which of course is being held in Metropolis.  Mike: Yeah. Which I mean, okay. Why, why not?  Jessika: Exactly. Meanwhile, Lex Luther was salty about being denied entry for an exhibit for the World's Fair because the organizers didn't want to encourage his villainy.  Mike: It's so good. It's so good. Jessika: And so Luther decides to try to blackmail a way in, but that didn't work. So, of course he decides the thing to do is to threaten, to like completely destroy the fair, and ultimately creates another red solar radiation trap. This time, luring Superman into a room, rigged with explosives and bathed in red solar radiation, dun, dun, dun. So once again, there are computers in the room, I think, so. So he reaches out to [00:49:00] Alec and Shanna who are told that Wonder Woman should also be at the fair and to page page her. And she's basically like, okay, why are children paging me right now? But finds out that Superman is being held at the plantarium. She lassos the whole damn building and whips it around and it somehow deactivates the red solar radiation beam? Question mark? Mike: I don't know, man, I was pretty checked out when I was reading this. Like. They reused a lot of the same stuff, too. Like the same art where they were showing the computer chip, getting threaded through the needle, the bit where the kids are all walking on the giant demo version of the TRS,  Jessika: Oh, and those kids were being very nice because they acted surprised and very impressed to see that same damn exhibit for a second time.  Mike: Yeah. Which previously had showed up in the last issue. And I mean, like, it was a lot more exposition this time around too.  Jessika: It was.  Mike: [00:50:00] Anyway, sorry. Jessika: No, not at all. So Superman escapes and they catch Luther and the day is saved. And the end scenes were particularly silly. The mayor I'm assuming goes to thank Wonder Woman for saving the day. And she's like, but also these children, who just happened to be standing on the stage, like right behind her anyway, like the mayor, just, wasn't going to say anything about those kids on the stage, too, apparently. And they had a computer on stage with them? They were like, and this is the computer, let it hold the key too. And you got to know that like both Wonder Woman and Superman have to have entire rooms dedicated to the key to Metropolis that they get every time they save some damn building or something, they're all like, chuck another one in there. No, no, no. You kids keep that one.  Mike: It's fine. I've got 12 at home that are much nicer. Jessika: They're hanging on a wall around in a study.  Mike: They just use them as like coat racks. Jessika: [00:51:00] So Alec and Shanna, once again, saved the day, I guess.  Mike: Yeah, I mean, this was actually my least favorite of the three comics, because again, it was recycling art or, or using very similar art. It was making a lot of the same points, but it felt a lot more telling, not showing. And while I was really happy to see Lex Luther being next level petty, which, these days, you know, Lex Luther is a billionaire CEO, scientist who also has like armies of underlings performing super science for him that he's able to utilize. He's basically he is a more-  Jessika: Jeff Bezos.  Mike: Yeah, He is He is a, I was going to say, he's just, he's a more nakedly transparent, Jeff Bezos.  Jessika: Oh, you actually were going to say that. I'm sorry. I stole that right from out from under you. Mike: [00:52:00] No. I mean like it's, I'm sorry, like Jeff Bezos exploits his workers and use the money that he got from that to take a rocket ship and play astronaut, which side note, one of my favorite things about that entire story is that NASA at the last minute redefined, I think it was NASA, redefined what constitutes the definition of an astronaut, so he couldn't get an astronaut patch or pin. An astronaut pin, I think. Jessika: Which, again, the level of petty, but this is what I need. This is what I need to see, because it can't always be fucking Lex Luther winning.  Mike: Yeah. But anyway, like I really appreciated that we got to see Lex Luther being a super villain goon, like very flamboyant, flying around with his own little personal jet pack or jet boots, whatever they were like, they were like, it was like little rockets that he had attached to like his. I'm I'm struggling to remember if it was on his boots or on his waist. It was one or the other, right? Jessika: Yeah, I think it was [00:53:00] on his, I think you're right about the boots. And then he also had those fancy power gauntlets.  Mike: Yeah. And I mean, the other thing is back in this era, Lex Luther actually had a couple of different costumes that he wore that were very colorful and over-the-top, and it was like green and purple. So it kind of was that, that Joker color motif again, you know, it was really striking. And so he had that outfit of kind of the purple and green spandex that we saw in this issue. But then he also had this really baller set of green power armor that he used to really make Superman's life miserable for awhile. Like I said, after 1983, Radio Shack stopped with the Superman comics, but they didn't actually stop making comics. They kept on doing these comics with the Whiz Kids, but they instead moved over to Archie comic publications. I haven't been able to find out why the partnership's stopped. There's very little actual [00:54:00] documentation about these comics outside of a bunch of articles saying, oh yeah, they happened. Like they were a thing. They were dumb. And then pretty much all I've been able to find otherwise is people selling them. Cause there's still a lot of them around. And if you're looking for a fun piece of comic book history, these aren't very expensive, even in mint condition. That said the Tandy brand was starting to fall out of popularity by 83. For some perspective, it's estimated that Tandy controlled up to 60% of the personal computer market in the late seventies, which is like an astronomical market share. However, and this is from an article by a guy named Ron White, that he wrote for a magazine called 80 Micro in 1987, and you can now find it on a site called Vintage is the New Old, and we'll put this in the show notes again, Tandy's market share was down to 25% by 86. So it's a pretty fast fall from grace. Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: And then, even though Archie was publishing the comics, [00:55:00] none of the Archie characters actually showed up in any of these books with the Whiz Kids, although Radio Shack did publish Archie in the History of Electronics separately.  Jessika: Oh. Mike: Like, yeah. But based on that, my guess is that Radio Shack was looking to save some cash and Archie was probably a much better deal. I'm guessing it costs a lot more to license DC superheroes than it does to just make a comic without any big name characters. Jessika: Oh, I am sure.  Mike: Yeah. And then shortly after Archie took over the publication duties, the TRS computer line got rebranded to the Tandy computer. So it makes sense that the comic was rebranded from the TRS Whiz Kid's to the Tandy computer Whiz Kids. And that's actually, when I first became aware of this whole venture, because Nostalgia Alley, which is the local retro game store up in Petaluma, has a copy of one of the Tandy Whiz Kids comics on the shelf behind the counter. And so I [00:56:00] spotted that one time and I was talking to Jason, the owner, and he let me check it out for a couple of minutes. And that's when I started looking into this whole thing, which, per usual, led us down a rabbit hole. Jessika: Love these rabbit holes of ours.  Mike: Yeah, they're fun. Anyway, the Tandi Whiz Kid's comics kept on coming out until 1992. And based on what I understand, they featured the Whiz Kids solving crimes, using Tandy computers and other Radio Shack products. I haven't read them. I do really want to track down a copy of the Computer that Said No To Drugs though. Jessika: Who was offering computers drugs? They are expensive! Mike: I, I don't know. I'm really curious about everything about that. Jessika: Hey man, you want to hit this? It's just a fucking computer. And it's like, what are you talking about, dude?  Mike: Oh, I'm having flashbacks now of that episode of, uh, Futurama where Bender gets hooked on electricity. Jessika: Oh, hahahaha. [00:57:00]  Mike: They keep on referring to it as jacking on anyway. Yeah. But the early nineties were when things really started to go downhill for Radio Shack and they never really stopped, because stores like Best Buy and Walmart just started to really eat their lunch. And then, it got to the point where they've had to declare bankruptcy twice in the past five years or so. Like they also declared Nick Cannon as their chief creative officer around the time of the first bankruptcy. Yeah. And now they've been bought by some shady sounding company out of Florida. So the brand is still around, but it's not really the company that we grew up with. And I don't know, I'm honestly not sure what's worse, like partnering with Nick Cannon, or being this pale reflection of your former glory. They both sound pretty bad. Jessika: Yeah.  Mike: But yeah, that's the story about Superman, and how he wound up acting as a computer salesman for [00:58:00] a couple of years. You got any final thoughts? Jessika: So I'm just shaking my head over here. Like my nostrils are flaring.  Mike: How was that different from any other conversation I lead though? Jessika: I literally prepare myself for these, cause I'm like, all right, you can get angry, but don't get too angry. My secret is I'm always angry.  Mike: Dun dun dun. Jessika: Hmm. So you know, it's really interesting to see how very far we've come since these issues came out in the early eighties. Like, we're sitting here on small laptops, I've got a phone and a tablet right here in front of me as well, and you and I are basically sitting across from each other, having a conversation, even though we're not even in the same physical location.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: It blows my mind how amazing things like high speed trains and basic information [00:59:00] searches seemed back then, when they're so commonplace now. Like, I seriously Google everything. I would be nowhere without Google.  Mike: Yeah. My career is because of the internet. Jessika: Yeah. Yours, yours sure, is absolutely that's, yeah. That's a wild thing to think about too. And it's also wild to think about how much more advanced technology has become even in just, I had to do the calculations 40 years time, which I about had a panic attack when I mathed that out because. Ha ha ha. We're almost 40. Mike: Yep. Actually this episode is going to air right around the time that I'm going to be turning 40. Jessika: Yup. Happy birthday, to Mike.  Mike: Thanks, I hate it.  Jessika: No, Yeah. Right. At least you're not my mom giving my dad a [01:00:00] vulture piñata for his 40th birthday. Mike: No, Sarah has declared that she wants my 40th birthday to be a super soft birthday, which if you've ever watched Letterkenny.  Jessika: Yes! I was hoping You were going to say that. There has to be a unicorn.  Mike: I know, I think it's going to be put on hold until we're all vaccinated, but we might do a belated super soft birthday. Jessika: Yeah, okay. I figured you guys are going to have a family super soft birthday. But, if you want to have a super soft after birthday, when things clear up, I am, I am there and I will be eating some lovely pink frosted cupcakes with you.  Mike: You're on, big shoots. So we are now at the point of the episode where we're going to wrap things up with our Brain Wrinkles, which is when we discussed the one thing that is comics or comics adjacent that we just can't get out of our head. So you want to start things off? Jessika: Oh sure. [01:01:00] As I promised, I just finished watching the latest season of The Boys, which is season two. Holy shit. Holy fucking shit. That show is bat shit wild. Mike: Yeah.  Jessika: And what's been sticking in my head is the abuse dynamic between Homelander and mean, anybody he deals with, really? Mike: I was gonna say, everybody? Jessika: Yeah. And it's so interesting, cause as he was growing up, he was taught that not only is he more powerful than any person, he has been told that he is special and is entitled to do whatever pleases him. Which is really scary to see him manipulating others, using fear as a motivator to encourage them to comply. And honestly, the reason it scares me the most is just the powerlessness that these people, and most often women, are terrified into just following through with Homelander's whims.  Mike: Yeah. yeah. There's a lot of really [01:02:00] uncomfortable moments in that show. But I like the show, which I didn't expect. Jessika: Well, I do like that it's putting a spotlight onto that dynamic, cause that's a dynamic that we show is very one-sided, usually a little victim blamey.  Mike: Mmhmm.  Jessika: You know, why didn't she just leave kind of a narrative, which we all know it's not that easy.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: And I think this is a really good example of why it's not that easy, in a very powerful way. And, it does remind me of people who are stuck in abusive households or relationships and are in different ways, powerless to leave their situations. So, hopefully it sparks some conversation.  Mike: Yeah. Jessika: Well, but what about you?  Mike: Mine is also TV related, but it's not quite as topical as your thoughts. So, I actually was trying to show my stepson[01:03:00] some X-Men cartoons the other day. And as we started to watch the first episode of Wolverine and the X-Men, he started to ask me all these questions about who the different characters were, because they basically start the show off assuming that the audience knows who all of the X-Men are, because at the time when it launched, the X-Men were a major brand, and then Disney acquired Marvel right before this. And then, they kind of made mutants personas, non grata, and, the mutants have not been featured in Disney programming up until the point where basically for the past 10 years, major media representation for kids of characters, like the X-Men, aren't all that common. And so it was just kind of a really thoughtful moment for me, where I realized I had to start them over from the beginning with an earlier X-Men cartoon, where he gets all these introductions. And I think there's going to be this generation that is going to grow up learning who the X-Men are a lot later than a lot of us [01:04:00] did. Like I knew all of the X-Men by the age of nine and I suspect. Jessika: Oh, yeah. Mike: Yeah. And so I think it's going to be really interesting to watch a generation of teenagers discover the X-Men really for the first time outside of, you know, Wolverine and Deadpool, because everybody knows who they are. Jessika: Yeah, of course. Hm. Mike: But yeah.  Jessika: That's wild.  Mike: Yeah. It's kind of one of those surreal moments of realization. Yeah.  Jessika: Hmm.  Mike: So, in two weeks we will be back with our next installment of the Sandman book club, which is going to be volumes three and four. And then until then we'll see you in the stacks. Thanks for listening to Ten Cent Takes. Accessibility is important to us, so text transcriptions of each of our published episodes can be found on our website.  Mike: This episode was hosted by Jessika Frazer and Mike Thompson written by Mike Thompson, and edited by Jessika Frazer. Our intro theme was written and performed by Jared Emerson Johnson of Bay Area Sound, our credits and transition music is Pursuit of Life by Evan [01:05:00] MacDonald, and was purchased with a standard license from Premium Beat. Our banner graphics were designed by Sarah Frank, who you can find on Instagram as @lookmomdraws. Jessika: If you'd like to get in touch with us, ask us questions, or tell us about how we got something wrong, please head over to tencenttakes.com or shoot an email to tencenttakes@gmail.com. You can also find us on Twitter; the official podcast account is tencenttakes. Jessika is jessikawitha, and Jessika spelled with a K, and Mike is vansau, V a N S a U.  Mike: If you'd like to support us, be sure to download, rate and review wherever you listen. And if you like, what you hear, tell your friends. Jessika: Stay safe out there.  Mike: And support your local comic shop. Lfa66XA001sq2SOSeOU7

The Orion Way of Life Podcast
Episode 129 - Real Estate Investing with Mike Morawski

The Orion Way of Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 49:24


I am thrilled to have Mike on to talk about his story. He's an entrepreneur, author, real estate trainer, public speaker and personal Coach for over 30 years. He went from building a near $100 Million company in 30 months, to losing it all and going to Federal Prison for 8 years for wire fraud and mail fraud. He came out of it on the other side with a degree in Theology and created a whole ethics course that is being taught in Universities today. Now he's coached hundreds of people to ethically invest in Multi-Family apartments and build for retirement. You can connect with him at www.mycoreintentions.com and get into his courses there. #boyswillbeboys features Phil McCrory, who's idea helps clean up oil spills with human hair clippings. https://www.goodgoodgood.co/articles/hair-stylists-are-using-hair-clippings-to-clean-up-oil-spills Send emails to orionwaymailbag@gmail.com

Arts & Ideas
The continuing appeal of Tudor history

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 44:43


Historical novelist Philippa Gregory, historians Susan Doran and Nandini Das, and literary scholar and author Adam Roberts join Matthew Sweet at the Belgrade Theatre, Coventry to discuss the enduring appeal of Tudor history and the role that historical fiction plays in shaping our view of history. Plus the connection between Sir Walter Scott and nearby Kenilworth Castle. Part of the BBC Contains Strong Language festival. Elizabeth and Mary: Royal Cousins, Rival Queens opens at the British Library opens 8 October 2021–20 February 2022. Professor Susan Doran has edited the exhibition catalogue and will be giving an online talk on October 13th called Too Close to Her Throne: The Other Cousins Kenilworth Castle and Garden are run by English Heritage https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/kenilworth-castle/ Walter Scott (15 August 1771 – 21 September 1832) wrote many historical novels including Kenilworth - his account of Queen Elizabeth, the Earl of Leicester and the murder of his wife Amy Robsart which was published 13 January 1821. Philippa Gregory's novels include The Other Boleyn Girl, The King's Curse and her current Fairmile Series. She is a fellow of the Universities of Sussex and Cardiff and an honorary research fellow at Birkbeck University of London. Adam Roberts teaches at Royal Holloway, University of London and Nandini Das teaches at the University of Oxford. She is a BBC/ARHC New Generation Thinker. You can find a Free Thinking discussion about Waverly available to download as an Arts & Ideas podcast from the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04dr39q There is also a discussion about how we used to feel in the past and the idea of emotional history which hears from author and historian Tracy Borman https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003zp2 Producer: Torquil MacLeod

Money Savage
Critical Thinking with Dr. Greg Sadler

Money Savage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 39:53


LifeBlood: We talked about critical thinking, why it's more important than ever, how to get better at it, how to become a better consumer of news and information, and why it's harder than ever to do it. We discussed the idea of information literacy, why it's harder today than in times past to be able to trust our news sources, the reasons behind that, and how to become better consumers of news.  We talked about critical thinking, how it has been taught in Universities for a long time, and how it's value and the need for it is bigger than it's ever been, how the Stoics thought about it and applied it.   We discussed the Stoic virtue of justice, how to apply it to the biggest problems and issues were facing today like vaccines and abortion, how it's really important to go far beyond rhetoric and talking points if you really want to form an opinion on these issues, and how to engage in civilized discourse on difficult issues.   We talked about how to avoid binary thinking, how to appreciate and consider nuance, why it's essential to consider motivations and how to pursue truth with Dr. Gregory Sadler, philosopher, speaker, author, podcaster, consultant, coach and content creator.  He's the Editor of Stoicism Today, a Professor and the CoOrganizer of STOICON.   Listen to learn why history doesn't repeat itself, but it certainly rhymes, and how to be cognizant and mindful of that reality! You can learn more about Greg at ReasonIO.com, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter. Get your ticket to Stoicon HERE Thanks, as always for listening!  If you got some value and enjoyed the show, please leave us a review wherever you listen and subscribe as well.  You can learn more about us at MoneyAlignmentAcademy.com, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube and Facebook or you'd like to be a guest on the show, contact George at Contact@GeorgeGrombacher.com.

The David Knight Show
Wed 22Sep21 BREAKING: Martial Law Violence Escalates in Australia

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 181:37


* BREAKING: Martial Law Violence Escalates in Australia* Crisis in Food Production: Biden's New Rule & broken UK supply chain* INTERVIEW: Sheriff Mack, CSPOA.org, on how to find/support and connect with a local Sheriff that will protect your rights from federal, state and even other local officials* Data in England and Scotland accidentally reveals over 35,000 deaths within 28 days of vaccination* Big Brother comes to transportation — total, constant surveillance of drivers* Chinese student finds he can't escape ChiCom surveillance — EVEN IN THE UNITED STATESTOPICS by TIMECODE2:04 Martial Law Violence Escalates in Australia. Breaking clips of today's violence. Daily protests now. After a peaceful rapport at the Shrine of Remembrance (WW2), police suddenly attacked in force, firing rubber bullets at close range. Construction workers have a dozen goals, only one of the goals is specific to that group, the rest are about common rights EVERY nation's people should be demanding39:09 Biden's New Rule Attacks Farming & UK Food Crisis. “Renewable Energy” fails in UK, creating a shortage of fertilizer and, ironically, CO2 used extensively in food processing and even soft drinks. In the USA, Biden is playing 4D Chess — 4 ways to destroy food supply with a new OHSA rule to “protect” workers from working at temperatures higher than 80F or 26C (but still suffocate with mask and vaccinate them)1:01:26 A handful of border agents on horseback vs thousands of illegal immigrants. It's chaos & a horrible situation for everyone — created, incentivized by Biden, the destroyer-in-chief1:07:02 BigBrother Comes to Transportation: Total Surveillance of Drivers INSIDE Cars/Trucks. Amazon is already watching & reporting on their delivery drivers — and imposing financial penalties. Even more detailed surveillance of EVERYTHING you do in the car has already been developed and is awaiting mandate by the feds (as they've just mandated breathalyzers for EVERYONE)1:14:13 INTERVIEW: Getting the Sheriff on Your Side. Sheriff Mack, CSPOA.org, on how you can connect/recruit/support the “lesser magistrate” that can make the biggest difference in supporting your constitutionally recognized rights — your local sheriff1:55:39 Biden Mandate Consolidates Power in Military & Police. Vaccine mandate for military is a banana republic style purge of people with “sincerely held religious beliefs” and political beliefs that differ with the regime. Then the Satanic, occult Theosophy connections that extend even to General Flynn.2:18:06 35,000+ Vax Deaths in UK, December thru June. Data from UK & Scotland accidentally revealed how many died within 28 days of vaccination (same metric used for the pandemic & tests). And, Ivermectin success with massive population in India of over 241 MILLION people2:31:17 Listener. Disturbing report that hospitals are refusing treatment to unvaccinated2:41:22 Chinese student, studying in USA, who only has 2 followers on Twitter is hunted down by Chinese govt. He & his family threatened.2:52:06 Universities are establishing a permanent surveillance bureaucracy of “contact tracing” and punishments. Training students to accept it. From college credits to social credits.2:58:32 Massive blow-back against religious persecution. Parents & school thwart anti-Christian organization trying to ban prayer at football games. Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

Axios Today
Universities force choices on COVID vaccine mixing

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 11:12


On Monday, the Biden administration said it would lift travel restrictions starting in November, for travelers from 33 countries who are fully vaccinated. That means that the U.S. will let in people who have received vaccines that aren't yet authorized here in the U.S. by the FDA, like the AstraZeneca vaccine. But for international students who are coming here to study, that may not be the case. Plus, a test of the global financial system from China. And, why vinyl record sales keep exploding. Guests: Reuters' Ahmed Aboulenein, The Johns Hopkins News-Letter's Michelle Limpe, Axios' Felix Salmon and Erica Pandey. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Alex Sugiura. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices