Podcasts about social security

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Means-oriented social benefit

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  • Jun 24, 2022LATEST
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    Best podcasts about social security

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    Latest podcast episodes about social security

    MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
    SS Benefits for Non-Workers

    MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 25:27


    Some folks will tell you that you can't get Social Security benefits unless you've worked and paid payroll taxes for at least 40 quarters, or 10 years. We'll explain why today on MoneyWise. There's no question that Social Security is important maybe TOO important. It was never intended to provide more than 40% of what you'll need in retirement, but many people rely on it too heavily for their retirement plan by not having enough in savings. That said, it's especially important to do your research if you haven't worked the required 10 years. That's because the Social Security Administration usually won't inform you that you may be eligible for benefits. So let's get a jumpstart on that research. HOW DO YOU QUALIFY IF YOU DON'T HAVE NEEDED WORK RECORD? Even if you don't have the necessary work record, you may still qualify for Social Security benefits. The first way this is possible is through spousal benefits. You may be able to receive benefits based on your spouse's record, or even your former spouse's record in the case of divorce. Typically, you're eligible for up to 50% of your spouse's benefit if he or she applies for benefits at full retirement age (now 66 or 67). For example, if your spouse is eligible to receive $1,500 a month, your benefit amount could be as much as $750. You'd have to be at least 62 years old and your spouse would have to be receiving benefits already. Now, you can claim your spousal benefits that early, at age 62, but if you do, there's a cost. If you claim them before your full retirement age, your benefits will be permanently reduced by around 32% unless you're caring for an eligible child under age 16. Bottom line: unless you absolutely can't live without the money, it's better to wait for your full retirement age to collect spousal benefits. SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS AFTER DIVORCE You could almost say divorce has no impact at all on spousal benefits. If you're divorced, you may still be able to claim benefits based on your ex-spouse's work record. But there are a couple of conditions: The marriage must have lasted at least 10 years and you can't currently be married. And even if your ex has remarried, you're still eligible based on his or her record. As would be the case with a current spouse, you have to be at least 62 years old to file for spousal benefits, and your maximum benefit would also be 50% of your ex-spouse's full benefit amount if he or she files at their full retirement age. But unlike with a current spouse, your ex-spouse does not need to have already applied for Social Security benefits for you to receive them based on their record. NOTE: Claiming benefits has no effect on your ex-spouse's or or their current spouse's benefits. SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS FOR WIDOWS/WIDOWERS Here, we're getting into survivor benefits. Your eligibility for those depends on the age when your spouse passed away. If he or she worked for at least 10 years and qualified for benefits, then you may be entitled to survivors benefits. As a widow or widower, you only have to be 60, not 62, to file for benefits. You may also qualify if you're age 50 or older and have a disability. And you can file for survivor benefits at any age if you're caring for the deceased worker's child, just as long as the child is under age 16 or disabled. OTHERS WHO MAY QUALIFY Survivor's benefits aren't just for widows and widowers. Surviving children, ex-spouses, parents, and sometimes other relatives might also qualify for benefits. In all of those cases, the amount of the benefit depends greatly on how much the worker was eligible to receive and how many people file for benefits. There's a maximum amount of benefits per family, and that's based on the deceased's work record as well. So I know all of this is confusing, and it's safe to say that what you don't know about Social Security could cost you benefits that you're entitled to. That's why it's a good idea to make an appointment at your local Social Security office and go in with a list of questions. The folks there are generally pretty helpful. You can also get more information online at SSA.gov. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● Are NFCs biblically sound? ● How can a church finance a small portion of the costs for a new building? ● When should you start drawing Social Security benefits? ● How can you manage a 401k received in a settlement? RESOURCES MENTIONED: ● Everence ● AGFinancial ● Thrivent ● ECCU Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    Your Financial Pharmacist
    YFP 261: YFP Planning Case Study #2: Planning for Retirement, Saving for Kids' College, and Paying Off Debt

    Your Financial Pharmacist

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 37:32


    YFP Co-Founder & Director of Financial Planning, Tim Baker, CFP®, RLP® is joined by YFP Planning Lead Planners, Kelly Reddy-Heffner, CFP®, CSLP®, CDFA®, and Robert Lopez, CFP® to walk you through a financial planning case study on planning for retirement, saving for kids' college, and paying off debt. Key Points From This Episode Getting to know Fiona and Rob Anderson.  The home, work, and financial portfolios of our case study couple.  Fiona and Rob's investment accounts and insurance policies.  Diving into tax concerns. Your children's education versus building your retirement fund – conflicting goals.  How to prioritize conflicting goals. Some innovative ways to lower the costs of college/university. How to use 401Ks, RSUs, and other investment accounts wisely, for investing in your goals.  Delaying retirement and waiting to claim Social Security.  A closer look at whether their particular investment accounts work for their specific goals.  Unpacking the target date fund and traditional IRA.  What to consider when paying a mortgage in retirement. Your age concerning your debt, and if there is reason to panic. Links Mentioned in Today's Episode YFP Planning: Financial Planning for Pharmacists Schedule a free Discovery Call with YFP Planning Insuring Income: Get Quotes and Apply for Term Life and Disability Insurance YFP Planning Case Study #2 Summary Sheet Your Financial Pharmacist Disclaimer and Disclosures

    Retirement Reality Podcast
    Ep 96: Picking Sides In Important Financial Debates

    Retirement Reality Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 15:59


    On this episode, we'll try to pick sides of some important financial debates. From bonds to life insurance, credit card debt to starting Social Security, we'll propose several different topics to see which sides of the debates you and your advisor should probably fall on.   Here is some of what you'll learn on this show: Why it might not always be the best strategy to pay off your house as soon as you can. (2:03) How you can benefit from having life insurance in retirement. (5:00) Why annuities can provide big benefits to your financial plan even though a lot of people don't feel they're valuable. (6:57) Social Security benefits can begin as early as age 62 but that doesn't mean you should be claiming them as early as possible. (13:31)   If you have questions about anything we discussed on the show, please reach out and we'll be happy to talk to you about your financial situation.   For more, visit us online: http://principalpreservationservices.com 

    Numbers by Barron's
    Is Social Security Running Out?

    Numbers by Barron's

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 5:07


    Millennials will likely need to save more to make up for lost benefits. Volvo spinoff Polestar will start trading on Friday. And Biden's gas tax holiday could backfire. Host: Jackson Cantrell. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Keen on Retirement
    Separating the Good News from the Bad Headlines in the Latest Social Security Report

    Keen on Retirement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 40:19


    Last year, when the Social Security Board of Trustees released its annual report, there was quite a bit of handwringing. The economic hardships of 2020 had depleted reserves quicker than anticipated and projections were showing that Social Security could run out in 2034, one year ahead of previous estimates. By then, Social Security would only be able to pay approximately 78% of expected benefits to retirees.  As we discuss on today's episode, this year's report, released on June 2nd, is a bit more optimistic. But the ongoing social, political, and economic challenges that will affect your benefits in retirement mean it's critical that folks understand how these funds work, maintain realistic expectations, and work with an advisor to plan ahead. 

    Lever Time
    The Social Security Chopping Block (also, New York Democrats Don't Care About Climate)

    Lever Time

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 62:19


    On this week's episode of Lever Time: David speaks with Alex Lawson, the executive director of Social Security Works, to discuss Lindsey Graham's recent comments on entitlement reform and whether the Biden administration will capitulate to Republicans. He's then joined by Andrew Perez, whose recent Lever story explored a free medical clinic filling critical health care gaps in Sen. Manchin's home state of West Virginia, after the corporate Democrat blocked Medicare expansion. Finally, Julia Rock interviews climate organizer Pete Sikora, a campaign director for New York Communities for Change, about New York Dems' recent efforts to kill a renewable energy bill.If you'd like to support the independent journalism we're doing, head over to LeverNews.com to become a supporting subscriber.If you'd like to leave a tip for The Lever click the following link. We really appreciate your support :) levernews.com/tipjarHead over to SheetsGiggles.com/LEVER to get 15% off your order!

    Your Money Mamas
    Social Security and Dealing with a Spouse Who is a Financial Hot Mess Express.

    Your Money Mamas

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:24


    Hey! We missed you! In this episode, Linds & Jules fangirl over Jen Hatmaker, delve into the surprisingly interesting depths of Social Security and cover how to deal with a spouse who is a financial hot-mess-express. 

    Retirement Answer Man
    Leave a Lasting Legacy: How to Create Your Legacy Strategy

    Retirement Answer Man

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:44


    We all want to leave a legacy to those we love, but leaving a legacy doesn't mean simply making a will. To create a lasting financial and nonfinancial legacy you need to have a strategy that you can rely on. Today you'll learn the steps to take to create a lasting legacy. Leaving a legacy is different from estate planning Often times we read about a hot investment or retirement planning tip in an article or hear some equally savory advice in a podcast and we jump to take action on it rather than thinking about how it could fit into our overall plan. I call this letting the tail wag the dog.  Instead of letting the tail wag the dog, think about your actions first. Stop for a moment and think about how that new shiny idea or product would fit into your overall retirement plan. When you have a goal-based plan in place, it allows you to think through decisions in an organized way. You'll want to use similar methods to build a plan to create the most impactful legacy that you can. How to begin creating your legacy plan There are a couple of steps you can take to begin creating a strategy that will allow you to develop a lasting legacy.  The first step is to consider what you can afford to do. You can do this by determining how much excess capital you have. This can be a tricky number since there are so many unknowns to consider. These unknowns make it hard to determine how much you will have at the end of your life.  Consider what is feasible considering your resources and your projected spending. You can gain a better understanding by using a plan of record. If you have never used a plan of record, keep your eyes open for this week's 6-Shot Saturday newsletter to get a free template. If you aren't signed up for the newsletter, head on over to RogerWhitney.com to fill out the form and subscribe.  What are your legacy goals? Now that you have determined what is feasible given your life vision and resources you can move on to step 2. Consider what kind of financial and nonfinancial impact you want to have. What do you want to accomplish? Do you want to be able to contribute to your children's retirement savings? Or maybe you want to help them buy their first home.  Do you want to create a nonfinancial impact by developing the tradition of having a weekly family dinner? Do you plan on being an exemplar and coaching them through tough choices? Create intentionality with your legacy strategy by framing it in financial and nonfinancial ways and considering the impact you want to have during and after your life.  After these first two steps, you can begin to create your strategy. You'll want to think about maintaining flexibility with your strategy since markets won't always cooperate with your plans. Your legacy should be built with discretionary money. The tactics will come easy if you focus on creating a strategy first. Listen in to hear how to build your lasting legacy.  OUTLINE OF THIS EPISODE OF THE RETIREMENT ANSWER MAN PRACTICAL PLANNING SEGMENT [2:43] Doctors don't want you to engage and ask questions [8:00] Leaving a legacy is different from estate planning [13:17] What impact do you want to have during your life? [18:09] Take time making large stake decisions [25:50] The tactics are easy if you take these previous steps first LISTENER QUESTIONS [27:22] The differences between the representative payee program and advanced designation in Social Security [32:20] How to create a discount factor using a household balance sheet [40:09] My thoughts on taking Social Security at 68 instead of 70 [41:25] How the IRMAA brackets work [45:30] Reimbursing your Medicare Part B premiums from your HSA TODAY'S SMART SPRINT SEGMENT [47:05] Map out what kind of financial and nonfinancial legacy that you want to leave Resources Mentioned In This Episode BOOK - Retirement Planning Guidebook by Dr. Wade Pfau SSA.gov/payee SSA-44 How to Be a Better Advocate for Your Health LTCI Partners Rock Retirement Club Roger's YouTube Channel - Roger That BOOK - Rock Retirement  by Roger Whitney Roger's Retirement Learning Center

    Personal Pension Radio
    PPR 275 How To Save $10,000 At Carmax

    Personal Pension Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 9:15


    As a Paralegal and a Certified Financial Planner®, Kraig is uniquely able to assist clients with the careful preparation of asset protection and estate plans.  Kraig's team uses a financial-planning approach to ensure that each client obtains the best possible outcomes. With 120 years of combined legal and financial services experience between our team members, we can help you think defensively about protecting your wealth, investments, business intellectual property, and other assets and counsel you through choices you make to prepare for the future.   Thanks to the death of private pensions, the devaluation of Social Security benefits and other undeniable retirement factors such as inflation and increased taxes, America is now in a retirement income crisis. Kraig Strom, the host of Personal Pension Radio, is focused on helping you pack your bags for both halves of the retirement journey.  Kraig's mission is help you build & protect your wealth and lifestyle today and generationally. Along the way, Kraig is ready to assist with all matters related to your financial wellbeing as well as your business and family legal needs.    Optimizing Retirement income and protecting your legacy does not happen with a product. You must have an integrated approach.

    SML Planning Minute
    Social Security Trustees Report 2022: Doomsday Deferred

    SML Planning Minute

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 5:57


    Episode 182 - It's hard to believe, but the oldest millennials are already approaching middle age. What makes them different from a financial point of view?

    Your Money, Your Wealth
    Where to Find Retirement Income When the Stock Market Freaks Out - 383

    Your Money, Your Wealth

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 29:09


    Equitable accumulators, cash management accounts, and Social Security: with today's market volatility, how can you squeeze a few more dollars of income out of your retirement savings? Any reason not to use a robo-advisor for decumulation, in other words, spending down those savings? Plus, a pension retirement spitball follow-up, and is it possible to avoid tax liability on a lump sum withdrawal from a 401(k)? Finally, is Joe's marriage the canary in the Coors Light Party Ball for YMYW? Show notes, free financial resources, Ask Joe & Big Al On Air: https://bizlink.to/ymyw-383

    In The Moment podcast
    140. R. Douglas Arnold with Sally James: Can Social Security Be Fixed?

    In The Moment podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 48:26


    Since it started, Social Security has been a cornerstone for retirement in America. But Americans are living longer and having fewer children, which means that this popular program now pays more in benefits than it collects in revenue. There's less going into the pot than there is going out. Without reforms, 83 million Americans will face an immediate benefit cut of 20 percent in 2034, just a dozen years away. What's more, most future retirees are not participating in employee-sponsored retirement plans outside of Social Security, which could otherwise buffer the impacts of these cuts. Many people are counting on the safety net of Social Security for their future. How did we get here and what is the solution? In Fixing Social Security, R. Douglas Arnold explores how Social Security has played out in American politics, why Congress struggles to fix its problems, and what legislators can do to save it. In the 140th episode of Town Hall's In the Moment podcast, Sally James interviews Arnold about whether or not America will be able to fix the future of Social Security and how we might go about doing it. R. Douglas Arnold is the William Church Osborn Professor of Public Affairs Emeritus at Princeton University. His books include Congress, the Press, and Political Accountability (Princeton), The Logic of Congressional Action, and Framing the Social Security Debate. Sally James is a writer and journalist who covers science and medical research. She has written for The Seattle Times, South Seattle Emerald, Seattle and UW Magazines, among others. For the Emerald, she has been focusing during the pandemic on stories about health and access for communities of color. In the past, she has been a leader and volunteer for the nonprofit Northwest Science Writers Association. For many years, she was a reviewer for Health News Review, fact-checking national press reporting for accuracy and fairness. Buy the Book — Fixing Social Security: The Politics of Reform in a Polarized Age Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

    Beyond the Money
    VP Mike Pence Talks Social Security

    Beyond the Money

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 17:30


    In this episode Jackie Campbell and Monica Haberlin discuss the latest RECORD HIGH inflation numbers and how they are adjusting portfolios to accommodate clients retirement plans. Plus we hear from former Vice President Mike Pence who has some interesting thoughts on Social Security. Finally, we all make mistakes in retirement planning, but there are a few steps to take that could limit the damage to our overall plan.  For more information on Campbell and Company or to schedule a complimentary consultation call 727-334-0024 or visit www.mycampbellandco.com 

    Financial Straight Talk
    Vice President Mike Pence and Social Security

    Financial Straight Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 19:06


    Jim Fox welcomes on Vice President Mike Pence and discusses the future of social security in America. He also talks about the role it plays in your retirement plan and what you should consider first when create a plan for your financial future. 

    Retirement Coffee Talk
    Interview with former Vice President Mike Pence

    Retirement Coffee Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 8:36


    Charisse talks with former Vice President Mike Pence about taxes, Social Security, and the American Dream.

    The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow
    Alex Lawson: They're Trying to Steamroll Social Security

    The Zero Hour with RJ Eskow

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 42:05


    The Retirement and IRA Show
    Social Security, Roth Conversions, and Mortality Credits: Q&A #2225

    The Retirement and IRA Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 54:27


    Jim and Chris sit down to discuss listeners questions about Social Security, Roth conversions, and annuity mortality credits. (3:30) George in North Carolina looks for clarification on his spouses Social Security benefit and whether or not it will be WEP/GPO affected. (8:30) A listener from Wisconsin asks about the calculation for the pro-rata amount on […] The post Social Security, Roth Conversions, and Mortality Credits: Q&A #2225 appeared first on The Retirement and IRA Show.

    Chronic Wellness
    Episode 353: Arlene Faulk, Part 3

    Chronic Wellness

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 1:17


    To see Arlene's tai chi: https://www.youtube.com/user/faulktaichi To visit Arlene's website: https://arlenefaulk.com/ If you're in the Chicago area and want to take classes: https://faulktaichi.com/arlene-faulk/ Welcome back to the third installment of my conversation with writer and teacher Arlene Faulk. What was it like having a chronic illness at work before the ADA or insurance portability/insurance for preexisting conditions? As her symptoms worsened, she contacted an insurance company for a quote about what it would cost to privately cover herself. She was told she was uninsurable. If she could find insurance (it was the late 80s) she was told it would cost $10-15k/month. There was no coverage for preexisting conditions. She felt stuck – unable to be honest about her health at work. If she was to tell someone, they might to theorize about your “fitness” for work every time you're out for a day. Eight years later, new and worsening symptoms led to another hospital stay and then her parents came to visit, but yet she still didn't tell them what was happening with your health. Again, not wanting them to worry. We often believe we're protecting others by not saying what's true for us. Realizing that things have changed dramatically and for the worse, she is at the point of needing to accept her MS diagnosis. What advice would does she have for someone struggling with this reality? She asserts that our fear of failure often keeps us from acceptance. She talks about making the break from work, and what it felt like to leave that world and apply for Social Security benefits. Join us tomorrow for the conclusion of this interview. I'm Annette Leonard, speaker, coach, and sick person who believes that my illnesses do not define me. If health is the absence of disease and wellness is the presence of wholeness, then no matter what your disease status, we can work toward your wellness, your wholeness. Whether or not you are ever "healthy" on paper, you can be well. Join me and others on the path back to wholeness at AnnetteLeonard.com. Whether you are a person experiencing chronic illness or are someone who loves or serves people with chronic illness I have great resources here on this channel or on my website for you. WIN A COPY OF ARLENE'S BOOK Here's how to enter: 1) Leave me a rating or review on whatever audio podcast platform you listen to. 2) Let me know you've done that by emailing me at hello@annetteleonard.com or leaving me a comment about it on YouTube so that you can be entered in to the drawing. If you have a preference about which book you'd like, let me know in your comment or email. (I'm also giving away a copy of Michael Murray's My Pain Body Solution) 3) If you'd like to be entered multiple times you can also post about one (or both of the books) and tag me on Instagram @theAnnetteLeonard including tag of either @arlenefaulk or #mypainbodysolution, for up to two additional entries. The drawing is planned for 6/30

    Wealth Training Academy with Ed Storer
    The New Retirement-Expenses, Penalties, and Fees-Retirement Myths

    Wealth Training Academy with Ed Storer

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 52:16


    Ed points out how retirement planning is different now due to many factors such as dwindling pensions and longevity.  He talks about the importance of building income, protecting your wealth, and factoring in health care costs and inflation.  He then moves into discovering fees you may be paying and avoiding unnecessary costs in retirement including penalties.  Ed then keeps the conversation grounded in reality as he debunks some retirement myths and old ways of thinking in crafting retirement strategies. You can reach Ed Storer and his team by calling 800-563-7030. The Wealth Training Academy See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Financial Pizza
    Ep 151 Financial Pizza This week on Financial Safari Capital Financials Chief Wealth Strategist Parker Holland breaks down some strategies that could help you retire a little earlier than planned.

    Financial Pizza

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 28:42


    This week on Financial Safari Capital Financials Chief Wealth Strategist Parker Holland breaks down some strategies that could help you retire a little earlier than planned. Eric Kearney explains why you need a solid relationship with a financial advisor. Joe Murphy talks about how today's economy is a lot like the 1970's. Kevin Frisbie weighs in on life insurance and how it's changed over the past ten years. Senior Wealth Strategist Marty Hensley recounts his start in the business and how it's unrecognizable today. Call 800-662-6808. Text PIZZA to 600700. Visit FinancialPizza.com to learn more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    America's Work Force Union Podcast
    Jeff Stoffer (American Legion) / Rich Fiesta (Alliance for Retired Americans)

    America's Work Force Union Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 54:40


    Jeff Stoffer, Media and Communications Director for The American Legion, joined the America's Work Force Union Podcast and discussed the U.S. Senate's recent passage of the Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics (PACT) Act, the D-Day commemoration service in Normandy, France and articles in the July issue of The American Legion Magazine.    The Alliance for Retired Americans Executive Director Richard Fiesta appeared on the America's Work Force Union Podcast and spoke about proposed legislation that seeks to expand Social Security. He also explained a reduction in next year's Medicare premiums and the need to pass legislation to reign in the price of Insulin.

    Money Wisdom
    Things Everyone Can Relate To

    Money Wisdom

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 8:28


    We might all be different when it comes to money, but there are certain things that we can all relate to. Let's look at the areas of financial planning that we are all familiar with and discuss where people often go wrong.   Read more and get additional financial resources: http://johnsonbrunetti.com    What we discuss in this episode:  0:45 – Intro to the conversation 1:42 – Worrying about whether Social Security will last 2:44 – Not remembering someone's name  3:44 – Thinking you have a high risk tolerance until the market crashes 6:07 – Procrastinating with your financial plan

    Wealthworx Radio with Eric Kearney
    Ep 176 Wealthworx Radio Ep 176 This week Eric Kearney and Joseph Lanza dig into how planning for retirement has evolved over the past twenty years or so.

    Wealthworx Radio with Eric Kearney

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 52:15


    Dealing with change is often difficult. This week Eric Kearney and Joseph Lanza dig into how planning for retirement has evolved over the past twenty years or so. The top ten changes in getting to that next phase of life called retirement. That and much more this week on Wealthworx Radio.  Call Eric 800-779-1942 Visit EricKearneyAdvisor.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
    No Longer Skeptical About Faith-Based Investing With Matt Rusten

    MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 25:25


    Many investors want to apply their faith to the way they invest their money. And a small, but growing industry of faith-based investments is seeking to meet that desire. But many still have questions. Matt Rusten joins us to help answer those questions today on MoneyWise. Matt Rusten is executive director of Made to Flourish, a ministry dedicated to helping Christians live their faith seven days a week, not just on Sunday. Matt writes for the Eventide Center and recently penned an article titled Why I Was Skeptical of Faith-Based Investing and What Changed My Mind. Matt share his journal now an advocate for faith-based investing. His first real concern: Matt believed faith-based investing funds were fiscally irresponsible, and therefore, represented unwise stewardship. He said his analysis of the numbers led him to a clear verdict: smart money commits to low-fee index funds, while stupid money chases returns in actively managed, high-fee funds. Faith-based funds, values-based funds, socially responsible funds they all seemed simply like the latest gimmick by which actively managed funds continued to underperform. But Matt said that was only true on the basis of my second concern: He believed faith-based funds were shrewdly packaged products designed to make money from those with a weak conscience. This is a reference Romans 14, which described Christians with a weak conscience, whose moral alarms were always going off like a malfunctioning alarm clock. To the issues of stewardship and conscience, he added a third critique, this time with a theological lens: He believed faith-based funds were overly optimistic about their moral purity, and weren't sufficiently realistic about the moral ambiguity of our world. Afte the Fall, he reasoned, life and work in this world is always tainted by sin. In the prophet Jeremiah's words, the heart is deceitful above all things. Since sin is pervasive, it crops up in unexpected ways and places. The implication for investing seemed simple: it is naive to think we can invest only in companies that align with God's creational purposes. The world especially the world of business/investing is far too messy. Even companies with the best of intentions can cause untold harm, which is not always evident until many years later. The solution, he thought, was not to embrace a highly developed boycott mentality, but to recognize that we are not polluted by participation in an imperfect world. After all, Jesus told his disciples to pay their taxes to an evil government, and Paul ate meat sacrificed to idols, arguably aiding the idolatry industry. Such is life in a fallen world. WHAT CHANGED HIS VIEWS Over time, Matt said his views bagan to shift. Regarding underperformance and high fees, he began to see that ethically-run companies who create compelling value for people and planet tend to perform very well over the long term. Their business models are intrinsically sustainable making them less susceptible to the unpleasant surprises that can plague unsuspecting investors. Secondly, on the issue of faith-based or values-based funds being packaged for those with weak consciences, he came to see that investing is ownership. For two reasons, this magnifies our moral responsibility: Owning shares in a company helps the company succeed. And, more importantly, shareholders are directly profiting from the company's business activities. Effectively, a shareholder becomes a partner in its business model. His tangible first step was to ask what companies he actually owned through his investments, and whether he was happy benefiting from them financially. Thirdly, his thinking about the moral ambiguity of companies changed. He realized that some companies practice business in ways that align with God's Love your neighbor' command while others do the opposite. Some companies purposely create value for their various stakeholder neighbors customers, employees, suppliers, etc. Others often exploit those same neighbors. Eventually, Matt says he realized he had come to a different view of business. You can read the full article here. Discover more resources for faithful investing, ate Eventide's Faith and Investing Center at FaithandInvesting.com. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● Is it wise to move a portion of your investments into physical gold? ● Do have to wait until you're at least 62 years old to take Social Security benefits? RESOURCES MENTIONED: ● SSA.gov Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    The TK Show
    How does Retirement Benefit (Social Security) work?

    The TK Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 68:32


    Retirement (Social Security) works this way.  When we pay Social Security (it is mandatory) as an employee or self-employed it will eventually be used to calculate our pay when we retire, or  our beneficiaries (the wife and other dependents). Support the show

    Haws Federal Advisors Podcast
    Does The FERS Supplement Force Me to Take Social Security at 62?

    Haws Federal Advisors Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 6:13


    Free Book: Building Wealth In the TSP: Your Road Map To Financial Freedom as A Federal Employee: https://hawsfederaladvisors.com/free-tsp-book/ Want to schedule a consultation? Click here: https://hawsfederaladvisors.com/work-with-us/ TSP Cheat Sheet https://hawsfederaladvisors.com/tsp-cheat-sheet-landing-page/ Submit a question here: https://hawsfederaladvisors.com/question-submission-page/ Check out the full article here: https://hawsfederaladvisors.com/blog/ Check out "Building Wealth in The TSP" on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2FytP9W I am a practicing financial planner, but I'm not your financial planner. Please consult with your own tax, legal and financial advisors for personalized advice.

    Generacion Millennial - Power 102.1FM
    ENTREVISTA CON JOY FOX CANDIDATA AL CONGRESO DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS POR EL DISTRITO 2 RHODE ISLAND

    Generacion Millennial - Power 102.1FM

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 29:32


    Joy Fox participa en la serie de entrevistas El Candidato Responde en Poder 102.1 FMJoy Fox aspira ser electa al Congreso de Los Estados Unidos por el Distrito 2 de Rhode Island.Para mas informacion sobre Joy Fox seleccione el link de su campaña:https://joyfoxcongress.com/about/Joy Fox was born and raised in Cranston and has lived in Rhode Island's 2nd Congressional District her entire life. The oldest of five children, Joy has dedicated her life to making Rhode Island a great place to live, work and raise a family. She knows firsthand that it's working hard, building teams, and bringing people together that makes life better for everyday Rhode Islanders.Joy has made her career in communications, both in government service and as a small business owner.  She now leads the award-winning Clarendon Group, a small business advising public and private sector leaders, universities, non-profits, and local Rhode Island job creators.  She got her start in communications at age 11 delivering the Evening Bulletin and the Sunday Providence Journal to her neighbors. After graduating from Rhode Island College, she went on to become a reporter for the Cranston Herald and Providence Business News and an assignment editor for NBC10. Covering everything from Point Judith fishermen to the Station nightclub fire, she heard the stories of Rhode Islanders – their struggles and their triumphs – firsthand. She began her state service at the Rhode Island Department of Corrections, learning what it takes to run a complicated public safety system and increasing her understanding of the critical balance between criminal justice and social justice.Joy moved on to serve the people of the 2nd District, while working for Congressman Jim Langevin, and where she worked as part of a team that built coalitions, passed complex legislation, and, most importantly, stood up for the people of the 2nd District. She has hands-on experience cutting through bureaucratic red tape to get things done for Rhode Islanders. Whether it was helping seniors receive Social Security and helping Veterans access their benefits or working to expand coverage for affordable health care, Joy always worked in support of a government that worked for hardworking Rhode Islanders. Joy then worked with General Treasurer Raimondo to strengthen and sustain the state pension system and later joined Governor Raimondo where she worked to expand all-day kindergarten for every child in the state, and win critical investments in workforce development, and bridge and road repairs.Joy serves as Chair of the Board of the Sophia Academy, an all-girls middle school in Providence, where she has been a volunteer for more than a decade. She is an avid participant in all things Rhode Island, whether that is walking the Blessing of the Fleet in Narragansett and never missing a Gaspee Days, Greek Festival in Cranston, or the Washington County Fair.Joy's family has a long history in Rhode Island. Her grandfather, a WWII Navy veteran, started the PJ Fox Paper Company in 1957. Her dad ran the family small business until its closing in the early 2000s due to increasing competitive pressure from bigger corporations.   Like so many of her generation, Joy and her siblings are assisting their mom in the care of her Dad, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's in 2018.Joy attended the Edward S. Rhodes Elementary School, where her parents first met when they were in kindergarten. She attended St. Paul's School and St. Mary Academy Bay View. Her parents and siblings all live in the Second Congressional District, where they were born and raised.   

    The Banyan Collective
    Through the Pines Ep. 18 - How to Build an Investment Portfolio

    The Banyan Collective

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 59:23


    #Podcast: How to Build an Investment Portfolio - What you NEED to know! Our financial wizards Rex Baxter, Brandyn Smith, and Dan Nelsen help us navigate how to structure an investment portfolio and deal with the ups and downs of the market over time to eventually build wealth. WHAT WE COVER - How do you start building an Investment Portfolio? - How do you predict market downturns? - How do I know the amount of my portfolio that needs to be in higher risk versus less volatile assets? - Types of risk tolerances. - Planning for the future - Calculate living expenses, factor in taxes, inflation, Social Security, etc. Then determine annual distribution needs and multiply that by 5. ( 2008 took about 4 years to recover from the bottom, but was down for about 5.5 years) - Gut Risk- Even if the plan can handle the ups and downs, we don't ever want to put a client in a place they feel uncomfortable. - Timing the market - Can it be done? - Do you ever see people in the wrong risk tolerances? - When is it time to adjust your portfolio? Contact Info: planwithbaxter.com Through the Pines  -  Reminding you to use Yesterday's Dollars to Finance Tomorrow's Dreams Consider supporting the podcast: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/banyanmedia This episode includes financial advice from professionals. Visit the financial planners in this podcast at www.planwithbaxter.com. The Banyan Collective & Host, R. Brandon Long are not the financial professionals - podcast pro's, maybe - money men, not so much.

    Marketing For Financial Advisors
    Choosing The Right Marketing Topic

    Marketing For Financial Advisors

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 11:53


    Do you ever feel like you only present one topic? Perhaps you only like doing a single topic because it always works, or it always brings in the right people? In this episode, Donovan Stull goes into detail as to why changing the topic can be of benefit, and how it doesn't necessarily mean going out of your wheelhouse.  

    The Tanya Acker Show
    Bringing Down a Fraud in The Big Conn: Hero's Welcome or Shunned for Speaking Up?

    The Tanya Acker Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 49:22


    Sarah Carver and Jennifer Griffiths helped bring down the largest Social Security fraud in history - featured in The Big Conn (Apple TV+). What did courage cost them? 

    Informal Economy Podast: Social Protection
    #27 Social Security for Domestic Workers: trends and strategies

    Informal Economy Podast: Social Protection

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:30


    For decades, domestic workers have struggled to be recognized and to enjoy the same rights as other workers – including social protection rights. There has been significant progress over the past few years, as the workers' movement pressured in national and international forums to have labour and social protection rights enshrined in their legal system. The ILO Convention-189 and the ratification by 35 countries, is one example of such achievements. However, there is still a lot to be done in order to formally include domestic workers into social protection systems. But also, there are important steps to be taken in order to ensure that these workers are effectively enjoying their rights, even where they are legally entitled to them. In order to better understand the concepts, shortcomings, challenges and advances regarding the inclusion of domestic workers in social protection schemes I talked to Maya Stern-Plaza. Maya is the Social Protection Standards and Legal Expert of the Social Protection Department of the International Labour Organization. In addition to supporting the ratification and application of international social security standards she is also the Department's focal point for domestic workers. She is the main author of the report “Making the right to social security a reality for domestic workers: A global review of policy trends, statistics and extension strategies”, which is being launched today, June 16th, the International Domestic Workers' Day. *Our theme music is Focus from AA Aalto (Creative Commons) ---- References ILO report “Making the right to social security a reality for domestic workers: A global review of policy trends, statistics and extension strategies” https://www.ilo.org/global/publications/WCMS_848280/lang--en/index.htm “Ten Years Since Winning C189: Domestic Workers Become an Unstoppable Movement”, by IDWF and WIEGO https://www.wiego.org/sites/default/files/resources/file/C189%20Ten%20Years%20Since%20Winning%20C189%20for%20web_0.pdf "Making C189 Real": The Domestic Workers Project https://www.wiego.org/making-c189-real-domestic-workers-project Blog: What's Changed for Domestic Workers since C189? Our Legal Team Unpacks the Progress, by Pamhidzai Bamu https://www.wiego.org/blog/what%E2%80%99s-changed-domestic-workers-c189-our-legal-team-unpacks-progress

    John Riley Project
    Golden State Warriors, Social Security, Inflation, JRP0277

    John Riley Project

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 69:58


    The Golden State Warriors are enjoying their 6th NBA Finals in 8 years and are on the cusp of their fourth championship in that timeframe. I share my early memories as a Golden State Warriors fan. We then discuss financial planning for retirement and the shocking low savings rates in America. Is this due to a false sense of security that government will save the day? Is it a huge financial education deficit? Is it weak long-term thinking? It's time again to hear the Chicken Little rants of progressives that the Republicans are going to kill Social Security and Medicare. We hear this every election cycle when in reality Republicans have expanded both programs. The GOP are considering a bill to sunset all federal government programs every 5 years with the idea that they would be reaffirmed, optimized, or phased out. There is no way the GOP would cut these important programs that their senior citizen constituents depend on. It would be political suicide. Then we discuss the Federal Reserve's plan to increase interest rates in order to cool off the economy to fight inflation. This will lead to layoffs, bankruptcies, and further damage. Sadly, the inflation we are experiencing is a self-inflicted wound by printing and flooding the market with $6 trillion of new money. I present additional ideas that the government can enact to minimize the impact of inflation. I also offer personal recommendations for investors, businesses, and individual consumers to survive and thrive in an inflationary environment. #inflation #socialsecurity #GoldenStateWarriors Get proven and easy-to-implement strategies to build your business and pursue your happiness. Sign up now. It's FREE! https://johnrileyproject.com/ Be sure to share this video with a friend! Sponsors Happiness76.com – your source of gear that celebrates Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness. https://happiness76.com/ ☆☆    STAY CONNECTED    ☆☆ SUBSCRIBE for more reactions, upcoming shows and more! ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJJSzeIW2A-AeT7gwonglMA FACEBOOK ➡ https://www.facebook.com/johnrileyproject/ TWITTER ➡ https://twitter.com/JohnRileyPoway INSTAGRAM ➡  https://www.instagram.com/johnrileypoway/ Sponsorship Inquiries https://johnrileyproject.com/sponsorship/ Donations https://johnrileyproject.com/donations/donation-form/ Music https://www.purple-planet.com

    Taralets Talk: The Filipino Expat Chronicles
    Season 2 Episode 13: Pain Management in the US & How to Thrive in Life with a Disability with Kevin Perez

    Taralets Talk: The Filipino Expat Chronicles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 37:04


    In this episode of Taralets Talk, Navy veteran Kevin Perez returns as a guest for the second time to share his experience and knowledge about pain management in the US for the disabled. He shared his views on what you need to do when diagnosed with chronic pain, the professional care or help he received, and how to support those suffering from chronic pain. Episode highlights:What spinal stenosis is and what can worsen it.How he discovered he suffers from spinal stenosis.Pain and debilitating effects of chronic pain in someone's life.Medical treatments he received and managing his pain.Dealing with depression and his forced retirement from the Navy.Biggest misconception about people like him with disability.Knowing when it's necessary to get professional help for your mental health. How he came out of a dark place and changed his perspective to ease into his new normal. Link to find out more about our guest here: LinkedIn | Short Bio Guest Quotes:"Most of it mentally accepting what I can't do anymore. And more like looking at what I can do."  "You have to get out of the thought process of, ‘I can't do this anymore.'"  Have questions, comments, or concerns? We'd love to hear from you. Subscribe:  Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Audible | Amazon Music | Goodpods | iHeartRADIO |  

    Your Turn with Mike Causey
    Social Security: On life support?

    Your Turn with Mike Causey

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 53:33


    When Social Security was launched in 1935, the average life expectancy for men was 59.9 years and 63.9 for women. Full benefits started at 65, so do the math! It sounded almost like a safe, government-guaranteed Ponzi Scheme, minus the scheme part. But times have changed. The bad news, from an actuarial basis, is that we are living longer. A lot longer. A growing number of people are and will spend more time in retirement, getting Social Security, than they did working and paying into it. Again, do the math! Optimists predict Congress will fix it. Maybe make millionaires pay Social Security taxes on all of their income. Maybe raise them for everybody. Others, including many young people, say it's too late, or soon will be. That there won't be anything for them 99 years after the program began. For an update on the fate of your Social Security, we invited Tammy Flanagan to be on today's Your Turn radio show.

    Facing the Future
    Social Security and Medicare Creep Towards Insolvency

    Facing the Future

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 44:49


    This week on Facing the Future, we once again return to an all-star panel of Concord Coalition experts to examine the latest reports from the Trustees of the Social Security and Medicare Trust Funds.  Those reports show that without major action by Congress, the Medicare Trust Fund will be out of money by 2028, and the Social Security Trust Fund will be depleted by 2035. Concord Communications Director Av Harris sits in as guest host.   

    The Kevin Jackson Show
    Ep. 22-235 - An Abject Failure

    The Kevin Jackson Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 38:40


    In this episode, new Gallup poll shows an astounding dissatisfaction. They can't stand him but can't have him be seen as an abject failure. The dilemma!

    Live Life RIch
    106: Q&A - Just for You on What to Do

    Live Life RIch

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 35:02


    Today's episode is all about you.   After listening to the “what to do” series last month, many of you wrote in with your specific situations and asked me what you should do in them.    These are real-life questions. There is a real need for advice on the scenarios all of you are going through.   I can't wait to share that advice.   In this episode, I am giving practical strategies on what to do when you're 22, 42, 62, and everything in between. These tips are on various stages and circumstances of life. I'm going to talk about what to do with your mindset, retirement, marriage, career, and business.    Most of all, I'm talking about practical steps to take with your finances.   So tune in to learn what to do with your money right here and right now.   In this episode, you will hear: How much you need in your cash emergency fund. How to plan for retirement well. How to estimate how much you'll get from Social Security. How to apply the three bucket strategy. How to take advantage of the equity on your home. The danger of debt. The difference between selling and repositioning your stocks. What to do with your old retirement plans. Subscribe and Review Please share this podcast with your friends and family. Our beliefs really do drive our behavior and you are born for more. Have you subscribed to my podcast? If the answer is no, I'd love for you to subscribe. Live Life Rich is full of stories of business, some behind the scenes, and freaking amazing guests. If you're feeling really generous, I'd love for you to give me a review over on Apple Podcasts. Simply select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” then a quick line with your favorite part of the episode. It only takes a second and it helps me out a ton! Supporting Resources: https://marissanehlsen.com  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/marissa.nehlsen Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/marissanehlsen/ Standard of Living Budget Worksheet: https://marissanehlsen.com/standard/ Bulletproof Your Business: https://marissanehlsen.com/bulletproofyourbusiness/ The E Myth by Michael E. Gerber: https://www.amazon.com/Myth-Revisited-Small-Businesses-About/dp/0887307280 Get my “15 Ways to Create Cash in Your Business” download: https://15stepstofreedom.com Join the Live Life Rich Community Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/liveliferich/ *** Episode Credits If you like this podcast and are thinking of creating your own, consider talking to my producer, Emerald City Productions. They helped me grow and produce the podcast you are listening to right now. Find out more at https://emeraldcitypro.com. Let them know I sent you.

    The Long View
    Christine Benz, David Blanchett, and Karsten Jeske: The State of Retirement Income

    The Long View

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 51:06


    This week we're pleased to bring you a special “State of Retirement Income” episode, which we recorded live at the annual Morningstar Investment Conference held recently in Chicago, Illinois. For this discussion, we turn the tables on Christine, who is part of an expert retirement planning panel that also includes David Blanchett, managing director and head of retirement research at PGIM DC Solutions, and Karsten Jeske, the founder of Early Retirement Now. Both were guests on past episodes of The Long View.In this panel discussion, recorded before a live audience, we delve into a number of retirement-planning topics, including the impact of inflation on spending patterns; the implications of the recent selloff on asset allocation; sequence-of-returns risk; optimal Social Security-claiming practices; the role and importance of guaranteed income sources; and a lot more. Without further ado, please enjoy this special episode of The Long View.Background“Karsten Jeske: Cracking the Code on Retirement Spending Rates,” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, Oct. 14, 2020.Karsten Jeske's blog, Early Retirement NowKarsten Jeske's bioDavid Blanchett's bio“David Blanchett: If You're Retiring Now, You're in a Pretty Rough Spot,” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, Sept. 18, 2019.“Christine Benz and John Rekenthaler: How Much Can You Safely Spend in Retirement?” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, Dec. 21, 2021.Inflation“How Much Should You Worry About Inflation in Retirement?” by Christine Benz, Morningstar.com, March 26, 2021.“Exploring the Retirement Consumption Puzzle,” by David Blanchett, financialplanningassociation.org, May 2014.Safe Withdrawal RatesThe Trinity Study“The Safe Withdrawal Rate Series—A Guide for First-Time Readers,” by Karsten Jeske, EarlyRetirementNow.com, Nov. 15, 2021.“The State of Retirement Income: Safe Withdrawal Rates,” by Christine Benz, Jeffrey Ptak, and John Rekenthaler, Morningstar.com, November 2021.“What's a Safe Retirement Spending Rate for the Decades Ahead?” by Christine Benz and John Rekenthaler, Morningstar.com, Nov. 11, 2021.“Drawdown From Financial Accounts in Retirement,” Vanguard Research by Thomas J. De Luca and Anna Madamba, vanguard.com, July 2021.Retirement Portfolio Construction“Cliff Asness: Value Stocks Still Look Like a Bargain,” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, May 31, 2022.“Bonds May Be Down, But Some Annuity Payouts Are Up,” by David Blanchett, thinkadvisor.com, May 13, 2022.“Inflation at 7%! Here's Why I'm Not Running for the Hills (Yet)!” by Karsten Jeske, earlyretirementnow.com, Jan. 13, 2022.“The Bucket Approach to Retirement Allocation,” by Christine Benz, Morningstar.com, Jan. 25, 2021.Christine Benz's model bucket portfoliosHarold EvenskyWhat Is a Monte Carlo Simulation?Guaranteed Income and Social Security“Guaranteed Income: A License to Spend,” by David Blanchett and Michael Finke, papers.ssrn.com, June 28, 2021.Open Social SecurityOther“Laura Carstensen: ‘I'm Suggesting We Change the Way We Work,'” The Long View podcast, Morningstar.com, Sept. 14, 2021.“Eight Centuries of Global Real Interest Rates, R-G, and the ‘Suprasecular' Decline, 1311-2018,” by Paul Schmelzing, bankofengland.co.uk, January 2020.

    Virginia Public Radio
    Full Disclosure Briefing: Saving Social Security

    Virginia Public Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022


    Social Security recipients got the largest cost of living adjustment in decades this year.  But the long-term future of the system is still in trouble. Roben Farzad, host of the Full Disclosure podcast, and Craig Wright have more on a new proposal to shore it up.

    ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
    Oncology, Etc. – In Conversation with Dr. Richard Pazdur (Part 1)

    ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 25:33


    In part one of this ASCO Education Podcast episode, director of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence Dr. Richard Pazdur talks with hosts Dr. David Johnson and Dr. Patrick Loehrer about his upbringing in Indiana, his family, and his circuitous route to oncology. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org.   TRANSCRIPT Dr. Pat Loehrer: Hi, I'm Pat Loehrer. I'm the director of the Center of Global Oncology and Health Equity at Indiana University. Dr. David Johnson: I'm Dave Johnson at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. Pat, great to be back with another episode of Oncology, Etc, an ASCO educational podcast. We have a very special guest today, Dr. Richard Pazdur, from the FDA Oncology Center of Excellence. I'm really looking forward to this conversation. Dr. Pat Loehrer: This will be terrific. Dr. David Johnson: Yeah. You were telling me before we got started about a little event that occurred this week, maybe you want to elaborate on that for us. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Yeah, we always start out this by talking about books, and one of the books I'm drawn to today is a book called, The Emperor of All Maladies, which was written by Dr. Mukherjee several years ago. I want to read a little bit from this because it has pertinence. This is about a guy named John Cleveland. Dr. Mukherjee writes, he goes, ‘In 1973 Cleveland was a 22-year-old veterinary student in Indiana. In August that year, two months after his marriage, he discovered a rapidly enlarging lump in his right testis. He was whisked off to the operating room for surgery and returned with a scar and he was diagnosed with metastatic testis cancer. This was right around the time that Larry Einhorn came to Indiana University where he was treated with a three-drug cocktail of actinomycin-D, bleomycin, and oncovin ABO. And then he had a brief remission progressing and was treated with mithramycin mithrymicin. And then in October of 1974, he once again developed progressive disease, and Larry approached him about a new cocktail with the drug cisplatin, that had never been used before in combination, and Larry's thought was to put it together with another couple of drugs.” So, I'll just finish reading this. “In October 7, 1974, Cleveland took the gamble, he enrolled as patient zero for BVP, an acronym for the new regimen containing Bleomycin, Vinblastine and cisplatin. 10 days later, he returned for routine scans and the tumors in his lungs had vanished. He was ecstatic and mystified. He called his wife from the hospital phone. I can't remember what he said, but I told her the results. So, John was the first one cured of testis cancer. Back then it was a 5% cure rate. Today, it's 95%. He is really the hero of heroes. Last week, at this time, John had asked me to come to his hospital room because he was diagnosed with metastatic cancer of a different type. He knew that this was basically the final hours of it. And so he wanted to say goodbye to me, and it was the most touching reunion I had. Two days ago, John passed away. So, my thoughts are with him, especially his family. But also, when we think about heroes, John was one of them, and if it wasn't for him, and his first treatment, Larry might not have gone on and treated other patients with this regimen. This drug cisplatin was experimental back then it caused a lot of nausea and vomiting and didn't work in many tumors, but this was a drug that was really highlighted and approved for the treatment of bladder cancer so Hubert Humphrey could get treated, and then in testis cancer, and it's really one the really success stories of all success stories in terms of oncology, and it started out with this experimental drug from the NCI that was approved by the FDA.” So, this leads us to our guest today, Rick Pazdur who I've known for many years. He grew up in Calumet City, Illinois, which is famous as the home of the Blues Brothers and Rick Pazdur. He got his bachelor's degree from Northwestern, his medical degree from Loyola Stritch Medicine, and then did his hematology-oncology fellowship, initially his oncology fellowship at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's, where I first met Rick, and then later finished his Heme-Onc fellowship at the University of Chicago. From there, he went to Wayne State, served on the faculty there for about five or six years, and then joined the faculty at MD Anderson. He was there from 1988 to 1999. Then, we'd like to hear about this, but for some reason, it got in his head that he wanted to go to the FDA and so he moved to the FDA where he was Director of the Division of Oncology Drug Products, from 1999 to 2005, when they created the Office of Hematology Oncology Products, and he became the Director of this. More recently, he's been made the director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence. He still serves as the acting director for this OHOP. Rick is an extraordinary individual. He's been awarded a number of awards. From ASCO, he got the Service Recognition Award and the Public Service Award in 2013. And the AACR also awarded him the Public Service Award in 2015. He's received numerous awards and he is probably one of the most respected oncologists that I know in this society. It's such a great pleasure to have you here today, Rick. Dr. Richard Pazdur: My pleasure, Pat. My pleasure entirely. I look forward to the conversation. Dr. David Johnson: Pat, you left out one award. He got so many awards that you can't list them all, but I was impressed that he got this award for the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center's – The 100 list. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Yeah, we made the cut-off. Dr. David Johnson: I have no idea what that is. Dr. Pat Loehrer: We were on the 1001 list. We made that one. The only thing I want to throw into is that when I first met Rick, when I was a resident or an intern, I think, he was on the service with Phil Bonomi, who is very important for me for my thymoma research, but there was an oncology nurse on the service, Mary Lind, who was a terrific oncology nurse as they all are. But it turned out there was more chemistry that went on. So, Rick ended up marrying Mary, and I'm sure he'll tell some stories. We'll come back to that in a little bit, too. Dr. David Johnson: Yeah, this is really exciting. So, let's get started. Rick, maybe you could tell us a little bit about your background and what got you into medicine in the early part of your career. Dr. Richard Pazdur: I had an interesting story. Pat had mentioned Calumet City home as a Blues Brothers. That was the orphanage in the movie. It was located in Calumet City. But what you don't know about Calumet City is that the real kind of nickname for Calumet City in the 50s 60s 40s was 'Sin City'. It has the honor of having the greatest number of liquor licenses in the United States. And in Calumet City, which was on the border of Hammond, Indiana, and Calumet City, they're kind of Sister Cities. They're one in Illinois, Calumet City. And Hammond is in Indiana, obviously, there was this strip, and it was called ‘The Strip' and it had all of these bars and floor shows with Sally Rand and gambling. If you walk down there, which I never did as a kid, but drove down there with my father some time just traversing the city, those lights were so bright, it was just like Las Vegas, basically. So, you had that Strip and that went on for maybe three, four, or five blocks. And then you have the rest of the city that I grew up in, which was primarily a Polish Catholic city, which I am kind of a representative of being 100% polish. There were scattered bars throughout the city. In fact, my fondest memory is sleeping in bed at 3 o'clock in the morning or 2 o'clock in the morning, awakening to people running out of a bar, which was 50 feet or 100 feet from my bedroom window. They were screaming and yelling and cursing and everything and throwing beer bottles at each other. And in those days, obviously, as you remember, in the 60s, there was no air conditioning. So, the bar was called The Tropical Inn. Let me tell you this, there was nothing tropical about it and there was nothing 'in' about it. Dr. David Johnson: That background might have driven…. Dr. Richard Pazdur: That was not what I would call a highbrow area, but I enjoyed it. It was a fabulous childhood that I had. Most people don't know this. So, I will share this with you because it really had an indelible mark on my life and something that really transformed my childhood and my high school years and my college years, and my medical school years. When I was about in seventh or eighth grade, my father who was basically a blue-collar factory worker, developed glaucoma, and he went blind at a very early age. And that threw the family into not only emotional turmoil but also economic turmoil. I survived basically by getting Social Security dependent income and had to work at a very early age. I started as a dishwasher. My mother lied about my age so I could start working at a crummy restaurant in Calumet City as a dishwasher and I worked throughout school, but that experience really made me grow up really fast if I could say so. You didn't have a childhood, you had to be responsible because there was really no security blanket to fall back on. Although my parents didn't have a lot of money, they really had very good emotional support for me and both my father and my mother came from very large, Polish families. My mother had nine children in her family. She was right in the middle. And so, I had many cousins and many aunts and uncles and my father had seven children in his family and he was the oldest boy. So, there was a lot of support there, but obviously not a lot of financial support. So, it really made me grow up relatively quickly and really come to some of life's lessons, relatively fast like discrimination against disabled people, which I will always remember. When I was a boy, I remember going with my father walking and obviously he had a white cane, but walking down the street, people would actually cross the street to avoid us. They just didn't want to confront that anxiety. I don't know if it was discrimination or if they just felt uncomfortable dealing with it. When you go to a restaurant, people raise their voices, like the man was mentally impaired and that wasn't the case. Dr. Pat Loehrer: I'm sorry to interrupt you just for a second because I read this somewhere and I think it's important to throw in. So, you graduated from high school in three years? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Yes, that's what I was gonna say. I graduated and I worked during that time also. These jobs were not like jobs that kids have now as consultants or internships, these were like real jobs as a janitor, a gardener, or a packer in a grocery store. You had to do it and you had to compartmentalize your life to get things done, basically. But you were driven to do things and I'm thankful for that experience really. I even use it now when I'm facing turmoil in my life. I look back at that time and say to myself, Rick, if you did it then as a 12-year-old kid, a 14-year-old kid, you could do anything. So, it really fostered a sense of responsibility, self-awareness, and the need to do things for yourself and get going on yourself. because nobody's going to help you in a sense. I'm very grateful for that. Dr. David Johnson: Rick, at what point did you decide to become a physician? How did that experience really drive you into that field? Dr. Richard Pazdur: Well, I spent a great deal of time in the lobby of the University of Chicago hospital with my father. I was the primary caregiver and went with him to his doctor's appointments. I can't tell you the number of hours I spent in the lobby of that hospital. I was very interested in science. I was very interested in really helping people because of that background. I really had a great deal of clarity, though. I remember, when I was maybe a freshman or sophomore in high school, I wrote for the Northwestern Medical School catalog, because I thought I would be going to Northwestern undergraduate, I already decided in my own mind that that's where I wanted to go. I just got their medical school catalog and I was thumbing through it, and I remember this vividly sitting on my bedroom floor next to the window that was 50 feet away from the bar, basically, and was looking through the medical school catalog and seeing all these names of this doctor, head of neurology, assistant professor, associate professor. I said, “Hell, if I'm going to be a doctor, I want to be one of these people. I want to be the best doctor. I want to be teaching the physician here and doing research.” So, unlike most kids today that have to find themselves, like, ‘I'm going to take 8 years to complete college or something like that and take a year off to find myself.' I had to be very, very focused on what I wanted to do. So, I really worked very hard during it through time. I don't regret it, as I say. I went to Northwestern undergraduate and had a fantastic experience there. I graduated in three years as I mentioned. I had a special interest there that most people don't know about. The people at the FDA know about it. I did these pre-med courses but I had a really special interest in the field of sociology, and actually was toying with the idea if I didn't get into medical school to pursue a Ph.D. in Sociology and become an academic sociologist. If you remember and both of you are of this age. Dr. Pat Loehrer: David is, not me. Dr. Richard Pazdur: Okay. David might know of the Vietnam War. This was right around the time of Kent State and closing down the schools, I'm sure you remember that, for the colleges, etc. Nobody went into business or anything like that. It was a sociology, psychology, and anthropology type of things people were interested in. My love was this field, and I did a lot of research on it. I remember one of the professors that probably had the most influence on me, a woman called Zena Smith Blau, who was a sociologist, and I did multiple research projects and independent studies. The first thing when I took her first course, she assigned us a paper and she said, write about yourself, ‘What makes you unique? I went to see her and I said, ‘I really don't know exactly what you mean by this.' She said, ‘Well, how different are you?' And I said, ‘Well, my parents are children of Polish immigrants, and I really know the Polish community in Chicago fairly well.' She said, ‘That's it Rick, that's what your specialty will be.' I did multiple research projects on this area with her. Some of them were like the assimilation of Polish immigrants with regard to urban-rural origin. Another one was working-class youth in Chicago, and mobility based on education and high school part-time employment. So, that was a fantastic experience that is totally outside of what I did in my future. Dr. David Johnson: We asked our listeners to submit questions because we knew you were coming on. We did get a question that perhaps is appropriate to ask at this time. It comes from a younger trainee, who wants to know what advice you would give to a trainee aspiring to have a clinical investigative career in oncology? What sort of preparation should they have? Obviously, you've got to learn all of the techniques of clinical trial designs, statistics, etc. But what other advice would you give a trainee hoping to pursue a career in clinical investigation? Dr. Richard Pazdur: I think one's career always has to go back to the basics and have a patient focus. So, what is your interest in the patient, so to speak? And that is what advice I would give them. Are you interested in a supportive care issue? Are you interested in a specific disease? I think you have to follow a passion and that is what is most important to me. What is your passion in life? Because as physicians, we spend a great deal of time preparing for our careers and then subsequently afterward, in our designated careers, and you really can't approach this as a job. It has to be a passion. So, if you do have this, what are the questions that you really want to answer? What is the field that you want to go into and make an indelible mark in? So, that's what I come from, and that's something that I tell our staff is: what do you really want to do? What makes you happy? What would make you a success in your mind? Not defining yourself by somebody else. Dr. Pat Loehrer: Finish the story a little bit. Was it a patient then that turned you on to oncology? What brought you into oncology? Dr. Richard Pazdur: I had a very circuitous circular route to oncology. Oh my God! I don't know if you have enough time to hear this story, but let me start though. I originally went to medical school because of my background in sociology. I wanted to become a psychiatrist because here again, I thought psychiatry, sociology, and psychology, these are kinds of things I was interested in until I took my first rotation in psychiatry. It was nothing like I thought it was going to be. I saw my first patient that got ECT (Electroconvulsive Therapy) and I said, 'I ain't doing this.' So, I was then interested in cardiology. Loyola at that time where I was going to medical school and where I did my internship and residency, had a huge cardiology program that was like CAST city, USA. Everybody was just coming into the hospital getting CAST and going out of the hospital. Dr. Pat Loehrer: [Unintelligible 18:13] was there, right? Dr. Richard Puzdar: Yes. Mary Kate [Unintelligible 18:18]'s father was the head of medicine there. And it had a huge cardiology program and an excellent cardiology program. I really did like Clinical Oncology, and I was all signed up for a cardiology fellowship, the Ts were crossed, the dots were placed, the contract signed, and everything. And somebody said, ‘Rick, why don't you take a rotation while you're a resident in the cath lab? We have an opening and this would be a great time and opportunity for you to jumpstart your fellowship. So, you can come and work for us in the middle of your third year of residency for about two or three months.' So, I did that and I hated it. I just dreaded it. I couldn't stand it. It was the most boring thing. I would think of every opportunity to escape the Cath lab. It was the same thing over and over and over again, inject the dye, turn on the [Unintelligible19:16] machine, and follow the coronary arteries. So, I happened to go to a community hospital, St. Francis in Evanston, Illinois, and I met an oncologist there that had just finished her fellowship. I really was very impressed by her clinical skills. She had finished her fellowship at the University of Chicago and worked with her there and was just amazed by really the quality of care that the oncologist gave patients with cancer. Previous to that, I had an interest also in oncology. At Loyola at that time, we had an oncologist his name was Ketty Badrinath, and he was an excellent clinical teacher. Now that I decided that I'm not going into cardiology, the first problem I have is to find a job and to find a fellowship in oncology. So, I started investigating oncology programs at St. Francis Hospital there. I went down to the gift shop and I said, I want $10 worth of quarters. I went to a payphone, closed the door of the payphone, dialed information, and got every oncology program that I could think of from Mayo Clinic to all of the programs in Chicago. One of my last phone calls was to Rush Presbyterian. I found that program director, Jules Harris, I don't know if you remember him, and he said, “We have an opening.” So, I accepted the position. At the end of June, whatever it was, June 27, 1979. I started my oncology fellowship program. Now Oncology at that time in Chicago, to give you a picture of it, the largest program in oncology was at Rush. It had a total of 12 people. And the therapy started at Rush around solid tumors really in the endocrine therapies of prostate cancer and breast cancer. So, it was a different program than most programs throughout the United States that were offshoots of Hematology programs and the treatment of acute leukemia and lymphomas. So, it had a really kind of different orientation. So, I started my fellowship. And on the first day, I met Phil Bonomi, who had a tremendous influence and still has an influence over me. I know no doctor that I respect most more than Phil. I think the greatest compliment that one could give a doctor is to refer your own family to him. And I've done it on numerous occasions with various cousins and aunts and uncles, etc. But as you mentioned, Pat, I also had the opportunity to meet my wife. And I met her and at first, we were very good friends and there was no romantic relationship. And then, as time proceeded, we knew that there was something special there. My wife was just a wonderful person. Like myself, my wife was pretty much a self-made person. She was one of eight children, the oldest daughter. As the oldest daughter, she had to assume a lot of childcare responsibilities, cooking, etc, for all of her brothers and sisters and took care of the younger children. But she was an excellent student. She graduated first in her class. She was a national merit finalist. I often asked my wife, ‘Mary, you're a nurse, are you interested in going into medicine? I'll be happy to work with you to get you into medical school.' And she said, ‘No, you want to go into medicine, I want to go into nursing.' That was her orientation toward other people. It wasn't about the buck. It wasn't about the title. It was about the work of helping other people. I really have to honor her mother and father who gave her that orientation. Of interest, all of her sisters are nurses. Her mother was actually a school nurse, and an original graduate of Rush. She went to Rush Nursing School in the 50s but had to leave because at that time in the 1950s, if you got married, you can't be in nursing school, they kicked you out. So, it shows you how times have changed.   Dr. Pat Loehrer: Well, this concludes part one of our interview with Dr. Richard Pazdur who is the director of the US Food and Drug Administration's Oncology Center of Excellence. Stay tuned for part two of this conversation where we'll hear how cancer has touched his life personally and will explore the initiatives and programs, he started to improve patient care globally.   Thank you to all of our listeners for tuning into Oncology, Etc. This is an ASCO education podcast where we'll talk about just about everything and anything. If you have an idea for a topic or guests you'd like to see on the show, please email us at education@asco.org. Have a good week.   Unknown Speaker: Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes. Please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive education center at education.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

    KMJ's Afternoon Drive
    Monday 6/13 Hour 2

    KMJ's Afternoon Drive

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 36:41


    Derek Carr was at Valley Children's Hospital on Friday as part of a ribbon-cutting ceremony for a newly renovated playground at the hospital that Carr helped fund. The mother of a non-verbal child with Down's Syndrome used the promise of meeting John Cena to keep him calm while evacuating worn-torn Ukraine. Cena heard about it and showed up to meet the family in Amsterdam so she wouldn't be a liar. A Fresno man who was the chairman of the American Labor Alliance faces a four-count indictment for allegedly cheating the federal government out of taxes, defrauding Social Security for disability benefits and spending hundreds of thousands of ALA dollars on escorts and rent. Clovis Unified School District employees will receive a pay increase of at least 7%, possibly more. School psychologists and mental health counselors represented by the Association of Clovis Educators will not be included. A glitch in the system allowed customers to fill up at a Shell station in Rancho Cordova for 69 cent/gallon for three hours before the error was caught.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Learn Real Estate Investing | Lifestyles Unlimited
    (June 13, 2022) The Mother of All Procrastination

    Learn Real Estate Investing | Lifestyles Unlimited

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 36:42


    According to NerdWallet.com, “young people will work on average 13 more years than today's typical retirees”, and yet society still pushes IRA's, 401(k)s, and Social Security as the best retirement strategies. Del Walmsley calls out these deceptive procrastinatory devices for what they truly are. Don't feed the beast, feed your future. Click to Listen Now

    The Everything Medicare Podcast!
    Episode 269: Medicare Advantage VS Medicare Supplement 2022 Version!

    The Everything Medicare Podcast!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 24:17


    This is the Everything Medicare Podcast hosted by Christian Brindle. It can be found on most major platforms that podcasts can be found. Christian Brindle was raised & brought up around the insurance industry. With his dad being an insurance broker for close to 30 years, Christian had the luxury of being able to learn all about the industry from a young age. Christian has worked with people far and wide on their Medicare plans and has seen close to any situation. Christian believes in empowering people on Medicare by not just finding them a plan, but showing them and educating them on why that plan is a good fit. Christian hosts the most popular Medicare podcast on the internet called The Everything Medicare Podcast, written and published two books about Medicare, and is the founder of his own company that is dedicated to helping people on Medicare everywhere. Don't forget to like and subscribe for more videos! Helping people in Utah, Idaho, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, California, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Florida, Arizona, Nevada, Alaska, Mississippi, Kentucky, Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, Maryland, Georgia, Tennessee, Missouri, Indiana, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Maine, Michigan, Wisconsin. Visit our website for more information: www.christianbrindleinsuranceservices.com Pick up Christian's Medicare Guidance book and learn everything you need to know to make a good choice: https://www.amazon.com/Medicare-Guida...​ Follow us on social! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/christianbri...​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christianbr...​ Twitter: https://twitter.com/C_E_Brindle​ #Medicare​ #Medigap​ #Insurance​ #HealthInsurance​ #Health​ #Healthcare​ #Medicaresupplement​ #MedicareAdvantage​ #Medicare2021​ #Medicarehealthplan​ #InsuranceAgent​ #MedicarePodcast Medicare, Medigap, Medicare Supplement, Insurance, Health Insurance, Health, Healthcare, HAS, Retire, Retirement, Social Security, Christian Brindle, FICA, Medicare Podcast, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, Medicare Part A, Medicare Part B, FICA, FICA Tax, Retirement, Retire

    CONFIDENT CONVERSATIONSâ„¢ on Retirement
    Age-Based Retirement Reminders

    CONFIDENT CONVERSATIONSâ„¢ on Retirement

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 21:51


    Our experts from T. Rowe Price discuss some age-based milestones around retirement contributions and distributions, Social Security, and Medicare.

    Money Guy Show
    Will Social Security Be Around When I Retire?

    Money Guy Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 22:43


    How confident can you be that social security will be around when you retire, and how should you prepare in case it's not? We'll walk you through that question and more in today's Q&A episode! Watch more exclusive content only on YouTube! Visit our website - Get our FREE financial resources - Sign up for our Financial Order of Operations course - Get easy to understand answers to your financial questions Follow us on social media! -Instagram -Twitter -Facebook -TikTok

    MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
    A Biblical Perspective On Earning

    MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 25:28


    There are five ways you can interact with money: You can earn it, live on it, give it away, pay it to someone you owe, or grow it for the future. Today on MoneyWise, we'll offer practical guidelines related to the first of those five: earning. EARNING One of the things Scripture teaches us about earning is that it is God who gives us the ability to produce wealth. You'll find that exact phrase in Deuteronomy 8:18. And, if you think about it for a moment, you'll realize how obvious that truth is. It is God who created us. It is he who gives us the physical strength and the mental prowess to do productive work. And, it's been my observation that he seems to give most people a natural bent toward a certain type of work. For example, some people are very detail-oriented and make good research assistants and accountants. Some people are very personable. They make good salespeople. Some people are brainy. They make for good scholars. These natural inclinations can be fostered and refined, but we don't come up with them ourselves. It's something God puts into us and not just for work-related purposes. Our natural traits may have other applications. But the point is, these things are gifts from God gifts that can help us make our way in the world. This is why we should always be humble about our success in the work world. As Christians we know that everything flows from God. The Apostle Paul touches on this idea in his first letter to the Corinthians when he asks, What do you have that you did not receive? And if you did receive it, why do you boast as though you did not? Of course, you and I are responsible for taking what God has given us and using it to the fullest. Typically that will involve honing our skills and also gaining new ones. And we must do things concerning a job like show up on time, work diligently, and be trustworthy, knowing that how we work is a means of honoring God. GOD'S OWNERSHIP We also need to recognize that whatever we earn whether it comes to us by our current labor, or by way of our investments, or what we receive from a pension, or even by way of Social Security benefits is not really ours. Our earnings really belong to God the One who has given us the ability to make wealth. He entrusts those earnings to us to use as stewards on his behalf. GIVING STARTS WITH EARNING The 18th-century preacher and theologian John Wesley once wrote a sermon titled The Use of Money. In it, he urged Christian believers to do three things. He said, "Having, first, gained all you can, and secondly saved all you can, then give all you can." In other words, the pathway to saving sufficiently and giving generously begins with gaining that is to say, earning, as much as we can. Now, we all know that earning potential will differ from person to person, based on one's skills and career field, and also on things such as one's health and family responsibilities. But to the highest degree possible, we should apply ourselves to earning what we can so that we can take care of loved ones, save for the future, and be generous. If we are able-bodied and of working age, we should seek to earn money through diligent, honorable work, all the while seeing our work as part of our stewardship over what God has entrusted to us. Next Monday, we'll continue with our teaching on the first principles of being financially faithful. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● Is it legally permissible for a church to rent space to a commercial tennant? ● Is title lock insurance a wise thing to buy? ● How do you determine exactly how long it will take to pay off an auto loan when adding extra money to the monthly payment? ● How should you tithe on retirement investment proceeds? ● Does it make sense to use retirement funds to pay off credit card debt? ● Are I-bonds a good option for low-income people to save for retirement? ● Where is the best place to place or invest savings roughly 10 years before retirement? RESOURCES MENTIONED: ● Find a Certified Kingdom Advisor ● Christian Credit Counselors ● Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

    The Retirement and IRA Show
    Social Security, IRA Recharacterizations, and Annuities: Q&A #2224

    The Retirement and IRA Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 92:11


    Jim and Chris sit down to discuss listeners questions about Social Security, IRA recharacterizations, and annuities. (18:15) A listener looks for advice on whether or not she should claim her spousal Social Security benefit. (33:30) A listener describes her concern about a previously completed IRA recharacterization. (50:30, 1:12:15, 1:14:30) George asks a couple of questions […] The post Social Security, IRA Recharacterizations, and Annuities: Q&A #2224 appeared first on The Retirement and IRA Show.

    Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
    The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation as Top Economic Priority, Homebuyer Budget Reduction, Falling Lumber Prices

    Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 6:06


    In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending June 4th, 2022... what's being done about inflation, how inflation is impacting homebuyers, and why lumber prices are actually falling.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic News We begin with economic news from this past week, and lots of talk about inflation. President Biden launched a new effort last week to tackle inflation. As reported by the Washington Post, he was apparently fuming to aides that not enough was being done to control inflation. That turned into a flurry of activity to get the ball rolling and send a positive message to the American people. He met with both Federal Reserve Chief Jerome Powell and Former Fed Chief Janet Yellen in the Oval Office, and said in a public address that fighting inflation was his top economic priority. (1)President Biden also published an op-ed piece for the Wall Street Journal outlining a three-part strategy for fighting inflation. The first part involves the Federal Reserve's responsibility for controlling inflation, which it's now doing with aggressive rate hikes. Biden says he won't meddle with that, but for part two, he says he will do what he can, or with the help of Congress, “to make things more affordable for families.” That includes an effort to lower prices for gas, utilities, prescription drugs, and other everyday goods. The third part involves deficit reduction. The Congressional Budget Office projected the deficit will fall by $1.7 trillion this year. Biden wants to see even more of a reduction with what he calls “common-sense” tax reforms. (2)*Ironically, what was not mentioned was the Fed's stimulus, and the trillions of dollars that were created over the past two years that increased the money supply by nearly 50%. Additionally, the Fed had continued to buy Mortgage Backed Securities to support the housing market, until spring of 2022, when home prices had already increased by 20%. So in my opinion, the Federal Reserve together with the US government contributed to the inflation they are now trying to combat with rapidly rising rates and Quantitative Tightening. If you'd like to hear more about my opinions on how we got here, listen to the new podcast, On the Market, which is sponsored by FundRise. I am a regular guest expert on that show, and we go into detail on what's behind the headlines.There's a bit of good news about Social Security thanks to the strong job market recovery. The Treasury Department says that Social Security benefits are now fully funded through 2034. That's one year longer than previous estimates. It also says the disability insurance program has enough funds to pay full benefits for the next 75 years, through 2097. Last year, Treasury officials said that funds would be gone by 2057. (6)Unemployment claims fell for a second week in a row. There were just 200,000 initial claims, and 1.31 million continuing claims. Continuing claims are the lowest since 1969. (7) The unemployment rate in May was at 3.6%. (8)Now to the housing market: Construction spending was .2% higher in April, mostly due to money spent on residential construction. It was up .5% for single-family homes, .8% for multi-family buildings, and down for non-residential private and public construction. (9)*The latest Case-Shiller home price report shows that prices hit a new record high in April. The 20-city index was up 3.1% in April for a yearly rate of 21.2%. Keep in mind that April closings probably had rate locks in March, before interest rates increased two points.(10)Mortgage Rates Mortgage rates didn't move much this last week. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage was down just one basis point, to 5.09%. The 15-year was up one point to 4.32%. (11) Purchase applications are now about 14% lower than they were a year ago, thanks to higher rates. The Mortgage Bankers Association says the average contract rate for a 30-year with a 20% down payment was 5.33% last week. (12)In other news making headlines...Inflation Impact on Homebuyer's BudgetInflation is taking a huge bite out of the homebuyer's budget. According to the National Association of Realtors, homebuyers have to chop $40,000 off their budget for a home because they are paying more for everything else. (13)NAR says the average consumer is paying about $500 more per month compared to a year ago. That's an extra $6,000 a year. NAR'S chief economist Lawrence Yun expects a 10% decrease in housing demand thanks to higher prices, although he still expects a 5% increase in home prices because of the tight inventory. Lumber Prices TumbleLumber prices are coming back down to earth. The National Association of Homebuilders says they fell 12% this last week to their lowest level so far this year. (14) The Wall Street Journal reports that prices are coming down because the housing market is cooling off a bit. It says that orders for lumber are slowing down so inventories are building up, and sawmills are slashing prices.That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more. Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2022/05/31/biden-inflation-frustration/2 -https://www.wsj.com/articles/my-plan-for-fighting-inflation-joe-biden-gas-prices-economy-unemployment-jobs-covid-11653940654?mod=opinion_lead_pos53 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/06/03/feds-mester-says-inflation-hasnt-peaked-and-multiple-half-point-rate-hikes-are-needed.html4 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/06/02/fed-vice-chair-lael-brainard-says-its-hard-to-see-the-case-for-the-fed-pausing-rate-hikes-.html5 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/06/01/the-feds-mary-daly-says-rate-hikes-should-continue-until-inflation-is-tamed.html6 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/06/02/social-security-trust-fund-will-be-able-to-pay-benefits-longer-than-expected.html?&qsearchterm=social%20security7 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-unemployment-claims-drop-to-200-000-as-layoffs-fall-to-lowest-level-on-record-11654173646?mod=economy-politics8 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-u-s-jobs-report-for-may-11654257620?mod=economic-report9 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-construction-spending-rose-slightly-in-april-271654094325?mod=search_headline10 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/increase-in-u-s-home-prices-hits-another-record-high-case-shiller-shows-11654004193?mod=bnbh_mwarticle11 -https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms12 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/06/02/mortgage-applications-are-falling13 -https://www.realtrends.com/articles/inflation-cuts-homebuyer-budgets-by-40000/14 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/06/03/the-lumber-bubble-may-have-just-burst15 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/06/01/top-cities-for-renting-in-2022