Podcasts about conkling

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Best podcasts about conkling

Latest podcast episodes about conkling

Minnesota Vikings
Tyler Conkling joins KFAN after 30-17 win over the Seahawks | #KFANVikes

Minnesota Vikings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 2:49


The Twin Cities Sports Leader

On the Job with PORAC
S4, E13 - PORAC Corporate Sponsor: Conkling Team - CrossCountry Mortgage

On the Job with PORAC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 27:13


On this episode of On the Job With PORAC, PORAC President Brian Marvel and Vice President Damon Kurtz sit down with Curt Conkling of Conkling Team - CrossCountry Mortgage to learn more about the mortgage lender and how PORAC members can save money when purchasing or refinancing a home. Conkling Team - CrossCountry Mortgage is a 2021 PORAC Corporate Sponsor and will be present at our upcoming 69th Annual Conference of Members in Monterey, CA.   Click Here to learn more about Conkling Team - CrossCountry Mortgage today! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About Conkling Team - CrossCountry Mortgage The Conkling Team's mission is simple: to provide you with the best possible advice and benefit to your financial needs while facilitating a straightforward, transparent mortgage process for buyers, sellers and realtors. Their team is dedicated to making the mortgage process easy, stress-free and rewarding. Our culture is based on honesty, humility, integrity, and service — whether you're stuck in the snow on a cold winter night or seeking to achieve the American dream of homeownership. For more information, contact: Phone: 855-847-0975 Email: PORAC@myccmortgage.com Visit their Facebook page!

Other Voices
Jim Milton, director of “Women and War” at Conkling Hall

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 30:23


Director Jim Milton says he was attracted to theater because, being raised as a Cathoic, he found this Biblical phrase profound: “The Word was made flesh.”“To me, words are sacred,” Milton says in this week's podcast. “Words are almost living things.”Milton, who lives in Tannersville in the Catskills, has adapted Charles Dickens's “A Christmas Carol” and Henry James's “The Turn of the Screw” for the stage. He shortened Richard Wilbur's translation of Molière's “Tartuffe,” in iambic pentameter, by one-fifth, writing it in tetrameter instead.Milton is currently directing Jack Cunningham's “Women and War” — a collection of fictional stories based on historical fact. Online performances are at 7 p.m. on July 1 and 2 with a live performance at Conkling Hall in Rensselaerville on July 3, also at 7 p.m. Three couples — with the men fighting in Europe during World War II, in Korea, and in Vietnam — correspond through letters. Milton directs the actors to focus on the words and the emotions carried on those words.“They call theater the fabulous invalid,” says Milton, noting the impending death of theater has been proclaimed with the advent of movies, then of television, and now of the internet. “We are a species for which stories are important,” says Milton, whether they are told through religion, in newspapers, in novels or on stage.“Theater is one of the major ways in which a community can come together,” he said. A play is not etched in stone like a movie. “It can't react when you laugh; it can react when you cry. You are part of the play,” he said.Asked who should watch “Women and War,” Milton said, “The audience is anyone who is curious about our history, which of course should be everyone.” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Book Club for Kids
Passenger on the Pearl by Winifred Conkling

Book Club for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2021 40:49


The Book Club for Kids podcast began in the smallest quadrant of Washington DC called Southwest. It was the waterfront for DC, the place where ships would dock bringing everything from building supplies to fresh fish to slaves. This week marks the 173rd anniversary of what Washington Post writer Colbert King calls "one of the most courageous acts in antebellum America": the attempted escape of African American slaves on a ship docked at the Southwest waterfront, a ship called the Pearl. This week, Book Club for Kids honors its roots by reprising our one episode featuring a non fiction book: Passenger on the Pearl by Winifred Conkling, taped before a live audience at Virginia's Fall for the Book Festival. Lolita Marie is our celebrity reader. www.bookclubforkids.org

Your Voice; Your Power with Anika
Hypnosis Simplified with Melissa Conkling

Your Voice; Your Power with Anika

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 43:05


Melissa Conkling is a Certified Hypnotist currently pursuing her NLP Practitioner and Life Coaching certification. She works with the subconscious mind to make changes on a deeper level to release blocks, overcome limiting beliefs and build confidence. Her passion is to help women transform creating powerful changes in their lives by uncovering limiting beliefs, building confidence, joy and authenticity. Her goal is to empower women to become the best versions of themselves, building a better, sustainable life full of confidence, joy through purpose and passion. She was recently named the 10 Bet hypnotists by Natural Nutmeg magazine, and was featured on the Work Smart Hypnosis podcast. Our interview explores the true meaning, direction and capabilities of hypnosis through raised awareness of where you are, where you want to be and how to get there. Melissa discusses her ability to help you rewire, reposition and imagine where you are trying to go, while letting go of the blocks, barriers and limiting beliefs preventing you for achievement and ultimate success. Learn more about Melissa at www.connecticuthypnosis.com Hypnosis, the Subconscious Mind & Manifesting Your Dream Life: https://www.facebook.com/groups/498367311053008 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/anika-wilson/message

C4S Villains
Ep3: WandaVision Episode 4 Spoilers Discussion & Our Most Anticipated Comicbook Movies of 2021 - Guest: Chris Conkling

C4S Villains

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 149:27


Hosts: JB | Vash Guest: Chris Conkling | Pop-O-Holics PodcastMain Topic #1 WandaVision Episode 4 Main Topic #2 Most Anticipated Comicbook Movies and Tv Shows in 2021In Order of Release Zack Snyder’s Justice League (4 Hour Movie) - March 18, 2021The Falcon and The Winter Soldier - March 19, 2021Black Widow - May 7, 2021Loki - May 2021Venom: let There Be Carnage - June 25, 2021Shang Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings - July 9, 2021The Suicide Squad - August 6, 2021Eternals - Nov. 5, 2021Spider-Man 3: (Home for the Holidays) - December 17, 2021Website - https://careful4spoilers.com​​Hosts SocialsFollow JB on Twitter - https://twitter.com/jbxclusive​​Follow JB on Instagram - https://instagram.com/jbxclusive​​Follow Vash on Instagram - https://instagram.com/LegendDVash​​Follow Vash on Twitter - https://twitter.com/LegendDVash​​​Guest SocialsFollow Chris on Twitter - https://twitter.com/ChrisConklingC4S | AxL SocialsSupport C4S on Patreon - https://patreon.com/c4spoilers​​C4S Discord - https://discord.gg/y7J6AuBS8g​​Follow C4S on Twitter - https://twitter.com/c4spoilers​​Follow C4S on Facebook - https://facebook.com/c4spoilers​​Follow C4S on on Instagram - https://instagram.com/c4spoilers​​​Follow Anime Lately - https://linktr.ee/animelately​​Podcast Feeds- C4S Villains Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/c4s-villains/id1554370159- Careful 4 Spoilers Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/careful-4-spoilers/id1028914371- Best One Worst One Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/best-one-worst-one/id1463304818- You’ve Gotta See This Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/youve-gotta-see-this/id1488553333- No Anime No Life Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/no-anime-no-life/id1268423571- Dammit Barry Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dammit-barry/id1283169565- The Anime Lately Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-anime-lately-podcast/id1461649567The Pop-O-Holics Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/popoholics/id1436563644

Won Buddhism Dharma Talks
A Perfect Balance - Douglas Conkling

Won Buddhism Dharma Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2020 15:28


Member's talk by Douglas Conkling (Nov/08/2020) @ Won Dharma Center

Other Voices
John Arrighi — Rensselaerville's Conkling Hall

Other Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2020 35:32


John Arrighi lives in an historic Rensselaerville church and, as president of the Friends of Conkling Hall, is helping to improve another one, which serves as a community meeting space. Arrighi is seated on the edge of the stage at Conkling Hall. The hall, on Methodist Hill Road, was built as a church in 1839 and changed to a community center in the early 1900s. Arrighi, who was born in Brooklyn, raised on Long Island, and came to Albany County to study at the University at Albany, discovered Rensselaerville when his pottery professor, Frances Simches, invited him to her workshop and home — the 1836 Baptist church he now calls home. “If someone comes to a generous giving heart through religion, that’s great,” says Arrighi in this week’s podcast. Although he is not a believer himself, he says both still-active churches in Rensselaerville play a positive role in the community. He recently made a video of the “hidden treasures” in the hall’s attic, a fascinating way to understand both the modern retrofits and the historic castoffs — from ornate plaster moldings to a pipe that brought gas to a now-electrified chandelier. The Conkling Hall volunteers have used the time of coronavirus, when the usual cake walks and chili cook-offs are impossible, to make improvements, from painting to installing Wi-Fi. Arrighi sees people sitting on a bench outside the hall to use the hotspot — a symbol of evolving uses for a community meeting place. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success
WSH291 - Melissa Conkling on Hypnotic Communities

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2020 33:59


Melissa Conkling joins me today to discuss building hypnotic communities and share her experience of accidentally becoming hypnotized and training for a career in hypnosis. Melissa shares her strategies for working with weight loss by creating an identity shift and building confidence to help clients realize that change is possible. She reveals the nuances of running your own Facebook community and building engagement through consistency and adding value. She also shares how her approach builds warm leads organically and her experiences while working online with tools such as Zoom and Facebook Live.   Melissa is a Certified Hypnotist and the Founder of Connecticut Hypnosis, where she helps people achieve their goals and build their confidence, motivation, and mindset through hypnosis. Melissa has a passion for helping people worldwide with weight loss and confidence building. She was first introduced to hypnosis in a hypnotic marketing class when searching for marketing applications to use for direct sales. Melissa is a Licensed Real Estate Salesperson in Connecticut with a 15-year career in residential real estate. Previously, she worked in theatre history and criticism, offering freelance script consulting and dramaturgy. Melissa has a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre from Eastern Connecticut State University and a Master of Arts in Theatre from the City University of New York-Hunter College.   Check out Jason’s new podcast launching October 21: http://HypnoHacks.com/   Want to learn new systems to effectively book more clients and increase the value of your hypnosis business? Visit http://HypnoFormula.com       “It’s all about picking a theme for the group - not necessarily a super-narrowed-down niche, but a theme.” - Melissa Conkling       Why you should recognize and trust the different layers behind a client's issue How unsuccessful dieting can affect confidence and create self-doubt, which overflows into other areas of a client's life Strategies to discover and release limiting beliefs How to build a Facebook group, build rapport, and provide value to generate warm leads Working with clients over Zoom and the benefits of online work How to handle unexpected distractions during online hypnosis sessions Leveraging Facebook Live and ongoing media to drive engagement Doubling down on multiple Facebook groups     Resources Mentioned:   https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/nowonline/ http://hypnohacks.com/ Connect with Melissa Conkling:   Connecticut Hypnosis Connecticut Hypnosis on Facebook Melissa Conkling on LinkedIn         Get an all-access pass to Jason’s digital library to help you grow your hypnosis business: https://www.hypnoticbusinesssystems.com/   Get instant access to Jason Linett’s entire hypnotherapeutic training library: https://www.hypnoticworkers.com/   If you enjoyed today’s episode, please send us your valuable feedback! https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/itunes https://www.facebook.com/worksmarthypnosis/   Join the new WORK SMART HYPNOSIS COMMUNITY on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/worksmarthypnosis/   Want to work with Jason? Check out: https://www.virginiahypnosis.com/call/          

Towards Data Science
51. Adrien Treuille and Tim Conkling - Streamlit Is All You Need

Towards Data Science

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2020 39:35


We’ve talked a lot about “full stack” data science on the podcast. To many, going full-stack is one of those long-term goals that we never get to. There are just too many algorithms and data structures and programming languages to know, and not enough time to figure out software engineering best practices around deployment and building app front-ends. Fortunately, a new wave of data science tooling is now making full-stack data science much more accessible by allowing people with no software engineering background to build data apps quickly and easily. And arguably no company has had such explosive success at building this kind of tooling than Streamlit, which is why I wanted to sit down with Streamlit founder Adrien Treuille and gamification expert Tim Conkling to talk about their journey, and the importance of building flexible, full-stack data science apps.

Landmine Radio
Jeremy Conkling - Episode 162

Landmine Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2020 51:34


Jeff was joined by Jeremy Conkling, President of the Anchorage Police Department Employees Association. They discuss why he became a police officer, the day-to-day work of a police officer, how people feel about cops, the issue of police brutality, proper use of force, what we can do to improve policing, and the culture within the police department. 

Live Your Spa Life
#146: Living Your Life On Terms - with Meg Conkling!

Live Your Spa Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2020 37:15


Meg Conkling is a professional hairstylist, salon owner, and business coach for salon owners. She thrives off being service helping others find their joy and living a life of authenticity. She exclusively works with naturally curly hair clients and absolutely loves what she does. Known on the social media platforms as Curly Hair Alchemist Meg is telling her stories with love and moxie.Important TopicsMeg's favorite storyLiving life in her termsHer definition of luxuryOn her valuesOn social mediaTalking about her airport incidentThe moment she feel disempoweredQuotes"Luxury is a choice.""Social media actually brings people together.""Little things matter."Connect with Meg: Instagram: @curlyhairalchemistEmail: curlyhairalchemist@gmail.comOther links and resources:Free Gift from Diane (5 Moves to RESET Your Power) - https://ResetYourPowerGift.comFree Gift from Diane (Life RESET Quiz) - https://LifeResetQuiz.comBANKCODE - https://MyBankCode.com/VictoryDiane Halfman's website - http://www.DianeHalfman.comWant to know more about yourself?Some people ask me how to RESET their life.Some people ask me how to be more sensual.Others are wondering how to make more money.How to be more successful.How to start a business.All of these questions and more are what I answer in my programs!Come see me at http://www.DianeHalfman.com

Live Your Spa Life
#146: Living Your Life On Terms - with Meg Conkling!

Live Your Spa Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2020 37:15


Meg Conkling is a professional hairstylist, salon owner, and business coach for salon owners. She thrives off being service helping others find their joy and living a life of authenticity. She exclusively works with naturally curly hair clients and absolutely loves what she does. Known on the social media platforms as Curly Hair Alchemist Meg is telling her stories with love and moxie.Important TopicsMeg's favorite storyLiving life in her termsHer definition of luxuryOn her valuesOn social mediaTalking about her airport incidentThe moment she feel disempoweredQuotes"Luxury is a choice.""Social media actually brings people together.""Little things matter."Connect with Meg: Instagram: @curlyhairalchemistEmail: curlyhairalchemist@gmail.comOther links and resources:Free Gift from Diane (5 Moves to RESET Your Power) - https://ResetYourPowerGift.comFree Gift from Diane (Life RESET Quiz) - https://LifeResetQuiz.comBANKCODE - https://MyBankCode.com/VictoryDiane Halfman's website - http://www.DianeHalfman.comWant to know more about yourself?Some people ask me how to RESET their life.Some people ask me how to be more sensual.Others are wondering how to make more money.How to be more successful.How to start a business.All of these questions and more are what I answer in my programs!Come see me at http://www.DianeHalfman.com

HistoryBoiz
The Assassination of James A. Garfield

HistoryBoiz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2020 130:06


The assassination of a beloved president by a deranged traveling preacher/failed lawyer/office seeker and the medical malpractice that failed him. It's of course, the tragic assassination of James A. Garfield!

Trumpet Dynamics
Do it for Them, Not You: How to Undergo a Performance Makeover w/ Pastor Tim Conkling

Trumpet Dynamics

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2020 48:26


"If you help enough people get what they want, you'll get what you want." --Zig ZiglarThat quote came to my mind as I was listening to my friend, pastor and mentor Tim Conkling share his experience w/ performance anxiety and how he overcame some of his own struggles with it in his younger years. Tim is an ordained Presbyterian pastor. But he has an extensive history and interest in the trumpet community. He is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, receiving his performer's certificate before entering full-time ministry. He also gave Yours Truly some valuable encouragement and coaching when I decided to make music my full-time craft in 2007. Well, he reached out to me a couple of weeks ago and said he wanted to do a podcast on performance anxiety, and I readily agreed. Here's what he shared:Tim's Performance Makeover...11:13Never practice, always perform Ungracious performers Practice vs. performance mentality Kill the ego when you perform Perform any chance you get Break the physiological and psychological cycle...19:40Dry mouth, sweaty palms Inderol inhibits the sympathetic nervous system Gradually wean off the beta blockers Identity is tied up with your performance "Identity is not tied to my playing" Enjoy the moment, even your mistakes What's at the root of performance anxiety?...27:05We don't understand the ego Our identity gets tied into our playing A big ego can give you lots of courage or lots of fear Quit being selfish; become selfless and self-forgetful https://amzn.to/3bykV6x (The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle) How to stay in the parasympathetic state (if beta blockers aint yo thang)...31:55Deep breathing Neck and shoulder massage What teachers are really looking for in auditions (it's not how well you play)...37:12Tim's take on universities and conservatories in dealing w/ performance anxiety...42:37Resources mentioned:https://amzn.to/3bykV6x (The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle) http://timothyconkling.com (timothyconkling.com) Want to pick Tim's brain on performance anxiety? Send him an email! tim@timothyconkling.com

Poem-a-Day
Hilda Conkling: "About My Dreams"

Poem-a-Day

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2020 1:34


Recorded by Academy of American Poets staff for Poem-a-Day, a series produced by the Academy of American Poets. Published on March 8, 2020. www.poets.org

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories
Haussner's (02-07-20)

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2020 2:30


On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium, as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point.

American Presidents: Totalus Rankium

Arthur is not the most well known of presidents, but that does not mean he did not achieve much in his early life. Who else managed this level of corruption? Who else could claim to benefit from the patronage system so well? Who else was so much of a Conkling man? He may be a coaster, but damn it, he could coast like the best of them. 

RADAR TALK INTIMATE
RADAR TALK INTIMATE #40 -- PARISH CONKLING and JOY HARRIS

RADAR TALK INTIMATE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2019 59:40


Parish Conkling and Joy Harris came by my studio in the Heights of Houston to talk about "Revolution! Scholars and Artists Rethinking Political Action" a conference they're putting together in partnership with Houston Community College's Philosophy Department and Experimental Action. You can find more info at philevents.org or on experimentalaction.com. We have a wonderful conversation where we go over everything about the conference, what it's about, what Parish and Joy's goals are, and everything else. I had fun learning about Revolution! and I hope to be part of this conference in 2020, as I hope you will take part in it as well, either as an artist, a scholar, or as an audience member! As always, thanks for listening, thanks for sharing, and thanks for telling me what you think!

Hometown, Alaska – Alaska Public Media
How citizens can ride along with the APD

Hometown, Alaska – Alaska Public Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2019


This summer solstice evening, Senior Judge Elaine Andrews participated in a citizen’s ride along with the Anchorage Police Department, riding with Sgt. Jeremy Conkling. Conkling also currently serves as president of the Alaska Police Department Employees Association (APDEA), a bargaining unit that represents 500 employees at APD. Conkling’s APD career began in 2011 as a […]

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories
Haussner's (05-24-19)

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2019 2:31


On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium, as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end, the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
“How High The Moon” by Les Paul and Mary Ford

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2018


Welcome to episode nine of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. Today we’re looking at Les Paul and Mary Ford, and “How High The Moon”. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. —-more—-  A couple of notes: This one is a few hours late, as I had some *severe* technical problems with the several previous attempts at recording this. This version was recorded starting around midnight on Sunday night, which is usually the time I put them up, so I apologise if it’s lacking a final polish Resources If the episode starts you wondering about playing instruments while physically disabled, or inventing new instruments, you might want to check out a charity called the One-Handed Musical Instrument Trust, which invents and provides instruments for one-handed musicians. As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This 3-CD box set is a very good compilation of Les Paul and Mary Ford’s best work. The quotes from Les Paul in this episode come from this book of interviews with him. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript   To be a truly great guitarist, you need to have an imagination. You need to be inventive. And you need to have a sense of musicality. Some would also say that you need to have a lot of dexterity, and to be able to move your fingers lightning fast. Maybe also have long fingers, so you could reach further down the neck. But let’s talk about Django Reinhardt for a bit. We mentioned Django a little bit in the episode on Bob Wills and “Ida Red”. We talked, in particular, about how he was making music that sounded very, very similar to what the early Western Swing musicians were doing. We’re not going to talk much about Django in this series, because he was a jazz musician, but he *was* very influential on a few of the people who went on to influence rock, so we’re going to touch on him briefly here. He never played an electric guitar, but he still influenced pretty much every guitarist since, either directly or indirectly. And this was despite having disadvantages that would have stopped almost anyone. One point we haven’t made very much yet, but which needs to be made repeatedly, is that the people in most of these early podcasts were crushingly, hellishly, poor by today’s standards. Poverty still exists of course, to far too great an extent, but the people we’re talking about here lived in conditions that would be unimaginable to almost all of the listeners to this podcast. And Reinhardt had it worse than most. He was a Romany traveller, and while growing up his greatest skill was stealing chickens — real, proper, poverty. But he became a professional musician, and it looked like he might actually become well off. And then his bad luck got worse. His caravan caught on fire, and in trying to rescue his wife and child, he suffered such extreme burns that one of his legs became paralysed — and more importantly for Reinhardt as a musician, he lost the use of two of his fingers on his left hand. He had to re-teach himself to play the guitar, and to use only two fingers and a thumb on his left hand to play. Remarkably, he managed well enough to do things like this: [Excerpt: “How High The Moon” Django Reinhardt] Reinhardt influenced many guitarists, and one American guitarist in particular became a friend of Reinhardt and said that he and Reinhardt were the only two guitarists in the world at that time who were actually serious about their instrument. He was another jazzman, with a similar style to Reinhardt but one who had a more direct influence on rock and roll. Waukesha, Wisconsin, is not the most rock and roll town in the world. It was a spa town, before the water started to dry up, and about the most exciting thing that ever happened there is that Mr Sears, the founder of Sears & Roebuck, retired there when he got too ill to work any more. It’s a bland, whitebread, midwestern town in a state that’s most notable for dairy farming. Yet it’s also the birthplace of the only man who is in the rock and roll hall of fame *and* the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and who probably did more than any other individual to make the guitar a respected lead instrument. Almost every moderately-known guitarist eventually gets a “signature” model named after them, and most of these sell a small number of instruments before being discontinued. But one man has a signature model that’s so popular that other guitarists get their signatures *alongside his*. When you buy a Jimmy Page or Mark Knopfler or Slash or Eric Clapton signature guitar, there are two names on there — the name of Page or Clapton or whoever, and the name Les Paul. Les Paul was a remarkable man, whose inventions are far more widely known even than his name. You’ll almost certainly have seen musicians playing guitar and harmonica at the same time, using a harmonica holder — Les Paul invented that, as a teenager, making the first one out of a coathanger. I guess if you were a teenager in Waukesha in the 1920s, you’d have little better to do with yourself than invent coathanger harmonica holders too. But Les Paul was, first and foremost, a guitar player, and he became a semi-professional musician by the time he was thirteen. The choice of the guitar was one that was actually made by his mother. She explained to him “if you play the piano you got your back turned to the audience. If you play the drums, you gotta carry all that stuff around, it’s not musical. If you play a saxophone, you can’t sing and talk at the same time.” In his own words, she “whittled it down to guitar in a hurry”. His mother, indeed, seems to have been a remarkable woman in many ways — if you read any interviews with Les, he barely ever goes a few sentences without saying something about how much she did for him. That’s one of the defining characteristics of Les Paul’s life, really — his admiration for his mother. There were two more things that characterised him though. The first was that pretty much dead on, every ten years, he would have some major health crisis that would put him out of commission for a year. The other was his lifelong devotion to learning, which meant that he used those health crises as an opportunity to learn something new. This love of learning could be seen from his very early days. When he was just learning the guitar, the singing cowboy star Gene Autry came to town. Gene Autry was a star of Western music — the very biggest star in the country — and his music was a cleaned-up, politer, version of the kind of music Bob Wills played: [excerpt: Gene Autry “Back in the Saddle Again”]. Les and his friend went to every show in the residency, and after a couple of nights, Gene Autry stopped the show in the middle of the set and said “something strange has been happening here — every time I play an F chord, and *only* when I play an F chord, there’s a flash of light. What’s going on, how is this happening?” It turned out that Les had been wanting to learn how Autry made that chord shape, so he’d been there with a pencil and paper, and his friend had a torch, and every time he played the chord Les Paul wanted to learn, the torch would come on and Les would be trying to sketch the shape of Autry’s fingers. Autry invited Les Paul onto the stage, showed him how to make the chord, and had him play a couple of songs. A few years later, when Autry moved from radio to films, he suggested Les Paul take over his radio show. So Les Paul was always fascinated by learning, and always trying to improve himself and his equipment. And once he decided to be a guitarist, he also decided to electrify his guitar, a full decade before electric guitars became a widespread instrument. He explained that when he was starting out, he was playing at a hotdog stand, using a homemade microphone for his voice and harmonica — the microphone was made out of bits of an old telephone, and it was plugged in to his mother’s radio. People who were listening liked his performances, but they said they wished the guitar was as loud as his voice — so he took his *dad’s* radio, too, and connected it to a record player needle, which he jammed into the body of his guitar. Once electric guitars started being manufactured, Paul started playing them, but he never liked them. The electric guitars of the late 1930s were what we’d now call electro-acoustics — they were acoustic guitars, playable as such, but with pickups. There were two main problems with them — firstly, they were very prone to feedback, because the hollow body of the guitar would resonate. And secondly, most of the sonic energy from the strings was going into the guitar itself, so there was no sustain. Paul came up with a simple solution to this problem, which he called “the log”. The log was almost exactly what the name would suggest. It was a plank, to which were nailed some pickups, strings, and tuning pegs. On the front was attached the front of a normal guitar — not anything that would actually resonate, just to make it look like a proper guitar. But basically it was just a lump of wood. Les Paul wasn’t the first person to build a solid-body electric guitar — but as he put it himself later “there may be some guy out there in Iowa says he built the guitar in 1925, for all I know, and he may have. I only know what I was doing and I was out there weaving my own basket, and there wasn’t anybody else around and it had to be done.”. He perfected the solid-body guitar during the first of his years of illness — he’d been running an illegal radio station, accidentally stuck his hand in the transmitter, and not only got an electric shock but had a load of equipment fall on him. By the time he was well enough to work again, he had the idea perfected. He took his solid-body guitar idea to Gibson in 1941, but they weren’t interested — no-one was going to want to buy a solid guitar. It wasn’t until Leo Fender started selling his guitars in 1950 that Gibson realised that it might be worth doing. But by then Les Paul had become one of the most famous guitarists in the country. Even before he became hugely famous, though, he’d been one of the *best* guitarists in the country. In 1944, when the guitarist Oscar Moore was unable at the last minute to play at Jazz At The Philharmonic — the first of what would eventually become the most famous series of jazz concerts ever — Les Paul was drafted in at short notice, and the live recordings of that show are some of the greatest instrumental jazz you’ll hear, at a time when the borders between jazz, R&B, and pop music were more fluid than they became. Listen, for example, to this excerpt from “Blues, 1, 2, & 3”. [excerpt] The honking saxophone player there is Ilinois Jacquet, the man who we talked about in episode one of this podcast, who invented R&B saxophone. The pianist there was also pretty great — he was, in fact, a pianist who was already regarded as one of the best in the business, even before he started to sing, and who later had two further, separate careers under his more familiar name – one in R&B in which he inspired a generation of singers like Charles Brown and Ray Charles, and one in pop, where he became one of the great ballad singers of all time. He’s credited on the track we just heard as “Shorty Nadine” for contractual reasons, but you probably know him better as Nat “King” Cole. Listening to that you can hear musicians performing at a time when jazz and R&B and rock and roll were all still sort of the same thing, before they all went off in their different directions, and it’s hard not to wish that that cross-fertilisation had continued a while longer. But it didn’t, and it would be easy to imagine that as a result Les Paul, who was absolutely a jazz musician, would make no further contributions to rock and roll after his popularising the solid-body electric guitar. But we haven’t even got to his real importance yet. Yes, something he did that was even more important than the Les Paul guitar. It started when his mother told him she’d enjoyed something she heard him play on the radio. He’d replied that it wasn’t him she’d heard, and she’d said “well, all those electric guitar players sound the same. If you want to be a real success, you want to sound different from everyone else — at least different enough that your own mother can recognise you”. And over the years, Les Paul had learned to listen to his mother — she’d been the one who’d got him playing guitar, and she’d been the one who had told him to go and see Bob Wills, the day he’d ended up meeting Charlie Christian for the first time. So he went and spent a lot of time working on a sound that was totally different from anything else, spending days and weeks alone. He stopped working with his trio — and started working with a young country singer who renamed herself Mary Ford, who Gene Autry had introduced him to and who he soon married — and he eventually came up with a whole new idea. This episode is primarily about Les Paul, because he was such an astonishing force of nature, but it’s worth making clear that Mary Ford was very much an equal partner in their sixteen years together. She was an excellent singer — *far* better than Les Paul was — and also a pretty good guitarist herself. On their live dates she would play rhythm guitar, and often the two would do a comedy guitar duel, with her copying everything Les Paul played. She was a vital part of the sound — and of the sonic innovations the records contained, because one of the things they did for the first time was to have her sing very close to the mic — a totally different technique than had been used before, which gave her vocals a different tone which almost everyone imitated. But that wasn’t the only odd sound on the records. It sounded like Les Paul was playing two or three guitars at the same time, playing the same part. And sometimes he was playing notes that were higher than any guitar could play. And sometimes, when Mary Ford was singing… it sounded as if there were two or more of her! This was such an unusual sound that on the duo’s radio and TV appearances they made a joke of it — they pretended that Paul had invented a “Les Paulveriser”, which could duplicate everything, and that for example he could use the Les Paulveriser on Mary, so there’d be multiple Marys and she could get the vacuum cleaning done quicker. It was the fifties. But of course, what Paul was actually doing was overdubbing — recording one guitar part, and then going back and recording a second over it. He’d been fascinated by the idea for decades and he’d first done it as an experiment when he was still with the trio. He’d wanted to rehearse a song on his own, but with the arrangement the rest of the band played, so he’d recorded himself playing all the parts, using a disc cutter and playing along with previous takes. This didn’t give good results until the introduction of magnetic tape recording in the very late forties — when you recorded directly to a disc there was so much surface noise, and recording quality was so poor, that no-one would even think of recording overdubs. But in 1945, American soldiers brought back a new technology from Germany as spoils of war — high fidelity tape recording. With magnetic tape you could record sound with orders of magnitude less noise than by cutting to disc. And Bing Crosby, who often worked with Les Paul, was the first person to see the possibilities of this new technology (in his case, for pre-recording his radio shows so they didn’t have to go out live, which meant he could record them in batches and have more time to spend on the golf course). Les Paul was far more technical than Crosby, though, and far more aware of what could happen if, for example, you had two tape recorders. Or if you ran one slow so that when you played it back at normal speed everything sounded sped up. Or a dozen other obvious tricks that occurred to him, but had never occurred to anyone else. So on those Les Paul and Mary Ford records, literally every instrument was Les Paul on the guitar. The bass was Les Paul’s guitar slowed down to half speed, the percussion was his guitar, *everything* was his guitar. So now we come to “How High the Moon” itself. This is a song that originally dated back to 1940 — the Benny Goodman band had the first hit with it, and indeed Les Paul had recorded a version of it in 1945, with his trio. [excerpt Les Paul Trio version of “How High the Moon”] That was right before his experiments with tape recording started. Shortly after the first results of those were released, in 1948, there was another one of those every-decade health problems. In this case, Mary Ford was driving the two of them from Wisconsin to LA. She was from California, and not used to driving in winter weather. She hit a patch of ice and the two of them went off the road. Les Paul spent hours in ice water with multiple bones broken before anyone could get him to a hospital. For a while, it was believed it would not be possible to save his right arm — and then for a while after that the doctors believed they could save it, but it would permanently be fixed in a single position if they did, as his elbow would be unfixable. He told them to try their best, and to set it in a position with his hand over his navel, because if it was in that position he could still play guitar. As a precaution, he spent his time in hospital drawing up plans for a synthesiser, ten years before Robert Moog invented his, because he figured he could play the synth with one arm. When he got better, he and Mary Ford recorded a new version of “How High The Moon”, but at first the record label didn’t want to release it: [Excerpt Les Paul and Mary Ford: “How High The Moon”] That record sat unreleased for eighteen months, until 1951, because Jim Conkling at Capitol said that there’d been seventy-five recordings of the song before and none of them had been a hit. Conkling thought this was because the lyrics don’t make sense, but Les Paul was insistent that no-one was going to listen to the lyrics anyway. “It doesn’t matter what Mary sang or if it was done by the Four Nosebleeds. It didn’t make any difference, because that wasn’t what made the record. It was the arrangement and the performance.” And he was right — the version by Les Paul and Mary Ford was an absolute phenomenon. It spent twenty-five weeks in the Billboard pop charts, nine of them at number one, and while it was at number one another Paul and Ford track was at number two. Even more astonishingly, it also made number two on the rhythm and blues charts. Remember, that was a chart that was specifically aimed at the black audience, and between 1950 and 1955 only five records by white performers made the R&B charts at all, mostly very early rock and roll records. “How High the Moon” might easily seem an odd fit for the R&B charts. To twenty-first century ears, it’s hard to imagine anything more white-sounding. But what it does, absolutely, share with the music that was charting on the R&B charts at the time, and the reason it appealed to the R&B audience, is a delight in finding totally new sounds. The R&B charts at the time were where you looked for experimentation, for people trying new things. And also, there’s that rhythm on the record — this is entirely a record that’s driven by the rhythm. It’s not quite dance music, not like the jump bands — and there’s only guitar and vocals on it, something which would be absolutely out of the ordinary for rhythm and blues records at the time with their emphasis on piano and saxophone — but what there is in that guitar playing is personal expression. And R&B was all about individual expression. Les Paul was doing something which was qualitatively different both from jazz and from R&B, and so it’s not surprising that he ended up crossing over from one market to another. But in doing so, he also invented the way the guitar was to be used in rock and roll music. There’s a lot of Western Swing about what he’s doing on “How High the Moon”, unsurprisingly. But while the rhythm guitar is keeping to the same kind of rhythms that the Western Swing people would use, the lead guitar is much more aggressive and forceful than anything you got in country or western music at the time. It’s playing jazz and R&B lines — it’s playing, in fact, the kind of thing that a saxophone player like Illinois Jacquet might play, full of aggressive stabs and skronks. And more than that, he invented the way the recording studio would be used in rock and roll. Before Les Paul and Mary Ford’s early records, the recording studio was used solely as a way of reproducing the sound of live instruments as accurately as possible. After them, it became a way to create new sounds that could not be made live. One thing we’re going to see over and again in this series is the way technological change, artistic change and social change all feed back into each other. The 1950s was a time of absolutely unprecedented technological change in America, and people went from, in the beginning of the decade, listening to recordings played at 78RPM, often on wind-up gramophones, made of breakable shellac, to listening to high fidelity forty-five RPM singles and long-playing records which could — shockingly — last more than four minutes a side. Radio went from being something that had to be listened to as a family because of the size of the radiogram to something a teenager could listen to in bed under the blankets on a transistor radio, or something that you could even have on in your car! The combination of these changes made music into something that could be personal as well as communal. Teenagers didn’t have to share the music with their parents. All of that was still to come, of course, and we’ll look at those things as they happen during our history. But “How High the Moon” was the first and best sign of what was to come, as the 1940s gave way to the 1950s, and music entered a totally new age. Les Paul kept playing the guitar into his nineties. Interviewed in his late seventies, when his arthritis was so bad he only had movement in two fingers, with all the others so stiff they just had to stay where he put them, he said he played better than he had when he had ten fingers, because he’d had to learn more about the instrument to do it this way. In the end, his arthritis got to the point that he could no longer move any fingers on either hand — so he just let his fingers stay where they were, but would move his whole hand to play single notes and bar chords — he could lift his fingers up and down, just not move the knuckles. But he could still play. This is him on his ninetieth birthday: [excerpt: Les Paul 90th birthday concert “Sweet Georgia Brown”] So it turns out you don’t even need the two fingers Django had left, not if you have the kind of mind that gets you into the rock and roll hall of fame *and* the inventors’ hall of fame. Les Paul died, aged ninety-four, in 2009.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
"How High The Moon" by Les Paul and Mary Ford

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2018 28:15


Welcome to episode nine of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. Today we're looking at Les Paul and Mary Ford, and "How High The Moon". Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. ----more----  A couple of notes: This one is a few hours late, as I had some *severe* technical problems with the several previous attempts at recording this. This version was recorded starting around midnight on Sunday night, which is usually the time I put them up, so I apologise if it's lacking a final polish Resources If the episode starts you wondering about playing instruments while physically disabled, or inventing new instruments, you might want to check out a charity called the One-Handed Musical Instrument Trust, which invents and provides instruments for one-handed musicians. As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This 3-CD box set is a very good compilation of Les Paul and Mary Ford's best work. The quotes from Les Paul in this episode come from this book of interviews with him. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript   To be a truly great guitarist, you need to have an imagination. You need to be inventive. And you need to have a sense of musicality. Some would also say that you need to have a lot of dexterity, and to be able to move your fingers lightning fast. Maybe also have long fingers, so you could reach further down the neck. But let's talk about Django Reinhardt for a bit. We mentioned Django a little bit in the episode on Bob Wills and “Ida Red”. We talked, in particular, about how he was making music that sounded very, very similar to what the early Western Swing musicians were doing. We're not going to talk much about Django in this series, because he was a jazz musician, but he *was* very influential on a few of the people who went on to influence rock, so we're going to touch on him briefly here. He never played an electric guitar, but he still influenced pretty much every guitarist since, either directly or indirectly. And this was despite having disadvantages that would have stopped almost anyone. One point we haven't made very much yet, but which needs to be made repeatedly, is that the people in most of these early podcasts were crushingly, hellishly, poor by today's standards. Poverty still exists of course, to far too great an extent, but the people we're talking about here lived in conditions that would be unimaginable to almost all of the listeners to this podcast. And Reinhardt had it worse than most. He was a Romany traveller, and while growing up his greatest skill was stealing chickens -- real, proper, poverty. But he became a professional musician, and it looked like he might actually become well off. And then his bad luck got worse. His caravan caught on fire, and in trying to rescue his wife and child, he suffered such extreme burns that one of his legs became paralysed -- and more importantly for Reinhardt as a musician, he lost the use of two of his fingers on his left hand. He had to re-teach himself to play the guitar, and to use only two fingers and a thumb on his left hand to play. Remarkably, he managed well enough to do things like this: [Excerpt: "How High The Moon" Django Reinhardt] Reinhardt influenced many guitarists, and one American guitarist in particular became a friend of Reinhardt and said that he and Reinhardt were the only two guitarists in the world at that time who were actually serious about their instrument. He was another jazzman, with a similar style to Reinhardt but one who had a more direct influence on rock and roll. Waukesha, Wisconsin, is not the most rock and roll town in the world. It was a spa town, before the water started to dry up, and about the most exciting thing that ever happened there is that Mr Sears, the founder of Sears & Roebuck, retired there when he got too ill to work any more. It's a bland, whitebread, midwestern town in a state that's most notable for dairy farming. Yet it's also the birthplace of the only man who is in the rock and roll hall of fame *and* the National Inventors Hall of Fame, and who probably did more than any other individual to make the guitar a respected lead instrument. Almost every moderately-known guitarist eventually gets a "signature" model named after them, and most of these sell a small number of instruments before being discontinued. But one man has a signature model that's so popular that other guitarists get their signatures *alongside his*. When you buy a Jimmy Page or Mark Knopfler or Slash or Eric Clapton signature guitar, there are two names on there -- the name of Page or Clapton or whoever, and the name Les Paul. Les Paul was a remarkable man, whose inventions are far more widely known even than his name. You'll almost certainly have seen musicians playing guitar and harmonica at the same time, using a harmonica holder -- Les Paul invented that, as a teenager, making the first one out of a coathanger. I guess if you were a teenager in Waukesha in the 1920s, you'd have little better to do with yourself than invent coathanger harmonica holders too. But Les Paul was, first and foremost, a guitar player, and he became a semi-professional musician by the time he was thirteen. The choice of the guitar was one that was actually made by his mother. She explained to him "if you play the piano you got your back turned to the audience. If you play the drums, you gotta carry all that stuff around, it's not musical. If you play a saxophone, you can't sing and talk at the same time." In his own words, she "whittled it down to guitar in a hurry". His mother, indeed, seems to have been a remarkable woman in many ways -- if you read any interviews with Les, he barely ever goes a few sentences without saying something about how much she did for him. That's one of the defining characteristics of Les Paul's life, really -- his admiration for his mother. There were two more things that characterised him though. The first was that pretty much dead on, every ten years, he would have some major health crisis that would put him out of commission for a year. The other was his lifelong devotion to learning, which meant that he used those health crises as an opportunity to learn something new. This love of learning could be seen from his very early days. When he was just learning the guitar, the singing cowboy star Gene Autry came to town. Gene Autry was a star of Western music -- the very biggest star in the country -- and his music was a cleaned-up, politer, version of the kind of music Bob Wills played: [excerpt: Gene Autry "Back in the Saddle Again"]. Les and his friend went to every show in the residency, and after a couple of nights, Gene Autry stopped the show in the middle of the set and said "something strange has been happening here -- every time I play an F chord, and *only* when I play an F chord, there's a flash of light. What's going on, how is this happening?" It turned out that Les had been wanting to learn how Autry made that chord shape, so he'd been there with a pencil and paper, and his friend had a torch, and every time he played the chord Les Paul wanted to learn, the torch would come on and Les would be trying to sketch the shape of Autry's fingers. Autry invited Les Paul onto the stage, showed him how to make the chord, and had him play a couple of songs. A few years later, when Autry moved from radio to films, he suggested Les Paul take over his radio show. So Les Paul was always fascinated by learning, and always trying to improve himself and his equipment. And once he decided to be a guitarist, he also decided to electrify his guitar, a full decade before electric guitars became a widespread instrument. He explained that when he was starting out, he was playing at a hotdog stand, using a homemade microphone for his voice and harmonica -- the microphone was made out of bits of an old telephone, and it was plugged in to his mother's radio. People who were listening liked his performances, but they said they wished the guitar was as loud as his voice -- so he took his *dad's* radio, too, and connected it to a record player needle, which he jammed into the body of his guitar. Once electric guitars started being manufactured, Paul started playing them, but he never liked them. The electric guitars of the late 1930s were what we'd now call electro-acoustics -- they were acoustic guitars, playable as such, but with pickups. There were two main problems with them -- firstly, they were very prone to feedback, because the hollow body of the guitar would resonate. And secondly, most of the sonic energy from the strings was going into the guitar itself, so there was no sustain. Paul came up with a simple solution to this problem, which he called "the log". The log was almost exactly what the name would suggest. It was a plank, to which were nailed some pickups, strings, and tuning pegs. On the front was attached the front of a normal guitar -- not anything that would actually resonate, just to make it look like a proper guitar. But basically it was just a lump of wood. Les Paul wasn't the first person to build a solid-body electric guitar -- but as he put it himself later "there may be some guy out there in Iowa says he built the guitar in 1925, for all I know, and he may have. I only know what I was doing and I was out there weaving my own basket, and there wasn't anybody else around and it had to be done.". He perfected the solid-body guitar during the first of his years of illness -- he'd been running an illegal radio station, accidentally stuck his hand in the transmitter, and not only got an electric shock but had a load of equipment fall on him. By the time he was well enough to work again, he had the idea perfected. He took his solid-body guitar idea to Gibson in 1941, but they weren't interested -- no-one was going to want to buy a solid guitar. It wasn't until Leo Fender started selling his guitars in 1950 that Gibson realised that it might be worth doing. But by then Les Paul had become one of the most famous guitarists in the country. Even before he became hugely famous, though, he'd been one of the *best* guitarists in the country. In 1944, when the guitarist Oscar Moore was unable at the last minute to play at Jazz At The Philharmonic -- the first of what would eventually become the most famous series of jazz concerts ever -- Les Paul was drafted in at short notice, and the live recordings of that show are some of the greatest instrumental jazz you'll hear, at a time when the borders between jazz, R&B, and pop music were more fluid than they became. Listen, for example, to this excerpt from "Blues, 1, 2, & 3". [excerpt] The honking saxophone player there is Ilinois Jacquet, the man who we talked about in episode one of this podcast, who invented R&B saxophone. The pianist there was also pretty great -- he was, in fact, a pianist who was already regarded as one of the best in the business, even before he started to sing, and who later had two further, separate careers under his more familiar name – one in R&B in which he inspired a generation of singers like Charles Brown and Ray Charles, and one in pop, where he became one of the great ballad singers of all time. He's credited on the track we just heard as "Shorty Nadine" for contractual reasons, but you probably know him better as Nat "King" Cole. Listening to that you can hear musicians performing at a time when jazz and R&B and rock and roll were all still sort of the same thing, before they all went off in their different directions, and it's hard not to wish that that cross-fertilisation had continued a while longer. But it didn't, and it would be easy to imagine that as a result Les Paul, who was absolutely a jazz musician, would make no further contributions to rock and roll after his popularising the solid-body electric guitar. But we haven't even got to his real importance yet. Yes, something he did that was even more important than the Les Paul guitar. It started when his mother told him she'd enjoyed something she heard him play on the radio. He'd replied that it wasn't him she'd heard, and she'd said "well, all those electric guitar players sound the same. If you want to be a real success, you want to sound different from everyone else -- at least different enough that your own mother can recognise you". And over the years, Les Paul had learned to listen to his mother -- she'd been the one who'd got him playing guitar, and she'd been the one who had told him to go and see Bob Wills, the day he'd ended up meeting Charlie Christian for the first time. So he went and spent a lot of time working on a sound that was totally different from anything else, spending days and weeks alone. He stopped working with his trio -- and started working with a young country singer who renamed herself Mary Ford, who Gene Autry had introduced him to and who he soon married -- and he eventually came up with a whole new idea. This episode is primarily about Les Paul, because he was such an astonishing force of nature, but it's worth making clear that Mary Ford was very much an equal partner in their sixteen years together. She was an excellent singer -- *far* better than Les Paul was -- and also a pretty good guitarist herself. On their live dates she would play rhythm guitar, and often the two would do a comedy guitar duel, with her copying everything Les Paul played. She was a vital part of the sound -- and of the sonic innovations the records contained, because one of the things they did for the first time was to have her sing very close to the mic -- a totally different technique than had been used before, which gave her vocals a different tone which almost everyone imitated. But that wasn't the only odd sound on the records. It sounded like Les Paul was playing two or three guitars at the same time, playing the same part. And sometimes he was playing notes that were higher than any guitar could play. And sometimes, when Mary Ford was singing... it sounded as if there were two or more of her! This was such an unusual sound that on the duo's radio and TV appearances they made a joke of it -- they pretended that Paul had invented a "Les Paulveriser", which could duplicate everything, and that for example he could use the Les Paulveriser on Mary, so there'd be multiple Marys and she could get the vacuum cleaning done quicker. It was the fifties. But of course, what Paul was actually doing was overdubbing -- recording one guitar part, and then going back and recording a second over it. He'd been fascinated by the idea for decades and he'd first done it as an experiment when he was still with the trio. He'd wanted to rehearse a song on his own, but with the arrangement the rest of the band played, so he'd recorded himself playing all the parts, using a disc cutter and playing along with previous takes. This didn't give good results until the introduction of magnetic tape recording in the very late forties -- when you recorded directly to a disc there was so much surface noise, and recording quality was so poor, that no-one would even think of recording overdubs. But in 1945, American soldiers brought back a new technology from Germany as spoils of war -- high fidelity tape recording. With magnetic tape you could record sound with orders of magnitude less noise than by cutting to disc. And Bing Crosby, who often worked with Les Paul, was the first person to see the possibilities of this new technology (in his case, for pre-recording his radio shows so they didn't have to go out live, which meant he could record them in batches and have more time to spend on the golf course). Les Paul was far more technical than Crosby, though, and far more aware of what could happen if, for example, you had two tape recorders. Or if you ran one slow so that when you played it back at normal speed everything sounded sped up. Or a dozen other obvious tricks that occurred to him, but had never occurred to anyone else. So on those Les Paul and Mary Ford records, literally every instrument was Les Paul on the guitar. The bass was Les Paul's guitar slowed down to half speed, the percussion was his guitar, *everything* was his guitar. So now we come to "How High the Moon" itself. This is a song that originally dated back to 1940 -- the Benny Goodman band had the first hit with it, and indeed Les Paul had recorded a version of it in 1945, with his trio. [excerpt Les Paul Trio version of "How High the Moon"] That was right before his experiments with tape recording started. Shortly after the first results of those were released, in 1948, there was another one of those every-decade health problems. In this case, Mary Ford was driving the two of them from Wisconsin to LA. She was from California, and not used to driving in winter weather. She hit a patch of ice and the two of them went off the road. Les Paul spent hours in ice water with multiple bones broken before anyone could get him to a hospital. For a while, it was believed it would not be possible to save his right arm -- and then for a while after that the doctors believed they could save it, but it would permanently be fixed in a single position if they did, as his elbow would be unfixable. He told them to try their best, and to set it in a position with his hand over his navel, because if it was in that position he could still play guitar. As a precaution, he spent his time in hospital drawing up plans for a synthesiser, ten years before Robert Moog invented his, because he figured he could play the synth with one arm. When he got better, he and Mary Ford recorded a new version of "How High The Moon", but at first the record label didn't want to release it: [Excerpt Les Paul and Mary Ford: "How High The Moon"] That record sat unreleased for eighteen months, until 1951, because Jim Conkling at Capitol said that there'd been seventy-five recordings of the song before and none of them had been a hit. Conkling thought this was because the lyrics don't make sense, but Les Paul was insistent that no-one was going to listen to the lyrics anyway. "It doesn't matter what Mary sang or if it was done by the Four Nosebleeds. It didn't make any difference, because that wasn't what made the record. It was the arrangement and the performance." And he was right -- the version by Les Paul and Mary Ford was an absolute phenomenon. It spent twenty-five weeks in the Billboard pop charts, nine of them at number one, and while it was at number one another Paul and Ford track was at number two. Even more astonishingly, it also made number two on the rhythm and blues charts. Remember, that was a chart that was specifically aimed at the black audience, and between 1950 and 1955 only five records by white performers made the R&B charts at all, mostly very early rock and roll records. "How High the Moon" might easily seem an odd fit for the R&B charts. To twenty-first century ears, it's hard to imagine anything more white-sounding. But what it does, absolutely, share with the music that was charting on the R&B charts at the time, and the reason it appealed to the R&B audience, is a delight in finding totally new sounds. The R&B charts at the time were where you looked for experimentation, for people trying new things. And also, there's that rhythm on the record -- this is entirely a record that's driven by the rhythm. It's not quite dance music, not like the jump bands -- and there's only guitar and vocals on it, something which would be absolutely out of the ordinary for rhythm and blues records at the time with their emphasis on piano and saxophone -- but what there is in that guitar playing is personal expression. And R&B was all about individual expression. Les Paul was doing something which was qualitatively different both from jazz and from R&B, and so it's not surprising that he ended up crossing over from one market to another. But in doing so, he also invented the way the guitar was to be used in rock and roll music. There's a lot of Western Swing about what he's doing on "How High the Moon", unsurprisingly. But while the rhythm guitar is keeping to the same kind of rhythms that the Western Swing people would use, the lead guitar is much more aggressive and forceful than anything you got in country or western music at the time. It's playing jazz and R&B lines -- it's playing, in fact, the kind of thing that a saxophone player like Illinois Jacquet might play, full of aggressive stabs and skronks. And more than that, he invented the way the recording studio would be used in rock and roll. Before Les Paul and Mary Ford's early records, the recording studio was used solely as a way of reproducing the sound of live instruments as accurately as possible. After them, it became a way to create new sounds that could not be made live. One thing we're going to see over and again in this series is the way technological change, artistic change and social change all feed back into each other. The 1950s was a time of absolutely unprecedented technological change in America, and people went from, in the beginning of the decade, listening to recordings played at 78RPM, often on wind-up gramophones, made of breakable shellac, to listening to high fidelity forty-five RPM singles and long-playing records which could -- shockingly -- last more than four minutes a side. Radio went from being something that had to be listened to as a family because of the size of the radiogram to something a teenager could listen to in bed under the blankets on a transistor radio, or something that you could even have on in your car! The combination of these changes made music into something that could be personal as well as communal. Teenagers didn't have to share the music with their parents. All of that was still to come, of course, and we'll look at those things as they happen during our history. But "How High the Moon" was the first and best sign of what was to come, as the 1940s gave way to the 1950s, and music entered a totally new age. Les Paul kept playing the guitar into his nineties. Interviewed in his late seventies, when his arthritis was so bad he only had movement in two fingers, with all the others so stiff they just had to stay where he put them, he said he played better than he had when he had ten fingers, because he'd had to learn more about the instrument to do it this way. In the end, his arthritis got to the point that he could no longer move any fingers on either hand -- so he just let his fingers stay where they were, but would move his whole hand to play single notes and bar chords -- he could lift his fingers up and down, just not move the knuckles. But he could still play. This is him on his ninetieth birthday: [excerpt: Les Paul 90th birthday concert “Sweet Georgia Brown”] So it turns out you don't even need the two fingers Django had left, not if you have the kind of mind that gets you into the rock and roll hall of fame *and* the inventors' hall of fame. Les Paul died, aged ninety-four, in 2009.

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories
Haussner's (Encore)

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2018 2:30


On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium, as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point.

Matturday
#40 Tim Conkling (Antihero)

Matturday

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2017 50:05


#40 Tim Conkling (Antihero) by Matthew Squaire

Gil Sandler's Baltimore Stories

On the afternoon of December 18, 1999, watched anxiously in auctioneering house in Timonium , as the auctioneer rattled off the artifacts for sale from the once and famous and now defunct Haussner's restaurant - weeks earlier a reigning queen at Eastern Avenue and Conkling streets. In the end the memories of thousands of lunches and dinners and of millions of dollars of artwork and 73 years of Baltimore times winds up in a ball of twine - on display in an antique shop on Fells Point. ?This episode originally aired March 2016.

Gaming - The Podcast
IBD #17 - Tim Conkling on Antihero, tabletop games & video game design

Gaming - The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2017 65:14


In this episode of the IBD podcast we talk to Tim Conkling, creator of strategy title and digital board game, Antihero.  We discuss design inspiration, Steam reviews, AI programming and curiously titled locations, such as the Salty Nonce and Windy Bottom. Before all of that, however, we start with talk of games that have made the leap from the physical tabletop to the virtual one. Games such as Settlers of Catan, Ticket to Ride, Talisman, Warhammer Quest and many more besides, and to what extent Tim played those games for the purposes of education, motivation and inspiration for his own development journey of Antihero. Brought to you by the writers and creators of Independent By Design: Art & Stories of Indie Game Creation, the Indie By Design Podcast (IBD) is the show that goes behind the scenes to explore the world of game design and game designers. Visit us at indiebydesign.net - Twitter: @indiebydesign - Facebook/independentbydesign Music by Ben Prunty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Indie By Design Podcast
IBD #17 - Tim Conkling on Antihero, tabletop games & video game design

Indie By Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2017 65:14


In this episode of the IBD podcast we talk to Tim Conkling, creator of strategy title and digital board game, Antihero.  We discuss design inspiration, Steam reviews, AI programming and curiously titled locations, such as the Salty Nonce and Windy Bottom. Before all of that, however, we start with talk of games that have made the leap from the physical tabletop to the virtual one. Games such as Settlers of Catan, Ticket to Ride, Talisman, Warhammer Quest and many more besides, and to what extent Tim played those games for the purposes of education, motivation and inspiration for his own development journey of Antihero. Brought to you by the writers and creators of Independent By Design: Art & Stories of Indie Game Creation, the Indie By Design Podcast (IBD) is the show that goes behind the scenes to explore the world of game design and game designers. Visit us at indiebydesign.net - Twitter: @indiebydesign - Facebook/independentbydesign Music by Ben Prunty. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Everett Public Library Podcasts
The Fate of Greenland by Philip Conkling

Everett Public Library Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2012 2:18


The Lone Reader; one librarian talks about the books he reads.   Music: The Four Seasons, by Antonio VivaldiU.S. Air Force Band     time: 0:02:18size: 2.15 mb