Podcasts about Blue Sky

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Latest podcast episodes about Blue Sky

How Was Your Week, Honey?
311: In Stitches

How Was Your Week, Honey?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 82:23


The Maier's sit down together after an eventful week that included a trip to the ER! Topics include: married couples, the cut, the hospital, car accidents, shopping cart etiquette, Blue Sky cocktail, pool update, SOW, OLN is back, and Elvis. Reach Us:  @kmaemaier  @chrismaierbc  @hwywhoney  hwywhoney@gmail.com

Dirt Church MTB
DCMTB - ep. 30 (Christsonthy and Blue Sky MTB)

Dirt Church MTB

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 86:06


And that's a wrap on season one! Hard to believe we made it, but here we are. We got together with Christsonthy from Blue Sky MTB to close out our first season, and we went out with a bang. We covered it all on this one.  Huge thanks to everyone that has joined us along the way. Stay tuned for more great stuff in the future, but don't skip out on this one. Its a full on barn burner.

Demystifying the Akashic Records
#69: Case Study 20 - Akashic Light Reading & Healing Session with Mike

Demystifying the Akashic Records

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 41:37


Welcome to Episode 69 on Case Study 20 - Akashic Light Reading & Healing Session with Mike. This is Mike's second Akashic Records session with me. In this session, Mike asked: (1) Will the business of co-living in real estate be suitable for him & his wife to venture into? (2) For this collaboration with a company and two persons, will they be credible to work with? (3) Is it advisable for them to sell the flat by themselves, or should they find someone to help them sell? Is this mentor helpful or reliable in guiding them to buy properties that won't make them lose money? (4) When Mike returns to work next month, is there any advice on areas that he should focus on developing when back at work? (5) For the mistakes made in doing investment & trading in stock markets, is this part of his learning journey? Anything that he should take note moving ahead, as he continues to invest & trade? (6) For his experience shared, is this what the Akashic Masters meant by “a team of Akashic Masters and Pure Light Beings who would join him in his meditation”? (7) Not long ago, Mike felt a being's presence that felt negative emotionally. He thought that he might have come across this being from outside. Is it true, or is it part of his team? (8) For the blockage experienced when practising Samadhi meditation, what is the problem he is facing? (9) Whether there is opportunity for him & his wife to have a child naturally? Or should they look at other means such as adoption? (10) Is it due to past karmic actions that they have done that have resulted in this? If they sincerely repent some of the past actions, will this help? (11) For Mike's father, what is their relationship in the past life? Is there anything that Mike can do to benefit his father in this life, so that it can value-add to his father in his next life? What more can Mike do to help his father spiritually, so that his father can have a better future life? Credits to music used: Under a Blue Sky by Sefy TofanTo read the transcript, click here.

Software Engineering Daily
Optimizing Cloud Data Platforms with Mingsheng Hong

Software Engineering Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 55:12 Very Popular


Mingsheng Hong, is CEO and co-founder (along with Zheng Shao) of Bluesky. He is a thought leader for machine learning and has built data infrastructure to support some of the world's most challenging workloads. Most recently, Mingsheng was at Google, where he led teams to build storage and querying stacks that power Google's $100 billion The post Optimizing Cloud Data Platforms with Mingsheng Hong appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

Podcast – Software Engineering Daily
Optimizing Cloud Data Platforms with Mingsheng Hong

Podcast – Software Engineering Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 56:41


Mingsheng Hong, is CEO and co-founder (along with Zheng Shao) of Bluesky. He is a thought leader for machine learning and has built data infrastructure to support some of the world's most challenging workloads. Most recently, Mingsheng was at Google, where he led teams to build storage and querying stacks that power Google's $100 billion The post Optimizing Cloud Data Platforms with Mingsheng Hong appeared first on Software Engineering Daily.

CLM Activa Radio
Retrocedemos en el Tiempo 05-01-2023

CLM Activa Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 58:34


FOUR LITTLE DIAMONDS (1983) CAN'T GET IT OUT OF MY HEAD (1974) ALL OVER THE WORLD (1980) SECRET MESSAGES (1983) LONG BLACK ROAD (2001) ROCKARIA (1976) THE DIARY OF HORACE WIMP (1979) SHANGRI-LA (1976) TWILIGHT (1981) MR. BLUE SKY (1977) SWEET TALKIN WOMAN (1977) ROCK'n'ROLL IS KING (1983)

The Paul Revere Show
Bringing in the New Year with Blue Sky Waukesha

The Paul Revere Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 44:13


Mark sits down with the president of Blue Sky Waukesha, Kristin Hansen and the organization’s director of voter engagement, Lauren Yoder. They talk about the mission of Blue Sky Waukesha, their successes in 2022, and look forward to the elections of the coming year. Learn more about Blue Sky Waukesha at: https://www.blueskywaukesha.org/Civic Media

Disney Conversations
Tour 84 Blue Sky WDW 2023 and Beyond

Disney Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 53:46


Tour 84 takes a look at some of the "Blue Sky" ideas shown to us at the D23 Expo this past September. We talk about the ideas that came out of Imagineering, and add a few of our own as well. I am joined this week by my co-host, Diane Whiting, and our special guest tour guide Janette Pellegrini. Together we have a lively conversation with a rabbit trail or 2 thrown in along the way for variety. We hope you enjoy this tour and will share it with your Disney loving friends! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/matthew-wallace9/message

Web3 101
S1E17|最热社交协议Lens:激进的DeFi实验开启全新Web3社交?

Web3 101

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 42:17


马斯克提出的Twitter 2.0计划,再次让Web3社交回归大家的视野,当下热度最高,最符合Web3理念的去中心化社交协议Lens,将诸如「关注」和「转发」这些常见社交功能的权限变成NFT并资产化,希望让隶属大公司的社交图谱,成用户拥有的通用协议。 这期让我们以Lens为例,聊聊去中心化的社交是否可行?相比长毛象和Bluesky,Lens是理想的去中心化社交协议吗?这些违背直觉的做法,是否能让Web2时代被低估的信息被更好地货币化? 主播|阿伟 Awaei ,Twitter:@web3awaei (https://twitter.com/web3awaei) 嘉宾|刘果, Matters Lab (https://matters-lab.io/) 联合创始人&CTO,Twitter:@GuoLiu (https://twitter.com/_GuoLiu) 【你将听到】 01:35 Lens VS Twitter 2.0 VS Bluesky 02:49 Lens将社交功能NFT化,资产化 06:52 反直觉的设置,让「关注」变得可交易 12:25 让「转发」变成稀有的副本进行售卖 16:47 Web3能否货币化社交关系,非依靠注意力经济? 21:03 资产化之前,Web3需要以新的方式将人组织起来 21:58 Lens未必是Web3社交协议模板,但方向值得关注 26:04 Lens由DeFi协议Aave团队开发 28:40 提前模块化VS渐进式去中心化 31:49 Lens生态亮眼产品少,人群极客,投机属性强 35:16 月活过万,Lens的链上数据还不错 35:53 5%用户渗透率,是社交产品的发力点 【相关播客与文章】 * 马斯克首曝 Twitter 2.0,将支持长推文、视频、支付等功能 (https://www.ithome.com/0/657/001.htm) * Lens公开信 (https://www.lens.xyz/letter) * 刘果:为共创内容设计所有权 (https://www.caa-ins.org/archives/8695) * 朱啸虎关于社交产品的观点Twitter (https://twitter.com/xiaohu_zhu/status/1600902294257946624) * S1E14|智能合约钱包为WEB3引入10亿用户?EOA/CA/账户抽象科普 (https://web3101.fireside.fm/23) 【相关人物与术语】 Lens官网 (https://www.lens.xyz/) Dune上的Lens数据看板 (https://dune.com/bhndt/niftytable) Aave (https://aave.com/):知名DeFi协议 Stani Kulechov (https://twitter.com/StaniKulechov):Aave、Lens创始人 DWeb Decentralized Web 去中心化网络 DWeb 代表产品:长毛象(Mastodon (https://joinmastodon.org/))、Bluesky (https://blueskyweb.org/) ActivityPub (https://www.w3.org/TR/activitypub/):长毛象使用协议 Web3早期社交探索产品:Steemit (https://steemit.com/)、hive (https://hive.io/) Planet (https://www.planetable.xyz/):Web3开源建站工具 Loot (https://www.lootproject.com/):2021 火爆一时的NFT Aragon (https://aragon.org/):知名DAO工具 海外类「知识星球」产品:Patron (https://www.patreon.com/)、substack (https://substack.com/) Account Abstraction 账户抽象 Seed Phrase 助记词 Progressive Decentralization 渐进式去中心化 【BGM】 Mumbai — Ooyy 【后期】 Amei 【在这里找到我们】 中国用户:苹果播客|小宇宙 海外用户:Apple Podcast|Google Podcast|Amazon Music|Spotify Twitter:@Web3_101 (https://twitter.com/Web3_101) 【嘉宾言论仅代表个人,本期节目不构成任何投资建议哦】

Say It In Red
Say it in Red | Episode 35: Chaos;Head Noah (Part 2 of 2)

Say It In Red

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 202:35


Have you ever felt the prickling sense of a pair of eyes gazing at you from a place unseen? Are you able to instantly locate the sound of a cellphone ringing anywhere in your room? Do you sometimes see faces in the patterns of woodgrain or on a popcorn ceiling? And, most importantly, has a pink haired girl every broken your arm or hurled you from a building? If so, you may be entitled to damages.  This month, to close out 2022 and our coverage of Chaos;Head Noah, Sara, Runa, and returning guest Meowgon dig deep to excavate the remainder of the main story, play through the alternate endings, and experience the true horror of the Noah experience: The Girls' routes. After following Taku's growing paranoia and increasing entanglement in the NewGen murder cases and the vast conspiracy surrounding di-swords and their wielders, we arrive with him at the top of a skyscraper overlooking the scramble crossing as he finally lays eyes on his own sword. A mild earthquake has somehow caused a record number of casualties, Nanami has been kidnapped, and Rimi has vanished as Taku stands above a crowd of thousands, looks out across the crossing, and reaches for the outline of a di-sword. Unfortunately for him, it will be almost four more chapters until he claims it. Chaos;Head Noah is a remake and update of the original Chaos;Head, originally released in 2008 and only now available in 2022 with an official English version. In this half of our coverage, we'll cover the last five chapters of the core game of Chaos;Head Noah, the additional Crying Sky ending, all of the Girls' Routes and their associated endings, and then the "Blue Sky" ending added to the Noah version, unlocked once you complete every other available ending in the game. After the earthquake that closed out Chapter 5, reports pour in of massive casualties with over 300 injured and over 100 dead, all from a simple 5.6 earthquake which centralized most of its damage exclusively within Shibuya. Taku, however, has far more dire things to worry about as Shogun has sent him a "present" - Nanami's severed right hand, still clutching her cell phone, and wrapped up carefully in a cardboard box. From there, things only get worse for Taku: A mysterious caller tries to force him to manifest his di-sword, his classmates sneer at him after he's humiliated on a live nationwide broadcast, more NewGen murders occur, Sena tries to kill him for inadvertently creating the formula that allows a mind control device to function, and worst of all he tries to go back home. In the end, no matter what path you take through the story, Shibuya lies in ruins. As a note to listeners who want to read along with us, Chaos;Head Noah is a horror game with a long list of graphic, disturbing, and potentially anxiety-inducing topics. While we mention a few of them in our episode, because of the wide variety of delusions present in the game and the breadth of content included, it's impossible for us to list all of the things that come up in even just these first 5 chapters. We encourage you to seek out a list of content warnings before playing.As always, if you enjoy our episodes, please rate and review us wherever you listen to podcasts! You can also find bonus episodes at our patreon at patreon.com/sayitinred and follow us on twitter at sayitinredpod.Content Warnings for this Episode:General warning for murder, death, stabbing, unreality, mind control, discussion of assorted weird ableism, and gore.00:36:20: Body Horror, Corpse Mutilation00:53:30 to 01:00:00: Mind Control, Unreality, Vomiting, Infant Death, Mutilation, Suicide01:09:00: Suicide Attempts01:36:00 to 01:40:00: Body Horror, Mutilation, Graphic Violence, Suicide01:50:30 to 01:52:45: Sexual Assault01:53:00: Body Horror/Impalement02:20:40 to 02:31:00: Discussion of the Incest romance route

The Team Engagement Podcast
Blue Sky Business Consulting

The Team Engagement Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 12:29


Shawn Richards , The CEO and Founder of Blue Sky Business Consulting. 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 160: “Flowers in the Rain” by the Move

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022


Episode 160 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Flowers in the Rain" by the Move, their transition into ELO, and the career of Roy Wood. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-minute bonus episode available, on "The Chipmunk Song" by Canned Heat. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Note I say "And on its first broadcast, as George Martin's theme tune for the new station faded, Tony Blackburn reached for a record." -- I should point out that after Martin's theme fades, Blackburn talks over a brief snatch of a piece by Johnny Dankworth. Resources As so many of the episodes recently have had no Mixcloud due to the number of songs by one artist, I've decided to start splitting the mixes of the recordings excerpted in the podcasts into two parts. Here's part one . I had problems uploading part two, but will attempt to get that up shortly. There are not many books about Roy Wood, and I referred to both of the two that seem to exist -- this biography by John van der Kiste, and this album guide by James R Turner.  I also referred to this biography of Jeff Lynne by van der Kiste, The Electric Light Orchestra Story by Bev Bevan, and Mr Big by Don Arden with Mick Wall.  Most of the more comprehensive compilations of the Move's material are out of print, but this single-CD-plus-DVD anthology is the best compilation that's in print. This is the one collection of Wood's solo and Wizzard hits that seems currently in print, and for those who want to investigate further, this cheap box set has the last Move album, the first ELO album, the first Wizzard album, Wood's solo Boulders, and a later Wood solo album, for the price of a single CD. Transcript Before I start, a brief note. This episode deals with organised crime, and so contains some mild descriptions of violence, and also has some mention of mental illness and drug use, though not much of any of those things. And it's probably also important to warn people that towards the end there's some Christmas music, including excerpts of a song that is inescapable at this time of year in the UK, so those who work in retail environments and the like may want to listen to this later, at a point when they're not totally sick of hearing Christmas records. Most of the time, the identity of the party in government doesn't make that much of a difference to people's everyday lives.  At least in Britain, there tends to be a consensus ideology within the limits of which governments of both main parties tend to work. They will make a difference at the margins, and be more or less competent, and more or less conservative or left-wing, more or less liberal or authoritarian, but life will, broadly speaking, continue along much as before for most people. Some will be a little better or worse off, but in general steering the ship of state is a matter of a lot of tiny incremental changes, not of sudden u-turns. But there have been a handful of governments that have made big, noticeable, changes to the structure of society, reforms that for better or worse affect the lives of every person in the country. Since the end of the Second World War there have been two UK governments that made economic changes of this nature. The Labour government under Clement Atlee which came into power in 1945, and which dramatically expanded the welfare state, introduced the National Health Service, and nationalised huge swathes of major industries, created the post-war social democratic consensus which would be kept to with only minor changes by successive governments of both major parties for decades. The next government to make changes to the economy of such a radical nature was the Conservative government which came to power under Margaret Thatcher in 1979, which started the process of unravelling that social democratic consensus and replacing it with a far more hypercapitalist economic paradigm, which would last for the next several decades. It's entirely possible that the current Conservative government, in leaving the EU, has made a similarly huge change, but we won't know that until we have enough distance from the event to know what long-term changes it's caused. Those are economic changes. Arguably at least as impactful was the Labour government led by Harold Wilson that came to power in 1964, which did not do much to alter the economic consensus, but revolutionised the social order at least as much. Largely because of the influence of Roy Jenkins, the Home Secretary for much of that time, between 1964 and the end of the sixties, Britain abolished the death penalty for murder, decriminalised some sex acts between men in private, abolished corporal punishment in prisons, legalised abortion in certain circumstances, and got rid of censorship in the theatre. They also vastly increased spending on education, and made many other changes. By the end of their term, Britain had gone from being a country with laws reflecting a largely conservative, authoritarian, worldview to one whose laws were some of the most liberal in Europe, and society had started changing to match. There were exceptions, though, and that government did make some changes that were illiberal. They brought in increased restrictions on immigration, starting a worrying trend that continues to this day of governments getting ever crueler to immigrants, and they added LSD to the list of illegal drugs. And they brought in the Marine Broadcasting Offences Act, banning the pirate stations. We've mentioned pirate radio stations very briefly, but never properly explained them. In Britain, at this point, there was a legal monopoly on broadcasting. Only the BBC could run a radio station in the UK, and thanks to agreements with the Musicians' Union, the BBC could only play a very small amount of recorded music, with everything else having to be live performances or spoken word. And because it had a legal obligation to provide something for everyone, that meant the tiny amount of recorded music that was played on the radio had to cover all genres, meaning that even while Britain was going through the most important changes in its musical history, pop records were limited to an hour or two a week on British radio. Obviously, that wasn't going to last while there was money to be made, and the record companies in particular wanted to have somewhere to showcase their latest releases. At the start of the sixties, Radio Luxembourg had become popular, broadcasting from continental Europe but largely playing shows that had been pre-recorded in London. But of course, that was far enough away that it made listening to the transmissions difficult. But a solution presented itself: [Excerpt: The Fortunes, "Caroline"] Radio Caroline still continues to this day, largely as an Internet-based radio station, but in the mid-sixties it was something rather different. It was one of a handful of radio stations -- the pirate stations -- that broadcast from ships in international waters. The ships would stay three miles off the coast of Britain, close enough for their broadcasts to be clearly heard in much of the country, but outside Britain's territorial waters. They soon became hugely popular, with Radio Caroline and Radio London the two most popular, and introduced DJs like Tony Blackburn, Dave Lee Travis, Kenny Everett, and John Peel to the airwaves of Britain. The stations ran on bribery and advertising, and if you wanted a record to get into the charts one of the things you had to do was bribe one of the big pirate stations to playlist it, and with this corruption came violence, which came to a head when as we heard in the episode on “Here Comes the Night”, in 1966 Major Oliver Smedley, a failed right-wing politician and one of the directors of Radio Caroline, got a gang of people to board an abandoned sea fort from which a rival station was broadcasting and retrieve some equipment he claimed belonged to him. The next day, Reginald Calvert, the owner of the rival station, went to Smedley's home to confront him, and Smedley shot him dead, claiming self-defence. The jury in Smedley's subsequent trial took only a minute to find him not guilty and award him two hundred and fifty guineas to cover his costs. This was the last straw for the government, which was already concerned that the pirates' transmitters were interfering with emergency services transmissions, and that proper royalties weren't being paid for the music broadcast (though since much of the music was only on there because of payola, this seems a little bit of a moot point).  They introduced legislation which banned anyone in the UK from supplying the pirate ships with records or other supplies, or advertising on the stations. They couldn't do anything about the ships themselves, because they were outside British jurisdiction, but they could make sure that nobody could associate with them while remaining in the UK. The BBC was to regain its monopoly (though in later years some commercial radio stations were allowed to operate). But as well as the stick, they needed the carrot. The pirate stations *had* been filling a real need, and the biggest of them were getting millions of listeners every day. So the arrangements with the Musicians' Union and the record labels were changed, and certain BBC stations were now allowed to play a lot more recorded music per day. I haven't been able to find accurate figures anywhere -- a lot of these things were confidential agreements -- but it seems to have been that the so-called "needle time" rules were substantially relaxed, allowing the BBC to separate what had previously been the Light Programme -- a single radio station that played all kinds of popular music, much of it live performances -- into two radio stations that were each allowed to play as much as twelve hours of recorded music per day, which along with live performances and between-track commentary from DJs was enough to allow a full broadcast schedule. One of these stations, Radio 2, was aimed at older listeners, and to start with mostly had programmes of what we would now refer to as Muzak, mixed in with the pop music of an older generation -- crooners and performers like Englebert Humperdinck. But another, Radio 1, was aimed at a younger audience and explicitly modelled on the pirate stations, and featured many of the DJs who had made their names on those stations. And on its first broadcast, as George Martin's theme tune for the new station faded, Tony Blackburn reached for a record. At different times Blackburn has said either that he was just desperately reaching for whatever record came to hand or that he made a deliberate choice because the record he chose had such a striking opening that it would be the perfect way to start a new station: [Excerpt: Tony Blackburn first radio show into "Flowers in the Rain" by the Move] You may remember me talking in the episode on "Here Comes the Night" about how in 1964 Dick Rowe of Decca, the manager Larry Page, and the publicist and co-owner of Radio Caroline Phil Solomon were all trying to promote something called Brumbeat as the answer to Merseybeat – Brummies, for those who don't know, are people from Birmingham. Brumbeat never took off the way Merseybeat did, but several bands did get a chance to make records, among them Gerry Levene and the Avengers: [Excerpt: Gerry Levene and the Avengers, "Dr. Feelgood"] That was the only single the Avengers made, and the B-side wasn't even them playing, but a bunch of session musicians under the direction of Bert Berns, and the group split up soon afterwards, but several of the members would go on to have rather important careers. According to some sources, one of their early drummers was John Bohnam, who you can be pretty sure will be turning up later in the story, while the drummer on that track was Graeme Edge, who would later go on to co-found the Moody Blues.  But today it's the guitarist we'll be looking at. Roy Wood had started playing music when he was very young -- he'd had drum lessons when he was five years old, the only formal musical tuition he ever had, and he'd played harmonica around working men's clubs as a kid. And as a small child he'd loved classical music, particularly Tchaikovsky and Elgar. But it wasn't until he was twelve that he decided that he wanted to be a guitarist. He went to see the Shadows play live, and was inspired by the sound of Hank Marvin's guitar, which he later described as sounding "like it had been dipped in Dettol or something": [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Apache"] He started begging his parents for a guitar, and got one for his thirteenth birthday -- and by the time he was fourteen he was already in a band, the Falcons, whose members were otherwise eighteen to twenty years old, but who needed a lead guitarist who could play like Marvin. Wood had picked up the guitar almost preternaturally quickly, as he would later pick up every instrument he turned his hand to, and he'd also got the equipment. His friend Jeff Lynne later said "I first saw Roy playing in a church hall in Birmingham and I think his group was called the Falcons. And I could tell he was dead posh because he had a Fender Stratocaster and a Vox AC30 amplifier. The business at the time. I mean, if you've got those, that's it, you're made." It was in the Falcons that Wood had first started trying to write songs, at first instrumentals in the style of the Shadows, but then after the Beatles hit the charts he realised it was possible for band members to write their own material, and started hesitantly trying to write a few actual songs. Wood had moved on from the Falcons to Gerry Levene's band, one of the biggest local bands in Birmingham, when he was sixteen, which is also when he left formal education, dropping out from art school -- he's later said that he wasn't expelled as such, but that he and the school came to a mutual agreement that he wouldn't go back there. And when Gerry Levene and the Avengers fell apart after their one chance at success hadn't worked out, he moved on again to an even bigger band. Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders had had two singles out already, both produced by Cliff Richard's producer Norrie Paramor, and while they hadn't charted they were clearly going places. They needed a new guitarist, and Wood was by far the best of the dozen or so people who auditioned, even though Sheridan was very hesitant at first -- the Night Riders were playing cabaret, and all dressed smartly at all times, and this sixteen-year-old guitarist had turned up wearing clothes made by his sister and ludicrous pointy shoes. He was the odd man out, but he was so good that none of the other players could hold a candle to him, and he was in the Night Riders by the time of their third single, "What a Sweet Thing That Was": [Excerpt: Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders, "What a Sweet Thing That Was"] Sheridan later said "Roy was and still is, in my opinion, an unbelievable talent. As stubborn as a mule and a complete extrovert. Roy changed the group by getting us into harmonies and made us realize there was better material around with more than three chords to play. This was our turning point and we became a group's group and a bigger name." -- though there are few other people who would describe Wood as extroverted, most people describing him as painfully shy off-stage. "What a  Sweet Thing That Was" didn't have any success, and nor did its follow-up, "Here I Stand", which came out in January 1965. But by that point, Wood had got enough of a reputation that he was already starting to guest on records by other bands on the Birmingham scene, like "Pretty Things" by Danny King and the Mayfair Set: [Excerpt: Danny King and the Mayfair Set, "Pretty Things"] After their fourth single was a flop, Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders changed their name to Mike Sheridan's Lot, and the B-side of their first single under the new name was a Roy Wood song, the first time one of his songs was recorded. Unfortunately the song, modelled on "It's Not Unusual" by Tom Jones, didn't come off very well, and Sheridan blamed himself for what everyone was agreed was a lousy sounding record: [Excerpt: Mike Sheridan's Lot, "Make Them Understand"] Mike Sheridan's Lot put out one final single, but the writing was on the wall for the group. Wood left, and soon after so did Sheridan himself. The remaining members regrouped under the name The Idle Race, with Wood's friend Jeff Lynne as their new singer and guitarist. But Wood wouldn't remain without a band for long. He'd recently started hanging out with another band, Carl Wayne and the Vikings, who had also released a couple of singles, on Pye: [Excerpt: Carl Wayne and the Vikings, "What's the Matter Baby"] But like almost every band from Birmingham up to this point, the Vikings' records had done very little, and their drummer had quit, and been replaced by Bev Bevan, who had been in yet another band that had gone nowhere, Denny Laine and the Diplomats, who had released one single under the name of their lead singer Nicky James, featuring the Breakaways, the girl group who would later sing on "Hey Joe", on backing vocals: [Excerpt: Nicky James, "My Colour is Blue"] Bevan had joined Carl Wayne's group, and they'd recorded one track together, a cover version of "My Girl", which was only released in the US, and which sank without a trace: [Excerpt: Carl Wayne and the Vikings, "My Girl"] It was around this time that Wood started hanging around with the Vikings, and they would all complain about how if you were playing the Birmingham circuit you were stuck just playing cover versions, and couldn't do anything more interesting.  They were also becoming more acutely aware of how successful they *could* have been, because one of the Brumbeat bands had become really big. The Moody Blues, a supergroup of players from the best bands in Birmingham who featured Bev Bevan's old bandmate Denny Laine and Wood's old colleague Graeme Edge, had just hit number one with their version of "Go Now": [Excerpt: The Moody Blues, "Go Now"] So they knew the potential for success was there, but they were all feeling trapped. But then Ace Kefford, the bass player for the Vikings, went to see Davy Jones and the Lower Third playing a gig: [Excerpt: Davy Jones and the Lower Third, "You've Got a Habit of Leaving"] Also at the gig was Trevor Burton, the guitarist for Danny King and the Mayfair Set. The two of them got chatting to Davy Jones after the gig, and eventually the future David Bowie told them that the two of them should form their own band if they were feeling constricted in their current groups. They decided to do just that, and they persuaded Carl Wayne from Kefford's band to join them, and got in Wood.  Now they just needed a drummer. Their first choice was John Bonham, the former drummer for Gerry Levene and the Avengers who was now drumming in a band with Kefford's uncle and Nicky James from the Diplomats. But Bonham and Wayne didn't get on, and so Bonham decided to remain in the group he was in, and instead they turned to Bev Bevan, the Vikings' new drummer.  (Of the other two members of the Vikings, one went on to join Mike Sheridan's Lot in place of Wood, before leaving at the same time as Sheridan and being replaced by Lynne, while the other went on to join Mike Sheridan's New Lot, the group Sheridan formed after leaving his old group. The Birmingham beat group scene seems to have only had about as many people as there were bands, with everyone ending up a member of twenty different groups). The new group called themselves the Move, because they were all moving on from other groups, and it was a big move for all of them. Many people advised them not to get together, saying they were better off where they were, or taking on offers they'd got from more successful groups -- Carl Wayne had had an offer from a group called the Spectres, who would later become famous as Status Quo, while Wood had been tempted by Tony Rivers and the Castaways, a group who at the time were signed to Immediate Records, and who did Beach Boys soundalikes and covers: [Excerpt: Tony Rivers and the Castaways, "Girl Don't Tell Me"] Wood was a huge fan of the Beach Boys and would have fit in with Rivers, but decided he'd rather try something truly new. After their first gig, most of the people who had warned against the group changed their minds. Bevan's best friend, Bobby Davis, told Bevan that while he'd disliked all the other groups Bevan had played in, he liked this one. (Davis would later become a famous comedian, and have a top five single himself in the seventies, produced by Jeff Lynne and with Bevan on the drums, under his stage name Jasper Carrott): [Excerpt: Jasper Carrott, "Funky Moped"] Most of their early sets were cover versions, usually of soul and Motown songs, but reworked in the group's unique style. All five of the band could sing, four of them well enough to be lead vocalists in their own right (Bevan would add occasional harmonies or sing novelty numbers) and so they became known for their harmonies -- Wood talked at the time about how he wanted the band to have Beach Boys harmonies but over instruments that sounded like the Who. And while they were mostly doing cover versions live, Wood was busily writing songs. Their first recording session was for local radio, and at that session they did cover versions of songs by Brenda Lee, the Isley Brothers, the Orlons, the Marvelettes, and Betty Everett, but they also performed four songs written by Wood, with each member of the front line taking a lead vocal, like this one with Kefford singing: [Excerpt: The Move, "You're the One I Need"] The group were soon signed by Tony Secunda, the manager of the Moody Blues, who set about trying to get the group as much publicity as possible. While Carl Wayne, as the only member who didn't play an instrument, ended up the lead singer on most of the group's early records, Secunda started promoting Kefford, who was younger and more conventionally attractive than Wayne, and who had originally put the group together, as the face of the group, while Wood was doing most of the heavy lifting with the music. Wood quickly came to dislike performing live, and to wish he could take the same option as Brian Wilson and stay home and write songs and make records while the other four went out and performed, so Kefford and Wayne taking the spotlight from him didn't bother him at the time, but it set the group up for constant conflicts about who was actually the leader of the group. Wood was also uncomfortable with the image that Secunda set up for the group. Secunda decided that the group needed to be promoted as "bad boys", and so he got them to dress up as 1930s gangsters, and got them to do things like smash busts of Hitler, or the Rhodesian dictator Ian Smith, on stage. He got them to smash TVs on stage too, and in one publicity stunt he got them to smash up a car, while strippers took their clothes off nearby -- claiming that this was to show that people were more interested in violence than in sex. Wood, who was a very quiet, unassuming, introvert, didn't like this sort of thing, but went along with it. Secunda got the group a regular slot at the Marquee club, which lasted several months until, in one of Secunda's ideas for publicity, Carl Wayne let off smoke bombs on stage which set fire to the stage. The manager came up to try to stop the fire, and Wayne tossed the manager's wig into the flames, and the group were banned from the club (though the ban was later lifted). In another publicity stunt, at the time of the 1966 General Election, the group were photographed with "Vote Tory" posters, and issued an invitation to Edward Heath, the leader of the Conservative Party and a keen amateur musician, to join them on stage on keyboards. Sir Edward didn't respond to the invitation. All this publicity led to record company interest. Joe Boyd tried to sign the group to Elektra Records, but much as with The Pink Floyd around the same time, Jac Holzman wasn't interested. Instead they signed with a new production company set up by Denny Cordell, the producer of the Moody Blues' hits. The contract they signed was written on the back of a nude model, as yet another of Secunda's publicity schemes. The group's first single, "Night of Fear" was written by Wood and an early sign of his interest in incorporating classical music into rock: [Excerpt: The Move, "Night of Fear"] Secunda claimed in the publicity that that song was inspired by taking bad acid and having a bad trip, but in truth Wood was more inspired by brown ale than by brown acid -- he and Bev Bevan would never do any drugs other than alcohol. Wayne did take acid once, but didn't like it, though Burton and Kefford would become regular users of most drugs that were going. In truth, the song was not about anything more than being woken up in the middle of the night by an unexpected sound and then being unable to get back to sleep because you're scared of what might be out there. The track reached number two on the charts in the UK, being kept off the top by "I'm a Believer" by the Monkees, and was soon followed up by another song which again led to assumptions of drug use. "I Can Hear the Grass Grow" wasn't about grass the substance, but was inspired by a letter to Health and Efficiency, a magazine which claimed to be about the nudist lifestyle as an excuse for printing photos of naked people at a time before pornography laws were liberalised. The letter was from a reader saying that he listened to pop music on the radio because "where I live it's so quiet I can hear the grass grow!" Wood took that line and turned it into the group's next single, which reached number five: [Excerpt: The Move, "I Can Hear the Grass Grow"] Shortly after that, the group played two big gigs at Alexandra Palace. The first was the Fourteen-Hour Technicolor Dream, which we talked about in the Pink Floyd episode. There Wood had one of the biggest thrills of his life when he walked past John Lennon, who saluted him and then turned to a friend and said "He's brilliant!" -- in the seventies Lennon would talk about how Wood was one of his two favourite British songwriters, and would call the Move "the Hollies with balls". The other gig they played at Alexandra Palace was a "Free the Pirates" benefit show, sponsored by Radio Caroline, to protest the imposition of the Marine Broadcasting (Offences) Act.  Despite that, it was, of course, the group's next single that was the first one to be played on Radio One. And that single was also the one which kickstarted Roy Wood's musical ambitions.  The catalyst for this was Tony Visconti. Visconti was a twenty-three-year-old American who had been in the music business since he was sixteen, working the typical kind of jobs that working musicians do, like being for a time a member of a latter-day incarnation of the Crew-Cuts, the white vocal group who had had hits in the fifties with covers of "Sh'Boom" and “Earth Angel”. He'd also recorded two singles as a duo with his wife Siegrid, which had gone nowhere: [Excerpt: Tony and Siegrid, "Up Here"] Visconti had been working for the Richmond Organisation as a staff songwriter when he'd met the Move's producer Denny Cordell. Cordell was in the US to promote a new single he had released with a group called Procol Harum, "A Whiter Shade of Pale", and Visconti became the first American to hear the record, which of course soon became a massive hit: [Excerpt: Procol Harum, "A Whiter Shade of Pale"] While he was in New York, Cordell also wanted to record a backing track for one of his other hit acts, Georgie Fame. He told Visconti that he'd booked several of the best session players around, like the jazz trumpet legend Clark Terry, and thought it would be a fun session. Visconti asked to look at the charts for the song, out of professional interest, and Cordell was confused -- what charts? The musicians would just make up an arrangement, wouldn't they? Visconti asked what he was talking about, and Cordell talked about how you made records -- you just got the musicians to come into the studio, hung around while they smoked a few joints and worked out what they were going to play, and then got on with it. It wouldn't take more than about twelve hours to get a single recorded that way. Visconti was horrified, and explained that that might be how they did things in London, but if Cordell tried to make a record that way in New York, with an eight-piece group of session musicians who charged union scale, and would charge double scale for arranging work on top, then he'd bankrupt himself. Cordell went pale and said that the session was in an hour, what was he going to do? Luckily, Cordell had a copy of the demo with him, and Visconti, who unlike Cordell was a trained musician, quickly sat down and wrote an arrangement for him, sketching out parts for guitar, bass, drums, piano, sax, and trumpets. The resulting arrangement wasn't perfect -- Visconti had to write the whole thing in less than an hour with no piano to hand -- but it was good enough that Cordell's production assistant on the track, Harvey Brooks of the group Electric Flag, who also played bass on the track, could tweak it in the studio, and the track was recorded quickly, saving Cordell a fortune: [Excerpt: Georgie Fame, "Because I Love You"] One of the other reasons Cordell had been in the US was that he was looking for a production assistant to work with him in the UK to help translate his ideas into language the musicians could understand. According to Visconti he said that he was going to try asking Phil Spector to be his assistant, and Artie Butler if Spector said no.  Astonishingly, assuming he did ask them, neither Phil Spector nor Artie Butler (who was the arranger for records like "Leader of the Pack" and "I'm a Believer" among many, many, others, and who around this time was the one who suggested to Louis Armstrong that he should record "What a Wonderful World") wanted to fly over to the UK to work as Denny Cordell's assistant, and so Cordell turned back to Visconti and invited him to come over to the UK. The main reason Cordell needed an assistant was that he had too much work on his hands -- he was currently in the middle of recording albums for three major hit groups -- Procol Harum, The Move, and Manfred Mann -- and he physically couldn't be in multiple studios at once. Visconti's first work for him was on a Manfred Mann session, where they were recording the Randy Newman song "So Long Dad" for their next single. Cordell produced the rhythm track then left for a Procol Harum session, leaving Visconti to guide the group through the overdubs, including all the vocal parts and the lead instruments: [Excerpt: Manfred Mann, "So Long Dad"] The next Move single, "Flowers in the Rain", was the first one to benefit from Visconti's arrangement ideas. The band had recorded the track, and Cordell had been unhappy with both the song and performance, thinking it was very weak compared to their earlier singles -- not the first time that Cordell would have a difference of opinion with the band, who he thought of as a mediocre pop group, while they thought of themselves as a heavy rock band who were being neutered in the studio by their producer.  In particular, Cordell didn't like that the band fell slightly out of time in the middle eight of the track. He decided to scrap it, and get the band to record something else. Visconti, though, thought the track could be saved. He told Cordell that what they needed to do was to beat the Beatles, by using a combination of instruments they hadn't thought of. He scored for a quartet of wind instruments -- oboe, flute, clarinet, and French horn, in imitation of Mendelssohn: [Excerpt: The Move, "Flowers in the Rain"] And then, to cover up the slight sloppiness on the middle eight, Visconti had the wind instruments on that section recorded at half speed, so when played back at normal speed they'd sound like pixies and distract from the rhythm section: [Excerpt: The Move, "Flowers in the Rain"] Visconti's instincts were right. The single went to number two, kept off the top spot by Englebert Humperdinck, who spent 1967 keeping pretty much every major British band off number one, and thanks in part to it being the first track played on Radio 1, but also because it was one of the biggest hits of 1967, it's been the single of the Move's that's had the most airplay over the years. Unfortunately, none of the band ever saw a penny in royalties from it. It was because of another of Tony Secunda's bright ideas. Harold Wilson, the Prime Minister at the time, was very close to his advisor Marcia Williams, who started out as his secretary, rose to be his main political advisor, and ended up being elevated to the peerage as Baroness Falkender. There were many, many rumours that Williams was corrupt -- rumours that were squashed by both Wilson and Williams frequently issuing libel writs against newspapers that mentioned them -- though it later turned out that at least some of these were the work of Britain's security services, who believed Wilson to be working for the KGB (and indeed Williams had first met Wilson at a dinner with Khrushchev, though Wilson was very much not a Communist) and were trying to destabilise his government as a result. Their personal closeness also led to persistent rumours that Wilson and Williams were having an affair. And Tony Secunda decided that the best way to promote "Flowers in the Rain" was to print a postcard with a cartoon of Wilson and Williams on it, and send it out. Including sticking a copy through the door of ten Downing St, the Prime Minister's official residence. This backfired *spectacularly*. Wilson sued the Move for libel, even though none of them had known of their manager's plans, and as a result of the settlement it became illegal for any publication to print the offending image (though it can easily be found on the Internet now of course), everyone involved with the record was placed under a permanent legal injunction to never discuss the details of the case, and every penny in performance or songwriting royalties the track earned would go to charities of Harold Wilson's choice. In the 1990s newspaper reports said that the group had up to that point lost out on two hundred thousand pounds in royalties as a result of Secunda's stunt, and given the track's status as a perennial favourite, it's likely they've missed out on a similar amount in the decades since. Incidentally, while every member of the band was banned from ever describing the postcard, I'm not, and since Wilson and Williams are now both dead it's unlikely they'll ever sue me. The postcard is a cartoon in the style of Aubrey Beardsley, and shows Wilson as a grotesque naked homunculus sat on a bed, with Williams naked save for a diaphonous nightgown through which can clearly be seen her breasts and genitals, wearing a Marie Antoinette style wig and eyemask and holding a fan coquettishly, while Wilson's wife peers at them through a gap in the curtains. The text reads "Disgusting Depraved Despicable, though Harold maybe is the only way to describe "Flowers in the Rain" The Move, released Aug 23" The stunt caused huge animosity between the group and Secunda, not only because of the money they lost but also because despite Secunda's attempts to associate them with the Conservative party the previous year, Ace Kefford was upset at an attack on the Labour leader -- his grandfather was a lifelong member of the Labour party and Kefford didn't like the idea of upsetting him. The record also had a knock-on effect on another band. Wood had given the song "Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree" to his friends in The Idle Race, the band that had previously been Mike Sheridan and the Night Riders, and they'd planned to use their version as their first single: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "Here We Go Round the Lemon Tree"] But the Move had also used the song as the B-side for their own single, and "Flowers in the Rain" was so popular that the B-side also got a lot of airplay. The Idle Race didn't want to be thought of as a covers act, and so "Lemon Tree" was pulled at the last minute and replaced by "Impostors of Life's Magazine", by the group's guitarist Jeff Lynne: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "Impostors of Life's Magazine"] Before the problems arose, the Move had been working on another single. The A-side, "Cherry Blossom Clinic", was a song about being in a psychiatric hospital, and again had an arrangement by Visconti, who this time conducted a twelve-piece string section: [Excerpt: The Move, "Cherry Blossom Clinic"] The B-side, meanwhile, was a rocker about politics: [Excerpt: The Move, "Vote For Me"] Given the amount of controversy they'd caused, the idea of a song about mental illness backed with one about politics seemed a bad idea, and so "Cherry Blossom Clinic" was kept back as an album track while "Vote For Me" was left unreleased until future compilations. The first Wood knew about "Cherry Blossom Clinic" not being released was when after a gig in London someone -- different sources have it as Carl Wayne or Tony Secunda -- told him that they had a recording session the next morning for their next single and asked what song he planned on recording. When he said he didn't have one, he was sent up to his hotel room with a bottle of Scotch and told not to come down until he had a new song. He had one by 8:30 the next morning, and was so drunk and tired that he had to be held upright by his bandmates in the studio while singing his lead vocal on the track. The song was inspired by "Somethin' Else", a track by Eddie Cochran, one of Wood's idols: [Excerpt: Eddie Cochran, "Somethin' Else"] Wood took the bass riff from that and used it as the basis for what was the Move's most straight-ahead rock track to date. As 1967 was turning into 1968, almost universally every band was going back to basics, recording stripped down rock and roll tracks, and the Move were no exception. Early takes of "Fire Brigade" featured Matthew Fisher of Procol Harum on piano, but the final version featured just guitar, bass, drums and vocals, plus a few sound effects: [Excerpt: The Move, "Fire Brigade"] While Carl Wayne had sung lead or co-lead on all the Move's previous singles, he was slowly being relegated into the background, and for this one Wood takes the lead vocal on everything except the brief bridge, which Wayne sings: [Excerpt: The Move, "Fire Brigade"] The track went to number three, and while it's not as well-remembered as a couple of other Move singles, it was one of the most influential. Glen Matlock of the Sex Pistols has often said that the riff for "God Save the Queen" is inspired by "Fire Brigade": [Excerpt: The Sex Pistols, "God Save the Queen"] The reversion to a heavier style of rock on "Fire Brigade" was largely inspired by the group's new friend Jimi Hendrix. The group had gone on a package tour with The Pink Floyd (who were at the bottom of the bill), Amen Corner, The Nice, and the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and had become good friends with Hendrix, often jamming with him backstage. Burton and Kefford had become so enamoured of Hendrix that they'd both permed their hair in imitation of his Afro, though Burton regretted it -- his hair started falling out in huge chunks as a result of the perm, and it took him a full two years to grow it out and back into a more natural style. Burton had started sharing a flat with Noel Redding of the Jimi Hendrix Experience, and Burton and Wood had also sung backing vocals with Graham Nash of the Hollies on Hendrix's "You Got Me Floatin'", from his Axis: Bold as Love album: [Excerpt: The Jimi Hendrix Experience, "You Got Me Floatin'"] In early 1968, the group's first album came out. In retrospect it's arguably their best, but at the time it felt a little dated -- it was a compilation of tracks recorded between late 1966 and late 1967, and by early 1968 that might as well have been the nineteenth century. The album included their two most recent singles, a few more songs arranged by Visconti, and three cover versions -- versions of Eddie Cochran's "Weekend", Moby Grape's "Hey Grandma", and the old standard "Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart", done copying the Coasters' arrangement with Bev Bevan taking a rare lead vocal. By this time there was a lot of dissatisfaction among the group. Most vocal -- or least vocal, because by this point he was no longer speaking to any of the other members, had been Ace Kefford. Kefford felt he was being sidelined in a band he'd formed and where he was the designated face of the group. He'd tried writing songs, but the only one he'd brought to the group, "William Chalker's Time Machine", had been rejected, and was eventually recorded by a group called The Lemon Tree, whose recording of it was co-produced by Burton and Andy Fairweather-Low of Amen Corner: [Excerpt: The Lemon Tree, "William Chalker's Time Machine"] He was also, though the rest of the group didn't realise it at the time, in the middle of a mental breakdown, which he later attributed to his overuse of acid. By the time the album, titled Move, came out, he'd quit the group. He formed a new group, The Ace Kefford Stand, with Cozy Powell on drums, and they released one single, a cover version of the Yardbirds' "For Your Love", which didn't chart: [Excerpt: The Ace Kefford Stand, "For Your Love"] Kefford recorded a solo album in 1968, but it wasn't released until an archival release in 2003, and he spent most of the next few decades dealing with mental health problems. The group continued on as a four-piece, with Burton moving over to bass. While they thought about what to do -- they were unhappy with Secunda's management, and with the sound that Cordell was getting from their recordings, which they considered far wimpier than their live sound -- they released a live EP of cover versions, recorded at the Marquee. The choice of songs for the EP showed their range of musical influences at the time, going from fifties rockabilly to the burgeoning progressive rock scene, with versions of Cochran's "Somethin' Else", Jerry Lee Lewis' "It'll Be Me", "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" by the Byrds, "Sunshine Help Me" by Spooky Tooth, and "Stephanie Knows Who" by Love: [Excerpt: The Move, "Stephanie Knows Who"] Incidentally, later that year they headlined a gig at the Royal Albert Hall with the Byrds as the support act, and Gram Parsons, who by that time was playing guitar for the Byrds, said that the Move did "So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star" better than the Byrds did. The EP, titled "Something Else From the Move", didn't do well commercially, but it did do something that the band thought important -- Trevor Burton in particular had been complaining that Denny Cordell's productions "took the toughness out" of the band's sound, and was worried that the group were being perceived as a pop band, not as a rock group like his friends in the Jimi Hendrix Experience or Cream. There was an increasing tension between Burton, who wanted to be a heavy rocker, and the older Wayne, who thought there was nothing at all wrong with being a pop band. The next single, "Wild Tiger Woman", was much more in the direction that Burton wanted their music to go. It was ostensibly produced by Cordell, but for the most part he left it to the band, and as a result it ended up as a much heavier track than normal. Roy Wood had only intended the song as an album track, and Bevan and Wayne were hesitant about it being a single, but Burton was insistent -- "Wild Tiger Woman" was going to be the group's first number one record: [Excerpt: The Move, "Wild Tiger Woman"] In fact, it turned out to be the group's first single not to chart at all, after four top ten singles in a row.  The group were now in crisis. They'd lost Ace Kefford, Burton and Wayne were at odds, and they were no longer guaranteed hitmakers. They decided to stop working with Cordell and Secunda, and made a commitment that if the next single was a flop, they would split up. In any case, Roy Wood was already thinking about another project. Even though the group's recent records had gone in a guitar-rock direction, he thought maybe you could do something more interesting. Ever since seeing Tony Visconti conduct orchestral instruments playing his music, he'd been thinking about it. As he later put it "I thought 'Well, wouldn't it be great to get a band together, and rather than advertising for a guitarist how about advertising for a cellist or a French horn player or something? There must be lots of young musicians around who play the... instruments that would like to play in a rock kind of band.' That was the start of it, it really was, and I think after those tracks had been recorded with Tony doing the orchestral arrangement, that's when I started to get bored with the Move, with the band, because I thought 'there's something more to it'". He'd started sketching out plans for an expanded lineup of the group, drawing pictures of what it would look like on stage if Carl Wayne was playing timpani while there were cello and French horn players on stage with them. He'd even come up with a name for the new group -- a multi-layered pun. The group would be a light orchestra, like the BBC Light Orchestra, but they would be playing electrical instruments, and also they would have a light show when they performed live, and so he thought "the Electric Light Orchestra" would be a good name for such a group. The other band members thought this was a daft idea, but Wood kept on plotting. But in the meantime, the group needed some new management. The person they chose was Don Arden. We talked about Arden quite a bit in the last episode, but he's someone who is going to turn up a lot in future episodes, and so it's best if I give a little bit more background about him. Arden was a manager of the old school, and like several of the older people in the music business at the time, like Dick James or Larry Page, he had started out as a performer, doing an Al Jolson tribute act, and he was absolutely steeped in showbusiness -- his wife had been a circus contortionist before they got married, and when he moved from Manchester to London their first home had been owned by Winifred Atwell, a boogie piano player who became the first Black person to have a UK number one -- and who is *still* the only female solo instrumentalist to have a UK number one -- with her 1954 hit "Let's Have Another Party": [Excerpt: WInifred Atwell, "Let's Have Another Party"] That was only Atwell's biggest in a long line of hits, and she'd put all her royalties into buying properties in London, one of which became the Ardens' home. Arden had been considered quite a promising singer, and had made a few records in the early 1950s. His first recordings, of material in Yiddish aimed at the Jewish market, are sadly not findable online, but he also apparently recorded as a session singer for Embassy Records. I can't find a reliable source for what records he sang on for that label, which put out budget rerecordings of hits for sale exclusively through Woolworths, but according to Wikipedia one of them was Embassy's version of "Blue Suede Shoes", put out under the group name "The Canadians", and the lead vocal on that track certainly sounds like it could be him: [Excerpt: The Canadians, "Blue Suede Shoes"] As you can tell, rock and roll didn't really suit Arden's style, and he wisely decided to get out of performance and into behind-the-scenes work, though he would still try on occasion to make records of his own -- an acetate exists from 1967 of him singing "Sunrise, Sunset": [Excerpt: Don Arden, "Sunrise, Sunset"] But he'd moved first into promotion -- he'd been the promoter who had put together tours of the UK for Gene Vincent, Little Richard, Brenda Lee and others which we mentioned in the second year of the podcast -- and then into management. He'd first come into management with the Animals -- apparently acting at that point as the money man for Mike Jeffries, who was the manager the group themselves dealt with. According to Arden -- though his story differs from the version of the story told by others involved -- the group at some point ditched Arden for Allen Klein, and when they did, Arden's assistant Peter Grant, another person we'll be hearing a lot more of, went with them.  Arden, by his own account, flew over to see Klein and threatened to throw him out of the window of his office, which was several stories up. This was a threat he regularly made to people he believed had crossed him -- he made a similar threat to one of the Nashville Teens, the first group he managed after the Animals, after the musician asked what was happening to the group's money. And as we heard last episode, he threatened Robert Stigwood that way when Stigwood tried to get the Small Faces off him. One of the reasons he'd signed the Small Faces was that Steve Marriott had gone to the Italia Conti school, where Arden had sent his own children, Sharon and David, and David had said that Marriott was talented. And David was also a big reason the Move came over to Arden. After the Small Faces had left him, Arden had bought Galaxy Entertaimnent, the booking agency that handled bookings for Amen Corner and the Move, among many other acts. Arden had taken over management of Amen Corner himself, and had put his son David in charge of liaising with Tony Secunda about the Move.  But David Arden was sure that the Move could be an albums act, not just a singles act, and was convinced the group had more potential than they were showing, and when they left Secunda, Don Arden took them on as his clients, at least for the moment. Secunda, according to Arden (who is not the most reliable of witnesses, but is unfortunately the only one we have for a lot of this stuff) tried to hire someone to assassinate Arden, but Arden quickly let Secunda know that if anything happened to Arden, Secunda himself would be dead within the hour. As "Wild Tiger Woman" hadn't been a hit, the group decided to go back to their earlier "Flowers in the Rain" style, with "Blackberry Way": [Excerpt: The Move, "Blackberry Way"] That track was produced by Jimmy Miller, who was producing the Rolling Stones and Traffic around this time, and featured the group's friend Richard Tandy on harpsichord. It's also an example of the maxim "Good artists copy, great artists steal". There are very few more blatant examples of plagiarism in pop music than the middle eight of "Blackberry Way". Compare Harry Nilsson's "Good Old Desk": [Excerpt: Nilsson, "Good Old Desk"] to the middle eight of "Blackberry Way": [Excerpt: The Move, "Blackberry Way"] "Blackberry Way" went to number one, but that was the last straw for Trevor Burton -- it was precisely the kind of thing he *didn't* want to be doing,. He was so sick of playing what he thought of as cheesy pop music that at one show he attacked Bev Bevan on stage with his bass, while Bevan retaliated with his cymbals. He stormed off stage, saying he was "tired of playing this crap". After leaving the group, he almost joined Blind Faith, a new supergroup that members of Cream and Traffic were forming, but instead formed his own supergroup, Balls. Balls had a revolving lineup which at various times included Denny Laine, formerly of the Moody Blues, Jackie Lomax, a singer-songwriter who was an associate of the Beatles, Richard Tandy who had played on "Blackberry Way", and Alan White, who would go on to drum with the band Yes. Balls only released one single, "Fight for My Country", which was later reissued as a Trevor Burton solo single: [Excerpt: Balls, "Fight For My Country"] Balls went through many lineup changes, and eventually seemed to merge with a later lineup of the Idle Race to become the Steve Gibbons Band, who were moderately successful in the seventies and eighties. Richard Tandy covered on bass for a short while, until Rick Price came in as a permanent replacement. Before Price, though, the group tried to get Hank Marvin to join, as the Shadows had then split up, and Wood was willing to move over to bass and let Marvin play lead guitar. Marvin turned down the offer though. But even though "Blackberry Way" had been the group's biggest hit to date, it marked a sharp decline in the group's fortunes.  Its success led Peter Walsh, the manager of Marmalade and the Tremeloes, to poach the group from Arden, and even though Arden took his usual heavy-handed approach -- he describes going and torturing Walsh's associate, Clifford Davis, the manager of Fleetwood Mac, in his autobiography -- he couldn't stop Walsh from taking over. Unfortunately, Walsh put the group on the chicken-in-a-basket cabaret circuit, and in the next year they only released one record, the single "Curly", which nobody was happy with. It was ostensibly produced by Mike Hurst, but Hurst didn't turn up to the final sessions and Wood did most of the production work himself, while in the next studio over Jimmy Miller, who'd produced "Blackberry Way", was producing "Honky Tonk Women" by the Rolling Stones. The group were getting pigeonholed as a singles group, at a time when album artists were the in thing. In a three-year career they'd only released one album, though they were working on their second. Wood was by this point convinced that the Move was unsalvageable as a band, and told the others that the group was now just going to be a launchpad for his Electric Light Orchestra project. The band would continue working the chicken-in-a-basket circuit and releasing hit singles, but that would be just to fund the new project -- which they could all be involved in if they wanted, of course. Carl Wayne, on the other hand, was very, very, happy playing cabaret, and didn't see the need to be doing anything else. He made a counter-suggestion to Wood -- keep The Move together indefinitely, but let Wood do the Brian Wilson thing and stay home and write songs. Wayne would even try to get Burton and Kefford back into the band. But Wood wasn't interested. Increasingly his songs weren't even going to the Move at all. He was writing songs for people like Cliff Bennett and the Casuals. He wrote "Dance Round the Maypole" for Acid Gallery: [Excerpt: Acid Gallery, "Dance Round the Maypole"] On that, Wood and Jeff Lynne sang backing vocals. Wood and Lynne had been getting closer since Lynne had bought a home tape recorder which could do multi-tracking -- Wood had wanted to buy one of his own after "Flowers in the Rain", but even though he'd written three hit singles at that point his publishing company wouldn't give him an advance to buy one, and so he'd started using Lynne's. The two have often talked about how they'd recorded the demo for "Blackberry Way" at Lynne's parents' house, recording Wood's vocal on the demo with pillows and cushions around his head so that his singing wouldn't wake Lynne's parents. Lynne had been another person that Wood had asked to join the group when Burton left, but Lynne was happy with The Idle Race, where he was the main singer and songwriter, though their records weren't having any success: [Excerpt: The Idle Race, "I Like My Toys"] While Wood was writing material for other people, the only one of those songs to become a hit was "Hello Suzie", written for Amen Corner, which became a top five single on Immediate Records: [Excerpt: Amen Corner, "Hello Suzie"] While the Move were playing venues like Batley Variety Club in Britain, when they went on their first US tour they were able to play for a very different audience. They were unknown in the US, and so were able to do shows for hippie audiences that had no preconceptions about them, and did things like stretch "Cherry Blossom Clinic" into an eight-minute-long extended progressive rock jam that incorporated bits of "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring", the Nutcracker Suite, and the Sorcerer's Apprentice: [Excerpt: The Move, "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited (live at the Fillmore West)"] All the group were agreed that those shows were the highlight of the group's career. Even Carl Wayne, the band member most comfortable with them playing the cabaret circuit, was so proud of the show at the Fillmore West which that performance is taken from that when the tapes proved unusable he kept hold of them, hoping all his life that technology would progress to the point where they could be released and show what a good live band they'd been, though as things turned out they didn't get released until after his death. But when they got back to the UK it was back to the chicken-in-a-basket circuit, and back to work on their much-delayed second album. That album, Shazam!, was the group's attempt at compromise between their different visions. With the exception of one song, it's all heavy rock music, but Wayne, Wood, and Price all co-produced, and Wayne had the most creative involvement he'd ever had. Side two of the album was all cover versions, chosen by Wayne, and Wayne also went out onto the street and did several vox pops, asking members of the public what they thought of pop music: [Excerpt: Vox Pops from "Don't Make My Baby Blue"] There were only six songs on the album, because they were mostly extended jams. Other than the three cover versions chosen by Wayne, there was a sludge-metal remake of "Hello Suzie", the new arrangement of "Cherry Blossom Clinic" they'd been performing live, retitled "Cherry Blossom Clinic Revisited", and only one new original, "Beautiful Daughter", which featured a string arrangement by Visconti, who also played bass: [Excerpt: The Move, "Beautiful Daughter"] And Carl Wayne sang lead on five of the six tracks, which given that one of the reasons Wayne was getting unhappy with the band was that Wood was increasingly becoming the lead singer, must have been some comfort. But it wasn't enough. By the time Shazam! came out, with a cover drawn by Mike Sheridan showing the four band members as superheroes, the band was down to three -- Carl Wayne had quit the group, for a solo career. He continued playing the cabaret circuit, and made records, but never had another hit, but he managed to have a very successful career as an all-round entertainer, acting on TV and in the theatre, including a six-year run as the narrator in the musical Blood Brothers, and replacing Alan Clarke as the lead singer of the Hollies. He died in 2004. As soon as Wayne left the group, the three remaining band members quit their management and went back to Arden. And to replace Wayne, Wood once again asked Jeff Lynne to join the group. But this time the proposition was different -- Lynne wouldn't just be joining the Move, but he would be joining the Electric Light Orchestra. They would continue putting out Move records and touring for the moment, and Lynne would be welcome to write songs for the Move so that Wood wouldn't have to be the only writer, but they'd be doing it while they were planning their new group.  Lynne was in, and the first single from the new lineup was a return to the heavy riff rock style of "Wild Tiger Woman", "Brontosaurus": [Excerpt: The Move, "Brontosaurus"] But Wayne leaving the group had put Wood in a difficult position. He was now the frontman, and he hated that responsibility -- he said later "if you look at me in photos of the early days, I'm always the one hanging back with my head down, more the musician than the frontman." So he started wearing makeup, painting his face with triangles and stars, so he would be able to hide his shyness. And it worked -- and "Brontosaurus" returned the group to the top ten. But the next single, "When Alice Comes Back to the Farm", didn't chart at all. The first album for the new Move lineup, Looking On, was to finish their contract with their current record label. Many regard it as the group's "Heavy metal album", and it's often considered the worst of their four albums, with Bev Bevan calling it "plodding", but that's as much to do with Bevan's feeling about the sessions as anything else -- increasingly, after the basic rhythm tracks had been recorded, Wood and Lynne would get to work without the other two members of the band, doing immense amounts of overdubbing.  And that continued after Looking On was finished. The group signed a new contract with EMI's new progressive rock label, Harvest, and the contract stated that they were signing as "the Move performing as The Electric Light Orchestra". They started work on two albums' worth of material, with the idea that anything with orchestral instruments would be put aside for the first Electric Light Orchestra album, while anything with just guitar, bass, drums, keyboard, and horns would be for the Move. The first Electric Light Orchestra track, indeed, was intended as a Move B-side. Lynne came in with a song based around a guitar riff, and with lyrics vaguely inspired by the TV show The Prisoner, about someone with a number instead of a name running, trying to escape, and then eventually dying.  But then Wood decided that what the track really needed was cello. But not cello played in the standard orchestral manner, but something closer to what the Beatles had done on "I am the Walrus". He'd bought a cheap cello himself, and started playing Jimi Hendrix riffs on it, and Lynne loved the sound of it, so onto the Move's basic rhythm track they overdubbed fifteen cello tracks by Wood, and also two French horns, also by Wood: [Excerpt: The Electric Light Orchestra, "10538 Overture"] The track was named "10538 Overture", after they saw the serial number 1053 on the console they were using to mix the track, and added the number 8 at the end, making 10538 the number of the character in the song. Wood and Lynne were so enamoured with the sound of their new track that they eventually got told by the other two members of the group that they had to sit in the back when the Move were driving to gigs, so they couldn't reach the tape player, because they'd just keep playing the track over and over again. So they got a portable tape player and took that into the back seat with them to play it there. After finishing some pre-existing touring commitments, the Move and Electric Light Orchestra became a purely studio group, and Rick Price quit the bands -- he needed steady touring work to feed his family, and went off to form another band, Mongrel. Around this time, Wood also took part in another strange project. After Immediate Records collapsed, Andrew Oldham needed some fast money, so he and Don Arden put together a fake group they could sign to EMI for ten thousand pounds.  The photo of the band Grunt Futtock was of some random students, and that was who Arden and Oldham told EMI was on the track, but the actual performers on the single included Roy Wood, Steve Marriott, Peter Frampton, and Andy Bown, the former keyboard player of the Herd: [Excerpt: Grunt Futtock, "Rock 'n' Roll Christian"] Nobody knows who wrote the song, although it's credited to Bernard Webb, which is a pseudonym Paul McCartney had previously used -- but everyone knew he'd used the pseudonym, so it could very easily be a nod to that. The last Move album, Message From The Country, didn't chart -- just like the previous two hadn't. But Wood's song "Tonight" made number eleven, the follow-up, "Chinatown", made number twenty-three, and then the final Move single, "California Man", a fifties rock and roll pastiche, made the top ten: [Excerpt: The Move, "California Man"] In the US, that single was flipped, and the B-side, Lynne's song "Do Ya", became the only Move song ever to make the Hot One Hundred, reaching number ninety-nine: [Excerpt: The Move, "Do Ya"] By the time "California Man" was released, the Electric Light Orchestra were well underway. They'd recorded their first album, whose biggest highlights were Lynne's "10538 Overture" and Wood's "Whisper in the Night": [Excerpt: The Electric Light Orchestra, "Whisper in the Night"] And they'd formed a touring lineup, including Richard Tandy on keyboards and several orchestral instrumentalists. Unfortunately, there were problems developing between Wood and Lynne. When the Electric Light Orchestra toured, interviewers only wanted to speak to Wood, thinking of him as the band leader, even though Wood insisted that he and Lynne were the joint leaders. And both men had started arguing a lot, to the extent that at some shows they would refuse to go on stage because of arguments as to which of them should go on first. Wood has since said that he thinks most of the problems between Lynne and himself were actually caused by Don Arden, who realised that if he split the two of them into separate acts he could have two hit groups, not one. If that was the plan, it worked, because by the time "10538 Overture" was released as the Electric Light Orchestra's first single, and made the top ten -- while "California Man" was also still in the charts -- it was announced that Roy Wood was now leaving the Electric Light Orchestra, as were keyboard playe

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The Sound Podcast with Ira Haberman
Live 5 - December 21, 2022.

The Sound Podcast with Ira Haberman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 47:58


Featured Songs: 00:38 - Oteil and Friends - 10-20-22 - Blue Sky > Franklin's Tower - The Ogden - Denver, CO 16:40 - Greensky Bluegrass - 12-07-22 - Into The Mystic - Strings & Sol - Puerto Morales, MEX  21:21 - Infamous Stringdusters - 12-08-22 - Terrapin Station - Strings & Sol - Puerto Morales, MEX  32:46 - Leftover Salmon - 12-08-22 - Sailin' Shoes - Strings & Sol - Puerto Morales, MEX  42:57 - Orebolo - 12-14-22 - Shelter From The Storm - Boulder Theatre - Boulder, CO See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

UK Investor Magazine
Low-cost Gold Production and Blue Sky Exploration with TRX Gold

UK Investor Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 13:31


The UK Investor Magazine Podcast was thrilled to welcome Stephen Mullowney, CEO of TRX Gold, for a deep-dive into their gold production and exploration activities in Tanzania. TRX operate the Buckreef Gold project and poured 8,874 ounces of gold and sold 8,598 ounces of gold in the year ended August 2022. The company is also embarking on a blue sky exploration programme that promises additional resource upgrades and production capacity.TRX Gold has achieve a low cash cost of $665 and is funding additional exploration through production cashflows. Watch TRX Gold's recent investor presentation here. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Web3 Revolution
015 Suji | 科技早知道联动节目:推特难民涌入的长毛象Mastodon的前生今世 The influx of Twitter refugees and Mastodon's past and present

Web3 Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 64:48


Summary / 内容总结: 本期节目为Web3 Revolution和科技早知道What's Next Podcast 的联动节目。 特朗普也在用的长毛象 Mastodon,会取代推特,成为社交的新绿洲吗? 在马斯克接手推特并开启一系列有争议的平台改革后,超过 14 万推特用户先后宣布,要将自己的社交阵地转移到 Mastodon 上。一个月内,Mastodon 平台活跃用户从 30 万迅速增长至 260 万,其受欢迎程度让创始人 Eugen Rochko 都感到震惊。不少广告主跟着迁移出去的推特用户,想找找在 Mastodon 上推广自己的机会,却只能失望而归,因为 Mastodon 现在还不支持任何形式的营销推广。这似乎也回应了 Mastodon 设立的初衷:社交网络不应被销售。 2016 年,有些社恐的德国工程师 Eugen 在 W3C 框架下,搭建了 Mastodon 的雏形,在不断众筹的过程中,长毛象成功地从小众应用里脱颖而出,成为了 Web3 社交产品里的当红炸子鸡。推特历史上曾有过多次的用户大出逃,而 Mastodon 一直是这些出逃故事里最重要的接纳者之一。在 Mastodon 经历了近期的惊人增长之后,九三年出生的 Eugen 在「Fortune」采访中放下豪言,终有一天,Mastodon 会取代推特。 本期节目,我们邀请了 Mastodon 的长期资助人 Suji, 以及在 Mastodon 上高强度冲浪的 Hana,深入探讨这款去中心化社交产品为什么可能成为推特最大的竞争对手。 Will Mastodon replace Twitter as the new oasis of social? After Musk took over Twitter and initiated a series of controversial platform changes, more than 140,000 Twitter users announced that they were moving their social presence to Mastodon. Within a month, the Mastodon platform grew from 300,000 to 2.6 million active users, and its popularity shocked even founder Eugen Rochko. Many advertisers followed the migrating Twitter users, looking for opportunities to promote themselves on Mastodon, only to be disappointed that Mastodon does not support any form of marketing at this time. This seems to echo the original purpose for which Mastodon was created: social networks should not be sold. In 2016, Eugen, a German engineer built the prototype of Mastodon in the framework of W3C, and in the process of continuous crowdfunding, Mastodon managed to stand out from the niche applications and became a popular product in Web3 social products. There have been many user exoduses in Twitter's history, and Mastodon has been one of the most important recipients of these exodus stories. After Mastodon's recent phenomenal growth, Eugen, who was born in 1993, made a bold statement in a Fortune interview that one day, Mastodon will replace Twitter. In this episode, we invite Suji, a long-time patron of Mastodon, and Hana, a new-comer on Mastodon, to take a deeper look at why this decentralized social product could become Twitter's biggest competitor. Featuring Guest / 嘉宾: Suji Yan Host / 主持人: Hana [Diane] Post-production / 后期制作: What's Next Podcast Sain Episode breakdown / 时间轴: [04:36] 一个技术宅打造长毛象的故事 [22:42] 长毛象和推特有哪些不同? [33:17] 联邦(Federation)和去中心化(Decentralization)并不完全一样? [44:40] Jack Dorsey 希望通过 Bluesky 实现什么目标? [54:56] 去中心化社交什么时候能赚钱? [04:36] The story of a German tech geek building Mastodon [22:42] What's the difference between a Mastodon and a Twitter? [33:17] Federated network and decentralization network aren't exactly the same? [44:40] What does Jack Dorsey hope to achieve with Bluesky? [54:56] When will decentralized social make money? About Web3 Revolution / 关于 Web3 Revolution: 什么是Web3 Revolution? 这是一档由 Mask Network 孵化赞助的探索 Web3 领域的双语播客,通过对话,联结在 Web3 这场社会实验中最前沿的参与者、行动者、创新者、投资者、KOL们。 Sponsored and incubated by Mask Network, Web3 Revolution is a bilingual podcast that explores the Web3 space, connecting participants, actors, innovators, investors, and KOLs at the forefront of the Web3 social experiment through conversations. Twitter/Media bio / 推特和媒体链接: What's Next Podcast Our Linktree: https://linktr.ee/w3revolution Follow us on Twitter @w3revolution_io Read English language transcriptions, please go to Medium 阅读中文转写稿,请点击我们的Matters主页

Life in Motion
Going In With An Open Mind - Building relationships with outdoor communities of all types with Berkeley Bryant of Blue Sky Funders Forum

Life in Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 58:15


In this episode we interview Berkeley Bryant of Blue Sky Funders Forum. Growing up in Texas, Berkeley spent a lot of time running around outside. In middle school she stumbled upon Sea Camp, which took her love for the outdoors to the next level. With her mind set on being a marine biologist, things took a turn when Berkeley realized she didn't want to study nature - she wanted to conserve it. That led her to earn a degree in environmental education and eventually became the social media manager at North Carolina State's College of Natural Resources. While Berkeley didn't see it at the time, this was the perfect opportunity to connect with others in the field. One recommended looking at environmental education through a different lens and suggested Blue Sky Funders Forum. It was an obvious fit for her love of the outdoors and educational background. Now as the program coordinator she's helping Blue Sky Funders Forum fulfill their mission of inspiring philanthropy that supports thriving communities by advancing equitable opportunities for meaningful outdoor experiences and connections to nature. If you've ever wondered why you should never stop chasing your passion, or why relationships are the most important aspect of any community, then this one's for you! Life in Motion is brought to you by Actual Outdoors. They help build beautiful brands that highlight the approachable and authentic parts of outdoor recreation. Said simply - they “keep it real”. Find them online at actualoutdoors.com or on Instagram at @actualoutdoors. Tweet us and let us know what you think of this episode! @illuminecollect Find more episodes at https://illuminecollect.com/blogs/news/life-in-motion-podcast Since 2017 Illumine has donated over $28,779 to outdoor nonprofits and shared over 129 stories on the Life in Motion Podcast.

CruxCasts
Blue Sky Uranium (BSK) - Raising Cash for Exploration Work

CruxCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 21:26


Blue Sky Uranium Corp. is a leader in uranium discovery in Argentina. The Company's objective is to deliver exceptional returns to shareholders by rapidly advancing a portfolio of surficial uranium deposits into low-cost producers, while respecting the environment, the communities, and the cultures in all the areas in which we work. Blue Sky has the exclusive right to properties in two provinces in Argentina. The Company's flagship Amarillo Grande Project was an in-house discovery of a new district that has the potential to be both a leading domestic supplier of uranium to the growing Argentine market and a new international market supplier. The Company is a member of the Grosso Group, a resource management group that has pioneered exploration in Argentina since 1993.

Imagineer Podcast
Rob't Coltrin (Disney Legend, Imagineer)

Imagineer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2022 59:54


Rob't Coltrin became a Disney Legend in 2020 (inducted at the D23 Expo 2022 ceremony) after spending 30 years at Walt Disney Imagineering. As a show set designer, concept artist, art director, and creative executive, Rob't became a go-to artist at Walt Disney Imagineering for concept work, storytelling, and ride layouts. Rob't is famous for helping design such noteworthy attractions as Expedition Everest, Toy Story Mania, Radiator Springs Racers, Seven Dwarfs Mine Train, Enchanted Tales of Beauty and the Beast, Mystic Manor, Mickey's Philharmagic, Mickey & Minnie's Runaway Railway, and the Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh (to name just a few). His likeness can also be found as a Disney S.E.A. character (Prof. R. Blauerhimmel, which fittingly translates to "Blue Sky"). In this podcast episode, I chat with Rob't about his career at Walt Disney Imagineering, including some of the attractions he helped bring to life. We also "geek out" together about ride layout design and blue sky development. What is your favorite Rob't Coltrin land or attraction? Send me your feedback via email or through direct or public message at any of the following and [with your permission] I'll include your message in a future show: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/imagineerpodcast Instagram: www.instagram.com/ImagineerPodcast Facebook Group (ImagiNation): https://www.facebook.com/groups/imagineerpodcast/ Facebook: www.facebook.com/ImagineerPodcast TikTok: www.tiktok.com/@imagineerpodcast  Twitter: www.twitter.com/ImagineerNews Email: matt@imagineerpodcast.com  Sponsors and Partners: Magical Park Vacations: plan a trip to Walt Disney World, Disneyland, Disney Cruise Line, Aulani, or any other Disney (or Universal) destination. These services are complimentary. WDW Park Planners: work with a concierge vacation planner to create a personalized Disney itinerary for you and your family. Magical Park Tours: hire an in-person guide to help your family navigate the parks and mitigate crowds. Get Bonus Content If you want to take your love of Imagineer Podcast to the next level and help support the show, definitely consider joining us on Patreon for virtual events, bonus content and episodes, exclusive access to our private Passholder communities and more.  How to Support the Show Share the podcast with your friends Rate and review on iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-imagineerpodcasts-podcast/id1244558092 Join our Patreon Group - https://www.patreon.com/imagineerpodcast Purchase merchandise - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/imagineer-podcast?ref_id=8929 Enjoy the show!

Place to Be Nation POP
Video Jukebox Song Of The Day #130 - ”Mr. Blue Sky” By Electric Light Orchestra

Place to Be Nation POP

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 7:57


Welcome to PTBN Pop's Video Jukebox Song of The Day! Every weekday will be featuring a live watch of a great and memorable music video. With the recent release of The Guardians of The Galaxy Holiday Special on Disney+, this week we are featuring songs from each of the Guardians of The Galaxy movies. On today's episode, Andy Atherton is watching “Mr. Blue Sky” by Electric Light Orchestra from 1978.   The YouTube link for the video is below so you can watch along!   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQUlA8Hcv4s

Michael's Record Collection
Episode 89: Best Morning Wakeup Songs

Michael's Record Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 106:38


This week, I've enlisted the help of fellow music lovers Dave Zalatoris (from the Beer in Front Podcast) and Jon Lamoreaux (from The Hustle Podcast) to discuss our favorite morning wakeup songs. We each brought five songs to the table that get us going one way or another in the morning, whether that's a fast-paced track that gets the blood pumping or a beautifully arranged song that awakens us spiritually and helps us face the day. We've crafted three very different lists and even mention some of our honorable mentions as well. Here's a handy list, in case you want to check them out: Michael - 1. ELO - Mr. Blue Sky, 2. Queen - Headlong, 3. Iron Maiden - The Trooper, 4. Rush - The Spirit of Radio, 5. R.E.M. - The Sidewinder Sleeps Tonite. Dave - 1. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Let the Day Begin, 2. The Killers - All These Things That I've Done, 3. The Darkness - I Believe in a Thing Called Love, 4. Stevie Wonder - Superstition, 5. Frank Turner - Get Better. Jon - 1. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Awake, 2. James - Born of Frustration, 3. The Moody Blues - Your Wildest Dreams, 4. UB40 - Breakfast in Bed (feat. Chrissie Hynde), 5. Cat Stevens - Morning Has Broken. There are two honorable mentions each as well. I hope you enjoy this discussion as much as we did! Reminder: You can support independent podcasting by becoming a Michael's Record Collection Patreon subscriber starting at only $2 per month (50 cents an episode...or less!) at the MRC Patreon page. Supporter benefits escalate at each level, providing more value the more you support the show. For example, you will know about interviews in advance and some levels can submit questions for the artists, come on the show to co-host, enter prize drawings, and more.  Please hit the like button and leave a rating/review on Apple Music or the Goodpods app if you consume this podcast on those platforms. You can read my Michael's Record Collection newsletter for free by signing up at michaelsrecordcollection.substack.com. Follow MRC on Twitter (@MikesRecords), like it on Facebook, and follow on Instagram. Have questions or comments or want to suggest a topic? Hit me up at michaelsrecordcollection@gmail.com.

GGUTTalks
Blue Sky Republic and the future: life-centric business | Arne Van Oosterom| Arne Van Oosterom

GGUTTalks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 7:22


This is the 8th and last conversation [EP9 to 16 S3] with Arne Van Oosterom, podcaster, teacher, facilitator and founder of Blue Sky Republic. We talk about Arne. His story. His journey (to date) - how he got started, building a global company, leaving it, somehow. Facts and emotions. Hope this inspires anyone who is listening.

The Growth Project
Episode 202: Embracing Blue Sky Thinking with David Baker

The Growth Project

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 54:18


Henry David Thoreau championed pursuing dreams fearlessly by writing, "If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours." This enterprising and visionary approach to life is a perspective put into practice by David Baker, co-owner of Methodical Coffee. Dr. Milt Lowder and David talk about the importance of tapping into the spirit of adventure, being open to possibilities with "blue sky thinking," and building a strong community.

TalkJive.org
The Kellie Jo Show Featuring First American Indian Toys for Tots Ambassador Bluesky Tosee & her dad, Don Tosee

TalkJive.org

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 18:51


Original Air Date: 12.2.22 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/talkjive/support

Not Dead Yet
Friday Bonus: Social Media's Alternate Universe

Not Dead Yet

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 20:49


This Friday bonus, the guys talk about the future of social media, and some alernative options coming down the pike. Good Stuff.#appetiteforconstructionpodcast #appetiteforconstruction #mechanicalhub #plumbingperspective #supportthetrades #socialmedia #plumbing #hvac #bluesky #mastadon #countersocial #tribel #cohostSubscribe to the Appetite for Construction podcast at any of your favorite streaming channels.

Doppelgänger Tech Talk

Philipp hat eine AR Idee, spielt mit OpenAI und würde gerne eine Testfahrt mit dem ID Buzz von VW machen. Pip ist positiv überrascht von Klarna den Klarna Zahlen. Ein Andreessen Horowitz & Bessemer Venture Start-up macht jetzt Crowdfunding. Earnings: Salesforce, Okta, Zscaler, Asana & UiPath. Philipp Glöckler (https://www.linkedin.com/in/philippgloeckler/) und Philipp Klöckner (https://twitter.com/pip_net) sprechen heute über: (00:04:30) BLUE SKY (00:10:00) VW ID Buzz (00:14:00) OpenAI (00:25:00) Klarna (00:44:10) Salesforce Earnings (00:51:00) SuperPhone (01:05:50) Okta Earnings (01:09:00) Zscaler Earnings (01:12:50) Asana Earnings (01:13:30) UiPath Earnings Shownotes: Philipp's OpenAI Experimente: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:7004392905884766209/ https://chat.openai.com SuperPhone Crowdfunding https://republic.com/superphone **Doppelgänger Tech Talk Podcast** Doppelgänger & Friends auf Twitch https://www.twitch.tv/doppelgaengerio Sheet https://doppelgaenger.io/sheet/ Earnings & Event Kalender https://www.doppelgaenger.io/kalender/ Disclaimer https://www.doppelgaenger.io/disclaimer/ Passionfroot Storefront www.passionfroot.xyz/doppelgaenger Post Production by Jan Wagener https://twitter.com/JanAusDemOff Aktuelle Doppelgänger Werbepartner https://lollipod.de/sn/doppelgaenger-werbung

TechTimeRadio
On TechTime Radio with Nathan Mumm, Netflix's theater strategy pays off. Astronomers troubled by new cell phone towers in space. Subscription fee to increase acceleration, and Twitter Competitors. A Christmas Gadget Special | Air Date 11/27 - 12/3/2

TechTimeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 55:42


Join us on TechTime Radio with Nathan Mumm, the show that makes you go "Hummmm" Technology news of the week for November 27th – December 3rd, 2022.Today on TechTime with Nathan Mumm, Netflix's theater strategy pays off. Astronomers worldwide are troubled by new cell phone towers in space. Would you pay a subscription fee to increase acceleration? Twitter Competitors are about to come to market. Finally, we have a special Christmas Gadget segment while China claims youth gaming addiction in its country has been resolved. In addition, we have our standard features, including "Mike's Mesmerizing Moment," "This Week in Technology," and a possible "Nathan Nugget." Episode 129: Starts at 1:34--- [Now on Today's Show]: Starts at 3:15--- [Top Stories in The First Five Minutes]: Starts at 4:19 Musk feuds with Apple over Twitter advertising. - https://tinyurl.com/4yzj33aj Astronomers Worldwide Troubled by New 'Cell Phone Towers in Space' - https://tinyurl.com/373w7ej9 Netflix's theater strategy pays offSpider-Man 4 could whip its way into theaters as early as mid-2024, according to multiple industry insiders.--- [Pick of the Day - Whiskey Tasting Reveal]: Starts at 17:52J.T.S. Brown Bottled 100 in Bond | 100 Proof | $13.99--- [What we Found on the Web]: Starts at 19:56Mercedes-Benz is to offer an online subscription service in the US to make its electric cars speed up quicker. For an annual cost of $1,200 excluding tax, the company will enable some of its vehicles to accelerate from 0-60mph a second faster.China claims youth gaming addiction resolved - Screen time has been in short supply for young Chinese gamers - https://tinyurl.com/yck9wtah Post News, a Twitter alternative, gets funding from a16z, and Jack Dorsey's Bluesky social network ready to launch. --- [This Week in Technology]: Starts at 39:46December 3, 2001 - Inventor Dean Kamen unveils the Segway self-balancing, battery-powered vehicle on the TV show Good Morning America. The Segway uses computers and motors in its base to keep itself upright while the user is riding it. Users shift their weight to control the Segway. While not considered a commercial success, the Segway has definitely become a familiar icon of personal transportation. --- [Marc's Whiskey Mumble]: Starts at 43:49--- [Nathan's Christmas Gadgets ]: Starts at 45:22--- [Mike's Mesmerizing Moment brought to us by StoriCoffee®]: Starts at 50:53--- [Pick of the Day]: Starts at 53:55J.T.S. Brown Bottled 100 in Bond | 100 Proof | $13.99Mike: Thumbs UpNathan: Thumbs Up

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast
Podcast #108: Vail Mountain Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Beth Howard

The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 75:56


To support independent ski journalism, please consider becoming a free or paid subscriber. This podcast hit paid subscribers' inboxes on Nov. 28. It dropped for free subscribers on Dec. 1. To receive future pods as soon as they're live, please consider an upgrade to a paid subscription.WhoBeth Howard, Vice President and General Manager of Vail Mountain, ColoradoRecorded onNovember 14, 2022About Vail MountainClick here for a mountain stats overviewOwned by: Vail ResortsPass affiliations: Epic PassLocated in: Vail, ColoradoClosest neighboring ski areas: Beaver Creek (20 minutes), Copper Mountain (23 minutes), Ski Cooper (42 minutes), Keystone (42 minutes), Loveland (43 minutes), Arapahoe Basin (47 minutes), Breckenridge (50 minutes) - travel times may vary considerably in winter and heavy traffic.Base elevation: 8,120 feetSummit elevation: 11,570 feetVertical drop: 3,450 feetSkiable Acres: 5,317* Front Side: 1,655 Acres* Back Bowls: 3,017 Acres* Blue Sky Basin: 645 AcresAverage annual snowfall: 354 inchesTrail count: 276 (53% advanced/expert, 29% intermediate, 18% beginner)Lift count: 32­­ (one 12-passenger gondola, one 10-passenger gondola, 4 six-packs, 14 high-speed quads, 1 fixed-grip quad, 2 triples, 1 T-bar, 3 platters, 5 carpets)Why I interviewed herI articulated this as well as I could a couple months ago, in an article about Vail Resorts' decision to limit lift ticket sales for the coming ski season:It was a notion quaint and earnest. Simplistic but no less authentic. To start with Vail would have seemed presumptuous. This American place most synonymous with skiing. Three-sided and endless, galloping back into valleys, super-fast lifts shooting in all directions. I wanted to be ready. To feel as though I'd earned it.My first trip West was in 1995. But I did not ski Vail until 2004. In our megapass-driven, social-media-fueled moshpit of a present, I doubt anyone thinks this way anymore. Vail is a social-media trophy – go seize it. But I proceeded slowly to the big time. Primed on Midwest bumps, anything would have seemed enormous. First, the rounds of Summit County. Then Winter Park. As though skiing were a videogame and I could not pass to the higher levels until I'd completed those that came before.  And then there it was. That first time standing over Sun Down Bowl, the single groomed path winding toward High Noon below. Eleven thousand feet over Colorado. Sliding down the ridges. Powder everywhere. Back to Blue Sky. Laps all day through unmarked glades. Refills from the sky even though it was April. Three thousand feet of up and down. The enormous complexity of it all. The energy. That impossible blend of wild and approachable.Vail Mountain and – on that same trip – Beaver Creek, were exactly what I needed them to be: the aspirational summit of America's lift-served skiing food chain. The best mountains I'd ever skied. I won't say it was The Experience of a Lifetime. But it was the best five days of skiing that I had, up to that point, ever done.I'm not sure what else I can add to that. Vail Mountain sits at the summit of American lift-served skiing. Yes I know, Backflip Bro: the terrain is not as Rad-Gnar as Snowbird or Jackson Hole or Taos or Palisades Tahoe or Big Sky. It does not get as much snow as Alta or Baker or Wolf Creek or Kirkwood. It does not minimize and mitigate crowds like Telluride or Aspen or Sun Valley.But Vail Mountain stands out even on that hall-of-fame lineup. Five thousand-plus acres of approachable terrain seated directly off the interstate. The Big Endless: 18 high-speed chairlifts, the Back Bowls™, a bit of rowdy and wild back in Blue Sky, a frenetic base village. If any mountain in Vail Resorts' sprawling, intercontinental empire is almost guaranteed to deliver The Experience of a Lifetime™, it's the namesake OG of them all: Vail Mountain. Even after all the growth and change and the Epic Pass atom bomb, Vail Mountain remains one of the greatest ski areas in North America.It's also a personal favorite of mine, and one that I've been eager to feature on the podcast since I expanded The Storm's focus from the Northeast to the entire country last year.What we talked aboutOpening weekend at Vail Mountain; staying open until May in 2022 and whether the ski area could do it again; marking Vail's 60th anniversary; Vail's founders; building the mountain and the town from raw wilderness; Vail in the ‘80s; Afton Alps; transitioning from food-and-bev to resort leadership; a Colorado-Tahoe comparison; what it means for Vail Mountain to share the Vail Resorts masthead with Whistler; going deep on the Game Creek Express upgrade and the new Sun Down Express lift; how Vail decides between a four- or six-place lift, and why Game Creek got the promotion to sixer; the future of fixed-grip lifts on Vail Mountain; why it was finally time to build the long-proposed Sun Down lift, and how that will change the ski experience and flow around the mountain; how this happened at High Noon Express (in February 2020), and how unusual it was:How Sun Down may help prevent a repeat; why Vail built Sun Down before the proposed Mongolia Express outlined in the resort's master plan (see below); thinking through the future of the Eagle Bahn gondola; a potential future portal at West Lionshead and the sorts of lifts we could see there; how Pride Express could evolve up and down the mountain; how the Cascade Village lift could better serve day skiers; the potential for terrain expansion in Blue Sky Basin; the growth and future of snowmaking on Vail Mountain; housing drama with the town at East Vail; why Vail rejected the town's $12 million offer for the land; how Vail's housing market has devolved to crisis levels over the decades; what other towns are doing to fix housing and whether any of that could work at Vail; the evolution of two housing markets – one for locals and one at market rate; the potential for Ever Vail; reaction to $275 walk-up lift tickets; and the factors that will go into setting lift ticket limits each day this season.   Why I thought that now was a good time for this interviewI've already written extensively about the valiant and courageous VAIL SHEEP DEFENDERS, an elite squadron whose mission is to ensure that local bighorns only have to poop next to rich people. In May, this group of nincompoops – the Vail Town Council – voted to condemn land where Vail Resorts planned to build 165 beds of worker housing on six acres of a 23-acre parcel (the remainder was to be set aside for bighorn habitat). Vail, which had already spent years permitting the project with the previous council, pushed back, and now the whole disaster has been swallowed by the courts, where it will likely remain for years.Meanwhile, the VAIL SHEEP DEFENDERS somehow missed the groundbreaking on, among other properties, a nearly $8 million, 5,700-square-foot mansion rising on that same bighorn habitat. This image – provided by Vail Resorts – distills the absurdity of the whole thing pretty well:In September, I chatted about this with Colorado Sun reporter Jason Blevins, who has lived in Eagle County for decades. He had a much more nuanced view:“Both sides have completely valid arguments here. Vail Resorts needs housing. They have the property, they went through three years of planning with the previous council to win all the approvals to develop this thing. They created a bighorn sheep management plan … Election came, new council came in, and that new council is more inclined to protect that herd than accommodate with housing. They've offered the company different spots in the valley where they could build. But the process has progressed, and it's along, and Vail is ready to pretty much break ground right now …“Yes, this is about bighorn. That council 100 percent supports the bighorn herd, and in their heart of hearts they are working to protect the bighorn. … And those bighorn have been there longer than us, and this is their winter habitat. They unquestionably come down in the winter … along the highway there.”The whole situation, Blevins told me, is reminiscent of the Telluride Valley Floor drama in the late ‘90s, in which the town and a developer took a land dispute all the way to the Colorado Supreme Court (read the court's full decision here). The town ended up paying $50 million to acquire the land. “Think of all the housing you could have build with $50 million in the early 2000s,” Blevins said.Unfortunately, Blevins said, “this one is lining up to follow that track. Could this fight go all the way to the Supreme Court? Could the town of Vail end up having a public fundraising campaign with rich residents giving money to support sheep habitat? Will it go that far? With the complaint filed last week, it certainly appears as though this is going to be a protracted legal battle that will end up costing the town millions and millions of dollars if they buy it from Vail Resorts. And the end result is no more new housing. So the true losers on this are the people in this town who need a place to sleep and live in that town.”  You can listen to our full exchange on this topic, including a long discussion of the elusive NIMBY, starting at 56:50:So the housing drama made the pod timely. But so did the fact that Vail is installing two new chairlifts and celebrating its 60th anniversary. So did the fact that its peak-day lift tickets just hit $275. Really though, I wasn't sitting around waiting for an excuse to talk about Vail. It's Vail. One of the greatest ski areas in America. It's always interesting, always relevant. It's one of a handful of ski areas that evokes skiing whether you ski 100 days a year or never. Aspen, Telluride, Vail. The podcast was built to score interviews like this: a big-time mountain seated at the heart of our collective lift-served skiing experience. Enjoy.Questions I wish I'd askedI would have liked to have explored the impacts of the mountain town housing crisis on employees and the environment a bit more deeply. What does it mean to have a 50- or 60-mile commute through one of America's most extreme wintertime environments? How does such a setup further exacerbate the I-70 traffic that everyone so loathes? How sustainable and safe is this whole ecosystem?Last year, Vail Resorts, Alterra, Boyne Resorts, and Powdr – America's four largest ski area operators – launched “the ski industry's first unified effort to combat climate change with shared commitments around sustainability and advocacy.” These efforts include portfolio-wide shifts to renewable energy sources, climate advocacy, and “responsible” stewardship of the environment. All admirable and necessary steps toward creating sustainable 21st century businesses.However. I would propose an additional pillar to this joint pledge: these operators must commit to working with local, state, and national governments to encourage building density, expand mass transit, and limit individual car use wherever possible within the mountains.It is not just the ski area operators that are missing this. We built modern U.S. America on the premise of unlimited land and unlimited individual, anytime mobility. But this model does not scale up very well. When Congress passed the Interstate Highway Act in 1956, the nation had 156 million residents. It now has around 338 million. Interstate 70 through the Colorado Rockies is a miracle of engineering and one of the most beautiful roads in the world. But this thoroughfare, combined with poor regional planning and a U.S. American mentality that thinks you can shape the Colorado High Country in the same fashion as suburban Atlanta, have delivered Los Angeles-caliber traffic to the otherwise pristine high alpine.This is not sustainable. It was a dumb way to build a country. Sprawl and our car-centric culture are environmental and human disasters, the invisible antagonists to all our high-minded climate goals. Ski area operators and the municipalities they operate in have an incredible opportunity to showcase a different sort of America: a transit-oriented, weather-resilient, human-centered built ecosystem in which employees walk or ride a bus (or, God help us, a gondola) to work from hubs close to or on the mountain; the great mass of skiers arrive via transport other than a personal vehicle; and a Saturday on Interstate 70 does not resemble a wartime evacuation.For those of you fearful that this means Manhattan-in-the-mountains, that's not what I'm proposing here. Nor am I suggesting a Zermatt-style ban on individual automobiles. Just a better transit and housing mix so people who don't want the expense and hassle of wintertime commuting can avoid it. We actually have a pretty good model for this: the college town. Most students live, without cars, in dorms on or close to campus. Free and frequent shuttlebuses port them around town. A dense and walkable university center gives way to successive waves of less-dense housing, for more established employees or those with families. Some commuting occurs, but it is minimal. The university is a self-contained world that absorbs as much impact as it can from the problems it creates by concentrating many humans on a small footprint.The fact that the Town of Vail cannot accommodate 165 humans on 23 acres of land is pathetic. Their willingness to invest $12 million into ensuring people cannot live on this parcel crystalizes how unserious they are, long term, about creating a more sustainable, livable Vail. Rather than fighting Vail Resorts, the town ought to be partnering with them – as the previous council did on permitting this project – to see if the company could shrink the six acres down to three or four, and bump the 165 beds up 30 or 40 percent, with select units reserved for employees who agree to live car-free and use a shuttle system instead. The town's current, combative posture is only going to push the employees that could have lived in East Vail farther out into the mountains and into daily, likely solo commutes in a car, all of which will further degrade the mountain environment the town claims to treasure. This project could have been a model for cooperation and imaginative development. Instead, it's turned into a spectacle, a disappointment, the most predictable and U.S. American thing imaginable.   What I got wrongI pronounced Vail Mountain founder Pete Siebert's name as “See-bert,” rather than “Cy-ber.” We also discussed Vail Mountain's remaining fixed-grip lifts, putting that total at just one. However, the ski area still has three fixed-grip chairlifts: the Cascade Village quad, the Gopher Hill triple rising out of Vail Village, and the Little Eagle triple at the top of Eagle's Nest.Why you should ski Vail MountainThere's a lot of pressure on Vail Resorts' flagship. While it's fairly easy to get to and navigate, Vail Mountain, for most skiers, is big, far, and exotic; a thing of myth, considered with reverence; less vacation destination than fantasy. It's work to get there, and no one wants to work without reward. Ride to your New England or Wisconsin or North Carolina local on a Saturday, and you'll cope with whatever mess they came up with. Arrive at Vail, and you expect the best skiing of your life.Vail can give you that. Yes, I know, Wasatch Bro, “Vail is great. Everyone should go there.” Sick burn, Bro. Original and hilarious. I'm not saying it's better than Utah or Tahoe or Aspen or Winter Park, but I am saying that the skiing at Vail Mountain is usually very good, often spectacular, rarely bad. It is big enough that there are always uncrowded bits somewhere. And since such a large percentage of the skiers here are tourists, and since most tourists are allergic to anything off-piste – and since only a small percentage of a 5,317-acre resort can be groomed at any one time – you can ride the ungroomed all day, most days, in relative isolation (meaning you're not speed-checking every four seconds at Fort Meyers Freddy arcs edge-to-edge turns over the fall line).I've often wondered how many skiers there are on Vail Mountain on any given Saturday. They won't tell me, but I'm guessing it's the population of a small city – 30,000 people? While the sorts of liftline nightmares profiled above do occasionally happen, they are, as Blevins (a Vail local) said in our interview, pretty rare, and pretty short-lived. The ski area moves people around really well.Everyone should ski Vail Mountain at least once. There is a sense of awe in being there. It is one of the best pure ski areas on the continent. Great terrain for (nearly) all abilities (sorry Backflip Bro, but you can hike over to East Vail). A terrific little town. Easy to get into and out of (off peak, at least). Affordable if you have enough sense to purchase an Epic Pass in advance. There are bigger and emptier and snowier ski areas out there, but Vail is going to give most skiers just about everything they want and a lot more than they need. The high expectations are earned, and, nearly always, met.Podcast NotesHoward and I talked quite a bit about elements of Vail Mountain's 2018 masterplan. Here's where new lifts could run on the frontside:And here's where they could run on the backside. You can also see potential new trails in Blue Sky Basin and Teacup Bowl:Vail is also aggressively building out snowmaking on the front of the mountain. Here's what that system could look like at full build-out:The Storm publishes year-round, and guarantees 100 articles per year. This is article 127/100 in 2022, and number 373 since launching on Oct. 13, 2019. Want to send feedback? Reply to this email and I will answer (unless you sound insane). You can also email skiing@substack.com.The Storm explores the world of lift-served skiing year round. Join us. Get full access to The Storm Skiing Journal and Podcast at www.stormskiing.com/subscribe

Demystifying the Akashic Records
#66 - Case Study 19 - Unlocking the Abundance that Your Soul Deserves with Geraldine*

Demystifying the Akashic Records

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 41:42


Welcome to Episode 66 on Case Study 19 - Unlocking the Abundance that Your Soul Deserves with Geraldine* (not her real name). This is the final of three themed Akashic Records sessions that Geraldine had with me.In this session, Geraldine asked: (1) What's the contract between Geraldine and her husband for this lifetime? (2) How to be more abundant in this lifetime? Specifically, Geraldine feels that she is always chasing for money; it is not enough. She spends money like water for other people, including her family who needs it, though it comes to her easily. (3) How to be more abundant in this lifetime?  Specifically, Geraldine has been afflicted with a lot of health issues. First, she has early menopause, so she couldn't conceive. Second, she has autoimmune issues, which cause allergies to flare up, joints to become very stiff, water retention etc. Until now, it is not fully recovered. Do Masters have any advice on all these? (4) Any final words for Geraldine? Credits to music used: Under a Blue Sky by Sefy TofanTo read the transcript, check out: Case Study 19 – Unlocking the Abundance that Your Soul Deserves with Geraldine* – Unlock the Wisdom & Healing in Your Akashic Records (asha-akashicrecords.com)

IndoctriNation
Opening Our Minds w/Jon Atack

IndoctriNation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 101:45


Jon Atack has been a consultant or expert witness in at least 150 court actions and worked on over 200 media pieces, he's published more than 500 articles and papers, and over 300 videos. His history of Scientology, Let's Sell These People a Piece of Blue Sky, is a best-seller. He has spoken at conferences all over the world and led the five-day Getting Clear of Scientology seminar in Toronto. Jon has been a scholar-practitioner for almost 40 years and has helped more than 600 people in their recovery. His most recent book, Opening Our Minds, exposes the similarities between authoritarian cults, multilevel marketers, pedophile groomers, terrorist radicalizers, pimps, and spousal abusers. It highlights the manipulative tricks shared by political spin doctors, advertisers, and PRs. Jon, along with his son Sam hosts the podcast “Jon Atack, family and friends” from his home near Nottingham, England where he resides with his two youngest boys. In this expansive and highly informative conversation, Rachel and Jon dive deep into the various common psychological states of Scientologists using examples from the hundreds of cases they have collectively worked on personally. Throughout the discussion, Jon offers his unique insights from his vantage point as an early architect of the independent Scientology movement to one of its most important and thorough critics. Before You Go: Rachel explains how followers of cultic groups are often unable to take note of the freedom they sacrifice in order to possess the security of absolute belief and devotion to community in high-control situations. Follow Jon's Podcast on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCI4tcSMV2kEh3BooY_XFSYQ/playlists Find Jon's most recent book here: https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/28159933-opening-minds You can purchase Rachel's webinar series LIVING IN FREEDOM here: rachelbernsteintherapy.com/webinar.html Thanks to all of our newest Patreon supporters: Meldal-Johnsen, Cassilly, NATALIE FABERT, Michelle Downs, Leti A, Eva Baumgartner, Jen Jeske, and Sue Walsh! To help support the show monthly and get bonus episodes, shirts, and tote bags, please visit: www.patreon.com/indoctrination Prefer to support the IndoctriNation show with a one-time donation? Use this link: www.paypal.me/indoctrination You can always help the show for free by leaving a rating on Spotify or a review on Apple/ iTunes. It really helps the visibility of the show!

Athens 441
#109: Matthew Sweet

Athens 441

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 59:28


Matthew Sweet on the 25th anniversary of “Blue Sky on Mars,” plus a live session with Robyn Hitchcock, as well as the latest from Black Market Karma and Twinn

The TheatreArtLife Podcast
Episode 148 – Creative direction Amna Abulhoul

The TheatreArtLife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 42:22


In this episode we are joined by Amna Abulhoul, talking all things creative. Amna is a Creative Director, and her last role was Creative Director for the Ceremonies at Expo 2020 Dubai. She developed creative programming for Al Wasl Plaza, the iconic centrepiece of Expo 2020, from concept and narrative to immersive experiences. Amna was also responsible for creating and developing the Expo 2020 Mascots, bringing the characters and their story to life. Amna has worked in creative production for more than eight years. She began her career in the Blue Sky department at Walt Disney Imagineering, Los Angeles. This role saw her contribute to the creative concepts and designs for rides and attractions in Disney theme parks. Amna studied Motion Graphics (Animation) at Zayed University and Architecture at the American University in Dubai. We want to hear from YOU and provide a forum where you can put in requests for future episodes. What are you interested in listening to? Please fill out the form for future guest suggestions here and if you have suggestions or requests for future themes and topics, let us know here! @theatreartlife Thanks to David Zieher who composed our music.

Something Extra
Blue Sky Thinking and the Future of Work w/ Isaac Sacolick

Something Extra

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 37:40


Digital transformation is hard work, so incorporating fun into the equation is crucial. Join Lisa as she covers this and more with Isaac Sacolick, President of StarCIO and Author of Digital Trailblazer and Driving Digital. Listen to be reminded of the importance of sharing ideas with others, innovating continuously, and preparing rising leaders. You will leave this conversation with a new understanding of the current issues in the IT landscape.Guest Links:Isaac's LinkedInStarCIO.com/something-extraDriving Digital: The Leader's Guide to Business Transformation Through Technology  by Isaac Sacolick Digital Trailblazer: Essential Lessons to Jumpstart Transformation and Accelerate Your Technology Leadership  by Isaac Sacolick Credits: Lisa Nichols, Host; Scott Crosby, Executive Producer; Jenny Heal, Guest Coordinator; Morgan Cochran, Marketing Support; Kendall Brewer, Leadership Programs 

Brad & Will Made a Tech Pod.
158: Twitastrophe

Brad & Will Made a Tech Pod.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 80:59


Elon Musk's Twitter disaster has been impossible to look away from, and since we probably owe some amount of our careers to everyone's favorite social media platform, we had to spend this ep running down and trying to make sense of a series of events that's almost impossible to believe. We also dig into some of the feasible alternatives to Twitter, like Mastodon, Cohost, and the Bluesky project with its AT protocol. #twitastropheSHOW NOTESStories and reporters referenced in this episode include:A timeline of the whole mess: https://www.ign.com/articles/elon-musks-twitter-takeover-and-the-chaos-that-followed-the-complete-timelineImplications for Musk's business empire: https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-twitter-takeover-money-sucking-quagmire-tesla-spacex-debt-2022-4Text messages between Musk and others: https://gizmodo.com/elon-musk-texts-joe-rogan-larry-elllison-dorsey-twitter-1849600155Casey Newton: https://www.platformer.news/Mike Masnick: https://www.techdirt.com/2022/11/02/hey-elon-let-me-help-you-speed-run-the-content-moderation-learning-curve/Mike Isaac: https://www.nytimes.com/by/mike-isaacAlso, Will's definitely-not-shitty blog: https://shitty.blog/Support the Pod! Contribute to the Tech Pod Patreon and get access to our booming Discord, your name in the credits, and other great benefits! You can support the show at: https://patreon.com/techpod

The Wolf Of All Streets
Crypto Adoption Gets A Massive Boost | Week In Review

The Wolf Of All Streets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 40:29


The main crypto news of this week: SBF's Alameda financials reveal massive FTT related asset holdings, high tech companies are laying thousands of employees off, 29 yo MakerDao co-founder dies under strange circumstances in Puerto Rico, Jack Dorsey's decentralized social media Bluesky to launch beta, Fidelity and MoneyGram boost crypto adoption among retail clients, and there are more crypto stories and charts! ►► JOIN THE FREE WOLF DEN NEWSLETTER https://www.getrevue.co/profile/TheWolfDen  GET UP TO A $8,000 BONUS IN USDT AND TRADE ALL SPOT PAIRS ON BITGET FOR ZERO FEES! ►► https://thewolfofallstreets.info/bitget   Follow Scott Melker: Twitter: https://twitter.com/scottmelker  Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/wolfofallstreets   Web: https://www.thewolfofallstreets.io  Spotify: https://spoti.fi/30N5FDe  Apple podcast: https://apple.co/3FASB2c  #Bitcoin #Crypto #Trading The views and opinions expressed here are solely my own and should in no way be interpreted as financial advice. This video was created for entertainment. Every investment and trading move involves risk. You should conduct your own research when making a decision. I am not a financial advisor. Nothing contained in this video constitutes or shall be construed as an offering of financial instruments or as investment advice or recommendations of an investment strategy or whether or not to "Buy," "Sell," or "Hold" an investment.

Dubious
Where Is Nancy? – The Attempted Assassination of Speaker Pelosi

Dubious

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 43:23


Q Anon conspiracy theorist, former “hemp artist” and nudist David DePape tried to murder Paul Pelosi with a hammer, in a middle of the night violent attack.In this episode we try to understand how the assailant, David DePape, was radicalized by the Q Anon cult and when his break from reality started to manifest. We go over all the details of the vicious attack as we explain how conspiracy theories emerge. If you like our content please become a patron to get two bonus premium episodes per month, as well as our public episodes ad-free. “Where is Nancy?” These are the words DePape was screaming as he broke in to the Pelosis' San Francisco home breaking a glass door in the back of the house, carrying his tool box, at least two hammers and zip ties. The investigators already determined that the target of the attack was The Speaker of The House. 1 The attacker's plan was to hold Nancy Pelosi hostage and probably torture her, “break her kneecaps” and find out more information about other democrats, he had a list of names with him too. 82 year old Paul Pelosi was seriously injured after being struck on the head with a hammer and was rushed to the hospital. 2 The situation was made worse by GOP politicians who started spreading conspiracy theories online. Elon Musk, days after buying Twitter, also got involved, implying in a reply tweet to Hillary Clinton that there's more to this story and alluding that Paul Pelosi and the attacker were involved sexually. He later deleted that tweet. 3 The one bit of good news is that Jack Dorsey is launching a new social platform, BlueSky Social. 4 1. Brian Klass. This week, 3 men were convicted of trying to.... Twitter. October 2022. ⇤2. Victoria Bekiempis. A secret bathroom 911 call: how Paul Pelosi saved his own life. The Guardian. October 2022. ⇤3. Kurtis Lee. Elon Musk, in a Tweet, Shares Link From Site Known to Publish False News. New York Times. October 2022. ⇤4. BlueSky App. Blue Sky. November 2022. ⇤

Kate Dalley Radio
110222 Susan BlueSky And Amnesty Passive Voice What Does It Mean

Kate Dalley Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 46:56


110222 Susan BlueSky And Amnesty Passive Voice What Does It Mean by Kate Dalley

The WAN Show Podcast
Gamer's GPUs Are Melting - WAN Show October 28, 2022

The WAN Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 169:55 Very Popular


Start using AnyDesk today at http://lmg.gg/AnyDesk Check out the Corsair Voyager A1600 Laptop at https://geni.us/VoyagerWAN Try Zoho One free for 30 days with no credit card required here https://www.zoho.com/one/lp/linus.html Timestamps (Courtesy of NoKi1119) Note: Timing may be off due to sponsor change: 0:00 Chapters 1:26 Intro 1:52 Topic #1 - RTX 4090's 12VHPWR adapters melting 2:50 Paraphrasing Igor's Labs' findings 5:08 Third party connectors, CableMod's instructions 7:34 Linus skips RTX 4000 for his PC, reasoning behind it 10:58 Topic #2 - AMD's Radeon RX 7000 series 11:14 AMD's "Radeon 7xxx" will not feature 12VHPWR 12:36 Linus on the word "left-angle" & adapter orientation 14:38 Luke discusses very old hardware with FP 15:36 LTT's video on increasing performance of AMD GPUs 17:12 Employees replace NVIDIA GPUs with AMD, couldn't tell a difference 18:49 AMD's history with drivers, Linus's experience with AMD 24:02 AMD's Radeon 7000 release, rolling for PCs idea 27:38 Topic #3 - Whether to purchase NCIX domain 28:51 Self-service PC building station 32:28 NCIX domain to expire soon™, LTTStoreNotCom 35:03 Retail V.S.industrial property in Vancouver 38:19 What to do with the domain? NCIX Labs & abbreviations 41:28 FP Poll - Does NCIX sound techie? ft. Turnip, odd suggestions 44:50 YouTube Super Chats still broken, Luke's grammatical mistakes 52:32 Sponsor - Corsair 53:46 Sponsor - Zoho One 54:31 Sponsor - AnyDesk 55:09 Merch Messages #1 55:23 Evolution of technology in classrooms 1:02:58 How are the adopted cats doing? 1:05:42 LTTStore new Blank T-Shirt merch 1:08:31 Explaining the prices of blank & printed t-shirts 1:10:56 LTTStore mystery men sweatpants 1:11:38 Topic #4 - Elon Musk acquires Twitter for $44B 1:13:39 Twitter developers locked out of the code base for auditing 1:15:28 Jack Dorsey's Bluesky, discussing trending on twitter 1:17:06 How much will Twitter change after the acquisition? Dogecoin spiking 1:21:54 Continuing to use Twitter, is the internet ready for ID tokens? 1:24:12 Upsides & downsides of toxicity on Twitter 1:28:10 Topic #5 - Adobe to replace Pantone colors with black 1:29:08 Pantone's subscription, possible workarounds 1:32:36 Creator's Warehouse story, trademarked Canadian Anthem phrase, inflation 1:37:25 Topic #6 - JASCO now works with home assistant via Z-Wave 1:42:34 Topic #7 - Arm to change its business model 1:44:36 Topic #8 - YouTube to separate Shorts & normal videos 1:46:07 Merch Messages #2 1:48:24 Would LMG become a game publisher? Linus on investing 1:55:56 Thoughts on Nebula, Floatplane & Curiosity Stream 2:01:19 How Luke deals with burnout 2:03:42 Would NVIDIA double-down or release a 12VHPWR V2? 2:07:36 Discussing loved or disliked finished games, shows or movies 2:16:32 Advice for studying better against procrastination 2:24:13 What exciting projects is labs working on? 2:26:17 Fun things to do in Vancouver, LTX Expo's distance to the ocean 2:27:52 Favorite sets made for LTT videos 2:29:48 What NCIX stood for in the past 2:31:36 Design & build process for logistics 2:39:47 Piece of media that inspired Luke 2:42:00 Double taking on a birth date in a resume 2:43:43 Any AAA studio would capture Tarkov's magic? 2:44:47 LTTStore CPU design puzzle from videos 2:45:26 What do you feel is getting worse in the tech industry? 2:46:54 To look into YouTube ads further 2:49:23 Outro

The BeanCast™ Marketing Podcast
0691-The BeanCast: Let That Sink In

The BeanCast™ Marketing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 60:34


This Week: Tedd Aurelius, Scott Monty, and Colby Vogt join Bob to discuss Elon finally buying Twitter, whether bad times drive bad behavior from tech, Dorsey launching BlueSky, the importance of open web data, plus this week's #FairFailFoul.

Core Intuition
Episode 535: A Modest Hellscape

Core Intuition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022


Daniel and Manton talk about everything Twitter. Elon Musk officially taking over the company, Manton's 10-year anniversary of not posting to twitter.com/manton, Twitter's open source Bluesky initiate and the AT Protocol, social media network effects, and how Twitter may or may not change in the coming months. The post Episode 535: A Modest Hellscape appeared first on Core Intuition.

This Week in Google (MP3)
TWiG 687: Rabble Rousing - Inside Planetary and Scuttlebutt, Mr. Beast, Shutterstock AI imagery, Chief TWiT

This Week in Google (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 168:46 Very Popular


Interview with Rabble. How Odeo turned into Twitter. What did Rabble do before Odeo? What did Rabble learn at TXTmob that came over to Twitter? Why Jaiku was so cool. What did Rabble work on at Yahoo from Uruguay? What was the core mistake of Friendster? What is the Scuttlebutt protocol and how does it work with Planetary? How does Rabble feel about Bluesky? What should I be able to export from Twitter right now? What's coming soon on Planetary and Scuttlebutt? Elon Musk dubs himself 'Chief Twit,' visits Twitter HQ with deal set to close. Do you worry about taking money for Planetary? Some use cases for how to use Planetary. Goodbye to Rabble. Musk Tells Bankers He Plans to Close Twitter Deal on Friday. Spotify Wants to Get Into Audiobooks but Says Apple Is in the Way. Shutterstock will start selling AI-generated stock imagery with help from OpenAI. Study: Playing lots of video games may benefit kids' brains. The Wire Retracts Its Meta Stories. Why audio will never capture the hearts of social media users. The Escape Artist: The Man Who Broke Out of Auschwitz to Warn the World Hardcover by Jonathan - Freedland. Is MrBeast actually worth $1.5 billion? Uber will show ads now. But don't count on a lower fare. Marco Arment: "Now my app's product page shows gambling ads, which I'm really not OK with. Republicans sue Google claiming spam filter blocks email. Leo's Meta Quest Pro. The Real Chief TWiT: Comfort Tee. Texas Sues Google Over Use of Facial Images. Google Home web app starts rolling out to view live Nest feeds, older cameras supported. Google Maps has removed its COVID-19 layer. Google is giving Workspace Individual subscribers a big storage bump. YouTube's new design makes it easier to fast-forward or rewind to the right part. YouTube Premium is getting a price hike for family plans to $22.99/month. Google Messages tests new design for delivered and read indicators. New Google Messages and Contacts app icons rolling out, Phone left. Rabble returns! Picks: Rabble - Planetary Jeff - 76% trust the technology sector Rabble - Web3 is Self-Certifying Leo - The Crypto Story Hosts: Leo Laporte and Jeff Jarvis Guest: Evan Henshaw-Plath (Rabble) Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Melissa.com/twit

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)
This Week in Google 687: Rabble Rousing

All TWiT.tv Shows (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 168:46 Very Popular


Interview with Rabble. How Odeo turned into Twitter. What did Rabble do before Odeo? What did Rabble learn at TXTmob that came over to Twitter? Why Jaiku was so cool. What did Rabble work on at Yahoo from Uruguay? What was the core mistake of Friendster? What is the Scuttlebutt protocol and how does it work with Planetary? How does Rabble feel about Bluesky? What should I be able to export from Twitter right now? What's coming soon on Planetary and Scuttlebutt? Elon Musk dubs himself 'Chief Twit,' visits Twitter HQ with deal set to close. Do you worry about taking money for Planetary? Some use cases for how to use Planetary. Goodbye to Rabble. Musk Tells Bankers He Plans to Close Twitter Deal on Friday. Spotify Wants to Get Into Audiobooks but Says Apple Is in the Way. Shutterstock will start selling AI-generated stock imagery with help from OpenAI. Study: Playing lots of video games may benefit kids' brains. The Wire Retracts Its Meta Stories. Why audio will never capture the hearts of social media users. The Escape Artist: The Man Who Broke Out of Auschwitz to Warn the World Hardcover by Jonathan - Freedland. Is MrBeast actually worth $1.5 billion? Uber will show ads now. But don't count on a lower fare. Marco Arment: "Now my app's product page shows gambling ads, which I'm really not OK with. Republicans sue Google claiming spam filter blocks email. Leo's Meta Quest Pro. The Real Chief TWiT: Comfort Tee. Texas Sues Google Over Use of Facial Images. Google Home web app starts rolling out to view live Nest feeds, older cameras supported. Google Maps has removed its COVID-19 layer. Google is giving Workspace Individual subscribers a big storage bump. YouTube's new design makes it easier to fast-forward or rewind to the right part. YouTube Premium is getting a price hike for family plans to $22.99/month. Google Messages tests new design for delivered and read indicators. New Google Messages and Contacts app icons rolling out, Phone left. Rabble returns! Picks: Rabble - Planetary Jeff - 76% trust the technology sector Rabble - Web3 is Self-Certifying Leo - The Crypto Story Hosts: Leo Laporte and Jeff Jarvis Guest: Evan Henshaw-Plath (Rabble) Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-google. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsor: Melissa.com/twit