Podcasts about theater

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Collaborative form of performing art

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  • Dec 2, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about theater

Show all podcasts related to theater

Latest podcast episodes about theater

Mind Gap
Episode 325 - Steve Leichman talks YouTube vs Twitch

Mind Gap

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 98:35


This week, Doug and Justin are joined by return guest and excellent human, Steve Leichman, from the Reviewniverse podcast and Streamviewniverse YouTube channel. Doug announces a new milestone in the podcast's progression on YouTube and the nerds dive into the current streaming topic of which company is better: YouTube or Twitch? The dorks break down their thoughts on which platform has the most going for it, what experts like Harris Heller are saying, and whether they'd want their kids growing up to be streamers. A fan submits another Ask Practical Doug question that leaves Steve wanting MORE questions answered!   Things are wrapped up with a throw-down featuring the monster from the movie The Thing vs. the Babadook. Tune in to find out who wins!   Follow us on Twitch to hang out while we record our new episodes and stream video game sessions!   We have MERCH now!   Check out our YouTube channel for podcast episodes, video game live stream highlights, Doug Watches Awkward Videos, and Justin Plays Video games. Be sure to like and subscribe! Follow us on all of our social medias and other platforms!  https://streamerlinks.com/mindgappodcast

Save Me An Aisle Seat
Episode 76: The Sound of Music

Save Me An Aisle Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 30:57


It's time to climb every mountain and tell us your favorite things as we hide from the Nazis in this classic, The Sound of Music! Listen along via our Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/2LQEvSPHu1dkhHTMK3nW8R?si=071dfa33edf5474a  For more episodes: www.ragtagnetwork.com  Follow us on Twitter: @saveanaisleseat  Follow us on Instagram and Facebook: @savemeanaisleseat  Check out our merch: https://www.ragtagnetwork.com/merch   Become a supporter here: https://ko-fi.com/ragtagnetwork 

Podcast - Booked It
Patten Disregard S1E5: "The Show Must Go On" with Lisa Gajda

Podcast - Booked It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 25:13


Patten Disregard Live: The Roast of Broadway, Dec 16, 2021 in NYC. Tickets and details at https://tinyurl.com/atdazfk6. Broadway's back to normal, right? Or is that just every other industry? Find out what's happening to the spirit of theater in: "The Show Must Go On"

Making Sense
Reading Dr. Pippa Malmgren: WW3 Has Already Started [Macropiece Theater, Ep. 172]

Making Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 14:00


An uncomfortable truth: WWIII is not on the horizon, it is here. Militaries around the world are in a state of high-alert. “Sub-threshold" events are occurring with increasing frequency. War is digitizing. A reading, by Emil Kalinowski.----------WHO----------Dr. Pippa Malmgren, author, economist, former White House advisor, entrepreneur and venture capitalist, is a well-recognized female voice in financial and geopolitical circles. Read by Emil Kalinowski. Art by David Parkins. Intro/outro is "Alegro" by TAGE at Epidemic Sound.----------WHAT----------WWIII Has Already Started: https://drpippa.substack.com/p/wwiii-has-already-started----------WHERE----------Pippa's Substack: https://drpippa.substack.com/Pippa's Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrPippaMPippa's Website: https://pippamalmgren.co.uk/index.htmlEmil's Twitter: https://twitter.com/EmilKalinowskiDavid's Art: https://davidparkins.com/---------HEAR IT----------Vurbl: https://bit.ly/3rq4dPn Apple: https://apple.co/3czMcWNDeezer: https://bit.ly/3ndoVPEiHeart: https://ihr.fm/31jq7cITuneIn: http://tun.in/pjT2ZCastro: https://bit.ly/30DMYzaGoogle: https://bit.ly/3e2Z48MSpotify: https://spoti.fi/3arP8mYPandora: https://pdora.co/2GQL3QgBreaker: https://bit.ly/2CpHAFOCastbox: https://bit.ly/3fJR5xQPodbean: https://bit.ly/2QpaDghStitcher: https://bit.ly/2C1M1GBPlayerFM: https://bit.ly/3piLtjVPodchaser: https://bit.ly/3oFCrwNPocketCast: https://pca.st/encarkdtSoundCloud: https://bit.ly/3l0yFfKListenNotes: https://bit.ly/38xY7pbAmazonMusic: https://amzn.to/2UpEk2PPodcastAddict: https://bit.ly/2V39Xjr

Weathering Rainbows
A Night of Queer Theater with Drag Daddy Productions Writer Tony Lewis

Weathering Rainbows

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 74:01


In this episode, Leah and Kurtis discuss reoccurring dreams, perfect proposals, and first relationships. In the second half, Kurtis Sunset interviews Tony Lewis, from Drag Daddy Productions, who writes and produces queer theater that highlights the theatrical talents of drag queens. He is known for many popular shows such as Snow White and The Seven Drag Queens, Heroes, Alice in Derbyland, and his latest production, Hedwig, starring Gilda Wabbit.  To connect with us visit www.weatheringrainbows.com INSTA: @weatheringrainbows FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/weatheringrainbows   Guest: Tony Lewis  INSTA: @dragdaddyproductions  

Entertainment(x)
Jenny Laroche Part 2 ”You Are Enough”

Entertainment(x)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 25:37


Jenny Laroche, (jennylaroche.org)(IG:@jennylaroche)(thelarocheapproach.com) whom you can see this Thursday Dec 2nd on NBC in Annie Live! is originally from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, is a graduate of SUNY Buffalo, where she earned her B.F.A, Cum Laude, and was awarded the program's Distinguished Alumni Award. Jenny began her career as a Radio City Rockette, and as a Rockette she made her big screen debut in the movie New Years Eve. Her feature film credits also include Annie 2014, The Merry Widow HD Live, and Netflix special by Bill Murray, A Very Murray Christmas.       Jenny originated the role of Norman Brokaw in the Broadway musical SUMMER. Her theatre credits also include Pal Joey directed by Tony Goldwyn, the role of Clo-Clo in The Merry Widow MetOpera, directed by Tony winner Susan Stroman; Annette in Can-Can at Paper Mill Playhouse, Suzanne Duval in Paint your wagon; Fly at Dallas Theatre Center, and Guys and dolls at Carnegie Hall.    Jenny is also known for her recurring role of Sue in the drama series SMASH on NBC produced by Steven Spielberg.  She has worked with recording artist such as Beyonce, Mariah Carey, and Liza Minnelli. She has also worked under the direction of Baz Luhrmann in The Great Gatsby Premiere event.           Live television credits include The Tony Awards 70th anniversary, Jimmy Fallon, SNL40, America's Got Talent, Best Time Ever, The Wendy William's show, The Today Show, TVLAND Awards and the Billboard Awards.               Jenny is the Associate Choreographer for SUMMER the First National Tour, casting and co-creating equity touring productions. She works in TV, Film, and Theatre as an artist and choreographer meanwhile training professionals through her founded program, The Laroche Approach. Catch her in the upcoming Netflix film Tick Tick Boom, directed by Tony winner Lin-Manuel Miranda, choreographed by Grammy-award nominee Ryan Heffington. She is also the founder of Laroche Approach, a musical theatre training program and Period.Laroche.NYC a chapter of the advocacy organization Period.

Tara & Ryan's Princess Diaries
Childhood Trauma Theatre: The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus

Tara & Ryan's Princess Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 46:04


This month we kick off 4 weeks of holiday movies with this wild, bizarre take on the 1902 book by Wizard of Oz author, L. Frank Baum. Come take a peek at what it's like in Ryan's head. Who is King Awgwa? It's The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus! T&R Hotline: (707) 968-7731 Email: TRPrincessDiaries@gmail.com Twitter: @TRPDiaries Instagram: @TRPrincessDiaries Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/trprincessdiaries/   Art by Carley McConnell https://www.instagram.com/ani.empire/  

The Play Podcast
The Play Podcast - 038 - Macbeth by William Shakespeare

The Play Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 71:35


Episode 038: Macbeth by William Shakespeare Host: Douglas Schatz Guest: Professor Emma Smith The Play Podcast is a podcast dedicated to exploring the greatest new and classic plays. In each episode we choose a single play to talk about in depth with our expert guest. We discuss the play's origins, its themes, characters, structure and impact. For us the play is the thing. William Shakespeare's Macbeth is a tragedy of love, ambition and betrayal, propelled by relentless energy and shocking violence, and infused by an air of the supernatural. It has some of the most memorable scenes in all of theatre: the witches chanting over their cauldron, the ghost of the murdered Banquo haunting Macbeth, Lady Macbeth sleepwalking and wringing her bloodless hands.  Professor Emma Smith from Hertford College, Oxford, joins us to explore Shakespeare's notorious ‘Scottish play'.

MPIR Old Time Radio
Thriller Theatre Episode 216 Replay

MPIR Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 33:25


Presenting a replay of The Whistler "Tell Tale Brand" aired on Jan 09, 1949. Please support these shows with your donation today, thank you. https://mpir-otr.com/sponsors-donations

Sideshow Sound Radio┃Film Soundtrack Podcast » Podcasts
Track Swap #15 – A Spy and an Agent walk into a Bar…

Sideshow Sound Radio┃Film Soundtrack Podcast » Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 17:09


Brand new guest Tim Halbur joins Track Swap and brings a classic to the show, while Lasse chooses something matching, but much more contemporary. Link: https://twitter.com/Halbur

City Lights with Lois Reitzes
History with Chutzpah

City Lights with Lois Reitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 51:45


Lois Reizes speaks with The Breman Museum's Jane Leavey, Leslie Gordan, and Adam Koplan about their 25th anniversary exhibit, “History with Chutzpah.”And, we'll hear from Museum Director of the Center for Puppetry Arts Sarah Dylla & puppeteer Anna Williford about the exhibition and show “Christmas Town: The story behind the story of Rudolph".Plus we'll listen back to a conversation with the High Museum's Chief Curator, Kevin Tucker about the first museum exhibition devoted to the work of Virgil Abloh -- “Figures of Speech.” It opened in November of 2019.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

There's No People Like Show People

Happy December Friends! Today on There's No People Like Show People I'm chatting with the lovely Jessica Alltop. Jessica is currently the production stage manager at the Myers Dinner Theatre and in this episode we talk a lot about organization and multi-tasking. THANK GODDESS for stage managers! The show absolutely would not go on without them. Thank you so much for listening and continuing to support the resilience of the global theatre community. 

Audio Footlights
AUDIO FOOTLIGHTS: Elf The Musical JR. Edition

Audio Footlights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 8:05


The Children's Theatre of Cincinnati, the nation's oldest professional theatre for young audiences, invites the young (and young-at-heart) to take a peek behind the scenes. TCT's Artistic Director and Stage Director of ELF THE MUSICAL JR., Roderick Justice interviews Maddie Burgoon Jones, featured performer and TCT's Associate Artistic Director. They discuss working through the pandemic, Maddie's job, and what it's like being on-stage and on the production side of things. Visit https://thechildrenstheatre.com/shows/elf/ to learn more about the show.

Audio Footlights
AUDIO FOOTLIGHTS: Nutcracker Rocks Edition

Audio Footlights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 5:39


The Children's Theatre of Cincinnati, the nation's oldest professional theatre for young audiences, invites the young (and young-at-heart) to take a peek behind the scenes. TCT's Associate Artistic Director and Stage Director of NUTCRACKER ROCKS, Maddie Burgoon Jones, interviews Renee Stoltzfus, of the show's touring actors about being back on stage and why this show is important for kids today. You can now watch the show online via Broadway on Demand! Visit https://thechildrenstheatre.com/shows/nutcracker-rocks-21-22/ to find out more!

Making Sense
Reading Matt Stoller: Economists label Cattle Ranchers "Emotional", then Defend Beef Monopoly [Macropiece Theater, Ep. 171]

Making Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 32:00


Agricultural economists manipulated data to block Congress from acting on high beef prices and the destruction of independent cattle ranching. Why? Because they think monopolies are good. A reading, by Emil Kalinowski.----------WHO----------Matt Stoller, author of the 2019 book "Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy", is a fellow at the Open Markets Institute and advises policymakers on the problem of monopoly. He has lectured on competition policy around the world and his writing has appeared in various news media and publications. Read by Emil Kalinowski. Art by David Parkins. Intro/outro is "Alegro" by TAGE at Epidemic Sound.----------WHAT----------Economists to Cattle Ranchers: Stop Being So Emotional About the Monopolies Devouring Your Family Businesses: https://bit.ly/3nZBP7g----------WHERE----------Stoller's Book: https://bit.ly/2YTD5iBStoller's Substack: https://mattstoller.substack.com/Stoller's Twitter: https://twitter.com/matthewstollerEmil's Twitter: https://twitter.com/EmilKalinowskiDavid's Art: https://davidparkins.com/---------HEAR IT----------Vurbl: https://bit.ly/3rq4dPn Apple: https://apple.co/3czMcWNDeezer: https://bit.ly/3ndoVPEiHeart: https://ihr.fm/31jq7cITuneIn: http://tun.in/pjT2ZCastro: https://bit.ly/30DMYzaGoogle: https://bit.ly/3e2Z48MSpotify: https://spoti.fi/3arP8mYPandora: https://pdora.co/2GQL3QgBreaker: https://bit.ly/2CpHAFOCastbox: https://bit.ly/3fJR5xQPodbean: https://bit.ly/2QpaDghStitcher: https://bit.ly/2C1M1GBPlayerFM: https://bit.ly/3piLtjVPodchaser: https://bit.ly/3oFCrwNPocketCast: https://pca.st/encarkdtSoundCloud: https://bit.ly/3l0yFfKListenNotes: https://bit.ly/38xY7pbAmazonMusic: https://amzn.to/2UpEk2PPodcastAddict: https://bit.ly/2V39Xjr

Hello From The Hallowoods
Episode 54 - Roads

Hello From The Hallowoods

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:23


Gale is woken up by an unexpected guest, Riot spends her first night on the road, and Barb goes for a drive. The theme of tonight's episode is roads. (To avoid spoilers, content warnings are listed at the end of this episode description). The bonus story that goes with this episode is ‘End of the Line', and is available for Hallowoods patrons on the show's Patreon, along with behind-the-scenes, exclusive merchandise, and more! Because the show runs without ads or sponsors, we rely on support from fans to guarantee the survival of this LGBTQ+ horror podcast.   Hello From The Hallowoods is written and produced by William A. Wellman, a queer horror author and writing coach. You can visit their website for more information!    The transcript for this episode is available on the Hello From The Hallowoods Website. Click here to read!   You can also find Hello From The Hallowoods on social media! The show is on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @thehallowoods. If you'd like to connect with other fans of the show, there's even a fan-run Discord Server!   Music for this episode was used under license from Artlist.com. The soundtracks featured were:    ‘Forest Overture', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Free Radicals', by Stanley Gurvich ‘The Sky Above', by Borrtex,  ‘Tea For One', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Once Upon A Time', by Maya Belsitzman and Matan Ephrat ‘Flow State', by Theater of Delays,  ‘The Scent', by Spearfisher,  ‘Mysa', by Laurel Violet,  ‘Horror In Your Eyes', by G Yerro,  ‘The Ghost', by Martin Puehringer,  ‘Gazing Wide', by Tamuz Dekel,  ‘Angst', by Jan Baars,  ‘Ganymede', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Dreaming Lucifer', by Dan Alayon,  ‘Back Alley', by Will Van De Crommert,  ‘Soft Awakening', by John Gegelman,  ‘84 Years Old', by Yehezkel Raz,  ‘Exhale', by Salt of the Sound,  And ‘Farewell', by Maya Belsitzman and Matan Ephrat     Content warnings for this episode include:  Violence, Kidnapping and abduction, Death + Injury, Blood, Gun Mention, Misgendering, Static (including sfx), Emotional Manipulation, Smoking

WORLD GONE GOOD
WONG GONE GOOD

WORLD GONE GOOD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 35:32


Kristina Wong never thought sewing masks would turn into a published book and an off-Broadway hit show but life doesn't always turn out the way we expect, now does it? From performer to politician to activist, Kristina wears so many hats - or in this case, masks - many of them at the same time, even she can't keep track. When the pandemic hit, she had a calling to DO something, so she found her own light in the darkness, and the Auntie Sewing Squad was born. They delivered thousands upon thousands of masks - and much more including a used ambulance - to people and communities in need. Ever the over-achiever, Kristina didn't stop there: She published the book, THE AUNTIE SEWING SQUAD GUIDE TO MASK MAKING, RADICAL CARE, AND RACIAL JUSTICE, based on her year-long experience. And then she decided to over-over-achieve her over-achievement and KRISTINA WONG, SWEATSHOP OVERLORD opened off-Broadway on November 4th to rave reviews. She's equally inspiring as she is hilarious and apparently never sleeps. Her journey will rally you to create a good squad of your own.

TheSwingNation
Nashville 2.0 and The Theater Group Lifestyle Club Review

TheSwingNation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 64:42


The Swing Nation PodcastEpisode 15 Nashville 2.0 and The Theater Group Lifestyle Club Review Dan and Lacy travel to Nashville to party with Tiktokgirl_Krystina and Life_of_Spice from #Swingtok. They attend a birthday party at the new lifestyle club in Nashville hosted by The Theater Group.  Websitehttps://theswingnation.netPod Cast Websitehttps://theswingnationpodcast.buzzsprout.com/Social MediaInstagram: SwingingSouthernGirl https://www.instagram.com/invites/contact/?i=1bm91i4odpy1&utm_content=mmmo11iTwitter: NorthMnSouthF https://twitter.com/northmnsouthf?ltclid=SnapChat: SouthSwingGirl2: https://www.snapchat.com/add/southswinggirl2?share_id=MDdBRkY2&locale=en_USTikTok: SwingingSoutherGirl3: https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMRW6J7Vx/Swinger WebsitesSDC: https://www.sdc.com/?ref=36313Use code 36313 for 14 days free!Our SDC User Name: NorthGuyNSouthGirlSLS: https://www.swinglifestyle.com/Our SLS User Name: NorthernGuynSouthernGirlSwinger Society Discord Serverhttps://discord.gg/53Cxg4SSy4Our Merchandisehttps://theswingnation.comLacys Fun LinksFree Only Fans: https://onlyfans.com/northernguynsoutherngirlVIP Only Fans: https://onlyfans.com/thesoutherngirlKrystina's Only Fans:https://onlyfans.com/tiktokgirl_krystina?rec=134636022Check out Krystina's Website: https://swingtok.netLife_of_Spices Only Fans: https://onlyfans.com/life_of_spice?rec=134636022Support the show (https://cash.app/$thesoutherngirl)

The Spark File with Susan Blackwell and Laura Camien

This week, Laura and Susan explore the inexplicable craving to consume pandemic-related entertainment during a pandemic -  not entertainment about the current state of the world, no, we prefer  imaginary pandemics dreamed up in the minds of fiction writers and TV writers like Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel, The End of October by Lawrence Wright, The Walking Dead and more.  These are some of the works imagined by creative minds at a time when an actual pandemic was a scary but far-fetched idea…Listen in to hear how Laura made her way through a tunnel of imaginary pandemic entertainment and emerged on the other side with extreme respect and admiration for #NormanReedus.Join us for The Spark File Annual New Year Creativity Kickoff on January 1st and 2nd. This 2 day virtual retreat will help you refocus your goals and lay the foundation for making 2022 your most creative year yet! Let us help you go from dreaming about what you want to make to making what you've been dreaming about. Go to thesparkfile.com to register. Spots are limited, so register now!

La Vie Creative
EP 168: Taylor Scott talks about a Parisian Shakespeare Theatre Group called Cygnet Theatre

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:57


Cygnet Theatre was founded in Paris by an international group of theatre artists looking to create, develop, and perform plays in the classical repertoire. The company is run by a board of administration, and all members of the team serve a creative function vital to Cygnet Theatre's ability to thrive.  Following the success of A Midsummer Night's Dream, the decision was made to form a company to produce high quality theatre in the heart of Paris. During the Summer Seasons, Cygnet performs in the beautiful Jardin des Arènes de Montmartre.Taylor Scott:Born and raised in Vancouver, I still struggle to name the surrounding mountains but can list the local theatres with ease. Theatre has always felt like a homecoming to me. After graduating with a BFA in Acting from the University of British Columbia in 2017, the heaviness of a four-year program left little room inside me for creative passion, s0 I did what seemed most logical at that moment… I ran away to Paris. Amidst the culture and chocolate crepes, I discovered it was possible to become a theatre artist on my own terms. Cygnet Theatre is the product of six like-minded individuals, all at different points in our artistic journeys, who came to that same realization. Our varied backgrounds and individual strengths challenge us daily, but ultimately they are also the steadfast foundation of a company that was unimaginable until my feet hit these cobblestone streets. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

Slumber Party
Favorite Sondheim Songs (w/ Michael Bullard)

Slumber Party

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 42:51


Tim's gay boyfriend Michael Bullard stops by to chat Tick, tick... Boom, House of Gucci and their favorite Sondheim songs of all time!

MPIR Old Time Radio
Thriller Theatre Episode 215 Replay

MPIR Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 33:30


Presenting a replay of Suspense "The Trap" aired on Jun 16, 1949. Please support these shows with your donation today, thank you. https://mpir-otr.com/sponsors-donations

ThoseMovieDudes
Spencer - Mainstream Boyz

ThoseMovieDudes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 53:07


This week Spencer and Jonathan checked out the "biopic" and drama Spencer. Kristen Stewart gives one hell of a performance in this film that is dead set on winning that Best Actress Oscar. It's yet another week of a not so mainstream film on the show, but every once in a while its worth watching a movie with some genuine Oscar buzz. Spencer is available on VOD and in Theaters. Make sure to follow our socials: Instagram: @thosemoviedudes Facebook: @thosemoviedudes --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/those-movie-dudes/support

Showbiz Sandbox
Showbiz Sandbox 563: The Grammy Nominations Are Bigger and More Baffling Than Ever

Showbiz Sandbox

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 70:53


When this year's Grammy nominations were announced last week the Recording Academy made a last minute decision to expand some of its biggest categories from eight to 10 nominees. This allowed popular artists like Taylor Swift, Kanye West and Lil Nas X to be included in this year's list. While this generates a small amount […] The post Showbiz Sandbox 563: The Grammy Nominations Are Bigger and More Baffling Than Ever appeared first on Showbiz Sandbox.

The Mike Madison Show
Tu 11.30.21 Maxwell Trial? / More Evidence of C19 THEATER / The Metaverse Plan

The Mike Madison Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 81:27


Details are emerging from the trial of Gislane Maxwell. But still waiting for a picture! More studies show what sane people already knew about Covid hysterics reactions to the virus. And Tech Tuesday - the land rush in the Metaverse!

RNZ: Morning Report
Barden Party bringing theatre to the people

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 3:06


With Covid-19 restrictions shrinking events around the country, a Nelson-based actor has decided to bring live theatre to the people. A small troupe of actors are performing A Midsummer Night's Dream in gardens and backyards across the top of the South Island, in what director Laura Irish has called The Barden Party. It's been so popular that the group has requests to perfom in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. In Nelson, Samantha Gee went along to a performance.

The Tom Barnard Show
Theaters Didn't Kill Themselves - #2086-2

The Tom Barnard Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 51:07


Streaming is the name of the game.  We've had this conversation before, but we've never mentioned frame interpolation or contrast ratio before.  We're much more intellectual now.  We even talk about Van Gogh.  You know, the ear guy.  Also tortured artist, but mostly ear guy. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

City Lights with Lois Reitzes
The Korean Vegan

City Lights with Lois Reitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 51:46


Lois Reitzes speaks with TikTok chef and author Joanne Lee Molinaro. Her new cookbook is “The Korean Vegan.” See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Making Sense
Reading Adam Tooze: Global Food Price (Crisis?) [Macropiece Theater, Ep. 170]

Making Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:00


According to the FAO Food Price Index, the cost of food has surged in real terms to levels last seen in the 1970s - during the Great Inflation. But another data set, by the OECD shows no such surge at all. What's going on? Is there a food price crisis, or not? A reading, by Emil Kalinowski.----------WHO----------Adam Tooze, author of the 2021 book "Shutdown: How Covid Shook the World's Economy", a professor of history at Columbia University. His 2018 book "Crashed" was the winner of the Lionel Gelber Prize, a New York Times Notable Book of 2018, one of The Economist's Books of the Year, and a New York Times Critics' Top Book. Read by Emil Kalinowski. Art by David Parkins. Intro/outro is "Alegro" by TAGE at Epidemic Sound.----------WHAT----------Chartbook #47: Crisis Talk - Global Food Prices: https://bit.ly/3cWhB88----------WHERE----------Adam's Book: https://adamtooze.com/shutdown/Adam's Substack: https://adamtooze.substack.com/Adam's Website: https://adamtooze.com/Adam's Twitter: https://twitter.com/adam_toozeEmil's Twitter: https://twitter.com/EmilKalinowskiDavid's Art: https://davidparkins.com/---------HEAR IT----------Vurbl: https://bit.ly/3rq4dPnApple: https://apple.co/3czMcWNDeezer: https://bit.ly/3ndoVPEiHeart: https://ihr.fm/31jq7cITuneIn: http://tun.in/pjT2ZCastro: https://bit.ly/30DMYzaGoogle: https://bit.ly/3e2Z48MReason: https://bit.ly/3lt5NiHSpotify: https://spoti.fi/3arP8mYPandora: https://pdora.co/2GQL3QgBreaker: https://bit.ly/2CpHAFOCastbox: https://bit.ly/3fJR5xQPodbean: https://bit.ly/2QpaDghStitcher: https://bit.ly/2C1M1GBPlayerFM: https://bit.ly/3piLtjVPodchaser: https://bit.ly/3oFCrwNPocketCast: https://pca.st/encarkdtSoundCloud: https://bit.ly/3l0yFfKListenNotes: https://bit.ly/38xY7pbAmazonMusic: https://amzn.to/2UpEk2PPodcastAddict: https://bit.ly/2V39Xjr

The Turnbuckle Tavern
Broken VCR #5: Play Misty For Me

The Turnbuckle Tavern

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 70:45


Clint Eastwood's 1971 directorial debut is on the docket. This female stalker film influenced an entire subgenre of cinema and exudes the dreamlike atmosphere of its Central California Coastline locale. Jessica Walter gives the performance of her career. Pop this 70s gem in and join Chad & Hoch for an hour of film nerd exploration! Every Tuesday | Apple & Spotify theturnbuckletavern.com Instagram @thebrokenVCR

Replay Value
Jerry Maguire (1996) | Ep. 418

Replay Value

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 80:22


Brothers Phil & Warren show you the money with a deep dive into the romantic dramedy sports classic “Jerry Maguire”. Topics include: Crowe's inspirations & the screenplay's five-year evolution (2:35), stars of the picture (16:00), stats & accolades (31:40), best scenes & lines (38:45), Judge Bob's recasting court (55:20), and the film's legacy & lore (1:12:15), plus much more.

Book of the Mouse Club
#67: “Disney & Dali: Architects of the Imagination” organized by the Walt Disney Family Museum & The Salvador Dalí Museum ft. Guest Reader Dr. Doug

Book of the Mouse Club

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 103:12


If a collaboration between Walt Disney and Salvador Dali seems surreal, that's because it is, literally. Hosts Courtney and Emily welcome back Dr. Douglas Kern to the podcast to visit a 2015 Walt Disney Family Museum exhibit through its commemorative book titled, Disney and Dali: Architects of the Imagination, to discuss the friendship between the two artists and, at the time, their unrealized animated short, Destino. The project's completion in 2003 and the opening of Walt Disney World Resort's Gran Destino Tower in 2019 enlightened many fans, including your hosts, to Disney and Dali's friendship and their mutual admiration for surrealism, animation, and cinema. To most, Disney and Dali would seem an unlikely pairing, but as the Oscar nominated animated short, Destino, and artifacts from the Walt Disney Family Museum and The Salvador Dalí Museum proved, the two artists were destined to work together.  Review Book of the Mouse Club on iTunes and Google Play and send any questions, comments, or suggestions to the hosts at bookofthemouseclub@gmail.com Follow Our Reading Journey On Social Media! Official Twitter and Instagram: @BookoftheMouse Courtney: Instagram @greatguthsby, Twitter @Courtney_Guth, and Goodreads Emily: Instagram and Twitter @emily_mickde, and Goodreads Doug Kern continues to write and publish pieces in Senses of Cinema, Continuum: The Peer Reviewed Journal of African Diaspora Drama, Theatre, and Performance; and Praxis: A Writing Center Journal, among others. YouTube: Dali and Disney: A Date with Destino Full Documentary 

Painted Trash
Thanksgivings Past

Painted Trash

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 56:01


Welcome to Episode 89! This week's episode has been slightly delayed in release following the Thanksgiving holiday but this one is a laugh-out-loud, hilarious episode! So let's jump right in!In this week's Pick- Up, Casey has returned from a quick trip for a wedding out of state and he had a ball! He is also readying for a big moment coming up around the Thanksgiving holiday as well.  Then Mark is back at the theatre seeing a riveting production of Bug by Tracy Letts and a new movie just released and streaming.In this week's Mid-Section, The Boys are discussing the origins of the Thanksgiving Holiday and what the holiday has evolved into. They are discussing some thing they are grateful for this year and of course --- the food! All the traditional tasty dishes they like (and ones they don't). Then it's on to Trash Talk!  This week Mark & Casey are hitting 3 stories from the news and painting them.  First up, everybody is talking about the problems around the country with hiring for jobs and the "shortage" of workers.  Well Mark has a story where some folks have gotten creative at finding "workers" but is it right to have these folks doing the work?? Then Casey is reviewing the excitement within the Archdiocese of the Catholic church after a recent report was released.  Then closing out this week's segment Mark has a story out of his hometown where a naked visitor to a local CNY theatre did go how he thought it would.In this week's recommendation, Casey is review a new TV show on streaming which was recently released and Mark has a new documentary now streaming about a 2020 Presidential Campaign and life in the public eye.The Boys hope you had a fabulous holiday!  With all the hustle and the bustle, you deserve some laughs. So pour some of your favorite (or leftover) port vintage get ready to paint with an all new episode of Painted Trash!=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-Let The Boys of Painted Trash know your thoughts on this week's topics and episode!Have a topic idea or story you recommend for Trash Talk, be sure to send it in to our email or through the "contact us" on our website.Follow us on:Instagram: instragram.com/paintedtrashpodTwitter: twitter.com/paintedtrashpodFacebook: facebookcom/paintedtrashpodcastDon't forget to click Subscribe and/or Follow and  leave us a review!email: paintedtrashpodcast@gmail.comweb: www.paintedtrashpodcast.com

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Boz deserves a seat at the table, life coaches, let's be directLet Me Run This By You: Gina versus plots - is it just ADD? Interview: We talk to Kate Dugan about living in Morocco, her playwriting program,  Sandy Shinner, Victory Gardens, shooting yourself in the foot, being ready or not to take advantage of opportunities, Outliers, regret, Sandra Delgado, the Bad Boyfriend years, Austin Film Festival, Ola Rotimi, Actor's Training Center, Meisner, Erica Daniels, Bikram yogaFULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited): 1 (8s):And Jen Bosworth from me this and I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? Not a whole hell of a lot. I mean, I'm, I feel I'm right. I just real, really excited to like level up my, my work life game. Like, it doesn't even mean that I, it just means that, like, I actually feel like an adult, like I just feel at 47 right now.1 (55s):I'm 47. I feel at 47. Like I'm ready. Oh girl. Wait, am I 40? No, I had a birthday. October four. Yeah. You turned 40 you're you're you're desperate to be older apparently. Oh, I've been telling people 47. Okay. So what year were you born? 75, but I'm terrible at math for 46 years. Okay. So what was I saying about being the wrong age? Oh, I just feel like at 46, right? That's my age at 46. I am finally ready to get a job, like, okay. I need a writing job, like a, B a real job, a real job of like, of like, I feel like I finally deserve, I just, I'm starting to feel like I finally deserve a seat at the table.1 (1m 47s):I love that. Yeah, I definitely do. Yeah. I mean, I just do deserve it, but like the world needs for you to have that seat at the table. Thank you. And I finally feel like that is a possibility, you know, it's interesting. And I was going to ask you about this. So there are all these Clem coaches in Los Angeles. Oh, that's funny. I was going to ask you if something about coaches, but go ahead. Okay, great. So, so God bless him and I can just see everyone is really trying to earn a living, right? So like, everyone I meet is trying to help. I know a lot of hustlers, right?1 (2m 28s):So coaches now have this language. It's fantastic. First time a coach uses language with me. I thought it was so cool. And I was so special. They all fucking use this language. Good ones, bad ones, whatever. Okay. So they get to the part. I had a free introductory session with a woman who was wonderful, nothing wrong with her. I'm talking about specific coaching language around payment and charging people talking about the fee. Okay. So therapists my in my, you know, the way it was, well, I also worked for a social service agency. So I could like just people please, my way out of it and say, well, the agency charges this, you know, all of this. Okay.1 (3m 8s):But for all the people I've seen as therapists, they're pretty straightforward. They're like, my fee is 180 an hour. This is how much your copay would. I looked up your insurance, whatever coaches have a whole nother situation where they say things like, I don't usually do this. This is what they say more than one coach say this to me. I don't usually do this, but I'm going to do something I don't normally do, which is I'm gonna let you set your fee. How much is this worth to you?2 (3m 36s):Oh God. Oh fuck you. What kind1 (3m 39s):Of invest?2 (3m 40s):$7 and 50 cents.1 (3m 42s):What kind of investment are you willing to make in your future? Whatever, whatever they get. And then2 (3m 51s):If you low ball it, it's like, well, I guess you're not recommend it to your future,1 (3m 54s):Right. Or, and you must not value. You must not yet. Right? You must not think that you're abundant enough to bring it the way. So the first time someone said this to me, I was like, this is brilliant. Like I totally, and I bought in and I was like, and I, and, and I didn't know. I was like, okay, you know, $80 a session. And then she later, and then we did that for a while later, she told me that she charges like $2,000 for, oh my God. Like a packet. And I was like, what? Okay, so right. Okay. This person did not do this the other day. I had a free introductory session. And she said that, you know, when she's a woman of color and I really adore her, but it was the same language.1 (4m 38s):And it's not, it's what they're trained to say. And so I just am, so I was so naive. I thought this was like such a cool thing. And now I'm like, wait, everyone's using the same thing, which is, I'm going to let you set your fee to tell me how much you are invested in yourself. And I'm like, wait, that's manipulative. Just set your fucking fee. And if I just said fan, and if I don't pay it, I don't pay it. And we don't work together because otherwise2 (5m 7s):You're setting up the road. I mean, setting up the dynamic where somebody is going to feel resentful, right? Like if, if you're the coach and you're not charging what you, what you think you're. I mean, what about that? Why wouldn't you turn it back on them and say like, well, I really rely upon providers to tell me what they think they're worth by having an established fee. I mean, this is, it's so crazy. It's, it's like saying actually I've had this before with, I can't think maybe babysitters, like how much you charge. Well, whatever you feel comfortable with, I don't know what to do with that. Like, I mean, I feel comfortable paying you nothing. Does that mean that's what you want to,1 (5m 48s):Right? This is what we get in trouble with when, whenever there's a barter situation as well. Like I remember, oh my God, my dad is a anyway. I remember a psychologist getting into huge trouble at a friend, my dad's friend for bartering with therapy.2 (6m 7s):Oh my God. Like, make me homemade tofu or something like1 (6m 11s):Similar, like out, like you do my yard work. I'll do. I mean, I mean, like you get into trouble. It leads to trouble. I think it's better to be out of vagueness, set your fee and not, and just say, this is my fee. And if someone wants to have a conversation about the fee and do you lower it, and then you have a further conversation, whether you decide to lower it or not is up to you. But like, yeah, I don't like this, this,2 (6m 39s):No. And let's just be direct. I mean, this is another problem that we have, like with just, I don't know, globally with communication. I just feel like people are so darn indirect and it doesn't help. I'm not, I'm not suggesting that like, I can't use more, you know, finesse or be half softer or whatever. But like at the end of the day, I just want to know what it is. You're trying to say to me, you know, and I don't want to guess about it because I'm going to guess wrong. And then you're going to feel a type of way about it. And it's unnecessary.1 (7m 12s):It's unnecessary. And I do, you know, as much as, as much as I, I always think back, I had a therapist at the, at Austin Riggs in Massachusetts and Stockbridge and Dr. Craig Pierce. Right. And he, it was interesting. I wanted to call him Dr. Craig. And he was like, no, that is not my name. And, and I was like, this guy is such a douche, but really he was setting a boundary saying, no, no, no, no, no. I'm not your friend. I'm actually not your dad. I'm not your, this isn't, we're working. We're doing serious work here. And it's either Craig or Dr. Pierce, but you can't. And at the time I was like 21 or something. I don't know what I was, but I thought what a douche, but now I'm like, oh, he actually was, was trying to help me.2 (8m 1s):Let's just get this out of the way. This is how I expect to be referred to this is how much I expect to be paid. My thing about coaches recently is I feel like everybody is doing this group delusion about, like, we can't go to therapy. So we have to say, I mean, we could pay more for a coach than we might for a therapist. We could be more revealing with a coach that we were therapists. It's just turned into the stigma of like, well, I don't want to go to therapy, but you know, I want to have a coach. And the problem with that is it's so wildly unregulated.1 (8m 34s):Yes,2 (8m 34s):Exactly. If anybody can call themselves a coach,1 (8m 37s):Right. And even this, this coach that I saw was like, yeah, it's wild Lynn regulated. And I understand that, you know, so, so there are some, you know, weird coaches and she's lovely and she's trying to make a living. The other thing that is so clear to me is everyone is trying to make a living. So there is right. Everyone's trying, I give them points for trying, like you she's trying to have a coaching business. So, so right. I don't fault her for it, but I did. I was like, so shocked that the language, I was like, oh, here we go. She's going to say the exact thing that this other coach said. So, duh, there's all kinds of like classes that for free structure that could the coaches taste.1 (9m 24s):Are you going to see her again? I mean, I'm not, no, no, no, no, no. I told her, I was like, you know, I'm just really not in a position to do coaching right now. And I'm not, I have a therapy. I have a new therapist. Let me just pay the therapist who told me what our fee was. So it was interesting. The other thing that I think was interesting is like I took, the reason I met this coach was I took a workshop on a free workshop on imposter syndrome, which is another like thing that people are really throwing around now is imposter syndrome. And self-sabotage those kinds of phrases. So I took an imposter syndrome workshop, lovely workshop. And then they said, you know, we're going to have a raffle and see who gets a free coaching session.1 (10m 5s):Well, we all, did. We all won the RAF. I mean,2 (10m 14s):Oh my God. I mean, is everything a play Like a performance piece in Los Angeles?1 (10m 24s):Yeah, it is. It is. And it's so, it's so funny, but like, so yeah, I was talking to my friend, I'm like, who went to the workshop? I'm like, oh, I won the I wasn't coaching says, she goes, so did I? And then I talked to someone else who I met when I networked with like soda. I was like,2 (10m 40s):I really respect how much it seems like people in LA are devoted to self-improvement. I really, really respect that in a way that I just feel like people out here aren't or if they are, they don't talk about it. Maybe it's what it is. But it does seem, it does seem like people in LA are either they're on a health kick or a mental health kick or they're, you know, getting sober or I just feel like there's a lot of, there's a lot of1 (11m 5s):Types here.2 (11m 8s):And I appreciate the fact that everybody talks about that openly. Because if, if people are into that stuff around here, they don't talk about it. So I ended up feeling like, you know, I'm a weirdo.1 (11m 19s):I feel like it's like, like literally like old money versus new money. I swear to God it's like old, old paradigms versus new paradigms. And like, yeah, it's out in the open here, everyone's on some kick, but at the same time, it's also lessened because everybody's talking about it all the time and it becomes like the, like a F like a farce, like not sacred in any way. It's like,2 (11m 47s):Yeah. And I bet there's a lot of people who are doing the most, like in terms of self-help and they're just still the biggest, or they're just lying to themselves about the fact that they're, they feel like they're getting better, but they're really just haven't changed at all. Yeah. I mean, I think that like, living anywhere is a problem. Well, let me get out of here. I feel like, wow, you can really feel the Puritan vibe. I mean, it's yes. You really it's like, we don't talk about feelings. We, we talk about things on the surface. We don't reveal, you know, very much about ourselves. Wow. Yeah. Keep everything. It's all, it's very buttoned up.2 (12m 27s):Wow. When I first moved here, I really appreciated that, you know, I've done some wild swings geographically, like yeah. Growing up in Sacramento was kind of one sort of thing unto itself that doesn't relate that much to California. Yeah. And then going to Chicago was like, oh, okay. I like this. These people are really down to earth. You know, then I got kind of sick of that. And then I moved to back to California, to the bay area. And I really was into that for awhile. And then I felt like, oh my God, this is all. So this is all bullshit. Like talking about everybody was an imposter. I felt like everybody was low key. So aggro. And then just this hippie, you know, talking about free level the time.2 (13m 8s):And then we moved to New York and I was like, oh, people will just get right to the point here. I really appreciate that. And I never got tired of that, but then we moved here and I thought, oh, this is new England. This is what the pilgrims they've decided a way to be. And it's very buttoned up and they haven't changed in, you know, 300 years. For, you know, have like a little ideas folder in my notes where I just make it little snippets of ideas and write them down. And I've had like six or seven that I realized are all circling around the same idea, which is, I want to have a movie or some, or some type of a script where it's a superhero, but the superhero, their power is that they can interact through some type of magic.2 (14m 8s):They can intervene in somebody else's life when they're making bad decisions. This is sort of romantic coaching and like, Hmm, maybe it's virtual reality, but they, they can kind of put themselves into the body of the person who's making the bad decisions and then help them. You know, it's like, it's basically like the therapist having none of the barriers to, you know, wellness or whatever, and just kind of getting right in there at the same time as this is a comment about how we look to other people to tell us how to behave. Anyway, the superheroes name is psyche and I love it. And, and I'm, I'm it, I'm it.2 (14m 49s):I want to kind of continue with this idea, but I am woefully terrible with plot, as I think we've talked about before. I don't know if you're talking about the podcast before and it's such a, it makes perfect sense that my given my own psychology, that plot would be the hardest thing,1 (15m 11s):Because more that,2 (15m 13s):Well, my, my mother is the first person to tell you, she's never done anything with a plan. She's always just reacted to whatever has come her way. In fact, the idea of like having a goal and working towards it was literally something I never learned until I met my husband. Wow. When like a week, a day. And he was like, what are you going to do today? And I said, oh, I think I'm going to sit out in the sun. And he said, what? I thought you were trying to be an actress. I thought you were like, well, you don't have any time to sit down and do anything. Like you have a goal. And that, and that's been my thing is like, I, I have these vague undefined or have had vague undefined goals yet that in some ways I'm working towards, but because there's no sort of master plan or not a conscious one, if don't know how to get from a, to B to C I know everything about what it looks like as you're traveling from a to B to C, I had to describe it and everything like that.2 (16m 10s):But as far as charting a course of like, this is where I'm starting, and this is where I'm going to end up. That's pretty new to me. And I feel like that's why I struggle with clot. Cause I just don't have like a lot of idea of how something unfolds.1 (16m 26s):Seriously. Literally just ADHD. Could that be,2 (16m 30s):Oh, maybe you have ADHD.1 (16m 33s):Did we talk about2 (16m 33s):This? I have add1 (16m 36s):Or add. So if you have that, this is when I talk to writers who have add that this is their exact situation. Oh, okay. Excellent. With dialogue, excellent. With everything except the actual plot pointing to a, to B, to C you just, I think you just need a class in some add meds. Like I'm serious. I, I don't think, Hey, this is not a, this is, this could be a very practical thing. So, so my father had some big problems, but was a brilliant man in a lot of ways, right? His dissertation, he could see the whole thing where it was going to end up.1 (17m 16s):He knew what he wanted people to feel when he read it. He knew he could not write the thing. So my mother ended up writing it for him. Please don't take your degree away possibly anyway, because he couldn't do the, the actual thing. So I I'm wondering, just like my thing was kind of practical of finding a coworking space and not getting a divorce kind of a situation like yours is literally like, could be a physiological response to too much stimuli going on and how to get to, to your vision. So, and maybe2 (17m 54s):I need a coach.1 (17m 56s):Well, Gina funny, you should bring that up because I was going to say to you, how much is it worth for? You know, I tried to tell you as being your coach on our pocket,2 (18m 6s):That would have been so slick. That would have been like, you're like, I, wasn't going to mention this to you, but I'm actually becoming okay.1 (18m 12s):I'm actually a coach now. So anyway, that is my 2 cents. When you start saying, when you start talking about that, I was like, wait a second. This is not a psychological problem. I don't think,2 (18m 25s):Okay. I mean, you know what? That sounds right to me.1 (18m 29s):Well, it makes a lot of work. You're not lazy and you're not, it's not like you don't have ambition. That's not true because you we've talked a lot on the podcast about how, like having some sense of power is really important to you. Maybe not fame, but power, the power that comes with that. So I'm like, all right, so that's not someone that has no ambition, right? So that's gotta be a different mechanism in the brain. That's not connecting in some way because you're also a people pleaser. So if someone, so my guess is if I w I would wonder if we did an experiment, like if you were in a class, right. And the class person was the teacher, the person in authority was like, and you trusted this person or mentor, whoever writing group, whatever the higher power is in that moment said, she said to you, Gita, you must do, you know, act one must be written by this date.1 (19m 18s):I wonder if you do it,2 (19m 20s):I would, I totally would. In fact, that's a part of me has been like, should I try to get into an MFA program? I don't think that's the answer. I class first just take a class,1 (19m 31s):The script anatomy, there's all these classes that like, that we can talk about later, but like take a class. I know I should have taken a class and not enrolled in an MFA program. Like that was what I, I mean, it was,2 (19m 44s):Can I tell you one of my favorite slash least favorite things in the world is when I have a big problem. And the answer is like, something really is. I both love and hate that. I hate it because I think, wow, why didn't I think of that? And why have I spent so much time just like ruminating and cogitating and wringing my hands about something that has like a pretty straightforward answer. Yeah.1 (20m 6s):And a lot of times, a lot of times us, I think kids that weren't really, for whatever reason, didn't get what they needed, emotionally, make all these things. Our brain works overtime to try to figure things out when this solution, like, I remember, like when I started having panic attacks, I thought I had schizophrenia. I thought I went to the doctor. He's like, you have a panic disorder, take this pill. And I was like, what? Yeah.2 (20m 31s):How could it be that easy? How could it be? How could it be? I feel like in that if I were in your shoes, I would think, no, no, no, I don't just have something that everybody else has. I have a truly unique, right. Is that what you were feeling?1 (20m 44s):Yeah. I thought I was going to end up in a state run nursing and I had a panic disorder. It was so I couldn't, and I think it gets wrapped up in shame and wrapped up and I should be able to, I could be, you know, all that shit, but yeah, it, it, it was like, he was like, no, no, no, no, you have something called a panic disorder. It's in this book and it was a DSM. He was like, it's in this book. And he read the, the stuff, the criteria. And I was like, I had that. He was like, no shit. Which is why I'm telling you to take this pill, the Zoloft. And I was like, wow, it didn't even cross my mind. The other thing is, nobody tells you about it. Like a lot of the struggle that we have, I think at, or at least that I have is internal. Right. So I don't, I'm not sharing it with people, which is why I think the podcast is good because maybe someone's listening to the podcast going, oh fuck.1 (21m 29s):Maybe I just have a panic disorder or maybe I have add, or I need a class instead of my life is over.2 (21m 36s):I'm terrible. I'm fundamentally incapable of getting any better. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Totally. Well, thank you for that. What a gift1 (21m 42s):You gave me? Well, yeah, that's just what came forward. I'm like, wait, this is not a psychological weirdo, psychological pathological emotional problem.0 (21m 55s):Well,4 (22m 0s):Today on the podcast, we're talking to Kate, Dougan a playwriting major from DePaul theater school who currently lives in Morocco, where she teaches English. She is also a performer and has some interesting stories about her road from wanting to be a performer to deciding, to be a writer. So please enjoy our conversation with Kate Dougan2 (22m 27s):Oh my God. You haven't changed you one1 (22m 30s):Tiny bit. Let's say.3 (22m 34s):Thanks. Wow. Nice to see you girls. Do you guys look the same? I can't believe it. 30 years almost, right?2 (22m 41s):Yeah. Don't say it like that.3 (22m 43s): sorry. It's been 30 years since I graduated from high school. 25, since I graduated from college.1 (22m 53s):It's a long2 (22m 54s):You go by Kate.3 (22m 55s):Yeah. I go by Kate now. I grew up from Katie. Yeah. Yeah. That's great. Yeah.2 (23m 3s):Well, Kate Dougan congratulations used for five to theater3 (23m 7s):School. I did. I did.2 (23m 10s):You are now in of all places, Morocco, what the heck's going on in Morocco?3 (23m 15s):I'm teaching a high school here at an American high school. Yeah. My husband is Moroccan. So that's how we ended up here. We met in Chicago, worked together and in 2018. Yeah. We just decided it was, you know, he, his parents are, you know, getting a little older and he had not lived in Morocco for about 20, 25 years. And so he decided, you know, he wanted maybe try to come home for a little while. And so he got a job at an American high school. He's a teacher, he's a math teacher. And so we came and then I, I started sort of in one job that didn't really work for me.3 (24m 2s):Cause I initially thought like I was coming to teach theater. Always. The reality is never quite the same as what everybody says is gonna happen. And so, but when we got here, so I tried to teach a theater class, it didn't school wasn't quite ready for it. Then I sort of morphed into teaching English as a second language. And then last year during, well, during 20 19, 20, 20, I got my teaching accreditation to teach high school English. So I teach English language and literature. So yeah. Yeah. How cool do you like it? I do, actually.3 (24m 43s):I like it a lot. I, you know, everybody says the teaching is the hardest job and in many ways, teaching really is the hardest job. Like you, it's a lot of work and it's kind of, it's almost like doing like five shows a day, but you have to write all of your own material and learn all of your own material. And you know, it, it, you have to sort of, you have to really be ready for like a group of high school kids. I mean, these are, you know, they, they want to be engaged and they want to be entertained and they want to, you know, and if you can do those things and talk to the kids and be real with them, then you know, it works.3 (25m 28s):And on days that you're not quite up for it, it's a little tough. But yeah, I do like it a lot. I mean, I think that if you like to be in the room with the kids, then, then you you're, you're going to win, you know? Yeah. There's, I think that there's unfortunately, a lot of teachers who don't necessarily like children. And so you kind of questioned that sometimes. I'm sure we've all had experiences as students in that kind of situation. But yeah, I liked the kids. I liked being with high school kids, you know, they're alive and interested and you know, they haven't given up yet.3 (26m 11s):It's true. There, there, I read something to them the other day about, yeah, they're not dead yet. They're still alive. So that's, that's what I like about it.1 (26m 21s):The other thing I was going to say is that my, my mom was a teacher and she used to say the first year of teaching, like full-time was the hardest year of her life. And she like cried every day after school and it was the most rewarding. And so I, yeah, yeah.3 (26m 39s):I mean, my first year was 2019 or 20. So 2019 to 2020, I was doing my accreditation and I was teaching part-time and that was March, 2020, obviously it was all online. And then September, we started back, it was my first year teaching full time. And, you know, we had one class that was online and then everybody, you know, the kids had the option to be online if they wanted to. So there was one class online and then there were students in school and yeah, you're just trying to, you know, learn, figure out what you're doing and teach yourself the material and, you know, stay alive and handle whatever it was.3 (27m 20s):It was, it was a very stressful year. Last year I got to the, I got to June and I was really tired and really stressed out. And I just, you know, the good part of that is I have declared this year. I will never let myself get into that state again, you know, whatever I have to do to maintain my balance is really important to me. And so far it seems to be working. I I'm feeling much more on top of things this year, so. Oh, good. Yeah. Yeah.2 (27m 55s):So beef, let's talk about the period of time you decided to go to theater school. You did, you caught up on the east coast.3 (28m 7s):Yeah. I, well, not exactly. I'm from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I know. I always thought of it as east coast. And then years later I was like, I think Pittsburgh is really Midwest. Like, I mean, it's, it's like this close to Ohio where I was from was like this close to West Virginia. So there's a whole other element going on. So it almost, you know, it is east coast, I guess, officially, but it has sort of a Midwest sort of feel like blue collar, you know, town, but yeah, so I grew up in Pittsburgh. I, I don't know.3 (28m 48s):Do you guys just want me to do grow2 (28m 49s):Performing and I do high school plays3 (28m 52s):And stuff. Okay. So not, not as much as I would've liked. I knew from a very young age that I did want to go into theater. We, we lived up the hill from a small college Washington and Jefferson college. I'm from Washington, Pennsylvania. And you know, they built a new like art center one year. And I remember going to see my first theater show there and it had just opened. And I think it was the Rainmaker. I think my dad knew the guy, the place Starbuck, and I just, you know, like, so we want to see the play and it was just the whole experience of it, you know, going to the theater and sitting in the audience and the lights and the people.3 (29m 36s):And I just remember like when the lights went down at the, at the end, I was just like, that's what I wanna do. I wanna do this, you know, how old were you? I was eight actually. So I, yeah, it got me at an early age. I wish I had gotten set on something else a little bit. But1 (30m 0s):Why Did the theater break your heart?3 (30m 5s):Ah, did the theater break? My heart? Well, I mean, it's, you know, it's, everybody's journey is different. Yeah. I mean, in some ways it's not that it broke my heart now. I feel like I just wish I had no, of course. I mean, I wouldn't change anything. I wouldn't change the trajectory. I wouldn't change that love, you know, like that feeling. But I think just like when you experience something like that, it's such a young age, like your mind gets like really set on that thing. And like, I think it's important to grow and change and you know, obviously I've done that and I've done other things.3 (30m 46s):It just, I don't know. No, because I don't wish it was really different. So I, but I, you know, we all have our moments, right. I'm sure. Of course.1 (30m 57s):Yeah. That's what this whole podcast is about where we were like, what the fuck was that? And theater broke my heart over and over again. I thought it was going to be one thing or the business and I, it was not that thing. So I, for me, it's been a off and on heartbreaking experience with the theater. And that doesn't mean that there hasn't been intense love to, you know what I mean? Like, I think it's all part of the same, but yeah. So you, you, from a young age, you were like, you saw Rainmaker and you were like, that's it? Yeah.3 (31m 25s):So that's what I want to do. And so, I mean, but like I said, it was a small town there wasn't like a whole lot going on there. I never really took any acting classes or anything until I was in high school. You know, I went like there was a, there was an acting teacher at my high school. And I just remember like going to her class and being like super excited to finally like, get to do this thing. And like, you know, she asked everybody to kind of give a spiel like about what they want to do. And so I talked about it. I was like, this is really what I want to do with my life. I'm really excited about it. I, I just, you know, this is it for me.3 (32m 6s):And, and I just remember her, like, it wasn't necessarily that day, but like at some point she just kind of looked at me and she was like, oh, you're the one that wants to be an actress. And it was like that first, like, I'm sure you guys have experienced this. It was like that first experience of like, oh, I guess like me being excited about it, isn't necessarily going to get people to be positive with me. There was certain that there was an element of bitterness, I guess, which I think happens to people, you know, and I think it happens justifiably.3 (32m 53s):And so I think, you know, it's very important to me that I don't become bitter that I, and I'm glad I haven't, but I, I felt it was a very, it was like that first experience, like, okay, this is somebody that I, I, this is something I want to do. And this is somebody that can help me. And she was just not very enthusiastic about being helpful to me, you know, like, yeah. Who knows I was, it was kind of a weird year for me. So maybe I, you know, wasn't a very good student or something, or maybe she,1 (33m 25s):She, she, that's a shitty you you're probably right on. No, no, because I know because I've done that to people. Actually, I, I feel like I've dampened peoples. I do this with my husband all the time where I rain on his parade. And she rained on your parade a little bit. I'm not saying it's not that she doesn't have good reason to rain grades, but she did. And that, that is sort of, we hear it a lot. So I would think for someone to either either blatantly or inadvertently reign on a youngster's parade in terms of their artistic dreams.3 (33m 57s):So like at high school, I wasn't really that, like, I, I think I, we did like a play for my English class or something. So I don't know. I, I try, like I was in speech and debate and I went to one meet. And let me tell you like the power of the mind. Like I got laryngitis that day. Like I got laryngitis on the bus on the way to the meet and couldn't talk all day. And then on the bus on the way home I was able to speak. And so, you know, I think, you know, there's, yeah. I mean, that's a, that's a whole other . I mean, does that mean you1 (34m 37s):Didn't keep going with speech and debate3 (34m 39s):Or you had no, I don't think I did. I don't really remember. I obviously it was not a huge part of my life because I think at some point I was like, okay, this is not the person that's going to help me. I'm not getting feeling very positive vibes here. And so I'm gonna try to, you know, do other things. So then I started taking acting classes.1 (34m 60s):Did she wait to interrupt? Did she run the speech and debate thing too?3 (35m 3s):Yes, she did. Oh, no.1 (35m 5s):So that's, I mean, there you go. I mean, that's3 (35m 8s):How my mom1 (35m 9s):Running.3 (35m 11s):Yeah. Who knows. Anyway, so then I started going to like taking acting classes in downtown Pittsburgh. There was the civic light opera, and they had like an academy of, it was musical theater, but I just took straight acting classes. I was never like really a singer or anything like that. And that was a really positive experience for me. I had a great teacher, Jill, and, you know, we did a lot of scene study and she was, she was the opposite, you know, she was a very positive person, very loving and sweet. And, you know, really, you made me feel good about what I was doing and what I could do.3 (35m 52s):So, you know, there are those people as well that, you know,2 (35m 57s):Who suggested that you could pursue it for college.3 (36m 5s):I mean, I think it was never, for me, it was just never a question like, but I long story, I didn't, I didn't, I wasn't in the acting program at DePaul, I was in the play. I was in the wait. I was in the, I was in the playwriting program. Yeah.2 (36m 27s):Why do I remember you as being in class with me? But I feel like I remember you as being one of the actors. I remember seeing you on Steve.3 (36m 38s):No, I, I, I doubt it. I, I, unless2 (36m 42s):Were you in a play onstage?3 (36m 44s):I don't think so. No. I mean, unless it was like some kind of workshop for one of my plays or something like that, but no,2 (36m 54s):I mean, do you remember me at all? I3 (36m 56s):Do remember. Yeah. I remember you guys. I remember you completely. I just, so I think I graduated. I was a year older than you guys. I think. When did you graduate? I graduated in 96. Okay. So yeah, one year older. You will, so, okay, go ahead.2 (37m 14s):Awesome. Yeah, that happened. What the hell?3 (37m 19s):Well, let me, let me dial back to, to where, cause you asked me if my teacher wanted me to go to college and for me, like there was just no other, I was going to school for theater and there was no stopping me. You know, it was funny. I've listened to some of your podcasts and, and I listened to Caitlin Kiernan's and she was just like, you know, I was 18. Like, what do you, you know, like what did I think? I don't know, but I just, this is what my mind was set on. So, so I'm sure she, she, I remember her telling me that that acting teacher, she was like of all of my, you know, she put me aside and this one other girl, Heather, who I think has actually done pretty well. I think she lives in LA and you know, there's not a lot of TV work.3 (38m 0s):And she was like, you know, she's like of my students. I think you guys have real potential to make something in this business. So she was very positive. So then I started auditioning. I auditioned for probably not enough schools. I should've heard DePaul and like Carnegie Mellon and I think some other, a couple of other schools. And so then I kind of had my mind set in Chicago. My brother lived in Chicago for a couple of years and I had gone to visit him. And I just really like fell in love with the city. And I always knew that I wanted to go to school in a city. So I kind of got my mind set on Chicago. I was like, well, if I get in the car to Carnegie Mellon, I'm from Pittsburgh obviously, but I didn't.3 (38m 45s):So then I auditioned for DePaul and I didn't get in my first, I didn't get in. And so I decided to take a year off and try again, which my dad was not super happy about, but I just had my mindset. I was like, no, I'm going to take year off. And then I'm going to try it again. I'm going to audition again. And that's it. And it ended up being, you know, I think taking your off was a good thing for me. I auditioned again and I didn't get in again. And so, you know, it's funny, like listening to these stories of you guys, like, and all the struggles that you went through and it's like, well, you know, well, at least you, you got in what's true.3 (39m 33s):Like there are different struggles. Yeah. There are different struggles for sure. But then so, and I, when I didn't get in the second time, I was just, I don't know. I think I was just set on Chicago. I was kind of set on DePaul. They'd offered me a place in theater studies program. And so I took it and then I, I decided when I was there to do join the playwriting program, and this is 1996 or 1992. And I was like, at that point I was like, literally like the only person in the playwriting program. My first year, there was like one person who was like a sophomore.3 (40m 14s):I think it was like the second or third year that Dean Corrin was there. He had just been taken on to start this program. And so, yeah. And then as I went through like a few other people joined like Diane Herrera and I think Adam Matthias was also in the writing program. And so while I was there kind of grew a little bit. Yeah. So I, it was, you know, I mean, I don't know. You just want me to keep talking? I feel like2 (40m 51s):I was just ask a question about the theater studies program, because I don't know that we've ever really talked about that program and, and how you just described it, made it sound like that's where people can go to figure out what non-acting thing they want to do in theater.3 (41m 9s):I mean, I think I, to be honest, you know, I mean, let's not kid ourselves college is about making money. Right. For, for most people it's, for-profit, it's private school. I think that they wanted to build the program and yeah. I don't know what it was. I mean, I think I did pretty good on my SATs. My grades were decent and I don't know, maybe my audition was okay. And so it was sort of, yeah, like, you know, they offered it to people like, you know, if you want to come, you're not invited to the acting program, but if you want, you can come to the theater studies program. And so I said, no, the first year, and then the second year I was like, I'm ready to go to school. I mean, sometimes I think I probably would've been better off like going to like a smaller school that didn't necessarily require an audition or something like that, but say levee.3 (41m 57s):Right. And, and so, yeah, I was like, well, I guess I'll do playwriting. And I, I, I mean, I'm glad I did it for many reasons. It was not, it ended up being a really good choice for me. I mean, I think like listening to you guys talk about the competition and, you know, sort of like, I don't do well with rejection. You know, I think you really, I don't, I don't necessarily like love to be the center of attention. And I think like, as an actor or at least to be successful on some level, you have to want that attention.3 (42m 42s):I mean, you guys do, do you feel that you like being the center of attention? She does.1 (42m 49s):Like, I love, I am constantly and mine is, if you listen to the podcast, like we talk about the psychological stuff. Like, I, I still, you know, feel like I wasn't treated right as a kid. So I'm constantly, I'm so transparent about it. I'm constantly trying to get the approval of my mother. Who's dead by the way. So yeah, I, I can say that, like, I want to belong and I want someone to say you are special and I pick you. That's like my dark sort of shadow side. And it always will be for me. I think even if I work through it, I think we all have our shadow sides and that's, and that's mine. And I think it transformed into, oh, maybe if this school likes me, that will give me that sense, but I never got that from DePaul because, you know, one it's that set up for that too.1 (43m 37s):People are bitter and weird and three it's an inside job. Yeah.3 (43m 41s):Yeah. For sure. Yeah. I mean, I think for me, like part of it was, I am the youngest of four and so I think it was like that craving for attention. Like I totally get what you're saying there. So, I mean, I like to be on stage, but like, I don't necessarily like the auditioning part of it and I don't necessarily, you know, like have to be the center of attention to parties or any of those things. But I did, you know, I really did enjoy, I really do enjoy acting like I, I do like it, but so1 (44m 12s):You, you,3 (44m 12s):You were doing a playwriting BFA. Yes. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. You did.1 (44m 18s):And your plays got workshopped.3 (44m 21s):Yeah. I mean, you know, the, the program was still very fledgling and I think because, you know, I wasn't in the acting program, you know, I had a little bit of a chip on my shoulder, I think admitted,1 (44m 43s):Wait, I just have to say, like, there's something really fierce about auditioning twice for the program and then going to theater school, studying theater studies, look at your, at a young age to say, you know what? I fucking want to go to school. So I'm going to, I mean, talk about, I, I see it as, you know, I hate calling people brave, cause I think it's kind of sending, but I think it's fierce to say I'm still going to go to this school. I mean, of course you had, I would have a chip on my shoulder so big. I wouldn't go. Yeah. You went and got an education for God's sake in a degree.3 (45m 16s):Yeah. And I, I, I got a really good education, you know, that's part of what was really positive for me. And I'll go back to the question about workshopping in a second. But what was positive for me is that the theater school had this glitch in their, in their system in because the acting students had to take so many classes cause you guys had yoga and movement to music and scene study and whoever knows what else. So like as part of your tuition, you could take up to 24 credits. And so what I did is I then got a really great liberal arts education.3 (45m 57s):I took poetry writing classes. I took like performance of literature. I took video editing. I took intro to film. I took like,1 (46m 10s):We'll do you could do that Kate? Like, how did you figure out like, oh, I have 24 credits. I'm going to use these.3 (46m 15s):I really don't. I don't know that anybody told me, I think I just figured it out at some point. And I was like, okay, well I guess I'm going to get my money's worth and I'm going to go take these other classes and these other schools and learn how to write and learn how to make films and do intro to film and learn, you know? So like I really loved college. I don't, you know, the theater school was, I don't have anything negative to really say about the theater school either. I knew what I was getting into. Like I said, I sort of had that chip on my shoulder to begin with about being part of the theater school about feeling like Jen, like you said, like about feeling like an insider, but you know, all my friends were in the theater school.3 (47m 2s):I, I love theater people. I really enjoyed that experience. But, but part of my good college experience happened outside of it in many ways, just because I kind of took the reins and I was like, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna have some fun with this and get a good education and, and play. And I, I loved it. I loved school. I loved learning new things and try new things. I even, I even took like a leave of absence from the theater for theater school for one quarter. Cause I did a, an overseas, I went to Ireland for a quarter.3 (47m 43s):So, and to do that, I had to take a leave of absence from the theaters. Yeah. Does that seem familiar? Yeah, probably Kelly was crying because I was supposed to be her roommate, but I never got which Kelly Kelly and Mick Adams. I was when I came back from Ireland, we were supposed to be roommates, but I never called and she just got her own apartments. And then I was like, oh my God, I don't know where I'm going to live. But yeah. So I, you know, anyway, so back to my theater school experience, so was, was positive also for playwriting. I, I don't know. I mean, I, you know, Dean Corrin was great, you know, we took like dramatic criticism we had yeah.3 (48m 30s):You know, another, another theme that I have, you know, listening to your podcast and you guys talked about it a little bit is like self-sabotage or not taking advantage of the opportunities presented to you. I feel like, because I kind of had that chip and I wanted to be an actor. Like I didn't necessarily take advantage of the opportunities, like playwriting opportunities, which came easier of course, because cause that's the way it goes, because if you want something it's not going to be, you know, it's not going to be easy, but if you're kind of, sort of like, well maybe, maybe not then the opportunities roll in, but yeah, like we had a poetry or a playwriting workshop class with Sandy Shinar she worked at victory gardens at the time.3 (49m 18s):Yeah. And she was good friends with Dean and like he had her come in as like a guest teacher one day and we were going to work my play and he'd given it to her and she had read it and, and I was just, I don't know. I, I just was like, oh God, I hate that. I really don't want to work on it. Do we have to do this? Can we do something else? And like how we shoot ourselves in the foot, you know, like what an opportunity really? And because I was insecure and scared, I'm sure like whatever psychological, you know, thing you want to come up with that, that, that we, we do to why, why we do these things for ourselves.3 (50m 1s):So, you know, and I, I had other opportunities like that along the way that I didn't necessarily take advantage of. But1 (50m 8s):Did you pull your play or did you work3 (50m 10s):On it? We didn't work on it. No, because there was somebody else in the class who was much smarter than I was and was like, oh, well here's my play. We can do my play. We can work on mine today. Yeah. I know. That's really that's.1 (50m 26s):I mean, I totally relate. And I think it, it just speaks to many things, but like, you weren't ready for that and that's it. And I, I'm starting to look at things like ready versus not ready versus good and bad. So you just weren't ready to have that experience. And we can look back and, you know, I listened to Gina and I talk to people on and we're like, we blame ourselves for that, but you just simply didn't have the emotional resources to take in that experience. And that sucks. But,2 (51m 1s):And when you're not ready, it, people could say anything to you. That person could have said, we want you to be the new resident playwright, a victory gardens. You would've said, I don't think so.1 (51m 13s):I could've gotten the laryngitis again. Like it it's, we couldn't stop.3 (51m 19s):That's so interesting. I mean, I agree with you. I think you're, I think you're right. And that's, that's hearing it come from you. It, it, it's nice Rather than me saying it to myself or trying to figure out, like, why, why do I do these things to myself?1 (51m 37s):And it's interesting having done all these podcasts, Kate, we see it over and over again. So we have the data to tell you that people have, we've heard like so many people like with these ICTs being offered these things and being like, no, I'm not going to move to LA because you know, I have an apartment in Wrigleyville. Like I'm not going to be a movie star. And people are like, what's the D we all have that. I think that's part of growing up. And I also also think it's part of expecting young people to really handle a lot of things we cannot handle.3 (52m 11s):Yeah. They're one of the books that I, I teach my students is called outliers. Have you guys read it? It's Malcolm Gladwell. And he, you know, there's a section in where he talks about practical intelligence and you know, how some people, the people that are successful, you know, they grow up with a certain family life, or, you know, maybe it's about money. It's about education. It's about these things. But it's also just knowing how to handle yourself in certain situations and knowing how to take advantage of the opportunities that are presented to you. And I think if you aren't, if you don't have that, or you're not taught that it is hard sometimes to, you know?2 (52m 50s):Yeah. And what, I just heard you, I mean, when you said, it's good to hear that from us, that made me think, oh, you've been beating yourself up about this for 25 years to yourself. Why did I squander this opportunity? Which, I mean, whether or not you did it, it's completely human. That, that you might occasionally have that thought, but have you spent a lot of time in, in regret?3 (53m 18s):I mean, I don't think so. I think I don't spend a lot of time in regret. You know, I definitely had moments over the years. I, well, a few years back, I sort of had like a little bit of a, not a breakdown, but like, I think of my midlife crisis started and like my, you know, I have two kids and my daughter was, you know, eight and my son was four and it was just kind of like, you know, you know, when kids are babies, it's just baby, baby, baby, baby. You don't, you don't have time to think about yourself. So who cares? And then like when you start to get back to yourself a little bit, it's just like, okay, I'm, you know, I'm 42 or, you know, whatever, and what have I really done?3 (54m 8s):And you know, what am I doing? And you know, is this, this, this it, I mean, I, I was teaching yoga. So, I mean, that's also a part of my journey. I mean, like I, so when I got out of school, like I did acting for a while, like, I've done some very bad independent films. Do you guys know Sandra Delgado? Oh yeah. Yeah. She, I like, we did a really bad film together in the early two thousands. And, you know, like I did like a horror film and I was like, had some small parts as mother independent films.3 (54m 52s):And, you know, I, I was trying to act and auditioning and auditioning and auditioning and like I did a couple of plays, but it was just never, you know, I just could never get to a certain point. I really just, I would have done theater and crappy theater and whatever, but I just, I couldn't, you know, for whatever reason, you know, I have the, that decade that I called the, the bad boyfriend years, so which we can all relate to on some level, which I, you know, where we all waste a lot of energy on people who don't deserve it. Oh yeah. Yeah. And then, so, so then, yeah, like a few years back, so it was kind of not in a good place.3 (55m 39s):And I was like, okay, well, I guess it's now or never. And I, I finally finished the play, so I went back to writing. Yeah. That's huge. That's awesome. You know, I finally cause I, I was like, okay, I guess if I'm going to try, I guess I gotta try. And, you know, I, I really discovered a few things. I discovered that I like writing. I, I feel good when I'm doing it. You know, there's a lot of positives to it in that way. I finished the play. I, it got, it got into like the second round at the Austin film festival.3 (56m 19s):So that was, yeah, that was pretty cool. I guess, since it was just like my first foray out of doing anything in theater in quite some time, and I had a stage reading in Chicago and then it sort of, you know, petered out after that. I, I was sending it out, sending it out, but no, no, no hits after that. But so, you know, I'm kind of gearing up to write again. So, no, I don't, I don't have, I don't, I haven't been beating myself up about it. I think that, you know, life takes a course and you can only do what you are doing in the time that you're doing it.3 (57m 0s):You only have the information that you have. You only have the life skills that you have. You only have the resources that you have. And so I think regret, I don't waste a lot of time on regret. I have enjoyed listening to the podcast and sort of like you said, Jen, like everybody's story is the same, a little bit. And that, you know, a lot of people who, you know, I've looked up to and had a lot of respect for and were really good actors and good at what they did. It just didn't happen for them. And so that's, that's like, I, yeah.2 (57m 37s):So I'm still just trying to, I'm still trying to wrap my head around why I just remember you as being an acting student, maybe it had to do with that. You were friends with Kelly and maybe because of your friendship with Kelly.3 (57m 54s):Yeah, probably that was it. Yeah. I mean, I was, I was friends with all the apartment three crew. I, yeah.1 (58m 2s):So I mean, I like, I like that even like deeper in my brain, I was like, what if I was taking on your desire to be an actor? I saw you as an actor because it was so strong that you wanted to be an actor. Like, I literally have an image of you on stage, but I actually can't3 (58m 22s):Be somebody else. Yeah. I1 (58m 25s):It's your face. It's really weird. So, anyway,3 (58m 27s):I mean, I guess at one time, like I had a play that maybe I did a stage reading of with Darryl Dickerson at school and maybe some other actors, maybe Kelly was in it. I don't know. But that would have really been like in a classroom. Yeah, yeah, no, I not an actor or, I mean, I am an actor, but none of the theater school. Yeah.2 (58m 54s):So these days, I mean, when you're talking about the work of being an English teacher, it reminded me actually, ironically, just a few days ago, I ran across a notebook that I haven't opened since I was a teacher of social studies and drama. And I re remember that I used to take for social studies. I used to write my lesson like a monologue kind of, and sort of not memorize it exactly, but almost like repeatedly rehearse it because it was not information that I already knew. I was learning the lesson right before I taught it. And teaching is so performative that during that time I was doing theater at the time.2 (59m 35s):But even if I weren't, I think I would have felt fulfilled in a performance way. Do you have that feeling about being a teacher? That it feels like a performance?3 (59m 50s):I guess what I, I do like the exchange of energy, like, like you would get from say a live audience or something like that. I don't know that I necessarily look at it as a performance, but I do feel like, yeah, you, obviously you have to be ready. You have to know what you're going to say. You have to know the material. And like, even if it is you just learning it that day or getting, you know, I feel that exchange, like, I feel good after class, like after talking with the kids and being with the kids and talking at them and, and teaching them, it does feel that way, like a little bit like that exchange of energy that you get from an audience a little bit.3 (1h 0m 35s):Yeah.2 (1h 0m 37s):Do you otherwise feel a kind of a need to do, do you have a need for any other type of creative outlet or your guys you're doing it because you're kind of getting back into3 (1h 0m 48s):My goal is to, yeah. To start writing again, like, I, I don't know how, what your, how you guys write. Like, I don't know what if you're constantly writing all the time or for me it's, it's like, I tend to sort of get inspiration and then work on something, you know, in a, in, in a period of time. Or if I create the discipline, like when I finished this play, I was getting up at like four 30 every day. I was teaching yoga at the time and the kids were, you know, still pretty young. And so I knew that the only way it was ever going to work is if I was disciplined enough to, you know, set that time aside, this is my time, my time to write.3 (1h 1m 33s):And so now, you know, after, like you said, you know, that first year is so hard, so now I'm starting to get my legs again. And I'm hoping to, yeah. Maybe start working on something I have, I've like dabbled in screenwriting before a little bit. So I'm thinking about, maybe I'm getting too into that a little bit.1 (1h 1m 57s):I have a question for you when you took playwriting. So this is interesting because it was such a young program, right. Was there any actually teaching of writing at the theater school, Like how to write a play?3 (1h 2m 12s):You know, it's funny about that. It's funny because I mean, like, I, it feels like we would write and we give it the stuff to Dean and we had deadlines and things like that. And he would give us feedback on it. You know, it's the funny thing is, is like the only, I feel like the only piece of practical writing advice that I ever got, and I, this is nothing against Dean. It's just what I remember. So Dean was awesome. I loved him. Well, we had a visiting playwright from Nigeria all over TIMI. I don't know if you remember him being there. He was there for like one quarter and he basically just like, kind of taught me to, to write a bit, you know, he's like, he's like, you have this scene here.3 (1h 2m 57s):And the guy he's at the cafe and he wants his coffee, but the waitress isn't giving him his coffee. He has to keep asking for his coffee over and over again. And it was just like, oh, you mean, I have to create like a little bit of dramatic tension in the scene, what a revelation. Right?2 (1h 3m 16s):Like it just a Mo create3 (1h 3m 17s):A moment. I felt like, you know, he gave me some real practical advice. It was just like, okay, you just have to, you know, these two people are here and you have to kind of, he wants his coffee and she won't give him his coffee and that's where the comedy comes in. And so, yeah. I don't know. I, I don't know how much, you know, they taught me about writing. I feel like I could have used a little bit of more help, like in practical matters, you know, listening to Kate's thing when you guys all went out for your showcase and that kind of thing. Like if somebody had talked to me more about submitting my work, maybe that would have been helpful.3 (1h 3m 58s):I mean, it's so weird though, to think of it at that time. I mean, I was, we were sending out headshots through the mail. We were sending out work through the mail. I mean, you have to go ,1 (1h 4m 14s):You'd have to go to what was called Kinko's then print out your play and then, and then mail it in an envelope to theaters or drop it off in person.3 (1h 4m 24s):And there was like that, like one place where you could get your headshots downtown, like the one like photography place where you could go and get like your headshots in bulk and you'd have to go pick them up. And like the blue2 (1h 4m 35s):Box. I remember the blue box.3 (1h 4m 37s):Yes. I still box exactly. You know,1 (1h 4m 44s):I think, or2 (1h 4m 45s):Yeah, something like that. So. Okay. So then let's talk about the period between graduating and we're where you are now. So you, well, you said you were auditioning,3 (1h 4m 57s):So I graduated. Yeah. And then after that, I, I, you know, I would go in spurts of productivity, you know, where I would audition a lot. You know, I was always looking at performing, you know, once again, trying to, I took a lot of classes in Chicago. I, I took classes at the actor's center. They had a lot of Meisner there. I did Steven, Steven. I have a villages program. He had a studio in like Wicker park. And so he had like a, like a, I think it was like a nine month program or something. So you would, you know, go and you'd be with the same group.3 (1h 5m 40s):And I went through a program there. I took classes downtown at, I forget what it's called now, the audition studio, or, you know, and I remember taking like an on-camera class with Erica Daniels. And who was the other, who was the lady that she always worked with? The casting director. Do you remember she was blonde1 (1h 6m 8s):Phyllis at Steppenwolf?3 (1h 6m 9s):No. It was like a casting director. Her name began with an ass. I want to say it was like Sharon or Sally, or, I dunno, she was like a big casting director at the time. So I took like an on-camera class with them, you know, I, Yeah. I don't know. It's funny cause like you, you, there's these moments where you realize like you're trying to be funny and it just, isn't funny and it just ends up really awkward. And that was one of those moments with them, you know, you're trying to impress somebody and, and she, I was sort of like chubby in high school.3 (1h 6m 57s):And so I think that as with most women who have issues with body issues, like you, you have those body issues forever. It takes a long time to shake them off. And I remember they gave me the scene. It was, the character was played by Sarah rule. Yeah. So, you know, she was a little overweight at the time, you know, and I remember kind of making this off-color joke about how, oh, I guess I see you gave me the, the part of the fat girl or something like that. Like really like probably not appropriate, but I, I meant it to be self-deprecating, but I wasn't really fat at the time.3 (1h 7m 37s):So it was didn't come off as self-deprecating it was another one of those instances where it's just like, and the woman just like hated me after that, you know? And Erica was pretty cool. I think she kind of realized that I was just nervous and awkward. And with the other woman, I remember seeing her like outside after, and she crossed the street to like, not talk to me. And I was like, oh my God, I'm such an asshole. Like, why did I say that? I didn't mean it. You know? And so I'm even blushing now I think thinking about it,1 (1h 8m 10s):You said what probably a lot of people were thinking when they would get that.2 (1h 8m 15s):Honestly, you can rest assured that absolutely every person who was there was just in an internal monologue about their own body issues. I mean, that's, that's the thing that comes up over and over again, when we feel so much shame about something like that, it's like, those people would never remember it. A and if, even if they did, they'd say with the benefit of hindsight, they might say, oh yeah, well, that just brought up for me. You know, my feelings about myself. And3 (1h 8m 44s):I mean, you know, I think, yeah, it just, it, so I took classes all over the city. I auditioned a lot, like I said, I did some independent films and then, you know, like I was still auditioning kind of in spurts over time, I think. And then I discovered yoga. And so I started doing Bikram yoga. It's just the hot yoga. I hear you guys talking about cults and cult leaders a lot on here. He's, he's one of those guys. He's a, he's a cult leader, a guru now downfall on by sexual harassment.3 (1h 9m 26s):But I started doing the yoga and that was like 2007, I think. And, you know, I had a friend who really kind of pushed me to go do the training and I wasn't really sure, but I decided to go do it. And you know, it kind of, I think, I don't know if you guys have ever done yoga, but it is sort of, you know, it kind of, it gave me something that I had been missing in a way. I think, you know, it is that, that mind body connection, I think I had been very detached from my body for many reasons, you know, abuse and all that.3 (1h 10m 7s):Like not physical abuse, but other kinds of abuse. And, and so like, I think that people get detached from their bodies. And so I think I was really connected to it in a way, and I felt good, you know, in a way that I hadn't felt in a long time. And, you know, I think that's the hardest thing. Sometimes when it goes, when you go back to theater, it's like you put so much energy into it and so much time. And I took so many classes and, you know, I enjoyed the classes and, but I just, you know, I really wanted to get on stage and it was just like, I just couldn't get there. And I think like at a certain point, you're just kind of like, what positive am I getting from this thing that I'm giving all this time and energy and love to like, what's the positives that I'm getting out of this.3 (1h 10m 55s):And I'm not, I'm not really seeing it anymore. You know, you know, I, I would get calls from people. We loved your audition. It was lovely. Please come audition for us again. So, you know, there, there were positives, but it just could never, it just really came to fruition. And so then I started doing the yoga and I, I felt really connected to it and I felt really good and in a way that I hadn't felt. And so then I started teaching yoga and I did that for like 10 years while I was having babies and raising them. And then like, yeah.3 (1h 11m 36s):So then 27 16, I started writing again.2 (1h 11m 40s):I did, I did Bikram yoga for like two years and you're just making me re remember that part of what I liked about it. It was kind of like rehearsal. I mean, cause you just go and you do the same, whatever it is, 26 poses. And the set is the same and the smell the same. And it is kind of like, it's very rich of all the nuggets, like really ritualistic.3 (1h 12m 8s):It is very ritualistic and you know, I haven't been practicing here in Morocco. Sometimes I, you know, close all the doors to my kitchen and I turn on t

MPIR Old Time Radio
Thriller Theatre Episode 214 Replay

MPIR Old Time Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 33:06


Presenting a replay of The Shadow "Death House Rescue" aired on Sep 26, 1937. Please support these shows with your donation today, thank you. https://mpir-otr.com/sponsors-donations

gude/laurance podcast
GudeLaurance Podcast – Episode 300

gude/laurance podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021


Today on the show, Paul and Ben talk about Fargo the TV show, the return of “How Dare You?”, the Annex D&D campaign, antivax anti maskers, Mad Men, Spike Milligan and the Muppets, the Onion's autistic reporter, the uncomfortable silence among English speakers, and finally Yelling for Betty.

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
Theatre production reimagines childhood classic to tell Mi'kmaw story

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 16:49


A new production put on by the Dalhousie Arts Centre has reimagined the childhood classic Peter & the Wolf to tell the Mi'kmaw story of the Wolverine & the Birds, or Ki'kwa'ju. Host Jeff Douglas and Mainstreet's Alex Guye met with the actors, musicians and directors involved to hear how the theatre production will unfold.

B.O. Boys (Movie Box Office)
Encanto barely beats Ghostbusters: Afterlife to take #1 and House of Gucci brings adults back to the theaters. Plus, Licorice Pizza has a gobsmacking $87K per screen average! Is the arthouse back?

B.O. Boys (Movie Box Office)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 63:34


Yes, Encanto is #1, but its Ghostbusters: Afterlife's 45% drop that is the story of the weekend. Is this IP stronger than we thought?    Also, House of Gucci brought the adults back to the theater. Studios know that the rats need their cheese, but will they get the message that the adults need their brie?   And finally, Paul Thomas Anderson's Licorice Pizza lit up the arthouse this weekend in 4 theaters in NYC and LA. Is this greasing the tracks for Simon Rex's Red Rocket to pop off next weekend? The Boys give their two cents   Subscribe: https://theboboys.substack.com E-mail us: theboboyspodcast@gmail.com

Media Path Podcast
Women of Wealth & Women of Value featuring Marlene Wagman-Gellar

Media Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 69:49


We are joined by bestselling author Marlene Wagman-Gellar whose specialty is sharing the real-life stories of famous, infamous, notorious and celebrated women. Marlene's books include Women of Means, Women Who Launch and Still I Rise and she's with us to share stories about Maya Angelou, Gloria Vanderbilt, Patty Hearst, Sunny Von Bulow, Hattie McDaniel, Mrs. Gandhi, Mrs. Einstein and so many more! Plus Fritz and Weezy are recommending King Richard on HBO and Belfast in Theaters.Path Points of Interests:Marlene Wagman-GellarWomen of Means by Marlene-Wagman GellarMarlene Wagman-Gellar's Amazon Author PageStill I Rise by Marlene Wagman-GellarLittle Gloria Happy at Last by Barbara GoldsmithThe Rainbow Comes and Goes by Anderson Cooper and Gloria VanderbiltNothing Left Unsaid DocumentaryEmpty Mansions by Bill Dedman and Paul Clark Newell Jr.Belfast - in Theaters King Richard on HBO Max

Small Beans
437. Directorpiece Theatre: How Michael Bay Saved Armageddon

Small Beans

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 83:35


Love him or hate him, we acknowledge that Bay's unique sense of motion and cinematic convention has led him to box office success. In this episode, Adam walks us through the story beats and intentions of Bay's Armageddon work, how Bay's cinematic tendencies become his strength, and ultimately how his style is designed to make you watch his movies in a certain way. Let's really mine this topic. Just drill it real good. Features: Abe Epperson: https://twitter.com/AbeTheMighty Adam Ganser: https://twitter.com/therealganz Support Small Beans and access Additional Content: https://www.patreon.com/SmallBeans Check our store to buy Small Beans merch! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/the-small-beans-store?ref_id=22691

Holmberg's Morning Sickness
11-29-21 - Entertainment Drill - MON - Dave Chapelle Meets w/High School Students Naming Theater After Him - 10 Most Expensive Music Vids - Artist Makes Lars Ulrich Toilet - Foo Fighters Cover Lisa Loeb

Holmberg's Morning Sickness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 13:53


Holmberg's Morning Sickness - The Entertainment Drill - Monday November 29, 2021

Garry Meier Show
Episode 884 - Short Attention Span Theater

Garry Meier Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 32:11


Some people are saying the new Beatles documentary is a little slow, but Garry thinks that might be the result of our short attention spans these days. Meanwhile, a Missouri couple won a pile of money on a scratch of ticket for the second time. Plus, a Florida woman made herself a little too comfortable in someone else's house. Garrforce t-shirts and coffee mugs are now available by going to "Can't Live Without" on the website. Your purchase of these items is what keeps the podcast going. Plus, you can always email me [garrymeiershow@garrymeier.com](mailto:garrymeiershow@garrymeier.com) or leave a text or voicemail at 773-888-2157 Thank you in advance!

Making Sense
Reading Allison Fedirka: Fertilizers & Food Insecurity [Macropiece Theater, Ep. 169]

Making Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 15:00


Fertilizer is a critical input to global food production but circumstances have conspired to throw a spanner into the food supply chain works. The supply and demand imbalances have caused a spike in fertilizer prices and, consequently, raised the costs of producing food. Who will pay for these increases? Farmers? Consumers? Is a period of food insecurity ahead? How long might it last? A reading, by Emil Kalinowski.----------WHO----------Allison Fedirka of Geopolitical Futures. Read by Emil Kalinowski. Art by David Parkins. Intro/outro is "Alegro" by TAGE at Epidemic Sound.----------WHAT----------Fertilizers and Food Insecurity: https://bit.ly/3I12ZlR----------WHERE----------Allison Fedirka's Writings: https://geopoliticalfutures.com/author/afedirka/Allison Fedirka's Twitter: https://twitter.com/afedirkaGeopolitical Futures: https://geopoliticalfutures.com/Geopolitical Futures Twitter: https://twitter.com/gpfuturesEmil's Twitter: https://twitter.com/EmilKalinowskiDavid's Art: Art: https://davidparkins.com/---------HEAR IT----------Vurbl: https://bit.ly/3rq4dPnApple: https://apple.co/3czMcWNDeezer: https://bit.ly/3ndoVPEiHeart: https://ihr.fm/31jq7cITuneIn: http://tun.in/pjT2ZCastro: https://bit.ly/30DMYzaGoogle: https://bit.ly/3e2Z48MReason: https://bit.ly/3lt5NiHSpotify: https://spoti.fi/3arP8mYPandora: https://pdora.co/2GQL3QgBreaker: https://bit.ly/2CpHAFOCastbox: https://bit.ly/3fJR5xQPodbean: https://bit.ly/2QpaDghStitcher: https://bit.ly/2C1M1GBPlayerFM: https://bit.ly/3piLtjVPodchaser: https://bit.ly/3oFCrwNPocketCast: https://pca.st/encarkdtSoundCloud: https://bit.ly/3l0yFfKListenNotes: https://bit.ly/38xY7pbAmazonMusic: https://amzn.to/2UpEk2PPodcastAddict: https://bit.ly/2V39Xjr

My Point Of View
Writing a book about your dating experience with Jenna Langbaum

My Point Of View

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 47:14


Today I'm joined by Jenna Langbaum, a creative director, copywriter, poet, and playwright. Jenna's original play, The Night of Blue and Salt, was produced in 2016 through the NYC New York International Fringe Festival in 2016, where during which she was declared by theasy.com as "a force to be reckoned with." Jenna grew up in Rye, NY New York, and attended Hamilton College, where she studied Creative Writing and Theater. Her book, Me In Search Of You, is wildly entertaining collection of micro fiction stories that delve into the hope, dismissal, frustration, angst, revival, and mediocrity of dating as a millennial and seeking real connection. Wistful and reminiscent, written for all the mes searching for yous and all the ones who have already found each other. It into the starts and stops, the ebbs and flows of not only dating but the triumphant self-discovery that comes along with it. Each piece is nameless in the hope that you'll crawl into them and see yourself. We talked about: - Her career story and becoming an author, was it something she always wanted to do? - How was the idea of the book born? - Hardest part of the process and easiest part - How is the book divided and why like that - Two of my favorite parts: We SWIRLED (P.21) and We ORBITED (P.28) - The rollercoaster of rejection and hope - Advice to your younger self, the one that was going through all of these experiences Jenna's IG: https://www.instagram.com/jennalangbaum/ Jenna's website: https://www.jennalangbaum.com/ My Point Of View on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mypointofview.podcast/ Music: Lukrembo https://soundcloud.com/lukrembo/

What It Takes
Best of - Stephen Sondheim: Maestro of Broadway

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:42


He grew up next door to Oscar Hammerstein and became his greatest protege. In 1957, he wrote the lyrics for "West Side Story," and for the next 60 years dominated the world of musical theater, and transformed it.  His songs managed to express the most complex and vital human emotions, and touched generations of theatergoers.  Stephen Sondheim was still writing and composing at 91, until Thanksgiving night, when he died suddenly, hours after dining with a group of friends.  The shows he leaves behind include "West Side Story," "Gypsy," "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," "Company," "A Little Night Music," "Sweeney Todd," "Sunday in the Park with George," "Into the Woods," and "Assassins." In this episode, which originally posted in 2018, he pulls back the curtain on his life and work, giving fascinating insights into some of the greatest Broadway collaborations of all time, and into the process of writing a song for the stage.

Mentors on the Mic
Sneak Peek featuring TV/Film Actor Tony Goldwyn

Mentors on the Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 12:36


Sneak peek for Season 3, beginning Monday, January 10th, starring TV/Film Actor and Director Tony Goldwyn. Tony's credits include Scandal, Ghost, Tarzan, The Last Samurai, Divergent, and more. Currently, he is in King Richard (in theaters and available on HBO MAX right now), as well as The Hot Zone: Anthrax, playing on National Geographic and available soon on Hulu. In this episode, we talk about: • My upcoming season of Mentors on the Mic podcast • A sneak peek of Tony Goldwyn's episode (the full interview available on Monday, January 10th) relaying the gripping story of how he booked his breakthrough role in Ghost (starring Demi Moore, Patrick Swayze, and Whoopi Goldberg) • What to expect from my short Friday bonus episodes King Richard is currently showing in Theaters and on HBO Max. The Hot Zone: Anthrax is a three night series starting Nov 28th, 2021. It will be available soon on Hulu. Guest: Twitter: @tonygoldwyn Wikipedia IMDB Instagram: @tonygoldwyn Host: Instagram: @MentorsontheMic @MichelleSimoneMiller Twitter: @MentorsontheMic @MichelleSimoneM Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mentorsonthemic Website: www.michellesimonemiller.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/24mmichelle

Don't Take It Personal
Episode 193: A Night At The Theater

Don't Take It Personal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 232:03


On episode 193 of "Don't Take It Personal" the guys turn full on movie critic and review season 2 of the HBO Max show "Love Life" (10:30), season 3 of the Netflix show "Master of None" (46:53), "True Story" starring Kevin Hart and Wesley Snipes (01:09:14), and the Netflix film "The Harder They Fall" (01:55:38). They then talk about Adele and Silk Sonics first week sales (02:40:45), their predictions for who will win Grammy's in 2022 (02:50:53), Doja Cat's rant on fame (03:12:43), and if Kendrick Lamar is the greatest West Coast rapper of all time (03:42:45)

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine
Episode 273 - James Calleri

Little Known Facts with Ilana Levine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 49:27


JAMES CALLERI along with his partners Paul Davis and Erica Jensen own Calleri Jensen Davis, a creative casting partnership. They have been awarded 16 Artios Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Casting. James proudly served on the Board of the Casting Society of America for many years. He is an Associate Professor of Theater at Columbia University School of the Arts where he co-heads the Graduate MFA Acting Program. He is the co-author with Robert Cohen of ACTING PROFESSIONALLY: RAW FACTS ABOUT CAREERS IN ACTING published by Palgrave MacMillan, in it's eighth edition it is one of the leading books in the country for young actors. He also runs his studio www.calleristudio.com where he coaches and explores the craft with professional actors. He resides in New York City and Saugerties, New York. Broadway Theater: Broadway credits include the current running Thoughts of a Colored Man and his office will cast the upcoming revival of For Colored Girls…this Spring. Other credits include Burn This starring Adam Driver and Keri Russell, Fool for Love starring Nina Arianda and Sam Rockwell, and Hughie starring Forest Whitaker, The Visit starring Chita Rivera and Roger Rees, Renee Fleming in Living on Love, the Tony winning revival Hedwig & The Angry Inch starring Neil Patrick Harris and Lena Hall, the revival of The Elephant Man starring Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola which traveled to London's West End as well and Of Mice and Men with James Franco, Chris O'Dowd and Leighton Meester.  Other Favorite Broadway credits include: Venus in Fur with Tony-winner Nina Arianda and Hugh Dancy, 33 Variations starring Jane Fonda, A Raisin in the Sun with Sean Combs, Audra MacDonald, Phylicia Rashad, Chicago with Usher, and James Joyce's The Dead starring Christopher Walken. Off-Broadway includes Ives Lives of Saints and his revival of All in the Timing, Buyer & Cellar, Murder for Two, The Hilltown Plays, Satchmo at the Waldorf, My Name is Asher Lev, the long-running Fuerza Bruta and The Revisionist with Vanessa Redgrave and Jesse Eisenberg.   Most proud of long terms collaborations with : Playwrights Horizons (10 seasons) including such premieres as Betty's Summer Vacation, Lobby Hero, Small Tragedy, Goodnight Children Everywhere, Violet to name a few. Over 10 years with Classic Stage Company- including A Month in the Country with Peter Dinklage & Taylor Schilling, Peter Sarsgaard as Hamlet, Passion, New Jerusalem, Three Sisters, The Cherry Orchard, Uncle Vanya with Maggie Gyllenhaal & Peter Sarsgaard and The Seagull with Dianne Wiest & Alan Cumming. and was Resident Casting Director ... for CSC, Rattlestick Playwrights Theater, Long Wharf Theater, The Flea, Keen Company, Williamstown Theater Festival, and Playwrights Realm. Other: City Theater, Berkeley Rep, Oregon Shakes, Naked Angels, New Georges, stageFARM, Epic Theater Ensemble and many seasons of SPF (Summer Play Festival) and NY Stage & Film Company. Some long running past productions... include Fuerza Bruta, Lobby Hero, The Guys, Fully Committed, Dinah Was, and The Vagina Monologues Nat'l Tour. TV: Love Life for HBO, Dickinson for Apple+, Queens for ABC , NY casting for When They See Us for Netflix, The Path for Hulu, Army Wives, Lipstick Jungle, Z Rock on IFC, the critically acclaimed A Raisin in the Sun on ABC also the hit series Ed, Hope & Faith, and Monk. Film: Beautiful Darkness, I Origins, Emoticon ;), Saint Janet, Another Earth, Refuge, Merchant Ivory's The City of Your Final Destination, Heights, and The White Countess, Yearbook, Lisa Picard is Famous, The Jimmy Show, Ready? OK!, Trouble Every Day, Peter & Vandy and Armless. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The FujiCast: Photography Podcast
#209 Seeing theatre in your street photography & what makes a great image?

The FujiCast: Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 72:20


Kev is under the weather but the test came back clean so he's fit to fly on the podcast and Neale has unleashed (can you see what we did there) his own studio dog. We muse over photographers that can't or won't embrace innovation, talk cropping, discuss the amount of images returned to clients from an edit, how we send images to clients, whether it's time to finally drop the full frame lens equivalent references, ask what makes an image great and other stories. Our guest is street photographer and FujiFilm ambassador Polly Rusyn.