Podcast appearances and mentions of elise viebeck

  • 8PODCASTS
  • 32EPISODES
  • 20mAVG DURATION
  • ?INFREQUENT EPISODES
  • Oct 27, 2020LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about elise viebeck

Latest podcast episodes about elise viebeck

In The Thick
The Latino Vote

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2020 44:21


Maria and Julio are joined byMike Madrid, co-founder ofThe Lincoln Projectand partner at the public relations firmGrassrootsLab, andLili Gil Valletta, CEO and co-founder of the big data analytics firmCien+andCulturIntel. Together, they unpack the nuances of the Latino voting bloc and discuss the Lincoln Project’s strategy for the 2020 election. They also talk about the recent surge in COVID-19 cases.This episode was mixed by Rosana Cabán.RSVP for ITT's Live Election Night Show: Our next virtual LIVE ITT show is on election night Nov. 3rd starting at 6pm ET! Maria and Julio will be joined by ITT All-Stars to provide live election analysis and coverage from a Black, Indigenous and POC perspective. Trust us you don't want to miss this one! For more info and to RSVP, click here.ITT is a finalist for the 2020 Discover Pods Awards. Support our work and vote for us in the category Best podcast created and/or hosted by a POC here. Voting closes November 6 at 6pm ET.ITT Staff Picks:As coronavirus cases surge, these states have refused to loosen rules on who can vote by mail, write Elise Viebeck and Arelis R. Hernández for The Washington Post.“Again and again, political analysts have underestimated the diversity among American Latinos.” Mike Madrid explains what democrats don’t understand about Latino voters for The Atlantic.Young Latino voters in Pennsylvania and Florida could play a decisive role in the presidential race, writes Nicole Acevedo for NBC News.Photo credit: AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Post Reports
A story on repeat in America

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2020 34:27


Today on Post Reports, Kim Bellware is following protests in Kenosha, Wis., where a Black man was shot multiple times by police. Columnist Eugene Robinson on the civil rights moment we’re in, and why we need Black Lives Matter. Elise Viebeck reports on how voting by mail went in the primaries. And, deputy weather editor Andrew Freedman on what happens when you’re dealing with climate change, a pandemic and a Category 4 hurricane. Read more:Opinion: We need Black Lives Matter. The police who shot Jacob Blake prove it.More than 500,000 mail ballots were rejected in the primaries. That could make the difference in battleground states this fall.Hurricane Laura struck Louisiana as a Category 4 storm. Read live updates here.Subscribe to The Washington Post: postreports.com/offer

Post Reports
More mail-in ballots, more problems?

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2020 28:00


Today on Post Reports, Elise Viebeck on the anxieties around voting by mail ahead of November. Phil Rucker explains how the White House failed to contain the coronavirus as the summer cases crept up. And Shibani Mahtani reports on the crackdown in Hong Kong. Read more: Anxieties about mail ballots were on full display in the latest round of primaries, highlighting worries for fall. The lost days of summer: How Trump fell short in containing the virus. Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested under national security law as political structures unravel. Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer

Post Reports
Will the coronavirus derail the Democratic primary?

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 22:41


Today on Post Reports, Elise Viebeck explains how the coronavirus could impact the presidential election. Andrew Freedman on why the coronavirus won’t necessarily go away in the summer. And how new health screenings at airports are playing out, from Post Reports executive producer Madhulika Sikka. Read more:The coronavirus outbreak is rattling voters and election officials ahead of Tuesday’s primaries.Will the coronavirus be thwarted by a change of seasons? New travel restrictions are meant to help slow the spread of coronavirus — but they’re also causing headaches for travelers and major delays at airports.Follow the Post’s live coverage of the coronavirus here.Subscribe to The Washington Post: https://postreports.com/offer

Impeachment: Updates from The Washington Post
A new inquiry phase and a new revelation: Your guide to the first public impeachment hearing

Impeachment: Updates from The Washington Post

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2019 23:32


Complete with contentious moments between lawmakers and insight into facts from key witnesses, the first day of impeachment hearings was eventful. On “Can He Do That?” reporter Elise Viebeck breaks down new information and major moments from the day.

Armstrong and Getty
Hair Sniffin's and Whatnot…

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2019 37:50


Hour Two of A&G includes the Joe Biden controversy--sexual or creepy? We pull apart the story over the former VP's well-documented behaviors. Joining us is Elise Viebeck--who spoke to his main accuser over the weekend.

Post Reports
Joe Biden is an affectionate guy. Is that a problem for a 2020 run?

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2019 26:38


Elise Viebeck on scrutiny over Joe Biden’s interactions with women. Caroline Kitchener on the only new Republican woman in the House. Plus, Christopher Ingraham on the amount of sex Americans are having.

Armstrong & Getty Extra Large Interviews
Joe Biden & the Me Ewwww Movement. Elise Viebeck talks to Armstrong & Getty

Armstrong & Getty Extra Large Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2019 7:29


Can you get away with creepy? That's the question following an increased focus on the strange touchy-feely manner of Joe Biden. Elise Viebeck of the Washington Post has both investigated Biden's history and talked to one woman who's spoken out against him.

Armstrong and Getty
Hair Sniffin's and Whatnot…

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2019 38:12


Hour Two of A&G includes the Joe Biden controversy--sexual or creepy? We pull apart the story over the former VP's well-documented behaviors. Joining us is Elise Viebeck--who spoke to his main accuser over the weekend.

Post Reports
As a top prosecutor, Klobuchar often declined to pursue charges in police-involved killings

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2019 28:19


Elise Viebeck and Michelle Lee on presidential hopeful Amy Klobuchar’s history as a county prosecutor; Lenny Bernstein on a lack of HIV prevention drugs where they’re needed; and Elahe Izadi on the horror-movie renaissance.

Armstrong and Getty
10/15/18 A&G Hr. 3 This Common Experience

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2018 37:34


Where's I Love Lucy when you need it? The common community experience (popular TV as an example) has been replaced with The Trump Show--Jack & Joe discuss during this episode of Armstrong & Getty. Plus, a Twitter war erupts during our chat with WaPo reporter Elise Viebeck on the Stormy Daniels lawsuit.

Armstrong and Getty
10/15/18 A&G Hr. 3 This Common Experience

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2018 37:35


Where's I Love Lucy when you need it? The common community experience (popular TV as an example) has been replaced with The Trump Show--Jack & Joe discuss during this episode of Armstrong & Getty. Plus, a Twitter war erupts during our chat with WaPo reporter Elise Viebeck on the Stormy Daniels lawsuit.

Armstrong and Getty
9/14/18 A&G Hr. 3 Kavanaugh Khaos

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2018 37:30


Joining A&G, Elise Viebeck regarding Senator Feinstein's "evidence" that could impact the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation. Plus, an outstanding newscast submitted by Marshall Phillips and there's a discussion on Norm MacDonald's bad week.

The Armstrong and Getty Show (Bingo)

Joining A&G, Elise Viebeck regarding Senator Feinstein's "evidence" that could impact the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation. Plus, an outstanding newscast submitted by Marshall Phillips and there's a discussion on Norm MacDonald's bad week.

Armstrong and Getty
9/14/18 A&G Hr. 3 Kavanaugh Khaos

Armstrong and Getty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2018 37:31


Joining A&G, Elise Viebeck regarding Senator Feinstein's "evidence" that could impact the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation. Plus, an outstanding newscast submitted by Marshall Phillips and there's a discussion on Norm MacDonald's bad week.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for July 4

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2018 4:18


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for July 3

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2018 4:24


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for July 2

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2018 4:57


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for May 4

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2018 4:16


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for May 3

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2018 3:43


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for May 2

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2018 3:55


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for May 1

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2018 4:26


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Three things that should be on your radar for April 30

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2018 4:12


Politics and investigations reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James.

Congressional Dish
CD158: Rapid DNA Act

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2017 96:47


Since 1994, the FBI has maintained a database with samples of DNA taken from convicted criminals in order to match those samples with DNA collected at crime scenes. However, over the course of the last two decades, the DNA database has expanded to include many more people. In this episode, we explore the expansion of DNA collection and storage by law enforcement and examine a new law that will further that trend. Later in the episode, get an update on Congress’s progress in meeting their multiple September 30th deadlines. Please support Congressional Dish: Click here to contribute using credit card, debit card, PayPal, or Bitcoin Click here to support Congressional Dish for each episode via Patreon Mail Contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North #4576 Crestview, FL 32536 Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD098: USA Freedom Act: Privatization of the Patriot Act CD128: Crisis in Puerto Rico CD147: Controlling Puerto Rico CD152: Air Traffic Control Privatization Bills Outline H.R. 510: Rapid DNA Act of 2017 Orders the FBI Director to create standards and procedures for the use of Rapid DNA machines and the DNA analyses they create. Expands the DNA samples allowed to be stored to include those prepared by any criminal justice agency using Rapid DNA machines that are approved by the FBI. H.R. 601: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018 and Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 Division A: Reinforcing Education Accountability in Development Act Official U.S. policy is now to partner with developing countries and "donors, multilateral institutions, the private sector, and nongovernmental and civil society organizations, including faith-based organizations" to promote education programs and activities to prepare individuals to be "productive members of society and the workforce" "Assistance provided under this section to support programs and activities under this subsection shall be aligned with and advance United States foreign policy and economic interests." Division B: Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 Appropriates $7.4 billion for disaster relief, as long as President Trump officially approves it. Authorizes the Small Business Administration to lend $450 million for disaster rebuilding but half of that is allowed to be for administrative expenses Appropriates and additional $7.4 billion for housing and infrastructure in disaster zones Includes a provision that says the recipients of funds "may adopt, without review or public comment, any environmental review, approval, or permit performed by a Federal agency, and such adoption shall satisfy the responsibilities of the recipient with respect to such environmental review, approval or permit." Division C: Temporary Extension of Public Debt Relief Suspends the debt ceiling until December 8, 2017. Division D: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018 Extends and cuts by .6791% the funding and provisions from the 2017 funding law until December 8, 2017. The .6791% cut will not apply to War on Terror funding Additional Reading Article: How the Graham-Cassidy bill compares with past Republican health care repeal efforts by Meridith McGraw and Maryalice Parks, ABC News, September 20, 2017. Article: GOP lawmaker urges colleagues to support short-term aviation bill by Melanie Zanona, The Hill, September 20, 2017. Commentary: Graham-Cassidy Is the Worst Obamacare Repeal Bill Yet by Thomas Huelskoetter, Fortune, September 20, 2017. Article: Hatch leads bipartisan CHIP reauthorization bill to continue children’s health coverage, Ripon Advance News Service, September 20, 2017. Transcript: Why The Government Sells Flood Insurance, NPR, September 16, 2017. Article: Congress May Need to Throw a Lifeline to Flood Insurance Program by Greg Tourial, Roll Call, September 15, 2017. Article: Congress just crossed three big things off its to-do list by Amber Phillips and Kim Soffen, The Washington Post, September 8, 2017. Article: Trump sides with Democrats on fiscal issues, throwing Republican plans into chaos by Mike DeBonis, Kelsey Snell, Philip Rucker and Elise Viebeck, The Washington Post, September 7, 2017. Article: Law enforcement can now scan your DNA in 90 minutes, but should they? by Annie Sciacca, Mercury News, August 25, 2017. Press Release: IntegenX Applauds the Passage of the Rapid DNA Act of 2017, IntegenX, August 21, 2017. Article: Despite Privacy Concerns, Miami Beach Police Testing "Rapid DNA" Scans on Suspects by Jerry Iannelli, Miami New Times, August 16, 2017. Transcript: Wray Confirmed as FBI Director as Questions Swirl over His Past Record & Close Ties to Big Business, Democracy Now, August 2, 2017. Article: Congress should consider taking another look at Christopher Wray, President Trump's pick to head up the FBI by James S. Henry, The American Interest, July 28, 2017. Article: NetBio Announces its DNAscan System is the First and Only Rapid DNA Product to Earn NDIS Approval from the FBI, Business Wire, April 7, 2016. Article: The Trouble Rising of Rapid DNA Testing by Ava Kofman, New Republic, February 24, 2016. Article: The FBI Is Very Excited About This Machine That Can Scan Your DNA in 90 Minutes by Shane Bauer, Mother Jones, November 20, 2014. Article: Supreme Court upholds Maryland law, says police may take DNA samples from arrestees by Robert Barnes, The Washington Post, June 3, 2013. Press Release: Life Technologies Offers New Rapid DNA Platform, Cision PR Newswire, April 1, 2013. Article: Life Tech to distribute rapid DNA tester by Bradley J. Fikes, San Diego Union Tribune, April 1, 2013. Article: Rapid DNA: Coming Soon to a Police Department or Immigration Office Near You by Jennifer Lynch, Eff, January 6, 2013. Audit Report: Combined DNA Index System Operational and Laboratory Vulnerabilities, Office of the Inspector General, May 2006. References Cornell Law School: Maryland v. King Cornell Law School: § 28.12 Collection of DNA samples Electronic Privacy Information Center: Maryland v. King - Concerning the Constitutionality of Mandatory DNA Collection Pre-Conviction GovTrack: H.R. 601: Continuing Appropriations Act, 2018 and Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 GovTrack: H.R. 510: Rapid DNA Act of 2017 FBI: FAQ on Rapid DNA Analysis FBI: FAQ on CODIS and NDIS FBI: Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) EFF: DNA Collection Federal Register: Regulations Under the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 2000 NCSL: DNA Arrestee Laws OpenSecrets: Clients lobbying on H.R.320: Rapid DNA Act of 2015 OpenSecrets: Clients lobbying on S.2348: Rapid DNA Act of 2016 OpenSecrets: Clients lobbying on H.R.510: Rapid DNA Act of 2017 OpenSecrets: IntegenX: Bills lobbied, 2015 OpenSecrets: IntegenX: Bills lobbied, 2016 OpenSecrets: IntegenX: Bills lobbied, 2017 Integenx: RapidHIT System YouTube: Watch Demo of Rapid DNA Analysis Machine YouTube: Forensic DNA Mixups | Greg Hampikian | TEDxBoise YouTube: How is DNA fingerprinting used to identify a criminal? YouTube: Jimmy Kimmel on Bill Cassidy’s Health “Care” Bill YouTube: Jimmy Kimmel Fights Back Against Bill Cassidy, Lindsey Graham & Chris Christie Listener Dee Bradley's Blog: World Political History Sound Clip Sources Hearing: Federal Bureau of Investigation Oversight, Senate Judiciary Committee, December 9, 2015. Witness: James Comey - Director, FBI Timestamps & Transcripts 5:07:58 Sen. Orrin Hatch (UT): Last week I introduced bipartisan legislation with Senators Feinstein, Lee, and Gillibrand to update our nation’s laws to take account of this exciting new technology. Now, Rapid DNA devices—they’re self-contained, they’re fully automated instruments that can be placed in booking stations, and they can both develop a DNA profile from a cheek swab and compare the results against existing profiles in less than two hours. Now, my bill, the Rapid DNA Act of 2015, would allow law enforcement officials using FBI-approved Rapid DNA instruments to upload profiles generated by such devices to the FBI's Combined DNA Index System and perform database comparisons. Director Comey, you've spoken in the past about Rapid DNA and how this technology will help law enforcement. Do you believe that Rapid DNA technology is important, how will it impact law enforcement, and do you believe Congress should pass legislation authorizing its use within standards and guidelines promulgated by your agency? Director James Comey: Yeah, that authority that's in your bill would help us change the world in a very, very exciting way, that allow us, in booking stations around the country, if someone's arrested, to know instantly, or near instantly, whether that person is the rapist who's been on the loose in a particular community before they're released on bail and get away, or to clear somebody, to show that they're not the person. It's very, very exciting. We are very grateful that we're going to have the statutory authorization if that passes to connect those Rapid DNA technologies to the national DNA database. Hatch: Well, thank you. My bill, the Rapid DNA Act, will not affect when or under what circumstances law enforcement collects DNA samples. These decisions would be governed by state or other federal law. What it will do is affect where samples are processed and how quickly they're processed. Now, Mr. Director, what would you say to individuals who may be concerned that Rapid DNA technology will raise privacy concerns, and what would you say to individuals who may be concerned that this technology could affect the integrity of FBI's Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS? And I would note that my bill restricts access to CODIS to FBI-approved Rapid DNA instruments operated in accordance with FBI-issued standards and procedures. Comey: The first—you said it well, Senator: folks need to understand this isn't about collecting DNA from more people. It's about the DNA that's collected when someone is arrested, being able to be analyzed much more quickly, that can show us in some cases this is the wrong person or can show us in some cases this is someone we have to be very worried about. That is good for our justice system as a whole. And you're exactly right. The national database, the CODIS database, is the gold standard. This legislation does not make it any—water down the standards that are applied before a DNA result can be pressed against that database. We're still going to have high standards. We're still going to require that this is the gold standard for identification in the United States. Hearing: H.R. 320, the “Rapid DNA Act”, House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, June 18, 2015. PDF Version Witnesses: Amy Hess - Executive Director of Science & Technology at the FBI Jody Wolf - President of the American Society of Criminal Laboratory Directors Natasha Alexenko - Founder of Natasha’s Justice Project Timestamps & Transcripts 6:05 Amy Hess: All 50 states, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Army’s Criminal Investigation Laboratory, and the FBI contribute DNA records to and participate in NDIS, which contains almost 14 million offender or arrestee DNA records and over 630,000 forensic or crime scene DNA records. 11:06 Jody Wolf: Currently, these devices are best suited for use with single-source, high-quantity biological samples such as referenced standards of blood or saliva from known individuals, thus limiting its usefulness for complex crime scene samples of more than one person. These instruments also currently can’t analyze trace amounts of DNA. Consequently, these instruments are not designed for the routine testing of evidence types found in rape kits and will not help with the reduction of rape kit backlogs. 22:03 Rep. Bob Goodlatte (VA): Would this legislation help speed this up a lot? Jody Wolf: Well, comparing 90 samples utilizing Rapid DNA would take almost 27 hours. Using the—processing it using a traditional existing technology would take 7 to 8 hours. So the limitation with the Rapid DNA is that you can only run 5 samples at a time, whereas on current technology, we can run 24 samples at a time. To process 90 samples utilizing Rapid would take 27 hours. Using existing technology would take 7 to 8. Same result. Goodlatte: So do you think that this is a good thing for people to have the option here, or not? Wolf: It depends on your goal. The advantage that Rapid DNA has is that you have that answer while the person is still in the booking station. With traditional databasing, there’s a delay because you have to transport the sample from point of collection to a laboratory for analysis. Supreme Court Argument: Maryland v. King, February 26, 2013. Audio Part 1 Audio Part 2 Witnesses Katherine Winfree - Chief Deputy Attorney General of Baltimore, MD Michael Dreeben - Deputy Solicitor General of the Department of Justice Timestamps & Transcripts Part 1 3:24 Katherine Winfree: The cornerstone of our argument is that when an individual is taken into custody, an individual is arrested on a probable cause—a probable-cause arrest—that person, by virtue of being in that class of individuals whose conduct has led the police to arrest him on—based on probable cause, surrenders a substantial amount of liberty and privacy. Justice Elena Kagan: But, Ms. Winfree, that can’t be quite right, can it? I mean, such a person—assume you’ve been arrested for something, the state doesn’t have the right to go search your house for evidence of unrelated crimes. Unknown Speaker: Justice Kagan. Kagan: Isn’t that correct? Winfree: That’s correct, Justice Kagan. Kagan: Doesn’t have the right to go search your car for evidence of unrelated crimes. Winfree: That’s correct. Kagan: Just because you’ve been arrested doesn’t mean that you lose the privacy expectations and things you have that aren’t related to the offense that you’ve been arrested for. Winfree: That’s correct, but what we’re seizing here is not evidence of crime. What it is, is information related to that person’s DNA profile. Those 26 numbers— Kagan: Well—and if there were a real identification purpose for this, then I understand that argument. But if it’s just to solve cold cases, which is the way you started, then it’s just like searching your house to see what’s in your house that could help to solve a cold case. Winfree: Well, I would say there’s a very real distinction between the police generally rummaging in your home to look for evidence that might relate to your personal papers and your thoughts. It’s a very real difference there than swabbing the inside of an arrestee’s cheek to determine what that person’s CODIS DNA profile is. It’s looking only at 26 numbers that tell us nothing more about that individual. Kagan: Well, but, if that’s what you’re basing it on, then you’re not basing it on an arrestee. I mean, then the chief justice is right: it could be any arrestee, no matter how minor the offense. It could be just any old person in the street. Why don’t we do this for everybody who comes in for a driver’s license because it’s very effective? Part 2 0:20 Katherine Winfree: Since 2009, when Maryland began to collect DNA samples from arrestees charged with violent crimes and burglary, there have been 225 matches, 75 prosecutions, and 42 convictions, including that of Respondent King. Justice Antonin Scalia: Well, that’s really good. I’ll bet you, if you conducted a lot of unreasonable searches and seizures, you’d get more convictions, too. That proves absolutely nothing. Press Briefing: DNA Use in Law Enforcement, Attorney General Ashcroft, March 4, 2002. Timestamps & Transcripts 0:33 Attorney General John Ashcroft: Douglas and Laura White were married just 11 days when, walking down a bike path in Mesquite, Texas, in November of 1993, a man jumped out from behind the trees and demanded their money. The frightened couple began to pray, which enraged their attacker. He shot Douglas dead on the scene, raped Laura, and disappeared into the Dallas suburb. Eight years later, in January of 2001, under the federal DNA Backlog Reduction Program, police in Dallas matched a DNA sample taken from Alvin Avon Braziel Jr., with DNA evidence collected from the crime scene. Braziel was convicted of capital murder and given the death sentence. The murder conviction of Alvin Brazil is a powerful example of how one technology, forensic DNA analysis, has revolutionized law enforcement. Over the short span of 10 years, DNA technology has proven itself to be the truth machine of law enforcement, ensuring justice by identifying the guilty and exonerating the innocent. With a strong support of Congress, the Department of Justice has served as a leader in the national effort to maximize the benefits of DNA evidence, and the past 5 years have seen a national explosion in forensic DNA collection. All 50 states and the federal government now have laws on the books that require DNA to be collected from convicted offenders for the purpose of criminal DNA databasing. The strong trend is toward broader DNA sample collection, including collection from all felons in many states. And the reason is simple: experience has taught law enforcement that the more offenders that are included in the database, the more crimes will be solved. 9:23 Attorney General John Ashcroft: The law enforcement tool that makes this DNA analysis useful to state and local police and prosecutors throughout the nation is the Combined DNA Index System, known as CODIS. It’s administered by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. CODIS brings the power of DNA technology to bear on thousands of law enforcement investigations by integrating information obtained by state DNA databases and making that information available nationwide. House Debate: DNA House Floor Debate, May 16, 2017. Timestamps & Transcripts 8:00 Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner: Like fingerprinting, photographing, and other booking procedures which at the time were novel but now have become routine, Rapid DNA will soon be standard procedure in police stations throughout the country. There is only one problem with Rapid DNA technology: federal law. Our law, written in 1994 when DNA technology was still in its infancy, prohibits the use of Rapid DNA technology in booking stations. This is not because of any limitation in Rapid DNA technology, but simply because at that time Rapid DNA technology was not even contemplated. Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio) Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Headlines for Sept. 4

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2017 3:40


National reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James Hohmann.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Headlines for Sept. 1

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2017 3:38


National reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James Hohmann with today's political headlines.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Headlines for Aug. 31

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2017 3:35


National reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James Hohmann with today's political headlines.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Headlines for Aug. 30

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2017 3:16


National reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James Hohmann with today's political headlines.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Headlines for Aug. 29

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2017 2:44


National reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James Hohmann with today's political headlines.

The Daily 202's Big Idea
Headlines for Aug. 28

The Daily 202's Big Idea

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2017 3:14


National reporter Elise Viebeck fills in for James Hohmann with today's political headlines.

The Armstrong and Getty Show (Bingo)
You Find That 5-Year-Old's Bike Yet?

The Armstrong and Getty Show (Bingo)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2017


9 AM - 1 - Washington Post's Elise Viebeck talks about her piece: "Nearly 50 Democratic lawmakers now skipping Trump's inauguration". 2 - Jack lost his son's bike. 3 - The News with Marshall Phillips. 4 - Ben Affleck is tired of being asked about Batman; Final Thoughts.

The Armstrong and Getty Show (Bingo)
Mailbag; Update on the sequester cuts

The Armstrong and Getty Show (Bingo)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2013


6 AM - MailBag; Elise Viebeck from The Hill talks sequester with us.