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Molecule that carries genetic information

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Latest podcast episodes about DNA

This Week in Virology
TWiV 818: Thor's hammer

This Week in Virology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 116:19


The TWiVers review phase 3 efficacy and safety results for the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine, effects on the neonatal immune system caused by maternal infection with SARS-CoV-2, and NHC, the metabolite of molnupiravir, causes mutations in cellular DNA. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Efficacy and safety of Novavax vaccine (medRxiv) A floret of spikes with Matt Frieman (TWiV 729) Maternal SARS-CoV-2 infection affects neonatal immunity (Nat Immunol) NHC is mutagenic in mammalian cells (J Inf Dis) Coding for catastrophe (Nat Struct Mol Biol) Molnupiravir development (Nature) Letters read on TWiV 818 Timestamps by Jolene. Thanks! Weekly Picks Dickson –  John Clease Brianne – Astronomy Picture of the Day: Swirl in the Southern Sky Kathy – Lise Meitner  Statue is at the Humboldt University Rich – Google has the cleanest cloud. Now it's helping other companies go green Vincent – Discovery of reverse transcriptase by Baltimore and Temin Listener Picks Sam – Air Travel Packing List Justin – PFAS: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver and EPA targets greenhouse emissions Intro music is by Ronald Jenkees Send your virology questions and comments to twiv@microbe.tv

6-minute Stories
"A Real Doozy" by Tonya Staufer

6-minute Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021


– revenge of the 6-year-oldA wronged child welcomes home the prodigal parents with a flood of retribution. As an author, Tonya is moved by the effect humor and narratives have on readers. She is enthusiastic about crafting stories with beguiling characters, adding dashes of humor, and engaging dialogue that leaves her fingerprint on each page. She is published in anthologies, e-magazines, local press, and literary magazines. She is a member of Poets and Writers. Her books include Old Mountain Cassie: The Three Lessons, A Secret Gift, Baubles to Die For, and Red, White, and Boom. She writes under the pen name Tonya Penrose. Find her at www.tonyawrites.com. Author's Talk Tonya Staufer Hello. I'm author Tonya Staufer; Tonya Penrose is my pen name for my novels. I was around six years old when I wrote my first book with illustrations. I made it using construction paper and judging by my parent's expressions over my drawing attempts, I knew focusing on writing was the best direction. I found my way back to writing when I was laid up with a broken ankle. Over the following months, I penned numerous stories that surprised me by being published in anthologies, e-magazine, local press, and literary magazines. With that dash of confidence, I kept writing. When my writer's group insisted one of my short stories needed to be a novel, I rebelled. I didn't have the patience to sit that long with the same characters, but they all loved Cassie and became her champion. Alas, they wore me down and I penned my first book, Old Mountain Cassie: The Three Lessons. Since then, I've gotten to know my writing chair pretty well over the last few years.I have four novels available for purchase at Amazon and other booksellers. A fifth book, Welcome to Charm, is multi-genre and my publisher says will be out spring of 2022. Currently, I'm writing my 6th book that's part of the “Shell Isle Mystery Series.” I'm a member of Poets and Writers. I invite you to visit: www.tonyawrites.com. You can learn more about my stories that might tickle your fancy. And please don't be shy about telling your friends and family about my books.The story, “A Real Doozy,” needed to be shared. It's my public service to all kids out there to remind parents to think before they act or face the consequences. I admit my actions back then were a tad extreme, but the tale still moves around every family gathering. The younger generations get a taste of our heritage and a lesson on how not to behave. Of course, I respectfully disagree with the disparaging of my reputation. The telling of “A Real Doozy” sets the record straight, you might say. The mischief-making and pranks continue. They're part of my DNA. To the chagrin of many that reside on my family tree, I continue to shine the light on what I consider their missteps. And I carry that torch proudly. — Tonya Staufer

Body Mind Empowerment with Siim Land
#270 Full Sauna Guide - Benefits of Sauna and How Much Sauna to Take

Body Mind Empowerment with Siim Land

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 50:50


This episode is a full guide to sauna. Timestamps: 00:22 What Is the Sauna 01:13 What Happens in the Sauna 04:28 WHat the Sauna Does 07:42 Sauna and Heart Disease 11:50 Sauna and Neurodegeneration 14:46 Sauna and Immune System 16:00 Sauna and Working Out 19:45 Sauna and Depression 20:43 Sauna and Detox 22:50 Dangers of Sauna 26:18 Sauna Benefits Timeline 35:35 Minerals Lost in Sauna 39:28 Dry Sauna vs Steam Sauna 41:33 Infrared Sauna vs Traditional Sauna 42:54 Benefits of Infrared Sauna And much more Self Decode is a genetics decoding company. You can get personalized health recommendations based on your DNA and the latest scientific research. They have numerous different DNA reports for different areas of focus like weight loss, longevity, gastrointestinal health, cognition, and even mood. Recently Self Decode came out with their 2.0 software that incorporates artificial intelligence in generating DNA reports. It's the most advanced and comprehensive consumer DNA service in the world. You can get a 10% discount with the code SIIM at get.selfdecode.com/siim Head over to get.selfdecode.com/siim and use the code SIIM for a 10% discount on your personalized DNA reports. Here are the links to the podcast on all platforms Link to the Audio Podcast on iTunes and Stitcher Link to the podcast on Spotify Link to the podcast on CastBox Watch the Biohacking Bootcamp Videos on Patreon This episode is sponsored by BiOptimizers. They're giving the listeners of this podcast an exclusive offer on one of their best-selling products. It's called Magnesium Breakthrough and is the most full-spectrum magnesium supplement out there. Most supplements contain only 1 or 2 forms of magnesium... when in reality there are at least 7 that your body needs and benefits from. Magnesium is the master mineral that governs virtually all physiological processes in the body.  With volume discounts combined with our custom 10% coupon code, SIIM10, you can save up to 40% off select packages of Magnesium Breakthrough! That's an AMAZING value. And I promise that deal is ONLY available on this specific website,  Click Here to Support the Show on Patreon!   Show Notes Lucas Aoun's Natural Testosterone Optimization Course 10% OFF The Immunity Fix on Amazon Get Magnesium Breakthrough for a 10% Discount! Use Code SIIM for 10% Off Self Decode Use Code SIIM for a 10% Discount on the KAATSU Bands My New Book Stronger by Stress My NEW BOOK Metabolic Autophagy Metabolic Autophagy Audiobook Metabolic Autophagy Master Class Total Sleep Optimization Video Course Get the FULL GUIDE to INTERMITTENT FASTING FREE BOOK Get the Metabolic Autophagy Program Keto Adaptation Manual Book Watch the Biohacking Bootcamp Videos on Patreon Body Mind Empowerment Handbook Keto Fit Program Keto // IF Program Stay Empowered Siim          

Smart Business Writing with Kent Sanders
Cathy Davis: How Someone Decides to Buy Your Book

Smart Business Writing with Kent Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 33:23


It seems like such a simple question, but the answers are more profound than you realize: What is the thinking process a person goes through when they are deciding whether to buy your book? I'm excited to have my friend, Cathy Davis, here on this episode to walk us through some answers. Cathy spent the bulk of her career as a Designer and Creative Director at Bank of America's Trust Division, managing a team of 18 designers and print specialists. Then, in January 2004, she founded Davis Creative, LLC after corporate downsizing. What originally began as a boutique creative services agency is now known as Davis Creative Publishing Partners, a sought-after publishing industry leader providing concierge publishing services for authors around the corner and around the world. Books are in Cathy's DNA and have always played a big role in her life. Cathy believes we all have a story to tell, and it is through our stories that we are able to find our voice, share our wisdom, and make a difference in the lives of others. Wisdom not shared is wisdom lost forever. In this conversation, Cathy walks through the elements of a book that influence a buyer's purchasing decision. We talk about the importance of your title, book cover, fonts, the Table of Contents, and more. This is one of the most illuminating and interesting conversations I've had in a long time. And not only that, Cathy is also based here in St. Louis, so it's always good to have a fellow St. Louisan on the show! Click on the links below to enjoy Cathy's free downloads, buy her book, or connect with her on social media: Get Cathy's books Check out Cathy's podcast Download Cathy's FREE resource, “Know Your Publishing Options” Snag Cathy's FREE download, “100 Top Book Marketing Tips” Email Cathy Check out Cathy's website Connect with Cathy on LinkedIn Watch Cathy's YouTube Channel Friend Cathy on Facebook Follow Cathy on Instagram *** Are you looking for a community of enthusiastic, generous writers to help you build better habits and grow your writing business? Check out our Daily Writer Community.      Check out our Daily Writing Prompts, which will help you break through creative blocks, brainstorm new ideas, and get back into a state of flow. Writing prompts are a fantastic creative tool for creative writing, journaling, teaching, social media posts, podcasting, and more!     Connect with Kent:     https://DailyWriterLife.com     Facebook: https://facebook.com/kent.sanders     Instagram: https://instagram.com/kentsanders     LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/kent-sanders     Twitter: https://twitter.com/kentsanders    

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why?

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 84:46


How Many Times Per Week Are You Being Cyber Attacked? From Where? How? Why? We've got a new study out showing that North American organizations, businesses, and others, are being hit with an average of 497 cyber attacks per week, right here in the good old USA. [Following is an automated transcript] This is a study by checkpoint software technologies. Checkpoint, I used, oh my gosh. It would have been back in the nineties back then. They were one of the very first genuine firewall companies. And it was a system that I was putting in place for my friends over at troopers. I think it was New England telephone. It might've been Verizon by then. I can't even remember, man. [00:00:41] It's been a little while, but it was, a system we were using in front of this massive system that I designed, I made the largest internet property in the world. At that time called big yellow. It morphed into super pages. It might be familiar with. But it was me and my team that did everything. We built the data center out. [00:01:05] We wrote all of the software. Of course they provided all of the yellow pages type listing so we can put it all in. And we brought it up online and we were concerned. Well, first of all, You know, I've been doing cyber security now for over 30 years. And at this point in time, they wanted something a little more than my home grown firewall. [00:01:29] Cause I had designed and written one in order to protect this huge asset that was bringing in tens of millions of dollars a year to the phone company. So they said, Hey, listen, let's go ahead and we'll use checkpoint and get things going. We did, it was on a little, I remember it was a sun workstation. If you remember those back in the. [00:01:52] And it worked pretty well. I learned how to use it and played with it. And that was my first foray into kind of what the rest of the world had started doing, this checkpoint software, but they've continued on, they make some great firewalls and other intrusions type stuff, detection and blocking, you know, already that I am a big fan, at least on the bigger end. [00:02:17] You know, today in this day and age, I would absolutely use. The Cisco stuff and the higher end Cisco stuff that all ties together. It doesn't just have the fire power firewall, but it has everything in behind, because in this day and age, you've got to look at everything that's happening, even if you're a home user. [00:02:37] And this number really gets everybody concerned. Home users and business users is. Businesses are definitely under bigger attacks than home users are. And particularly when we're talking about businesses, particularly the bigger businesses, the ones that have a huge budget that are going to be able to go out and pay up, you know, a million, $10 million ransom. [00:03:05] Those are the ones that they're after and this analysis. Point software who does see some of those attacks coming in, showed some very disturbing changes. First of all, huge increases in the number of cyber attacks and the number of successful ransoms that have been going on. And we're going to talk a little bit later, too, about where some of those attacks are coming from, and the reason behind those attack. [00:03:36] According to them right now, the average number of weekly attacks on organizations globally. So far, this year is 40% higher than the average before March, 2020. And of course that's when the first lockdowns went into effect and people started working from home in the U S the. Increase in the number of attacks on an organizations is even higher at 53%. [00:04:07] Now you might ask yourself why, why would the U S be attacked more? I know you guys are the best and brightest, and I bet it, I don't even need to say this because you can figure this out yourself, but the us is where the money is. And so that's why they're doing it. And we had president Biden come out and say, Hey, don't attack the. [00:04:27] well, some of those sectors are under khaki for more after he said that then before, right. It's like giving a list to a bad guy. Yeah. I'm going to be gone for a month in June and yeah, there won't be anybody there. And the here's the code to my alarm. Right. You're you're just inviting disaster checkpoints. [00:04:49] Also showing that there were more. Average weekly attacks in September 21. That's this September than any time since January, 2020. In fact, they're saying 870 attacks per organization globally per week. The checkpoint counted in September was double the average in March, 2020. It's kind of funny, right? [00:05:14] It's kind of like a before COVID after COVID or before the Wu Han virus and after the Wu Han virus, however, we might want to know. So there are a lot of attacks going on. Volume is pretty high in a lot of different countries. You've heard me say before some of my clients I've seen attack multiple times a second, so let's take a second and define the attack because being scanned. [00:05:40] I kind of an attack, the looking to see, oh, where is there a device? Oh, okay. Here's a device. So there might be a home router. It might be your firewall or your router at the business. And then what it'll do is, okay, I've got an address now I know is responding, which by the way is a reason. The, we always configure these devices to not respond to these types of things. [00:06:04] And then what they'll do is they will try and identify it. So they'll try and go into the control page, which is why you should never have when. Configuration enabled on any of your routers or firewalls, because they're going to come in and identify you just on that because all of a sudden them brag about what version of the software you're running. [00:06:26] And then if it's responding to that, they will try and use a password. That is known to be the default for that device. So in a lot of these devices, the username is admin and the password is admin. So they try it and now off they go, they're running. Some of these guys will even go the next step and we'll replace the software. [00:06:52] In your router or firewall, they will replace it so that it now directs you through them, everything you are doing through them. So they can start to gather information. And that's why you want to make sure that the SSL slash TLS. That encryption is in place on the website. You're going to, so if you go to Craig peterson.com right now, my website, I'm going to go there myself. [00:07:22] So if you go to Craig peterson.com, you're going to notice that first of all, it's going to redirect you to my secure site and it doesn't really matter. You won't see it. Okay. But you are there because if he. Typically at the left side of that URL bar where it says, Craig peterson.com. You'll see, there's a little lock. [00:07:44] So if you click that lock, it says connection is secure. Now there's a lot more we could go into here. But the main idea is even if your data is being routed through China or. Both of which have happened before many tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of time times. I'm not even sure of the number now. [00:08:06] It's huge. Even if your data is being routed through them, the odds are, they're not going to see anything. That you are doing on the Craig Peterson site. Now, of course you go into my site, you're going to be reading up on some of the cybersecurity stuff you can do. Right. The outages what's happened in the news. [00:08:27] You can do all of that sort of thing on my side, kind of, who cares, right? Um, but really what you care about is the bank, but it's the same thing with the bank. And I knew mine was going to be up there. And when everybody just check it out anyway, so. So the bad guys, then do this scan. They find a web page log in. [00:08:47] They try the default log in. If it works, the Le the least they will do is change. What are called your DNS settings. That's bad because changing your DNS settings now opens you up to another type of attack, which is they can go ahead. And when your browser says, I want to go to bank of america.com. It is in fact, going to go out to the internet, say is bank of America, the bad guys. [00:09:18] Did, and they will give you their bank of America site that looks like bank of America feels like bank of America. And all they're doing is waiting for you to type into your bank of America, username and password, and then they might redirect you to the. But at that point, they've got you. So there are some solutions to that one as well, and Firefox has some good solutions. [00:09:44] There are others out there and you had to have those that are in the works, but this is just an incredible number. So here's what I'm doing, right. I have been working for weeks on trying to figure out how can I help the most people. And obviously I needed to keep the lights on, right? I've got to pay for my food and gas and stuff, but what I'm planning on doing and what we've sketched out. [00:10:10] In fact, just this week, we got kind of our final sketch out of it is we're going to go ahead and have a success path for cyber security. All of the basic steps on that success path will be. Okay. So it will be training that is absolutely 100% free. And I'll do a deeper dive into some of these things that I'm doing that I'm doing right now here on the radio, because you can't see my desktop. [00:10:40] It's hard to do a deep dive and it's open to anybody, right? If you're a home user or if you're a business user, all of the stuff on that free. Is going to help you out dramatically. And then after that, then there'll be some paid stuff like a membership site. And then obviously done for you. If the cybersecurity stuff is just stuff that you don't want to deal with, you don't have the time to deal with. [00:11:05] You don't want to learn, because believe me, this is something that's taken me decades to learn and it's changing almost every day. So I understand if you don't want to learn it to. That is the other option. I'll give you, which is done for you, which we've been doing now for over 20, 30 years. Stick around. [00:11:25] We'll [00:11:25] So which sectors are economy are being hacked? I mentioned that in the last segment, but yeah, there are some problems and the sectors that president Biden lined out laid out are, are the ones that are under, even more attack after his message. [00:11:42] 497 cyber attacks per week. On average here in the US, that is a lot of attacks. And we started explaining what that meant so that we talked about the scan attacks that are automated and some person may get involved at some point, but the automated attacks can be pretty darn automated. Many of them are just trying to figure out who you are. [00:12:09] So, if it shows up, when they do that little scan that you're using a router that was provided by your ISP, that's a big hint that you are just a small guy of some sort, although I'm shocked at how many bigger businesses that should have their own router, a good router, right. A good Cisco router and a really good next generation firewall. [00:12:34] I'm shocked at how many don't have those things in place, but when they do this, That's the first cut. So if you're a little guy, they'll probably just try and reflash your router. In other words, reprogram it and change it so that they can start monitoring what you're doing and maybe grab some information from. [00:12:56] Pretty simple. If you are someone that looks like you're more of a target, so they connect to your router and let's say, it's a great one. Let's say it's a Cisco router firewall or Palo Alto, or one of those other big companies out there that have some really good products. Uh, at that point, they're going to look at it and say, oh, well, okay. [00:13:18] So this might be a good organization, but when they get. To it again, if when access has turned on wide area, access has turned down, that router is likely to say, this is the property of, uh, Covina hospital or whatever it might be, you know? And any access is disallowed authorized access only. Well, now they know. [00:13:42] Who it is. And it's easy enough just to do a reverse lookup on that address. Give me an address anywhere on the internet. And I can tell you pretty much where it is, whose it is and what it's being used for. So if that's what they do say they have these automated systems looking for this stuff it's found. [00:14:02] So now they'll try a few things. One of the first things they try nowadays is what's called an RDP attack. This is a remote attack. Are you using RDP to connect to your business? Right? A lot of people are, especially after the lockdown, this Microsoft. Desktop protocol has some serious bugs that have been known for years. [00:14:25] Surprisingly to me, some 60% of businesses have not applied those patches that have been available for going on two years. So what then button bad guys will do next. They say, oh, is there a remote desktop access? Cause there probably is most smaller businesses particularly use that the big businesses have a little bit more expensive, not really much more expensive, but much better stuff. [00:14:51] You know, like the Cisco AnyConnect or there's a few other good products out there. So they're going to say, oh, well, okay. Let's try and hack in again. Automate. It's automated. No one has to do anything. So it says, okay, let's see if they patch, let's try and break in a ha I can get in and I can get into this particular machine. [00:15:14] Now there's another way that they can get into their moat desktop. And this apparently has been used for some of the bigger hacks you've heard about recently. So the other way they get in is through credential stuff. What that is is Hey, uh, there are right now some 10 billion records out on the dark web of people's names, email addresses, passwords, and other information. [00:15:43] So, what they'll do is they'll say, oh, well this is Covina hospital and it looks it up backwards and it says, okay, so that's Covina hospital.org. I have no idea if there even is a Gavino hospital, by the way, and will come back and say, okay, great. So now let's look at our database of hacked accounts. Oh, okay. [00:16:04] I see this Covina hospital.org email address with a password. So at that point they just try and stuff. Can we get in using that username and password that we stole off of another website. So you see why it's so important to be using something like one password, a password generator, different passwords on every site, different usernames on every site, et cetera, et cetera. [00:16:29] Right. It gets pretty important per te darn quickly. So now that they're in, they're going to start going sideways and we call that east west in the biz. And so they're on a machine. They will see what they can find on that machine. This is where usually a person gets some. And it depends in historically it's been about six days on average that they spend looking around inside your network. [00:17:00] So they look around and they find, oh yeah, great. Here we go. Yep. Uh, we found this, we found that. Oh, and there's these file server mounts. Yeah. These SMB shares the, you know, the Y drive the G drive, whatever you might call it. So they start gaining through those and then they start looking for our other machines on the network that are compromised. [00:17:23] It gets to be really bad, very, very fast. And then they'll often leave behind some form of ransomware and also extortion, where that extort you additionally, for the threat of releasing your data. So there, there are many other ways they're not going to get into them all today, but that's what we're talking about. [00:17:43] Mirman, we're talking about the 500 cyber attacks per week against the average. North American company. So we have seen some industry sectors that are more heavily targeted than others. Education and research saw an 60% increase in attacks. So their education and I've tried to help out some of the schools, but because of the way the budgets work and the lowest bidder and everything else, they, they end up with equipment. [00:18:17] That's just totally misconfigured. It's just shocking to me. Right. They buy them from one of these big box online places. Yeah. I need a, a Cisco 10, 10. And I need some help in configuring it and all, yeah, no problems or we'll help you. And then they sell it to the school, the school installs it, and it is so misconfigured. [00:18:38] It provides zero protection, uh, almost zero, right. It provides almost no protection at all. And doesn't even use the advanced features that they paid for. Right. That's why, again, don't buy from these big box. Guys just don't do it. You need more value than they can possibly provide you with. So schools, 1500 attacks per week research companies, again, 1500 attacks per week, government and military. [00:19:10] Entities about 1100 weekly attacks. Okay. That's the next, most highest attacked. Okay. Uh, health care organizations, 752 attacks per week on average. Or in this case, it's a 55% increase from last year. So it isn't just checkpoints data that I've been quoting here. That, that gives us that picture. There are a lot of others out there IBM's has Verizon's has all of these main guys, and of course in the end, They've got these huge ransoms to deal with. [00:19:50] Hey, in New Hampshire, one of the small towns just got nailed. They had millions of dollars stolen, and that was just through an email trick that they played in. K again. I T people, um, I I've been thinking about maybe I should put together some sort of coaching for them and coaching for the cybersecurity people, even because there's so much more that you need to know, then you might know, anyways, if you're interested in any of this. [00:20:22] Visit me online. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You will get my weekly newsletter, all of my show notes, and you'll find out about these various trainings and I keep holding. In fact, there's one in most of the newsletters. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com. Stick around. [00:20:43] We've been talking about the types of attacks that are coming against us. Most organizations here in north America are seeing 500 cyber attacks a week, some as many as 1500. Now, where are they coming from? [00:21:00] Whether they're scanning attacks, whether they're going deeper into our networks and into our systems who are the bad guys and what are they doing? Microsoft also has a report that they've been generating, looking at what they consider to be the source of the attacks. Now we know a lot of the reasons I'm going to talk about that too, but the source is an interesting way to look at. [00:21:29] Because the source can also help you understand the reason for the attacks. So according to dark reading, this is kind of an insider, a website you're welcome to go to, but it gets pretty darn deep sometimes, but they are showing this stats from Microsoft, which you can find online that in the last year rush. [00:21:53] Has been the source of 58% of the cyber cat tax. Isn't that amazing now it's not just the cyber attacks. I, I need to clarify this. It's the nation state cyber tech. So what's a nature's nation state cyber attack versus I don't know, a regular cyber attack. Well, the bottom line is a nation state cyber attack is an attack that's occurring and is actually coordinated and run by and on behalf of a nation state. [00:22:31] Uh, So Russia at 58% of all nation state attacks is followed by North Korea, 23% Iran, 11% China, 8%. Now you probably would have thought that China would be. Right up there on that list, but Russia has 50% more of the nation state cyber attacks coming from them than from China. And then after China is south Vietnam, Viet, or I should say South Korea, Vietnam, and Turkey, and they all have less than 1%. [00:23:14] Now, this is this new pool of data that Microsoft has been analyzing. And it's part of this year's Microsoft digital defense report, and they're highlighting the trends in the nation state threat cyber activity hybrid workforce security. Disinformation and your internet of things, operational technology and supply chain security. [00:23:35] In other words, the whole gambit before, before all of this, now the data is also showing that the Russian nation state attacks are increasingly effective, calming from about a 21% successful compromise rate last year to 32%. So basically 50% better this year at effectiveness there, Russians are also targeting more government agencies for intelligence gathering. [00:24:10] So that jumped from 3% of their victims last year to 53%. This. And the Russian nation state actors are primarily targeting guests who us, right? The United States, Ukraine and the United Kingdom. Now this is all according to the Microsoft data. So why has Russia been attacking us? Why is China been attacking us and why the change this. [00:24:38] Well, Russia has been attacking us primarily to rent some us it's a cash cow for them just like oil and gas. They are making crazy money. Now that president Biden has made us dependent on foreign oil supplies. It's just insanity and even dependent on. Gas coming from other places. Well guess where the number one source of gases now for Europe and oil it's Russia. [00:25:08] So we are no longer going to be selling to Europe. Russia is so they're going to be making a lot of money off of. But before then they were actually counted on ransomware to help fund the Russian federal government, as well as of course, these Russian oligarchs, these people who are incredibly rich that have a substantial influence on the government. [00:25:33] Don't if you're wondering who they might be, just think of people like, oh, I don't know. Bill gates and, uh, w who are on the, some of the other big guys, you know, Tim cook, uh, Amazon's Jeff bayzos Elon Musk, right? Those are by my definition and looking it up in the dictionary, they are all a. They get exemptions to laws. [00:25:58] They get laws passed that, protect them. In fact, most of regulations actually protect these big companies and hurt small companies. So I would call them oligarchs and that's the same sort of thing in Russia in Russia. Okay. They probably have a little bit more underhanded stuff than these guys here do, but that's what Russia has been. [00:26:21] China has been continually going after our national secrets, national defense, the largest database of DNA of Americans DNA, of course, is that unique key. If you will building block for all of us, that's what DNA is. And the largest database of all of that uniquely identifying information is in. China stole from the office of personnel management records of a federal employees, their secret clearance, all of their background check information who was spoken with, what did they have to say? [00:27:03] And on and on. So China has been interested in infiltrating our businesses that provide things to the military and the military themselves and the federal state, and even the local governments that's who they've been targeting. And that's why there's 8% number might seem small. Although, as I just mentioned this year, Russia moved, moved dramatically. [00:27:30] They used to be about 3% of their attacks or against the government agencies. And now it's 53%. So Russia. And China are going after our national secrets and they can use them in a cold war, which as I've said, I think the first shots of the third world war have been fired. And frankly, they're all cyber, it's all online and Russia. [00:27:57] Isn't the only nation state actor who's changing its approaches here as espionage is the most common goal amongst all nation state groups as of this year. Tivity of hackers reveals different motivations in Iran, which quadrupled its targeting of Israel. Surprise, surprise. Over the last year. And Iran has been launching destructive attacks, things that will destroy power, power plants, et cetera, and North Korea, which is targeting cryptocurrency companies for profit. [00:28:29] So they're stealing these various crypto coins again, funding their government. So it's, it's a problem. Absolute problem. Government sectors are some of the most targeted 48%. These NGOs non-government organizations that act kind of a quasi government functions and think tanks are 31%. Uh, and Microsoft, by the way, has been alerting customers of nation, state attack, attack attempts. [00:29:01] Guess how many this year that they had to warn about 20,500 times in the past three years. So that's a lot and Microsoft is not a company that's been out there at the front lines. It never has been it's in behind. So to have them come out and say, this is. And okay, by the way, your stolen username and password run for a buck per thousand, and it's only gonna take you hundreds of hours to get it all cleared up. [00:29:32] Isn't that nice spear fishing for a hire can cost a hundred to a thousand dollars per successful account takeover and denial of service attacks are cheap from protected sites, roughly $300. Per month. And if you want to be ransomware king, it's only going to cost you 66 bucks upfront 30% of the profit. [00:29:54] Okay. Craziness. Hey, visit me online. Sign up Craig, peter.com/subscribe. [00:30:03] I had an interesting mastermind meeting this week. There's six of us. We're all business owners and it opened my eyes pretty dramatically because one of the members got hacked, but that's not what I really want to emphasize. [00:30:20] This whole cybersecurity thing gets pretty complicated, pretty quickly. And a friend of mine who is in one of my mastermind groups had a real problem. And the here's here's what went on. We'll call him Walt for back of a letter, lack of a better name since that is his name. [00:30:40] And he doesn't mind me sharing this with you. Walt has a very small business that he and his wife run, and they have a couple of contractors that help out with some things, but his business is very reliant on advertising and primarily what he does is Facebook advertising. Now I've been talking for two years, I think in this mastermind group about cyber security and the fact that everyone needs good cyber security. [00:31:13] And he always just kind of pole hum to, uh, wow. You know, and it's just too complicated for me. I got to thinking for a, you know, a bit, really a few weeks, what does he mean to complicated? Cause there's some basic things you can do. So this week on Tuesday, I was on our mastermind groups meeting and I explained, okay, so here's what happened to Walt. [00:31:42] He had $40,000 stolen, which by the way, it's a lot of money for a teeny tiny husband wife company. And. Uh, well, here's what we did. He, we helped them. We got the FBI involved and, you know, with our direct ties, cause we work with them on certain types of cases and he got back every dime, which is just totally unheard of. [00:32:06] But um, without going into all of the details there, I spent a problem. 1520 minutes with the whole group and the mastermind explaining the basics of cyber security. And that really kind of woke me up, frankly, because of their responses. Now these are all small business owners and so they're making pretty decent money. [00:32:31] In fact, every one of them and they all have some contractors and some employees all except for Walt and his wife, they had just have contractors and. I had two completely different responses from two members of this group that no. Let me tell you this was really eye opening for me. And this is why you might've heard me in the first segment talking about this, but this is why I have really changed my view of this stuff, this cybersecurity stuff, because I explained. [00:33:08] If you're using things like Norton antivirus or McAfee, antivirus, or really any of them, even the built-in Microsoft defender this year, those standard antivirus system. I have only been able to catch about 30% of the malware out there, 30%, you know, that's like having a house and you've got a security guard posted out front. [00:33:39] He's armed, he's ready to fight. And yet all of your windows are open and all of your doors are unlocked. And all someone has to do is crawl in the side window because that guy that's posted up front, he's not going to be able to stop. So 30% effectiveness. And of course, Walt had all of the basic stuff. [00:33:59] He thought he was good enough. It's not worth spending time or money doing any of this. And of course it turned out to be well worth the time and money if he had done it. But he has a friend who has contacts and, and made things happen for him. So I guess he's kind of, kind of lucky in that regard, but I explained that and I said, do you know the, the way you. [00:34:21] To go. If you're a small business, it's about $997 a month for a small business, with a handful of employees to get the type of security you really need. There's going to catch. 90 something 98%. Maybe if, if things go well of the stuff going on, in other words, you don't just have an armed guard at the front door. [00:34:46] You've got all the windows closed and blocked and the doors closed and locked as well. So yeah, somebody can still get in, but they got to really want to get in and risk getting caught. So that's kind of the analogy that I used now. One of the members of my. Of my mastermind thought, well, okay. Cause you're just being Frank with me. [00:35:09] Right? We're all friends. She said, well, initially I thought, oh Craig, I'm going to have to have you help out with stuff here. Cause my, you know, I'm concerned about my security. I make some good money. Uh, she's the one that has employee. She has a million dollar plus a year business and she wants to keep it safe. [00:35:26] But then she. Uh, you know, but, but you know, you were talking about all of this Norton and stuff and that it doesn't work. So I, I just, I don't have any hope. And that's when the another member jumped in and this other member said, well, Uh, oh, that's not what I got at all. I got the, the normal off the shelf stuff that you buy that you're going to get from Amazon, or you're going to get from PC connection or wherever that stuff is not going to work, but there is stuff that does, but it's only professional stuff. [00:36:02] You can only get it from professionals that are trained in certified. Which is the right message. Right. That was the message I was trying to relay. Yeah. Don't try and do it yourself because you can't even get the right tools that you need. That is frankly a problem. So that really got me to think. In, in a very big way, because here are two people that have heard me talk about cybersecurity and their eyes probably glazed over, but now their eyes, I know at least one of these ladies definitely glazed over. [00:36:36] So I've come to the realization that sometimes I. A little too deep into things. And although I can explain it quite well to many people, sometimes people glaze over and I get emails from you guys saying kind of the same thing. I really appreciate it. I don't understand a lot of what you're saying, Craig, but thanks for being there. [00:36:59] Listen to you every week here on the radio. Uh, then that's good. That's reassuring, but now I've come to realize a few things. One is. The I've got to be a lot clearer in my messaging, because even when talking to my friends, it is a little bit overwhelming for them sometimes. Right. And then the next thing is everybody needs help because you're being lied to. [00:37:29] Right. How are people getting ransomware? If the stuff that they're buying work. Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a disconnect there. So a lot of you guys have gone out and you've hired people and I want to spend just a few minutes right now, going through some red flags that you need to be looking out for in vendor security assessment. [00:37:56] Now I'm putting one together. As well, right yet another one. Uh, and what I'm trying to do is help you out, right? This is not as sales tool. It is trying to help you figure out where you're at. I'm putting together a webinar that I'm going to be holding these what I'm calling bootcamps, where I go through and show you exactly how to do the basic steps that you need to do in order to be safe on. [00:38:25] Okay. If an online, all that means is your, is plugged in, right. Okay. It doesn't mean you're going out and doing a lot of stuff out there on the internet just means it's connected. So those are going to be coming out. I will send an email out as soon as all of that. Stuff's ready. Cause. Absolutely free. And these assessments, I have the basic one that you can do yourself. [00:38:47] It's a self-assessment. And then I have the more advanced ones that I do that are five grand. Okay. So you've got to be a decent sized business for this to make sense where we look for all of the security problem. On all of your computers and your networks, and then give you a list of things you need to do and how to do them. [00:39:10] Okay. So it's well worth it for them, but if you're a very small company and you're trying to do some of this yourself, I want to help you. So that's what these boot camps are going to be all over. And also what the scorecard is going to be all about. So that's coming up, but here are some good red flags and an assessment. [00:39:30] I found this again on dark reading. This is kind of an insider website for those of us in the cybersecurity business, but, um, How can you verify the information that vendors are giving you about their own cybersecurity posture? We've heard in the news and I've talked about them all year, this year, and for years past. [00:39:56] That are we're vendors can be our worst nightmare because some of these hacks come in through our vendors. So you've got yourself, a cybersecurity company. How do you know if they are really telling you the truth? And man, is that hard for you to know? Right. You're going to ask him questions and the salesmen are going to say, oh yeah, yeah, yeah. [00:40:21] That's why we don't have salesmen. Right. We have engineers. You talk to me, you might talk to my son or my daughter, people who have been doing this with me, who I have trained and helped out. So this guy who wrote the article and there's this on attributed, I don't see an attribution on here on this page. [00:40:41] I definitely want to give him, probably I heard is John Babinec wrote this thing and he is a principle threat hunters. What he calls himself over at net and rich. So he says, here's what you got to do. And if you're trying to be cost-effective, he puts it in. What I call an ed month clause. And one of these days I'll tell you that story, but he calls it a validity check question so that an honest vendor would tell you, no, they don't do X and give you a good reason why they don't like it's not cost effective. [00:41:17] It's outside of a reasonable risk model. Does that make sense to you? So when you're trying to evaluate a vendor, who's going to be doing your cyber security put in one of these validity checks put in one of these questions. It doesn't really matter to you, but it's something that would be very hard for one of these cybersecurity companies to do. [00:41:42] And maybe it doesn't fit the risk model that you have. I think it's just absolutely brilliant. Probably one of the better ways when you're trying to evaluate an MSSP as cybersecurity managed or otherwise provider stick in something like that. So you have a red flag that just stands out for you. All right. [00:42:04] Make sure you are registered online. Craig Peter sohn.com/subscribe. So you can find out about all of these trainings coming up. [00:42:17] If you've never heard of the Carrington event, I really hope, frankly, I really, really do hope we never have to live through one of these. Again, there is a warning out there right now about an internet apocalypse that could happen because of the Sun. [00:42:34] Solar storms are something that happens really kind of all of the time. The sun goes through solar cycles. About every seven years, there are longer cycles as well. You might know. I have an advanced class amateur radio license I've had for a long time, and we rely a lot when we're dealing with short wave on the solar cycle. [00:42:59] You see what happens is that the sun charges, the atmosphere. You see that if you've ever seen the Northern light, that is. Part of the Sunzi missions, hitting our magnetic field and kind of getting sucked into the core of the earth, if you will, as they get caught in that field. And the more charged the atmosphere is, the more bounce you get. [00:43:24] That's what we call it bounce. And the reason us hams have all these different frequencies to use is because of the battle. We can go different frequencies with different distances, I should say, using different frequencies. So think about it right now. You've got the earth and I want to talk from Boston to Chicago. [00:43:47] For instance, I know about how many miles it is, and I have to figure out in the ionosphere up in the higher levels of the atmosphere, what frequency. To use in order to go up into the atmosphere, bounce back, and then hit Chicago. That's the idea. It's not quite as simple or as complex in some ways, as it sounds, a lot of people just try different frequencies and a lot of hams just sit there, waiting for anybody anywhere to talk to, particularly if they are. [00:44:20] It's really quite fun. Now what we're worried about, isn't so much just the regular solar activity. We get worried when the sun spots increase. Now, the solar cycle is what has primary image. On the temperature on earth. So no matter what, you might've heard that isn't your gas, guzzling car or a diesel truck that causes the Earth's temperature to change. [00:44:49] Remember the only constant when it comes to the Earth's temperature has been changed over the millions of years. We had periods where the earth was much warmer than it is now had more common that carbon dioxide in the atmosphere than it does now had less. In fact, right now we are at one of the lowest levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in earth, long, long. [00:45:15] So the sun, if you might remember, comes up in the morning, warms things up, right? And then it cools down. When the sun disappears at nighttime, it has a huge impact. It's almost exclusively the impact for our temperatures. If there's other things too, for instance, eruption can spew all to hold a lot of carbon dioxide. [00:45:40] In fact, just one, just Mount St. Helens wanted erupted, put more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than man has throughout our entire existence. Just to give you an idea, right? So these alarms that are out there, uh, you know, come on, people. Really, and now we're seeing that in, uh, this last year we had a 30% increase in the ice cap up in the, in, up in the north, up in Northern Canada, around the polls. [00:46:12] Uh, we also had some of these glaciers growing. It was so funny. I saw an article this year, or excuse me, this week that was showing a sign that was at one of our national parks. And it said this glacier will have disappeared by 2020. Of course it hasn't disappeared. In fact, it has grown now and it's past 2020. [00:46:34] Anyhow, the sun has a huge impact on us in so many ways. And one of the ways is. Well, something called a coronal mass ejection. This is seriously charged particles. That tend to be very, very directional. So when, when it happens, when there's one of these CMS coronal, mass ejections, it's not just sending it out all the way around the sun everywhere. [00:47:02] It's really rather concentrated in one. One particular spot. Now we just missed one not too long ago. And let me see if I can find it here. Just mast, a cm E near miss. Here we go. There a solar super storm in July, 2012, and it was a very, very close shave that we had most newspapers didn't mention it, but this could have been. [00:47:33] AB absolutely incredible. We'd be picking up the pieces for the next 50 years. Yeah. Five, zero years from this one particular storm. And what happens is these, these solar flares, if you will, are very, very extreme, they CME. You're talking about x-rays extreme UV, ultraviolet radiation, reaching the earth at the speed of light ionizes, the upper layers of atmosphere. [00:48:02] When that happens, by the way, it hurts our communications, but it can also have these massive effects where it burns out saddle. And then causes radio blackouts, GPS, navigation problems. Think about what happened up in Quebec. So let me just look at this call back, uh, hit with an E and yeah, here we go. And March 13th, 1989. [00:48:33] Here we go. Here's another one. Now I remembered. And this is where Quill back got nailed. I'm looking at a picture here, which is, uh, looking at the United States and Canada from the sky and where the light is. And you can see Quebec is just completely black, but they have this massive electrical blackout and it's becomes. [00:48:57] Of this solar storm. Now they, these storms that I said are quite directional, depending on where it hits and when it hits things can get very, very bad. This particular storm back in 1989 was so strong. We got to see their Rora Borealis, the Northern lights as far south, as Florida and cue. Isn't that something, when we go back further in time to this Carrington event that I mentioned, you could see the Northern lights at the equals. [00:49:35] Absolutely amazing. Now the problem with all of this is we've never really had an internet up online. Like we have today when we had one of the storms hit. And guess what we're about to go into right now, we're going into an area or a time where the sun's going to be more active, certainly on this, this 11 year cycle and possibly another bigger cycle too, that we don't really know much about. [00:50:07] But when this hit us back in the 1850s, what we saw was a, uh, a. Telegraph system that was brought to its knees. Our telegraphs were burned out. Some of the Telegraph buildings were lit. They caught on fire because of the charges coming in, people who were working the telegraphs, who are near them at the time, got electric shocks or worse than that. [00:50:34] Okay. 1859 massive Carrington event compass needles were swinging wildly. The Aurora Borealis was visible in Columbia. It's just amazing. So that was a severe storm. A moderate severity storm was the one that hit in Quebec here, knocked out Quebec, uh, electric. Nine hour blackout on Northeast Canada. What we think would happen if we had another Carrington event, something that happened to 150 years ago is that we would lose power on a massive scale. [00:51:13] So that's one thing that would happen. And these massive transformers that would likely get burned out are only made in China and they're made on demand. Nobody has an inventory. So it would be at least six months before most of the country would get power back. Can you believe that that would be just terrible and we would also lose internet connectivity. [00:51:39] In fact, the thinking that we could lose internet connectivity with something much less than a severe storm, maybe if the Quebec power grid solar, a massive objection here. Maybe if that had happened, when. The internet was up. They might have burned out internet in the area and maybe further. So what we're worried about is if it hits us, we're going to lose power. [00:52:07] We're going to lose transformers on the transmission lines and other places we're going to lose satellites and that's going to affect our GPS communication. We're going to lose radio communication, and even the undersea cables, even though they're now no longer. Regular copper cables. It's now being carried of course, by light in pieces of glass. [00:52:32] The, those cables need to have repeaters about every 15 miles or so under underwater. So the power is provided by. Copper cables or maybe some other sort of power. So these undersea cables, they're only grounded at extensive intervals, like hundreds or thousands of kilometers apart. So there's going to be a lot of vulnerable components. [00:52:59] This is all a major problem. We don't know when the next massive. Solar storm is going to happen. These coronal mass ejections. We do know they do happen from time to time. And we do know it's the luck of the draw and we are starting to enter another solar cycle. So be prepared, everything. Of course, you're listening to Craig Peterson, cybersecurity strategist. [00:53:28] If you'd like to find out more and what you can do, just visit Craig peterson.com and subscribe to my weekly show notes. [00:53:39] Google's got a new admission and Forbes magazine has an article by Zach Dorfman about it. And he's saying you should delete Google Chrome now after Google's newest tracking admission. So here we go. [00:53:55] Google's web browser. Right? It's been the thing for people to use Google Chrome for many years, it's been the fastest. Yeah, not always people kind of leapfrog it every once in a while, but it has become quite a standard. Initially Microsoft is trying to be the standard with their terrible browser and yeah, I to Exploder, which was really, really bad and they have finally completely and totally shot it in the head. [00:54:29] Good move there on their part. In fact, they even got rid of their own browser, Microsoft edge. They shot that one in. They had to, I know I can hear you right now saying, oh, Craig, I don't know. I just use edge browser earlier today. Yeah. But guess what? It isn't edge browser. It's actually Google Chrome. The Microsoft has rebranded. [00:54:52] You see the guts to Google Chrome are available as what's called an open source project. It's called chromium. And that allows you to take it and then build whatever you want on top of. No, that's really great. And by the way, Apple's web kit, Kat is another thing that many people build browsers on top of and is part of many of these browsers we're talking about right now, the biggest problem with the Google Chrome. [00:55:22] Is they released it so they could track you, how does Google make its money? Well, it makes us money through selling advertising primarily. And how does it sell advertising if it doesn't know much or anything about you? So they came out with the Google Chrome browser is kind of a standard browser, which is a great. [00:55:43] Because Microsoft, of course, is very well known for not bothering to follow standards and say what they have is the actual standard and ignoring everybody else. Yeah. Yeah. I'm picking on Microsoft. They definitely deserve it. Well, there is what is being called here in Forbes magazine, a shocking new tracking admission from. [00:56:05] One that has not yet made headlines. And there are about what 2.6 billion users of Google's Chrome worldwide. And this is probably going to surprise you and it's frankly, Pretty nasty and it's, I think a genuine reason to stop using it. Now, as you probably know, I have stopped using Chrome almost entirely. [00:56:31] I use it when I have to train people on Chrome. I use it when I'm testing software. There's a number of times I use it, but I don't use. The reality is the Chrome is an absolute terror. When it comes to privacy and security, it has fallen way behind its rivals in doing that. If you have an iPhone or an iPad or a Mac, and you're using safari, apple has gone a long ways to help secure your. [00:57:09] Well, that's not true with Chrome. In fact, it's not protecting you from tracking and Dave up data harvesting. And what Google has done is they've said, okay, well, we're going to get these nasty third party cookies out of the whole equation. We're not going to do that anymore. And what they were planning on doing is instead of knowing everything specifically. [00:57:34] You they'd be able to put you in a bucket. So they'd say, okay, well you are a 40 year old female and you are like driving fast cars and you have some kids with a grandkid on the way, and you like dogs, not cats, right? So that's a bucket of people that may be a few hundred or maybe up to a thousand. As opposed to right now where they can tell everything about you. [00:58:04] And so they were selling that as a real advantage because they're not tracking you individually anymore. No, we're putting you in a bucket. Well, it's the same thing. Right. And in fact, it's easier for Google to put you in a bucket then to track everything about you and try and make assumptions. And it's easier for people who are trying to buy ads to place in front of you. [00:58:28] It's easier for them to not have to kind of reverse engineer all of the data the Google has gathered in instead of. To send this ad to people that are in this bucket and then that bucket. Okay. It makes sense to you, but I, as it turns out here, Google has even postponed of that. All right. They really have, they're the Google's kind of hiding. [00:58:54] It's really what's going on out there. Uh, they are trying to figure out what they should do, why they should do it, how they should do it, but it's, it's going to be a problem. This is a bad habit. The Google has to break and just like any, anybody that's been addicted to something it's going to take a long time. [00:59:16] They're going to go through some serious jitters. So Firefox is one of the alternatives and to Google Chrome. And it's actually a very good one. It is a browser that I use. I don't agree with some of the stuff that Mozilla and Firefox does, but again, right. Nobody agrees on everything. Here's a quote from them. [00:59:38] Ubiquitous surveillance harms individually. And society Chrome is the only major browser that does not offer meaningful protection against cross cross site tracking and Chrome will continue to leave users unprotected. And then it goes on here because. Uh, Google response to that. And they admit that this massive web tracking out of hand and it's resulted in, this is a quote from Google and erosion of trust, where 72% of people feel that almost all of what they do online is being. [01:00:19] By advertisers, technology firms or others, 81% say the potential risks from data collection outweigh the benefit by the way, the people are wrong. 72% that feel almost all of what they do on online is being tracked. No, no. The answer is 100% of what you do is probably being tracked in some way online. [01:00:41] Even these VPN servers and systems that say that they don't do log. Do track you take a look at proton mail just last week. Proton mail it's in Switzerland. Their servers are in Switzerland. A whole claim to fame is, Hey, it's all encrypted. We keep it safe. We don't do logging. We don't do tracking, uh, guess what they handed over the IP addresses of some of the users to a foreign government. [01:01:10] So how can you do that? If you're not logging, if you're not tracking. Yeah, right. They are. And the same thing is true for every paid VPN service I can think of. Right. So how can Google openly admit that their tracking is in place tracking everything they can, and also admit that it's undermining our privacy and. [01:01:38] Their flagship browser is totally into it. Right? Well, it's really, it's gotta be the money. And Google does not have a plan B this anonymized tracking thing that they've been talking about, you know, the buckets that I mentioned, isn't realistic, frankly. Uh, Google's privacy sandbox is supposed to Fitbit fix it. [01:02:00] I should say. The, the whole idea and the way it's being implemented and the way they've talked about it, the advertisers on happy. So Google's not happy. The users are unhappy. So there you go. That's the bottom line here from the Forbes article by Zach Dorfman, delete Google Chrome. And I said that for a long time, I do use some others. [01:02:27] I do use Firefox and I use. Which is a fast web browser, that some pretty good shape. Hey, if you sign up for my show's weekly newsletter, not only will you get all of my weekly tips that I send to the radio hosts, but you will get some of my special reports that go into detail on things like which browser you shouldn't be using. [01:02:52] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. [01:02:57] Many businesses have gone to the cloud, but the cloud is just another word for someone else's computer. And many of the benefits of the cloud just haven't materialized. A lot of businesses have pulled back and are building data centers again. [01:03:14] The reason I mentioned this thing about Microsoft again, and the cloud is Microsoft has a cloud offering. [01:03:23] It's called Microsoft Azure. Many people, many businesses use it. We have used it with some of our clients in the past. Now we have some special software that sits in front of it that helps to secure. And we do the same thing for Amazon web services. I think it's important to do that. And we also use IBM's cloud services, but Microsoft is been pitching for a long time. [01:03:51] Come use our cloud services and we're expecting here probably within the next month, a big announcement from Microsoft. They're planning on making it so that you can have your desktop reside in Microsoft's cloud, in the Azure cloud. And they're selling really the feature of it doesn't matter where you are. [01:04:17] You have your desktop and it doesn't matter what kind of computer you're on. As long as you can connect to your desktop, using some just reasonable software, you will be able to be just like you're in front of a computer. So if you have a Chromebook or a Mac, Or a windows or tablet, whatever, and you're at the grocery store or the coffee shop or the office, you'll be able to get it, everything, all of your programs, all your files. [01:04:47] And we, Microsoft will keep the operating system up to date for you automatically a lot of great selling points. And we're actually looking into that. Not too heavily yet. We'll give them a year before we really delve into it at all. Cause it takes them a while to get things right. And Microsoft has always been one that adds all kinds of features, but most of the time, most of them don't work and we can, we can document that pretty easily, even in things like Microsoft. [01:05:18] Well, the verge is now reporting that Microsoft has warned users of its as your cloud computing service, that their data has been exposed online for the last two years. Yeah, let me repeat that in case you missed it, you, uh, yeah. I'm I'm I might've misspoken. Right. Uh, let me see, what does it say? It says, um, users of Azure cloud competing service. [01:05:48] So that's their cloud. Microsoft's big cloud. Okay. Um, their data has been. Exposed online. Okay. So that means that people could get the data, maybe manipulate the data that sort of exposed means for the last two years. Are you kidding me? Microsoft is again, the verge. Microsoft recently revealed that an error in its Azure cosmos database product left more than 3,300 as your customers data. [01:06:24] Completely exposed. Okay guys. So this, this, this is not a big thing, right? It can't possibly be big thing because you know who uses Azure, right. Nobody uses a zer and nobody uses hosted databases. Come on, give me a break. Let me see, what else does this have to say? Oh, okay. It says that the vulnerability was reported, reportedly introduced into Microsoft systems in 2019, when the company added a data visualization feature called Jupiter notebook to cosmos DB. [01:06:59] Okay. Well, I'm actually familiar with that one and let's see what small companies let's see here. Um, some Azure cosmos DB clients include Coca Cola. Liberty mutual insurance, Exxon mobile Walgreens. Hmm. Let me see. Could any of these people like maybe, maybe Liberty mutual insurance and Walgreens, maybe they'd have information about us, right. [01:07:26] About our health and social security numbers and account numbers and credit cards. Names addresses. Right, right. That's again, why I got so upset when these places absolutely insist on taking my social security number, right? It, it, first of all, when it was put in place, the federal government guaranteed, it would never be used for anything other than social security. [01:07:53] And the law even said it could not be used for anything other than social security. And then the government started expanding it. Right. And the IRS started using it. To track all of our income and you know, that's one thing right there, the government computers, they gotta be secure. Right. All of these breaches we hear about that. [01:08:12] Can't be true. Uh, so how about when the insurance company wants your personal information? Like your social security number? What business is it of? There's really no. Why do they have to have my social security number? It's a social security number. It's not some number that's tattooed on my forehead. [01:08:36] That's being used to track me. Is it this isn't a socialist country like China is, or the Soviet union was right. It's not socially. So why are they tracking us like that? Walgreens? Why do they need some of that information? Why does the doctor that you go to that made the prescription for Walgreens? Why do they need that information? [01:09:00] And I've been all over this because they don't. Really need it. They want, it makes their life easier, but they don't really need it. However, it exposes us. Now, if you missed the email, I sent out a week ago, two weeks ago now, I guess. You missed something big because I, in my weekly newsletter went through and described exactly what you could do in order to keep your information private. [01:09:35] So in those cases where websites asking for information that they don't really need, right? You don't want to lie, but if they don't really need your real name, why you're giving them your real name? Why do you use a single email address? Why don't you have multiple addresses? Does that start make sense to you guys? [01:09:54] And now we find out that Microsoft Azure, their cloud services, where they're selling cloud services, including a database that can be used online, a big database, uh, 3,300 customers looks like some of them are actually kind of big. I don't know. ExxonMobil pretty big. Yeah. I think so. Walgreens, you think that that might be yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. [01:10:22] Y. Why are we trusting these companies? You know it, if you have a lot of data, a lot of customers, you are going to be a major target of nation states to hack you and bat just general hackers, bad guys. But you're also, if, if you've got all this information, you've also got to have a much higher level of security than somebody that doesn't have all of that information. [01:10:52] Does that make sense too? Did I say that right? You don't need the information and, and I've got to warn anybody that's in a business, whether you're a business owner or you're an employee, do not keep more data than you need the new absolutely need to run your company. And that includes data about your customers. [01:11:16] And maybe, maybe it's even more specifically data about your customer. Because what can happen is that data can be stolen and we just found. That? Yes, indeed. It could have been, it was exposed Microsoft the same. We don't know how much it was stolen. If anything was stolen. Um, yeah, Walgreens. Hey, I wonder if anyone's going to try and get some pain pills illegally through, uh, this database hack or a vulnerability anyways. [01:11:47] All right, everyone. Stick around. We'll be back. Of course, you listening to Craig Peterson. I am a cybersecurity strategist for business, and I'm here to help you as well. You can ask any question any time, uh, consumers are the people I help the most, you know, I wish I got a dime for every time I answered a question. [01:12:09] Just email me@craigpeterson.com me@craigpeterson.com and stick around. [01:12:18] Whether or not, you agree with the lockdown orders that were put in place over this COVID pandemic that we had. Uh, there are some other parts of the world that are doing a lot more. [01:12:34] Australia has, I don't know. I think that they went over the deep end. The much, the same thing is true right next door to them. [01:12:45] And I am looking at a report of what they are doing with this new app. Uh, you might be aware that both apple and Google came out with an application programming interface. That could be used for contract tack tracking, contact tracking. There you go. Uh, it wasn't terribly successful. Some states put some things in place. [01:13:13] Of course you get countries like China. I love the idea because heaven forbid you get people getting together to talk about a Tannen square remembrance. Now you want to know who all of those people were, who were in close proximity, right? So, you know, good for China a while, as it turns out, Australia is putting something in place they have yet another COVID lockdown. [01:13:39] They have COVID quarantine orders. Now I think if you are sick, you should stay on. I've always felt that I, you know, I had 50 employees at one point and I would say, Hey, if you're sick, just stay home. Never required a doctor's note or any of that other silliness, come on. People. If someone's sick, they're sick and let them stay home. [01:14:04] You don't want to get everybody else in the office, sick and spread things around. Right. Doesn't that just kind of make sense. Well, they now in Australia, don't trust people to stay home, to get moving. Remember China, they were, they were taking welders and we're going into apartments in anybody that tested positive. [01:14:22] They were welding them into their apartment for minimum of two weeks. And so hopefully they had food in there and they had a way to get fresh water. Australia is not going quite that far, but some of the states down under. Using facial recognition and geolocation in order to enforce quarantine orders and Canada. [01:14:47] One of the things they've been doing for very long time is if you come into the country from out of the country, even if you're a Canadian citizen, you have to quarantine and they'll send people by your house or you have to pay to stay for 10 days in a quarantine hope. So you're paying the course now inflated prices for the hotel, because they're a special quarantine hotel. [01:15:14] You have to pay inflated prices to have food delivered outside your door. And that you're stuck there for the 10 days, or if you're at home though, they, you know, you're stuck there and they'll send people by to check up on you. They'll make phone calls to check up on you and. They have pretty hefty find. [01:15:36] Well, what Australia has decided to do is in Australia is Charlene's even going from one state to another state are required to prove that they're obeying a 14 day quarantine. And what they have to do is have this little app on their phone and they, the app will ping them saying, prove it. And then they have to take a photo of themselves with geo location tag on it and send it up via the app to prove their location. [01:16:15] And they have to do all of that within 15 minutes of getting the notification. Now the premier of the state of south Australia, Steven Marshall said we don't tell them how often or when on a random basis, they have to reply within 15 minutes. And if you don't then a police, officer's going to show up at the address you're supposed to be at to conduct an in-person check. [01:16:43] Very very intrusive. Okay. Here's another one. This is a, an unnamed government spokesperson who was apparently speaking with Fox news quote. The home quarantine app is for a selected cohort of returning self Australians who have applied to be part of a trial. If successful, it will help safely ease the burden of travel restrictions associated with the pandemic. [01:17:10] So there you go. People nothing to worry about. It's just a trial. Uh, it will go away. Uh, just like, uh, for instance, income tax, as soon as rule, number one is over, it will be removed and it will never be more than 3% and it will only apply to the top 1% of wage-earners. So there you go. Right. And we all know that world war one isn't over yet. [01:17:34] Right. So that's why they still have it in somehow. Yeah, some of the middle class pays the most income tax. I don't know. Interesting. Interesting. So there you go. Little news from down under, we'll see if that ends up happening up here. News from China, China has, uh, China and Russia have some interesting things going on. [01:17:55] First of all, Russia is no longer saw. Country, they kind of are. They kind of aren't, they are a lot freer in many ways than we are here in the United States. Of course, China, very heavily socialist. In fact, they're so socialists, they are communist and China. And Russia both want their kids to have a very good education in science, engineering, and mathematics. [01:18:23] Not so much on history, not so much on, on politics. Right. But definitely heavy on the, on the sciences, which I can see that makes all the sense. I think everybody should be pretty heavily on the science. Well, according to the wall street journal this week, gamers under the age of 18 will not be allowed to play online games between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM on Friday, Saturdays and Sundays. [01:1

Braincast
Expedições Brasileiras — Ep. 2: Do sertão nordestino ao espaço sideral

Braincast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 27:16


A minissérie Expedições Brasileiras vai te levar pelo sertão do Nordeste, pela Mata Atlântica e pelo gelo da Antártica para explorar as grandes descobertas da ciência brasileira. E dessa vez, vamos apertar os cintos e embarcar nos novos voos da ciência astronômica brasileira, que tem na região Nordeste o seu principal pólo astronômico. Vem com a gente nessa viagem até as obras da Radiotelescópio Bingo, na Paraíba, e conhecer uma estação espacial analógica no Rio Grande do Norte. O que esse pólo nordestino significa para o Brasil? Expedições Brasileiras é uma minissérie do Braincast em parceria com a Petrobras. _____ PETROBRAS A Petrobras é movida por uma fonte de energia inesgotável e muito poderosa: a inovação. E essa vocação não é de hoje: está enraizada na sua história e faz parte do seu DNA. A companhia acredita no poder da inovação, do conhecimento e da tecnologia para transformar a sociedade, sempre em parceria com universidades, centros de pesquisas, startups e outras empresas que integram o ecossistema de inovação. É essa energia inventiva que transforma o impossível em realidade. Que transforma conhecimento em valor. Porque é assim, com colaboração e tecnologia, que a Petrobras constrói o seu futuro. Petrobras: Energia para Transformar. _____ FICHA TÉCNICA Expedições Brasileiras é uma produção do B9 em parceria com a Petrobras. Apresentação de Carlos Merigo. Coordenação Geral Ju Wallauer, Cris Bartis e Carlos Merigo. Quem coordenou essa produção foi a Beatriz Souza. Pesquisa e reportagem de Guilherme Eler e Ana Pinho. Roteiro de Ana Pinho. Agradecimento especial ao Professor Luciano Barosi, coordenador do projeto BINGO na Paraíba. Nesse episódio, usamos trechos de áudios do canal da TV Unesp e do History Channel Brasil. A Edição é de Gabriel Pimentel com a supervisão de Alexandre Potascheff. Apoio de edição e trilhas sonoras de Angie Lopez. Identidade Visual: Johnny Brito. A publicação ficou por conta do Agê Barros. Coordenação digital de Pedro Strazza e Matheus Fiore. Atendimento: Rachel Casmala, Camila Mazza, Luzi Santana, Greyce Lidiane e Telma Zennaro.

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 70 - HIV Prevention

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 22:10


Episode 70: HIV Prevention. Prevention is key in controlling HIV-AIDS. Listen to ways to prevent HIV, mainly by using condoms, PrEP and PEP.Introduction: HIV and AIDSBy Robert Dunn, MS3.Introduction: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that is primarily transmitted via sex, needles or from mother to fetus. Once infected, the virus increases in its copies and decreases the individual's CD4+ cell count, thus leading to an immunocompromised state known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Once with AIDS, the patient is susceptible to opportunistic infections. Prevention from AIDS includes several options. Condoms for safe sex practices are the least invasive and most readily accessible option for all patients. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is also an option for men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women. If the patient is also exposed to HIV, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) may also be an option to prevent infection but must be administer ideally 1-2 hours after exposure but no later than 72 hours after. Today we will briefly discuss how to prevent HIV infection.This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home.___________________________HIV Series IV: HIV Prevention. By Robert Dunn, MS3.Participation by Huda Quanungo, MS3; Bahar Hamidi, MS3; and Hector Arreaza, MD.  HIV PreventionIntroductionThe Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that is primarily transmitted via sex, needles or from mother to fetus. Once infected, the virus increases in its copies and decreases the individual's CD4+ cell count, thus leading to an immunocompromised state known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Once with AIDS, the patient is susceptible to opportunistic infections. Prevention from AIDS includes several options. Condoms for safe sex practices are the least invasive and most readily accessible option for all patients. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is also an option for men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women. If the patient is also exposed to HIV, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) may also be an option to prevent infection, but it must be administered ideally 1-2 hours after exposure but no later than 72 hours after. We will concentrate in prevention during this episode.   What is HIV?The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus. When the virus gains access to our body via cuts on the skin or mucosa:The virus injects its 10kb sized RNA genome into our cells. The RNA is transcribed to DNA via viral reverse transcriptase and is incorporated into our cellular DNA genome. This causes our cells to become a virus producer. Viral proteins translated in the cell are transported to the edge of the cell and can bud off into new viruses without lysing the cell.  Acute HIV symptoms. Some potential early symptoms of HIV can include fever, chills, rash, night sweats, muscle aches, sore throat, fatigue, lymphadenopathy, and mouth ulcers. The most common acute symptom is NO SYMPTOM. Many people do not feel sick with the acute infection of HIV. Some people can live years with HIV in “clinical latency” without knowing they are infected, but they can still be contagious during this time. As viral load (the amount of virus copies you have in your blood stream) increases, the CD4+ cells that contribute to our adaptive immunity continues to fall. That's why the best test during this period is not going to be HIV antibody but you should test for antigens. Specifically, the 4th Generation HIV test, which tests for both antibody and p24 antigens.Chronic symptoms. Once patients begin to present with opportunistic infections (i.e. Pneumocystis pneumonia – PCP), or have a CD4 count below 200, the patient is considered to have Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and makes them susceptible to more serious infections. Without treatment, patients with AIDS typically survive about 3 years. Epidemiology of HIVHIV incidence: In 2019, there were 34,800 new HIV infections in the United States. This is an 8% decline from 2015. Amongst age groups: Age 25-34 had the highest rate of incidence (30.1 per 100,000)Age 35-44 had the second highest rate (16.5 per 100,000)Age 45-54 remained stableAge 13-24 had decreasing rates of incidence Amongst ethnic groups: Black/African-American groups has the highest rate of incidence (42.1 per 100,000)Hispanic/Latino had the second highest rate (21.7 per 100,000)Person of multiple races had the third highest (18.4 per 100,000) Amongst sex: Males had the highest rate of incidence (21 per 100,000)Females had the lowest rate of incidence (4.5 per 100,000) HIV Prevalence:In 2019, 1.2 million people (Ages 13 and older) in the US have HIV and 13% of them do not even know it. In 2020, there were an estimated 1.5 million people worldwide that acquired a new HIV infection. This is a 30% decline since 2020. An estimated 66% are receiving some HIV care and 57% were virally suppressed. Mortality: In 2019, there were 15,815 deaths among adults and adolescents diagnosed with HIV in the US. Preventative ScreeningThe USPSTF gives a Grade A recommendation for HIV screening for: Pregnant people and everyone between 15-65 years of age. All pregnant people at any point of their pregnancy, including those who present in labor or delivery and have an unknown status of HIV.The USPSTF only recommends a one-time screening and shows no benefit of repeat screening thereafter. Women may also be screened for subsequent pregnanciesAlso screen all Adolescents and adults ages 15-65.  An effective approach is routine opt-out HIV screening. This approach includes HIV screening as part of the standard preventive tests. This approach removes the stigma associated with HIV testing, it promotes earlier diagnosis and treatment, reduces risk of transmission, and it is cost-effective. The determination for repeated screening of individuals should take into account the following risk factors: -Men who have sex with men (MSM)-Individuals who live in areas with high prevalence of HIVIncluding attending to tuberculosis clinics, stay in a correctional facility, or homelessness-Injection drug use-Transactional/commercial sex work-1 or more new sexual partners -History of previous STIs Annual screening for HIV is reasonable, however, clinicians may want to screen patients every 3-6 months if they have an increased risk of HIV.  CondomsA simple and very effective method in HIV prevention is the use of condoms for safe sex practices. In 2009, the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the HIV medicine Association called for the wider availability of condoms and education to minimize HIV transmission. A meta-analysis of 12 HIV studies amongst heterosexual couples demonstrated the use of condoms in all penetrative sex acts reduced the risk of HIV transmission 7.4 times in comparison to those who never used condoms. Other studies show a 90-95% effectiveness in HIV prevention when “consistently” using condoms. A Cochrane review shoed that the use of a male latex condom in all acts of penetrative vaginal sex reduced HIV incidence by 80%. Overall, condoms are effective in HIV prevention.Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)Truvada and Descovy:Another option for prevention amongst HIV negative individuals is the use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). It is an anti-retroviral pill that is taken daily to maintain a steady-state level of the medication in the blood stream. The medication specifically a combination of 2 antiretroviral medications – Tenofovir and Emtricitabine. Both medications are nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) that work by blocking the viral reverse transcriptase from HIV and prevent the enzyme from copying the RNA genome into DNA. Therefore, it stops viral replications. There are 2 formulations of PrEP: Truvada and Descovy. Truvada's primary side effects are renal and bone toxicity with long-term use. Descovy's primary side effects are mild weight gain and dyslipidemia. Truvada is the most commonly prescribed PrEP because it has the most data since it has been around the longest. However, extra consideration should be taken for: Adolescents should weigh at least 35 kg before being prescribed PrEPDescovy may be preferred for adolescents by the prescribing physician as it is not associated with reduction in bone density, as Truvada is. Estimated GFR between 30 – 60Truvada is associated with acute and chronic kidney disease whereas Descovy is safe for patients with a GFR greater than 30Patients with osteoporosisTruvada is associated with bone toxicity, whereas Descovy is not. It is important to note that PrEP has only been studied in men or people who were assigned men at birth. So, its efficacy in vaginal sex and with vaginal fluids cannot be generalized at this time. Future of PrEP: In May 2020, the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 083 randomized trial demonstrated the potential of an injectable PrEP. Carbotegravir, is an integrase inhibitor, which prevents the HIV integrase from incorporating the HIV genome into the cellular genome. This study demonstrated its efficacy as PrEP in comparison to Truvada with few new infections (13 versus 39, respectively). Carbotegravir would be given via injection once every 8 weeks. In September 2021, the pharmaceutical company Moderna will begin 2 human clinical trials for an HIV vaccine that use mRNA technology. Previous studies conducted with non-mRNA vaccines demonstrated that B cells can be stimulated to create antibodies against HIV. Since HIV becomes integrated in the cellular genome within 72 hours of transmission, a high level of antibodies must be produced and present in the body to offer an adequate level of immunity. Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)If an individual is exposed to blood or bodily fluids with high risk of HIV via percutaneous, mucus membrane or nonintact skin route, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) may be an option. PEP is indicated when the HIV status of the exposure source is unknown and are awaiting test results, or if the exposure source is HIV positive. Therapy should be started within 1 or 2 hours of exposure and it is not effective after 72 hours of initial exposure. The recommended duration of therapy is 4 weeks but no evidence has been shown for an optimal duration. Occupational exposure. There are 2 regimens for PEP: Truvada with Dolutegravir Truvada  with Raltegravir Both Doltegravir and Raltegravir are integrase inhibitors which block the integration of the viral genome into the cellular DNA. The regiments are chosen based on efficacy, side effects, patient convenience, and completion rates. Dolutegravir is chosen because it is given once daily. While Raltegravir is taken twice daily, most experience with PEP has been with Raltegravir. Other risk with Raltegravir are potential skeletal muscle toxicity and systemic-cutaneous reactions resembling Steven-Johnson syndrome. One final word about prevention of vertical transmission is making sure pregnant women are treated during pregnancy and if the baby is delivered from a patient whose viral load is “detectable”, the baby needs to be treated, but we'll let that topic for another time to discuss. Joke: What do you call the patient zero of HIV? First Aids.HIV incidence is decreasing thanks to many prevention measures taken globally, and we discussed screening, condoms, PrEP and PEP as part of this prevention efforts. Stay tuned for more relevant medical information in our next episode. ____ Now we conclude our episode number 70 “HIV Prevention.” Robert, Huda and Bahar explained some ways to prevent HIV, mainly by screening those at risk, using condoms, PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) and PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis). Let's also remember that having a monogamous relationship and avoiding high risk sexual behaviors confer significant protection against HIV. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RBresidency@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Robert Dunn, Huda Quanungo, and Bahar Hamidi. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week!   References:About HIV. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC.gov, June 1, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/whatishiv.html . Accessed September 21, 2021. Simon V, Ho DD, Abdool Karim Q. HIV/AIDS epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment. Lancet. 2006 Aug 5;368(9534):489-504. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69157-5. PMID: 16890836; PMCID: PMC2913538. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16890836/]   US Statistics. HIV.gov, June 2, 2021. https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/statistics . Accessed September 21, 2021.  The global HIV/AIDS Epidemic. HIV.gov, June 25, 2021. https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/global-statistics. Accessed September 21, 2021.  Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening. U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, June 11, 2019. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/human-immunodeficiency-virus-hiv-infection-screening. Accessed September 21, 2021.  Holmes KK, Levine R, Weaver M. Effectiveness of condoms in preventing sexually transmitted infections. Bull World Health Organ. 2004 Jun;82(6):454-61. PMID: 15356939; PMCID: PMC2622864. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15356939/] Weller S, Davis K. Condom effectiveness in reducing heterosexual HIV transmission. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(1):CD003255. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD003255. PMID: 11869658. [https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD003255/full] Mayer, Kenneth H, MD, and Douglas Krakower, MD. Administration of pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection. UpToDate, June 24, 2020. Accessed September 21, 2021. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/administration-of-pre-exposure-prophylaxis-against-hiv-infection?search=8)%09Administration%20of%20pre-exposure%20prophylaxis%20against%20HIV%20infection&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1] Zachary, Kimon C, MD. Management of health care personnel exposed to HIV. UpToDate, June 07, 2019. Accessed September 21, 2021. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/management-of-health-care-personnel-exposed-to-hiv?search=9)%09Management%20of%20health%20care%20personnel%20exposed%20to%20HIV&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1]

Helping Sells Radio
303 Ben Bensaou Innovation is about anyone anytime anywhere

Helping Sells Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 61:17


Ben Bensaou is a Professor of Technology Management and Professor of Asian Business and Comparative Management at INSEAD, Fontainebleau, France. His research and teaching activities focus on how to create innovating capabilities and competencies as a way to build an innovating organization and culture, and this led him to write, Built to Innovate: Essential Practices to Wire Innovation into your company's DNA.We talked about the difference between execution and innovations, the difference between innovating and innovation, and how innovation is really about leaders because innovation is and should be about anyone, anytime, anywhere. More about Ben: His book: https://www.builttoinnovatethebook.com Get on the email list at helpingsells.substack.com

YCSO: Behind the Badge
YCSO Behind the Badge - The 2007 5-month long Phillip Watts Robbery & Shooting Spree

YCSO: Behind the Badge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:23


From October 2007 to February 2008 a string of harrowing armed robberies and shootings took place in York County. 14 years ago this month a crime spree began in York County that would put most everyone on edge. Phillip Watts would rob stores all the while shoot two clerks and two customers after they complied with his demands. Watts was finally arrested at a Rock Hill apartment off Riverview Road on Feb. 18 after a DNA match identified him. To go into detail of this case more in depth Sheriff Kevin Tolson and Solicitor Kevin Brackett to join us this week on the podcast to talk about the crimes and what it was like to prosecute this case.

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#159 Black Cancer Genes on Breast Cancer

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


We are ecstatic to announce that DNA Today won the Best 2021 Science and Medicine Podcast Award. A HUGE thank you to all you listeners who nominated and voted for the show. It is such an honor to win this award two years in a row. As you may recall, this is a People's Choice Award, so it truly is thanks to your support that we won. It's been such a fun journey over the last 9 years hosting and producing DNA Today and it's because of you listeners that we have amazing sponsors who keep the show running. Thank you all again! We have so many more episodes to bring you and we hope you keep tuning to learn more about genetics. In honor of breast cancer awareness month, Kira Dineen is joined by two representatives from Black Cancer Genes, Erika Stallings and Dena Goldberg (aka DenaDNA). Erika Stallings is an attorney, writer and BRCA awareness advocate. In June 204 she learned that she carried a BRCA2 gene mutation, a hereditary cancer mutation that causes up to an 85% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. In December 2014 she underwent a preventative double mastectomy which lowered her risk of breast cancer to less than 5%.Dena Goldberg Linder, MS, CGC (DenaDNA) is a licensed and board certified genetic counselor. She attended the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana for her undergraduate studies where she worked in a Molecular Anthropology lab studying ancestry genetics. Dena graduated from the Genetic Counseling Graduate program at UC Irvine. She worked at the UCSF Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program for four years as the Gordon and Betty Moore Endowed Counselor of Hereditary GI Cancer Prevention. Dena recently left this full time role to pursue Dena DNA and sees patients through Genome Medical. You can also hear her on episode 155 of DNA Today discussing genetic counseling grad school. On This Episode We Discuss:Black Cancer Genes Genetic testing for breast cancer Breast cancer risk among BRCA1/2 carriersRacial disparities in breast cancer diagnosisGenes prevalent in the black community Raising awareness about genetic counseling in the black community To learn more about Black Cancer Genes, visit their website. You can check out Erica's work on Twitter and Instagram, and see what Dena is up to on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram.Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today on October 29th, 2021 where I'll be joined by Dr. Alwan of TERIS to discuss teratogens! New episodes are released on the first and third Friday of the month. In the meantime, you can binge over 145 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. All episodes in 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNApodcast.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNApodcast.com. Want to chat with genetic counselors? You should attend the virtual open houses at Sarah Lawrence College! In these events you can learn what it's like to be a genetic counselor. And you will have the opportunity to ask your questions live! You can also hear insight about the Genetic Counseling Master's degree program at Sarah Lawrence College. It is the largest program in the world. Which means there are so many alumni to connect with, including myself. I graduated from the program last year and am really looking forward to chatting with you! The next open house is on October 28th followed by December 7th. Go to SLC.edu/DNAtoday to sign up for the free genetic counseling open houses. See you there! (SPONSORED)Picture Genetics is a unique DNA testing service. Their Picture Wellness kit allows you to learn your genetic risks for cancer and cardiovascular conditions. Including the BRCA genes that we talk about throughout this episode. Unlike other companies, this is actually a clinical grade test where physicians and genetic counselors are involved. The test sequences entire genes that are medically actionable. It's easy to order and understand with good looking reports! To order your kit go to picturegenetics.com and use code “DNATODAY” for 25% off and free-shipping! Get actionable genetic insights today to benefit your health tomorrow. (SPONSORED)The Illumina mission is to improve human health by unlocking the power of the genome. With Illumina's sequencing-by-synthesis technology, they have only just begun to discover the true impact of genomics in areas including oncology, reproductive health, genetic disease, agriculture, microbiology, and beyond. Knowing the discoveries that lie ahead is what inspires Illumina to push the boundaries of their imagination and constantly drive innovation. To learn more, visit illumina.com. (SPONSORED)Do you or someone you know have Prader-Willi syndrome? Harmony Biosciences is looking for people with Prader-Willi syndrome to enroll in a new clinical study in the United States. Harmony Biosciences will be studying the safety and impact of an investigational medication on excessive daytime sleepiness, cognition, and behavioral function in people with Prader Willi syndrome. Check out their website to learn more about the clinical study and refer a patient to a study center. (SPONSORED)

Marni on the Move
192. Giro Product Manager, Marquax Elliot Talks Cycling, Sustainabilty in Apparel, and Innnovation

Marni on the Move

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 64:59


When today's guest decided to conjure up and embark upon a fun cycling challenge, she set the bar pretty high, one million feet high to be exact. Today on the podcast I sync up with Margaux Elliot, the first woman ever to vertically ascend one million feet of terrain on a mountain bike, over a one year period. She also has a pretty cool job at world renowned cycling brand, Giro as the Apparel Product Manager where she is developing sustainable apparel with the launch of the Giro Renew Collection and beyond. On this episode Margaux and I sync up about Giro's sustainability strategy, how the brand is leading the way for cycling apparel company's around the globe  using fabrics made from recycled materials, setting the tone for a long term goal to bring sustainability to all of Giros apparel.  Margaux's shares how working at Giro was her dream job, her strategy to landing it and how she became one of the leading figures in promoting environmentalism in cycling and we talk about her goals for Giro in the near future. When she's not busy working on cycling apparel, she's out on her bike. And in 20202, she set out and complete an epic challenge, climbing one million feet, in under 52 weeks, with 25 hours of weekly riding. We do a deep dive into the genesis of this concept, where her jouney into cycling began, the strategy and planning that went into the challenge, her favorite gear, opportunities and obstacles along the way (hint: it involved lots of brake pads, grip tape, snickers, and a few Mountain Lions). Photos by CONNECT Giro on Instagram, Margaux Elliot On Socil Marni On The Move Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, LinkedIn, or YouTube Marni Salup on Instagram and Spotify SUBSCRIBE Sign up for our weekly newsletter, The Download for Marni on the Move updates, exclusive offers, invites to events, and exciting news! RIDE WIG ME  Meet me on Zwift, Strava, or Peloton OFFERS Take control of your health and wellness journey with InsideTracker, the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood, DNA, and lifestyle to help you optimize your body from the inside out. Transform your body's data into meaningful insights and a customized action plan of the science-backed nutrition recommendations you need to optimize your health!  Get 25% percent off today at InsideTracker with our code CHEERSMARNI Head over to our SHOP page for additional offers from Marni on the Move partners, sponsors, and guests SUPPORT THE PODCAST Leave us a review on Apple. It's easy, scroll through the episode list on your podcast app, click on five stars, click on leave a review, and share what you love about the conversations you're listening to. Tell your friends to what you love on social. Screenshot or share directly from our stories the episode you're listening to, tag us and the guests, and use our new Marni on the Move Giphy! SPECIAL THANKS Emma Steiner for help with show notes, guest research, and social media. Skye Menna for help with guest research and outreach, social media, and public relations    

Stories of our times
Seventeen years: The Andrew Malkinson story (Pt 4) - Forensics

Stories of our times

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:36


In episode four of this investigative series, reporter Emily Dugan hears how new DNA testing techniques reveal a different man may have been at the crime scene. Dugan also examines a dilemma that prisoners, who don't admit guilt, face. Andrew Malkinson was sentenced to life in jail in 2004 for rape. No forensics linked him to the scene and he's always maintained his innocence.This podcast was brought to you thanks to the support of readers of The Times and The Sunday Times. Subscribe today and get one month free at: thetimes.co.uk/storiesofourtimes.Host: Emily Dugan, reporter at The Sunday Times.You can listen to the full series in one place on The Reporter podcast feed.If you have any information that you want to share on Andy's case or remember anything from the time, you can contact Emily Dugan directly on email: emily.dugan@thesundaytimes.co.uk or by direct message on twitter: @emilyduganAudio from HMP North Sea Camp courtesy of Two Step Films. If you, or someone you know, has been affected by the issues raised in this episode, the following organisations can help:Rape Crisis England & WalesNHS - Help after rape and sexual assaultCriminal Cases Review CommissionAppeal - Charity and law practice See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Helix Reviews > A Christian Geek Podcast
298 James Bond Franchise Review Pt.2 (The Roger Moore Era)

Helix Reviews > A Christian Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021


 The Bond franchise continues! Today I am covering Roger Moore's 007 movies (Live and Let Die, The Man with the Golden Gun, The Spy Who Loved Me, Moonraker, For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, and A View to a Kill) as well as Sean Connery's brief return in Never Say Never Again!Be sure to Subscribe on iTunes and Stitcher or wherever podcasts are found!Helix Reviews is now on YouTube and Rumble! Check me out!helixreviewspodcast@gmail.comEpisode 298: https://ia601401.us.archive.org/33/items/298-james-bond-franchise-review-pt.-2-the-roger-moore-era/298%20James%20Bond%20Franchise%20Review%20Pt.2%20%28The%20Roger%20Moore%20Era%29.mp3

The Remote Real Estate Investor
How Dave Homyak makes killer returns in the Smoky Mountains

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 33:54


Dave Homyak is a former engineer that quit his job to go into short-term rental properties full time. Dave runs Smokey Mountain Cabin Realty, helping investors maximize their returns by investing in rental properties in Tennessee. In this episode, Dave shares his investment journey, how he quit his job, how he 1031s his way into bigger properties, what his returns look like, the most powerful price points to get into, and some tips for investors thinking about getting into this game.         https://www.facebook.com/dave.homyak https://smokymountaincabinrealty.com/ --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and Today we have with us Dave Homyak, who's going to be talking to us about short term rentals out in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, and what he did to leave his job is under two years with these types of investments. Without any further ado, let's get into it.   Hey, Dave, thanks so much for taking the time to hang out with me today. Really appreciate it.   Dave: Yeah. Thanks for having me.   Michael: Now, my pleasure. For our listeners who don't know you give us a brief background, who you are, Where'd you come from? And how'd you get started in real estate?   Dave: Okay, so basically, I was an engineer, I did engine calibration for a living, I worked for Chrysler, Detroit, diesel, General Motors, bunch of companies like that, and always wanted to do something in real estate, but quite honestly was afraid to do it. So my first investment property I purchased at 53. And the reason I purchased it is because I wanted to be able to get away from my W2 income. And I had had some money saved up I thought I'd pretty good saver. But I was like, what would it take to make me feel like I can walk away and not have any anxiety whatsoever?   And the answer was pretty easy. It's like if I replace my income, then I can walk away and do anything I want. And it's gonna, I will not have to ever worry. And so basically, I set the goal for myself to replace my engineering income in two years with real estate. And I was able to do it in a little bit under a year. And that was due to getting into short term rentals. And I ended up doing it in what I had kind of researched somewhat to the best of my ability at the time. But then what ended up is that an independent third party which is airDNA they ranked it as the best market in 18 best market in 19. It's three of the top six large cities in 20 and I'm waiting for the latest report to come out and I'm sure it's going to be in the top again.   So bottom line is I happen to buy in the one of the best markets and my research indicated that was a good plan. I had no idea that it was going to work out the way it did as quickly as it did though.   Michael: That's incredible. And so we've got to ask Where is that market?   Dave: Said market is in the Smoky Mountains, which is Eastern Tennessee, the three major cities are Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge, and Sevierville. So Sevierville is the one that people haven't heard of as much but it's equally profitable and made the air DNA dotco list basically ended up you know, I made the decision looked into apartment syndication knew I could replace my income with that didn't know if I could add it to your timeline, ended up deciding on the Smokies. I looked at the Smokies panhandle of Florida, which is also a good choice. I think Smokies are a little better. Less hurricanes there. I really wanted to go into Panama City. And that got hit about a year later. And I'm like, Oh, I'm so glad I don't have to mess with that stuff.   Michael: Dodged the bullet.   Dave: Yeah, exactly. And then Scottsdale and I ended up going to the Smokies. So started this search and started trying to figure out what I was going to do in March of 18. April is kind of apartment syndication month. first weekend in May, I actually went to the Smokies to look for the first time and ended up seeing six cabins tried to make a decision on three, picked one bought it. So end of May I had that up and running it worked great over the summer, bought another one in August and then bought a third one in November.   And in December I got when the General Motors was offering buyouts and I said, I think it's time to go. And my, my goal was actually to probably stay with General Motors through July. And basically they said if you leave now we'll pay you through July. So I said okay. I can start on, on my leaving and yeah, and all the healthcare and stuff like that that goes with it. So yeah, it worked out really well.   Michael: Fantastic. So what about the Smokies attracted you? They're just out of curiosity.   Dave: So the thing that attracted me was there were people that were making a lot of really good cash on cash return. So one of the things that makes the Smokies a lot different than most other markets and in the panhandle Florida it's fairly similar. But all these things are second homes they're sold turnkey. So if you have to furnish, if you have to buy silverware, if you have to put in beds, TVs, all that stuff, that's just more money that you're gonna have to pay. When the Smokies there's basically two contracts that get written when you buy a house.   One is the purchase agreement for the cabin or the chalet, whatever your choice may be. There's a reason that chalets sometimes work a lot better than cabins and mainly due to supply and demand issues of buyers. But you also write a purchase agreement for the entire contents of the house. So you know, you have here's the cabin price, the chalet price, and for $1, you get the contents. So I literally am closing midweek, and that weekend, I have it rented out. So that's one of the benefits of you don't have a whole lot of downtime. And the second benefit that I didn't even know about at the time or didn't, didn't have nearly as much of a priority on as I do now when I help other investors is the whole regulation.   So in the Smokies, there's not that many hotels, they cannot take nearly as many visitors into the hotels is a built up entertainment, venues, things like that. So there's no way that they can go in like they do in other cities and say we want to ban short term rentals or we want to regulate heavily short term rentals. And, you know, play that regulatory card in make what used to be a really good investment not nearly as good of an investment. And I think you see that in the panhandle of Florida, as well as the Smokies, but I like the Smokies a little better just weather wise stuff like that.   So yeah, I mean, then the other thing is, there's a couple loans that are available down there that I'm not sure if they're available nationwide, I know they're available down there, but there's a 10% down second home loan. So if you're, if your intention is to spend 14 days or more in that property that you're buying the first one down there, you can get a second home loan on it. And that's a fantastic way to get into that market. Because you know, most investment properties you're not going to get for 10% down, right, and certainly not investment properties, you know, that is a primary residence you can put down last but for secondary to put down 10% is pretty crazy.   And then the loan that just, it still makes me smile, it's making me smile right now, and I've talked about it hundreds of times with different investors is there's a 15% down investment loan. And to qualify for the loan, you have to project what the income of the cabin is. And if the cabin throws off enough income, that qualifies you on a debt to income ratio. So for example, if the cabin is gonna throw off $5,000 a month and the payments gonna be 2000. And you're maxed out on debt to income right now. You know, if you're at 40%, guess what, you still qualify because of a cash flow project. It's a cabin with projected cash-flow of 5000 a month, and that cash flows enough to cover the the mortgage payment.   So it's just, it's like one of those things that you're like, I'm pretty I get I've actually checked with my like, once a year, I check with my loan officer, the person that I've used just is this still a thing? Yep, still a thing. And I'm waiting for somebody to say I'm not sure that should be a thing. You know, but it still is now. So even if you're even if your debt to income is fairly high, you can still qualify on the for the investment loan at 15%.   Michael: That is just incredible.   Dave: Yeah, I, it makes me smile, every time I tell somebody, I still can't believe it.   Michael: Yeah, I'm still trying to wrap my head around it, it doesn't seem to make sense. But if it's a thing, it's a thing.   Dave: At least for me, when I've used an investment loan down there, like the property actually made the money it wasn't like you had to stretch your make something up, like I think it's gonna make 10,000 and it makes five or something like that. It's more like if it's going you know, I said an honest five, the payment I think was 16 or 1700 a month and and it did make the five a month that I said it would.   And then where it gets really interesting is once you show them once you show the mortgage company a Schedule E and prove that it made what you said it was going to make, you now qualify for another one the next year. So basically, you can get one of these a year, as long as you wait until after you file your Schedule E and give that to the loan officer. And then if you are married, you know and if you're playing in two person mode two player mode, then you and your wife can both do one a year on that plan. And then the next year you can both do one on that plan.   Michael: Oh my gosh.   Dave: So it's a way to build, build a portfolio very fast and that market is still one of the best markets when it comes to cash on cash returns. So even though there's been a lot of appreciation, the nightly rates have gone up a lot, they had about 2000 cabins burned down in 2016. And before COVID came in, they had I think five developers come in and start to build. And it just the nightly rates have just gone up and up and up. And it's just one of those places that when the when the economy does well, that place does well, the Smokies do well. When the economy does poorly, the Smokies do well, why 60% of the United States is within driving distance of the Smokies.   And smokey, Great Smoky Mountain National Park is the most visited National Park. And in 2009 2010, visitorship actually went up when the economy was doing poorly. And when people are like, what how do you Why do you think that happens? You know, I explained, you know, if, if you're afraid about the economy, you're not flying to Florida and taking a one week Disney Cruise, but you're still gonna want to go on vacation. So you're saying you know what, I'm going to drive to the Smokies, I'm going to rent a cabin for three days, we're going to do this thing on the downlow. It's going to be nice, but it's not going to be as extravagant. So I think even when things slow down.   There's, I obviously know a lot of people that invest down there and kind of one of the one of the questions that that we asked each other is what am I missing? It seems like there's really big upside, and not a whole lot of downside. And we haven't come up with anything. Yet that makes it scary. What am I, I very well may be missing something. But I've asked a couple guys and we can't figure it out.   Michael: So I mean, I just I love hearing all of this because as I was sharing with you when we connected before the podcast here, I just 1031ed into a property down there and severe bill. And so I'm very excited now to to get that up and running right here. And this only makes me even more giddy.   Dave: Yeah, yeah, it's pretty, it's pretty cool. I guess the other thing that I've done that I think is interesting, I think your listeners will find interesting is, the other thing I do is as an engineer, I don't sit still very well. So I'm constantly analyzing my properties. And I've owned five, but I keep trading up and 1031ing up. So for example, 2018, I bought a three bedroom, a four bedroom, a five bedroom, middle of 19, I look and I say hey, the five bedrooms doing better than the four, the four bedrooms doing better than the three. And they've all been appreciating, I know, I think I'll sell this three bedroom. So it's underperforming the other two.   So I sold the three bedroom and it had gone up enough that I actually use that 10 1031 money as a down payment on an eight bedroom. So very directionally correct eight bedroom does really well it costs me basically you know the downpayment that I put on the three bedroom and then just this you know the sale on the transfer the money to control an eight bedroom a year later. And there are different people that are doing that. So some are on a never sell anything. And I get I get some people upset on some of the real estate investment forums because they say, What's some of the worst real estate investing advice you've ever heard. And I say buy and hold and they say oh, they just don't like that.   And I'm like, I think I'm doing okay with it. And maybe I should have kept them all and just bought other ones. And then the other thing I ended up just recently doing is I sold the first cabin I bought which was a four bedroom, and I 1031ed did into this ultimate killer, like five bedroom the most incredible views. Just amazing. So that's kind of the other half of the coin is when you're looking at a lot of the when you're when you're looking to do Airbnb anywhere, when you take a look at the market. And if you if you buy the airDNA data, what you're going to see is, especially when you start to well, bigger places are there are less bigger places. So you're going to get outsized demand for the supply of bigger places, so you're able to charge more more bedrooms is better. In the Smokies a view is better a pool in the basement is better.   And what you're also going to see is that if you're running at 95th percentile property, your gross is double what your what a 50th percentile property's gross is going to be. So that isn't if you're running a 95th percentile property, your profits going to be double because you're already making a profit at the 50th percentile, it means your profits going to be you know, times three times four times five, because you've already got your expenses paid at 50th percentile. So anything about 50th percentile You really need, yeah, that's just money in your pocket.   So you really need to, I was, you know, I've made, I've made some mistakes along the way that have cost me someplace between, like a pretty lot of money and just like a lot of money. There are no small mistakes that I did. So, you know, one of the mistakes that I made was, well, if I can put 10% down, this will be I'm going to try not to put much more money and like, if something breaks, I'm going to do it. And looking back on it, there's a couple things that I could have upgraded, that wouldn't have been a big deal. That would have netted me more money in the long run better reviews. You know, when you look at that delta between the 50th percentile in the 95th percentile, it's amazing. So it's, it's worth, it's worth doing that and not kind of being gone on to put in 10%, I'm gonna try never to put another penny in unless something breaks, you know.   Michael: That's worth the upfront investment. So yeah,   Dave: It totally is worth the upfront investment. And even if it's in, let's just say it's, it's not, let's just say you only have the 10% of the closing costs, you know, the other thing is you're making, you should be making a couple 1000 a month anyway. So I mean, in two or three months, you're gonna have 567 $10,000 to spend. So maybe you wait a couple months, and then you put in, you know, the new the new furniture in the living room and refilled the pool table or whatever, get the better hot tub, whatever it is, when you feed that back in, I ended up just selling a place. And it's just doing some, I have some friends that also have properties that are identical, like literally identical to mine like same layout, same view, 50 feet away, and we were talking some numbers. And you know, they did, one guy did a really over the top renovation, his numbers were crazy, and one guy did a milder renovation. And I would I was doing some math of what it would have taken me to put in that and it'd been like under 10 grand. And basically, he was kind of he was out grossing me by about 10 grand, like, Oh, you put in the 10 grand and for the last three years, I could have made 10 grand instead of I save 10 Grand 30 grand Got it.   Michael: Right.   Dave: So it's it, you know, my mind is a is a work in progress for maximizing all these things. Well,   Michael: That's the engineer in you I totally get that as a reformed engineer myself. We get that.   Dave: Okay. Yeah, totally. Dave, I'm curious to get your thoughts because I'm sure that there are people that would argue that there are Smoky Mountain equivalents all over the place, I can invest anywhere in the country and make a good return. What are your thoughts on that? And how do you kind of narrow in on some hot markets?   Dave: I agree that you could probably make the same money. If you dig into 95th percentile stuff, if you dig into all this stuff that makes money. I think it's harder to make money in other places. And what's really interesting is what the how I made more money inn the Smokies, I've made more money, I've made significantly more money in the Smokies with appreciation than I actually did from Airbnb. So if you're making crazy cash on cash, which you still can kind of do, if you know where to look. And your appreciation is outpacing your cash on cash. That's the thing that I think some of the other markets lack. And I've known people that have had places that you know, guy that was in, in place just outside of Denver, and he was killing it in his neighborhood. And I forget if it was him, or his, basically the two of them where they were doing Airbnb in there and it got banned, and all of a sudden, everything's gone. Or you do it in some small place that maybe you're making money. But you know, how do you get that out? And how do you find the investors to come in behind that? Do they know that's a hot market?   So I think a lot of people concentrate and obviously the rental arbitrage people are just doing a just a strictly cash on cash thing. But I think if you look on, if you look at the markets that are being rated by air DNA, I think you're going to have a better overall return. Because other people are just being pointed to that direction, and they have the proof that they need if there's any, if there's any fear of the numbers, the books being cooked, whatever, and you know, some far off market, the middle of Wyoming, whatever I don't know. I mean, I've heard some really interesting numbers of people buying places in the Midwest with pools during COVID, they just they just annihilated because kids want to swim and people have money and if you couldn't go to the public pool and your kid really wanted to swim, guess what you're dropping top dollar, you're gonna beat out the other guy to get that lock in that place with a swim pool, even though it's a less expensive city. So I mean, those guys didn't really well, they're going to do now that the public pools are kind of open, I don't know.   But I think overall, I trust the air DNA data. And I think the cash on cash is available in other places, I'm not sure the appreciation is as much.   Michael: Okay. And so you actually help people find properties out in the Smokies, is that right?   Dave: I do. I do. I that wasn't my goal, my. So my goal straight up was, I was an engineer, I took my bite out, I said, I get to do whatever I want. And I don't like I don't sit still well. So I'm like, I am going to learn to fly airplanes. And my goal is to fly jets. So my goal was to fly for Delta. And so I'm like, I got my private pilot license, I got my instrument pilot license, made it halfway through commercial license, and then kind of like, the whole real estate thing kind of blew up for me.   And in even before I started working, about halfway through the commercial, or excuse me, halfway through the instrument license, I started to get people asking me, Hey, can you kind of help me do that? And can you help me find some of the best performing properties. And I think, because of the engineering background, and because I'm not afraid to do the numbers, and because I'm not afraid to run some spreadsheets and stuff like that, I'm able to better explain to some of the more technical science, math investors, why this makes the most sense. And I'm able to make them feel comfortable enough to invest there.   So I'm getting a lot of clients that have never invested anywhere, I'm getting a lot of 1031 clients, but they see the numbers and it's just like you can't not do it. And that's, it's, it's one of those things that you know, right now, depending on depending on the cash on cash that you're looking for, a lot of a lot of the places don't work. But if you know where to look and and how to make it work. It's a lot easier and, and it's one of those things that it's like, even with, even with MLS access down there. A lot of the agents don't put in the numbers that you need to see. So there's a lot of calling and texting and stuff to dig a lot of this stuff out to make sure that your clients are getting the best stuff. And I think that's what myself and my teammate do better than a lot of other agents is dig out those numbers and make our clients comfortable that they're getting some of the best returns that they can in one of the best markets.   Michael: That's awesome. So Dave talked to us a little bit about what some of these properties that we're talking about cost. And what are some of those cash on cash return numbers and metrics that you that you're seeing.   Dave: Rght. So yeah, when I got started, things were a lot cheaper, it was a lot easier. But the crazy thing is the numbers were slightly better when I got started. But they're still pretty righteous right now. So right now, it's very difficult to find, but I am finding some clients 60% cash on cash returns, I'm finding people between 40% and 50% cash on cash on a fairly regular basis. But yeah, there's, there's just some places that are under priced a little bit. And that's why you're looking just to see what it can do. And there's so many, one of the things I don't like about the Facebook forums, any Facebook forum for Airbnb, is the amount of people that say that nobody should ever take a course.   And I never took a course. And all these people said, are telling these brand new people don't take the course. And I added up what I didn't know and how much it costs me. And it's, it's like 40 or 50,000. Like if I'd taken the course I would have saved myself easily 40 or $50,000. And I'm like, You have no idea how much you can spend on a course and save money. So one of the things that we're seeing down there when we're finding these properties, right is there was somebody that was just bragging that they just filled their last two nights for 2021. And I just thought, boy, you're so underpriced. If you have your entire thing booked up every last day that that just tells me you're leaving a lot of money on the table.   So it's a combination of what you know, kind of what numbers they're generating, currently what their calendar looks like. You know, if they're completely full and they have pretty high gross while you know there's a lot of room, a lot of upside. There's just a bunch of different things like that, that we're using to find properties. And just the straight math is if you find some property compelling enough to pay $100,000 more for it. That's great. Down to roughly $500 a month in principal and interest payment that breaks down. So let's break it down to short term rental terms, you're going to rent it out list, it's going to be under 500. But we'll just call it 500. For the easy math, let's just say you're going to rent it out 20 days a month, now, in the summer, there's no you're renting it out 20 days a month, you're renting it out a lot more than that. But let's just say 20 just to make the math very conservative.   If you rent it out 20 days a month. That means whatever you paid $100,000 more for. If you can charge $25 a day, $25 a day more. For that additional amenity you're breaking even. And if you can charge $26 a day more, you're making money. And guess what have you cost in the Smoky Mountains? About $100,000? Can you rent a cabin for more than $25? A day more? If you get a view? Heck yes. Can you rent to you know, can you rent a five bedroom instead of a three bedroom for $25? More day? Heck, yes.   Yeah, there's so many of these things. So bottom line is if you look, if you want to do just straight math, and let the math guide you to what you need to buy to have the best cash on cash, you're starting to get into more expensive properties. And you know, that basically, kind of up to any price works several million is is fine. If you have the financial ability to do that, things start to make sense, things make a ton of sense. And like 750 $800,000 range, you're still making money in just about any range, you know, 300, 400,000, but you're not making as much and you don't have as much cushion.   So there's a lot of people that are like I want to start small, and I want to and I'm like you, I will be happy to help you find and buy anything you want. But let me explain to you why starting small, in my opinion is more dangerous than starting with something that's making 5-6- 7, 000 a month, right? Because guess what, you can lose 567 1000 a month and you're still breaking even versus you know, if you're making 1000 1500 a month when something goes wrong, you're now making nothing and you may be coming out of pocket. I never want to come out of pocket.   Michael:: This is mind blowing day. This is such good stuff.   Dave: Yeah, cool. So glad you like it.   Michael: As as we wrap up here and let you get out of here. What's a final takeaway that first time short term investors to be thinking about that they want to get into short term rental game? What are some of the hardest lessons that you've learned that you can help people to hear from?   Dave: One of the things I see people do is I want to stay so if there was a post I saw that said I visit Detroit on a regular basis, I want to stay in Detroit. I think I'm going to get a short term rental in Detroit. I say I will pay cash for wherever I want to stay. And if I want to stay in Detroit, I'll pay cash that I've earned in the Smokies are one of the top markets. I'm I'm very big into what's the least I like to earn money. But what I really like to do is earn money with less effort. So if I can have five or 10 places in Detroit, that earned me the same money as one place in the Smokies. I'm going with the Smokies all the time, or the panhandle of Florida or, you know, right now some of the other really hot ones Joshua Tree, Broken Bow. Some other places like that northeast corner of Pennsylvania.   There's a bunch of other markets, but I want I don't want to have I see a lot of guys do like a 40 or 50 person, kind of, or 40 or 50 property, you know, rental arbitrage grinding these things out. And that's just not me. I would say try to get the one that has the best cash flow and go from there.   Michael: Path of least resistance.   Dave: People trust me and people tell me things that they probably wouldn't tell other people. But if you knew, and you would never get any of these people on your podcast if you knew how much money that I know that friends have burned through attempting to do short term rentals poorly like 50,000 a year 75,000 a year just I thought I'd try this house. I thought people would really like it. And they didn't it's like go with the proven method, click the stuff that's working. Don't try to reinvent the wheel. You know, go to where there's 1000s of other people that have already done it.   That's the big mistake that I see people do that cost them lots of money and lots of time in the end and I don't know and just here's my other just general real estate investing advice. There's a friend there, I have a friend of mine who's very sharp. And he's basically he's put together a portfolio. He's mid 20s. And he's put together a portfolio that now basically makes him financially independent, he makes more money from his real estate portfolio than he does from his day job.   And it's like, just ask guys like that, or ask me or ask y'all like, I have this idea. What do you think? And you know, he's very happy to help people. I'm very happy to help people. I'm like, yeah, I'll jump on a call for five minutes. Tell me that you want to invest in, you know, I don't know, some, you know, I'll either tell you how to figure out whether it's a good idea, or I'll tell you why it's a horrible idea just to begin with, you know, avoid places with regulation, avoid places that you might lose money, avoid anything that you can make a couple $100 on, like, why are you doing that? Make 1000s? Like, think big. Like, it's not that much harder to do. It's actually easier. So I guess that would be the other. The other thing I would steer new investors too.   Michael: That's so so good day. Well, it kind of in that vein, how can people reach out to you to get a hold of you if they want to either invest with you in the Smokies or just want to bounce some ideas off of you.   Dave: I'm on Facebook. So Dave, homie, AK on Facebook is a way to reach me, you can message me click on me, whatever. I have a website, SmokyMountaincabinrealty.com and smokey is SMOKY. And if somebody wants to sign up, I have some introductory investment, zoom classes like a 60 minute thing. And I kind of explained what I think is important when finding an investment. I obviously say that the Smokies are a pretty good place to invest because I believe that so those would be the two the two main places to get in touch with me there's SmokyMountainCabinRealty.com, or DaveHomyak.com.   Michael: Alright, Dave, this has been great. One final question that I want to ask you. Because it seems like you are so hyper focused on one particular market. Do you think it's make sense to diversify and invest across multiple different states? What are your thoughts there?   Dave: Excellent question. I am hyper focused on the Smokies because I know those returns are incredible. I'm not necessarily saying somebody should invest in the Smokies only or the panhandle of Florida. I'm saying follow the numbers. I really have an issue with people that have multiple properties in multiple cities. And they're not doing a comparison of how much you know how much money they're earning, and how much time they're putting in. And there are properties that they have that are doing better and there are properties they have that are underperforming and It baffles me why somebody would want to waste their time on an underperforming property instead of cut that one loose and upgrade so I just wish more people would run the numbers.   Michael: This has been so great thank you again for taking the time to hang out with me and I know we'll be chatting soon because we're fellow smokey guys now   Dave: Yeah awesome really appreciate you having me on.   Michael: Take care talk soon.   Alrighty everybody that was our episode a big thank you to Dave super super cool story and I'm just total fanboy because as I mentioned the episode I also recently invested in a smoky so I'm very excited to hear that the outlook is positive. As always, if you liked the episode, leave us a rating or review wherever it is this your podcast and we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing

Black Compass Media
Tsu Surf, DNA, Eazy, Suge & MORE talk Promotion, Moving The Culture Forward & Marketing #BCSpaces

Black Compass Media

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 111:30


Epic Sync up with some of battle raps greats in #BCSpaces on @DaBlackCompass Twitter. Talking with Tsu Surf, DNA, Eazy The Block Captain, Fonz and all the top battlers on Promotion, moving the culture forward & marketing Wanna get in the convo live? Follow Black Compass Media @dablackcompass SUBSCRIBE TO THE CHANNEL!! #BattleRap2021 #BlackCompassMedia #HipHop #BCSpaces Follow Black Compass Radio @DaBlackCompass OIN BLACK COMPASS DISCORD - https://discord.gg/RX9YMfR - ALL ARE WELCOMED!!! https://www.patreon.com/THEREALBLACKCOMPASS - FOR OT AND EARLY/EXTENDED CLIPS!!! CONTACT US VIA EMAIL: blackcompasssociety@gmail.com

The Genetics Podcast
EP70: The University of Oxford's Professor Cecilia Lindgren: understanding complex disease through big data and team science

The Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 40:05


In this week's episode Patrick speaks to Director of the Big Data Institute at University of Oxford, Professor Cecilia Lindgren, about her biggest eureka moment, the power of collaboration and consortiums across academia and industry to grow genetic sample sizes and accelerate research, and the importance of best practice standards to enable genetic research to scale successfully.

Green Shirt: A Newbie's Trek Through The Next Generation
101 - Darmok (Sexy Jackets & Snork Thumbs)

Green Shirt: A Newbie's Trek Through The Next Generation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 77:22


The gang are joined by Ian Billington to try to translate the myth of "Darmok." Picard does some shopping therapy, Worf fires a torpedo at a language, and O'Brien plays with DNA samples. Cameron is being ethno-centric, Bobi is here for Leather Daddy Picard, Ian likes "My Bologna," and Rob doesn't understand. Plus a game of "You Talkin' Tamarian To Me?" Engage!Check out It's a Fandom Thing Pod Pick up some Green Shirt Merch

The 7investing Podcast
Gene Editing, Sequencing, Investing — Oh My!

The 7investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 50:03


Investors hear a lot about genomics these days, but what does it all mean, exactly? 7investing Lead Advisors Simon Erickson and Maxx Chatsko team up to discuss what investors should look for in pre-commercial drug developers. To provide practical examples, they discuss how continuous improvements in DNA sequencing have created various technological offshoots now loosely called "genomics," including exciting new opportunities in precision oncology and liquid biopsies. Finally, they provide a high-level overview of DNA editing tools and approaches, including base editing and prime editing. Welcome to 7investing. We are here to empower you to invest in your future! We publish our 7 best ideas in the stock market to our subscribers for just $49 per month or $399 per year. Start your journey toward's financial independence: https://www.7investing.com/subscribe Stop by our website to level-up your investing education: https://www.7investing.com Follow us: ► https://www.facebook.com/7investing ► https://twitter.com/7investing ► https://instagram.com/7investing --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/7investing/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/7investing/support

Third Eye Awakening
The Nuances Behind Certain Concepts Within Spiritual Awakenings - with Crystopher

Third Eye Awakening

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:09


Chrystopher is an astro medium who is a shadow and light worker and helps people bring back their energy into the light. We talked about spiritual by-passing and what it means, the effects of the planets in our lives and on earth - in particular the conjunction of Saturn and Pluto and the energies that we are approaching astronomically. We literally are light beings including our DNA. We spoke about ascension symptoms, plant based medicine, the effects and the importance of taking them in a group or retreat type setting and hybrid children and their different frequencies. You can find Crystopher on IG @the.astromedium You can find the details for my Rokfin here! You can find the details for the Akashic Reading waitlist here Find me on IG @amy.thenorthstar And on FB @ Amy Melissa Or join my free FB group Soul Space You can find all the details on my programs, courses and ways to work with me on my website here

Mind Over Murder
BONUS: Solving Cases with DNA, David Mittelman of Othram (Encore Part 3)

Mind Over Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 54:21


Join Mind Over Murder co-hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley for a bonus episode as we present an encore of an interview with David Mittelman, CEO of Othram, the Houston DNA lab that is breaking cold cases across the United States and Canada. This is Part 3.Othram's DNAsolves.com website featuring their newest cases:https://dnasolves.com/New Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature Colonial Parkway Murders article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer"https://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCheck out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" clothing and other good stuff!https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/New Story on Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasThe next CrimeCon will be held April 29-May 1, 2022 in Las Vegas. We will be there! Join us!Details: https://www.crimecon.com/cc22You can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportCheck out Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastJoin the Colonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 13,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase4 new episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning. Please share!Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

Bad Acts
Ep.61-Halloween from Hell: The Murder of Michaela Wooldridge

Bad Acts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 51:07


On Halloween 2012, 24-year-old Michaela Wooldridge was on the streets, still awaiting a bed at a shelter in Santa Rosa, California. At a nearby party, 20-year-old Jessy Zetino was at a Halloween party taking a synthetic LSD. Their two worlds would collide in a brutal stabbing that would scar the community. Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/badactspodPodMoth: https://podmoth.network/Episode Source List:https://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/news/santa-rosa-killer-gets-26-years-to-life-in-halloween-slaying/?ref=relatedhttps://www.ktvu.com/news/trial-begins-in-alleged-lsd-induced-2012-halloween-murderhttps://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/DNA-prompts-arrest-in-killing-of-Santa-Rosa-woman-5701137.phphttps://sfbayca.com/2016/01/09/man-faces-life-for-2012-halloween-stabbing/https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2015/11/12/jury-finds-man-guilty-in-drug-induced-stabbing-death-of-woman-in-santa-rosa/https://update.lib.berkeley.edu/2016/01/04/cdph-in-the-news-december-2015/https://www.sonomacountygazette.com/sonoma-county-news/homeless-people-gather-to-grieve-in-santa-rosa/https://www.leagle.com/decision/incaco20170828007

Small Town Murder
#245 - I See Dead People - Indialantic, Florida

Small Town Murder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 175:47


This week, in Indialantic, Florida, two successful, and seemingly happy couples enjoy life & love. This doesn't last long, though, as problems, affairs, and tempers flare up & cause many problems, including an absolutely horrific & violent murder, that freaks this upscale area right out. But who did it? The Ex? A new lover? A stranger? A friend, who sees the death, through psychic visions & leads their family to the location of the body? It's a mess, with changing stories, many motives, and ridiculous excuses!! Along the way, we find out that a lot of murder happens in Florida, that seizures usually don't cause psychic visions, and that leading people to a body disposal site makes you look super guilty!! Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman New episodes every Thursday! Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com & use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports! Follow us on...twitter.com/@murdersmallfacebook.com/smalltownpodinstagram.com/smalltownmurder Also, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On iTunes, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts

Your Brain on Facts
Twins Remix (ep. 169)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:04


Twins, synchronicity, science, anomalies, and dark mysteries. Support the show Merch, book Music by Kevin MacLeod  Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.     In 1940, a pair of twin boys, only three weeks old, were put up for adoption in Ohio.  Separate families adopted each boy and coincidentally named both James, calling them Jim for short.  They grew up never knowing anything about one another, but their lives were bizarrely similar.  They each had a dog named Toy and in elementary school, each both was good at math, showed talent in woodshop, but struggled with spelling.  But it was as they moved into adulthood that coincidences really started to pile up.  My name... If one is good, two must be better, so today we were talking about twin on the first of a pair of twin episodes.  Let's start with a quick review.  Fraternal twins occur when two eggs are separately fertilized.  They are genetically distinct, basically regular siblings that happened to be conceived at the same time.  Or not.  There's a rare circumstance called superfetation, where a woman ovulates while already pregnant and the second egg also gets fertilized.  Multiple eggs being released during ovulation can sometimes result in heteropaternal superfecundation, meaning the eggs were fertilized by different men's sperm, creating fraternal twins with different fathers.  Identical twins occur when a fertilized egg splits, creating two zygotes with the same cells.  The splitting ovum usually produces identical twins, but if the split comes after about a week of development, it can result in mirror-image twins.  Conjoined twins, what we used to call Siamese twins, can result from eggs that split most of the way, but not complete.  Twins account for 1.5% of all pregnancies or 3% of the population.  The rate of twinning has risen 50% in the last 20 years.  Several factors can make having twins more likely, such as fertility therapy, advanced age, heredity, number of previous pregnancies, and race, with African women have the highest incidence of twins, while Asian women have the lowest.    Twins have always been of great interest to scientists.  There's simply no better way to test variable vs control than to have two people with identical DNA.  Identical twins share all of their genes, while fraternal twins only share 50%.  If a trait is more common among identical twins than fraternal twins, it suggests genetic factors are at work.  "Twins studies are the only real way of doing natural experiments in humans," says Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at Kings College, London. "By studying twins, you can learn a great deal about what makes us tick, what makes us different, and particularly the roles of nature versus nature that you just can't get any other way.”   NASA was presented with a unique opportunity in the Kelly brothers, identical twins Scott, a current astronaut, and Mark, a retired astronaut.  As part of the "Year in Space" project, which would see Scott spend 340 on the ISS, the brothers provided blood, saliva, and urine samples, as well as undergoing a battery of physical and psychological tests designed to study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.  According to Dr Spector, twin studies are currently underway in over 100 countries.  Working with data and biological samples in the TwinsUK Registry, Spector's team has found more than 600 published papers showing a clear genetic basis for common diseases like osteoarthritis, cataracts and even back pain.  "When I started in this field, it was thought that only 'sexy' diseases [such as cancer] were genetic," Spector says. "Our findings changed that perception."   Back on our side of the pond, the Michigan State University Twin Registry was founded in 2001 to study genetic and environmental influences on a wide range of psychiatric and medical disorders.  One of their more surprising findings is that many eating disorders such as anorexia may not be wholly to blame on societal pressured by may actually have a genetic component to them.  "Because of twins studies,” says co-director Kelly Klump, “we now know that genes account for the same amount of variability in eating disorders as they do in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We would have never known that without twins studies."  On the topic of body-fat, a LSU study by Claude Bouchard in 1990 overfed a dozen young male twins by 1,000 calories a day for three months.  Although every participant gained weight, the amount of weight, and more importantly for the study, fat varied considerably, from 9-29lbs/4-13kg.  Twins tended to gain a similar amount of weight and in the same places as each other, but each pair differed from the other pairs in the test.   While some twin studies, like Year In Space, are famous, others are infamous.   If you're worried where this topic is going, don't be.  We're not talking about Joseph Mengele or the Russian conjoined twins, Masha and Dasha, though they may show up next week.  Twin studies helped create the thinking and even the word “eugenics.”  Francis Galton, a half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was one of the first people to recognize the value of twins to study inherited traits.  In his 1875 paper, "The History of Twins," Galton used twins to estimate the relative effects of nature versus nature, a term he is credited with coining.  Unfortunately, his firm belief that intelligence is a matter of nature led him to become a vocal proponent of the idea that "a highly gifted race of men" could be produced through selective breeding and that unsuitable people should be prevented from reproducing.  The word “eugenics” came up a lot during the Nuremberg trials, if it wasn't already clear with adherents to the idea had in mind.  More recently, in 2003, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia reviewed the research on the heritability of I.Q.  He noticed that most of the studies that declared that I.Q. is genetic involved twins from middle-class backgrounds.  When he looked at twins from poorer families, he found that the I.Q.s of identical twins varied just as much as the I.Q.s of fraternal twins.  In other words, the impact of growing up poor can overwhelm a child's natural intelligence.   Bonus fact: The trope of the evil twin can be traced back as far as 300 BCE, to the Zurvanite branch of Zoroastrianism, the world's oldest continuously-observed religion.    Of all the things inherent to and special about twins, one of the most fascinating is twin language.  You might have seen the adorable viral video of a pair of toddlers having an animated conversation in their twin language.  If you want to bust out your Latin, it's cryptophasia, a form of idioglossia, an idiosyncratic language invented and spoken by only one person or very few people.  It was a struggle not to throw myself head-first down the idioglossia rabbit hole; maybe for a later episode.  Twin speak, or even sibling speak has existed, for as long as human language, but has only been seriously studied for the last few decades, not only to determine how the languages develop but to see if speaking a twin language could hamper the children learning their parents' language.  The reason twins are more likely than other sibling pairs to create their own language is less interesting than psychic phenomena - twins spend a lot of time together, being built-in companions, and are at the same developmental stage.  They unconsciously work together to build their language by imitating and pretending to understand one another, reinforcing their use of the language.  This can weaken their incentive to learn to speak to everyone else--they already have someone to talk to.  Some researchers advocate treating cryptophasia as early as possible.  According to Oxford neuropsychologist Dorothy Bishop, twins often get less intervention from speech therapists than nontwins. “People often assume that it's normal for twins to have funny language, and so they don't get a proper assessment and diagnosis. And then, when they are identified, they are often treated together as a unit, and so each gets half the attention of the professionals working with them.”   When doctors first began examining cryptophasic children, they discovered that the language isn't created out of nothing, but is made up of mispronounced words they've heard or references that only work inside their family.  It's usually not a language at all.  According to Karen Thorpe, a psychologist with Queensland University of Technology, you can think of it like “conversations between married couples where words are invented and abbreviated or restricted codes are used because full explanations are redundant.”  That absolutely happens here.  My husband and I talk like kids in a tree fort clubhouse.  But sometimes, just sometimes, a full-blown language does develop, complete with syntax and totally independent of the language spoken at home.  The syntax of a true twin language doesn't arise from mistakes made while learning the family's language.  It's similar to the syntax seen in deaf children who create their own sign language when not taught to sign.  This syntax could “gives us a potential insight into the nature of language” and mankind's “first language,” says linguist Peter Bakker.  Twin languages play fast and loose with word order, putting subjects, verbs, and objects wherever, but always putting the most important item first, which makes sense.  Negation, making something negative, is used as the first or last word of the statement, regardless of how the parental language handles negation.  It's almost like a Spanish question mark, letting you know where the sentence is going.  Verbs aren't conjugated--go is go, regardless of it's attached to I, he/she, us, or them.  There are also no pronouns, like he, she, or they, only the proper nouns.  There is also no way to locate things in time and space; everything just is.  If you're a fan of Tom Scott's language series on YouTube, he's started making them again.  If not, start with “Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language.”  I'll put a link to it in the show notes.  If I forget, or you want to tell me what you thought, Soc Med.  Breakroom  Most children stop using private languages on their own or with minimal intervention, which is good, according to psychologists, because the longer they practice cryptophasia, the worse they do in tests later.  If you remember nothing else I say ever, remember that correlation does not equal causation.  Cryptophasia could be a symptom of an underlying handicap and that's the cause of the low test scores.     This simple-structured language is fine for two or a few people, but once there are more people to talk to or more things to talk about, you're going to need some more features, “unambiguous ways to distinguish between subject and object,” Bakker says.  “In the twin situation these can be dispensed with, but not in languages in which it is necessary to refer to events outside the direct situation.”  So do twin languages really offer insight into mankind's first language?  Could a primitive society have functioned as a cohesive unit with a language that can only refer to what can be seen at that moment?  That's what linguists are studying, but UC-Santa Barbara's Bernard Comrie adds the asterisk that this research into the infancy of spoken language is still a baby itself.  “First we were told that creole languages [that is, a distinct language that develops from the meeting a two or more languages] would provide us with insight into ‘first language,' then when that didn't pan out interest shifted to deaf sign language (also with mixed results)—I guess twin language will be the next thing.”     It's not an easy scientific row to hoe.  Twin languages come and go quickly as the children develop hearing their parents' language much more than their twin language.  They might keep speaking their twin language if they were very isolated, like two people in a Nell situation or that Russian family who lived alone for 40 years, but we'll file that idea under “grossly unethically and probably illegal.”  Not that it hasn't been tried.  Herodotus tells us of what is considered the first every psychological experiment, when Pharaoh Psammetichus I in the sixth century BCE wanted to know if the capacity for speech was innate to humans and beyond that, what language would that be.  He ordered two infants to be raised by a shepherd hermit who was forbidden to speak in their presence.  After two years the children began to speak; the word that they used most often was the Phrygian word for bread.  Thus, Psammetichus concluded that the capacity for speech is innate, and that the natural language of human beings is Phrygian.  Similar experiments were conducted by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 12th century CE who ordered children to be raised by caretakers forbidden to speak to them and 15th century James I of Scotland who ordered children raised exclusively by a deaf-mute woman, which was repeated by 16th century Mughal Indian Emperor Akbar, among others.  I shouldn't have to tell you that they were all based on dubious methodology and soaking in confirmation bias.  A less-terrible test was done in the 20th century by British ethologist, or animal behavior scientist, William H. Thorpe, who raised birds in isolation to determine which songs are innate.   One of the best-known cases a negative impact from cryptophasia is the Kennedy sisters of San Diego, Grace and Virginia, of Poto and Cabengo, as they called each other.  They created a media whirlwind in 1970s when it was reported that they only spoke their twin language, to the complete exclusion of English, at the rather advanced age of 6.  “Twin Girls Invent Own Language,” “Gibberish-Talking Twins,” “Like a Martian” the headlines read.  Here is a clip of the girls speaking and sadly this is the best audio quality I could find.  Grace and Virginia had suffered apparent seizures as infants, leading their parents to conclude that the girls had been left mentally handicapped.  Their parents opted to keep them inside and away from other children, leaving them mostly in the care of a laconic grandmother who often left them to their own devices.  They seemed like the next big thing in language-creation studies, but on closer examination, it was discovered that, like most cryptophasics, the girls were just very badly, and very quickly, mispronouncing English and German, the languages spoken at home.  Adding to their disappointment, when scientists tried to use the girls' words to converse with them, the girls couldn't stop laughing.  Grace and Virginia were also cleared of their parents mis-labeling them as intellectually handicapped.  Both were found to have relatively normal IQs, for as much good as IQ tests are, which is very little, but that's another show.  The girls eventually underwent speech therapy and learned regular English, though their language skills were a bit stunted, even into adulthood.  identical twins come from a fertilized egg that splits.  If the zygote splits most of the way, but not all, it results in conjoined twins.  Or if the zygotes collide and fuse, science isn't really sure.  Thus conjoined twins are always identical, meaning the same gender.  Why am I pointing that out?  I met two moms of twins at the She PodcastsLive conference who regularly have people ask them if their identical twins are the same gender.  This is why we need sex ed in school.  You'll also notice I'm not using the term Siamese twins.  That term comes from Chang & Eng Bunker, who were born in Siam, modern day Thailand, in 1811, connected by a band of tissue at the chest.  It's not offensive per e, but just doesn't apply to anyone not born in Siam, so people have stopped using it.   Conjoined twins occur once every 2-500,000 live births, according to the University of Minnesota. About 70% of conjoined twins are female, though I couldn't find a reason or theory why.  40 to 60% of these births are delivered stillborn, with 35% surviving only one day.  The overall survival rate is less than 1 in 4.  Often, one twin will have birth defects that are not conducive to life and can endanger the stronger twin.   Conjoined twins are physically connected to one another at some point on their bodies, and are referred to by that place of joining.  Brace yourself while I wallow in my medical Latin.  The most common conjoinments are thoracopagus (heart, liver, intestine), omphalopagus (liver, biliary tree, intestine), pygopagus (spine, rectum, genitourinary tract), ischiopagus (pelvis, liver, intestine, genitourinary tract), and craniopagus (brain, meninges).  75% are joined at the chest or upper abdomen, 23% are joined at the hips, legs or genitalia, 2% are joined at the head.     If the twins have separate organs, chances for separation surgery are markedly better than if they share the organs.  As a rule, conjoined twins that share a heart cannot be separated. Worldwide, only about 250 separation surgeries have been successful, meaning at least one twin survived over the long term, according to the American Pediatric Surgical Association. The surgical separation success rate has improved over the years, and about 75 percent of surgical separations result in at least one twin surviving.  The process begins long before the procedure, with tests and scans, as well as tissue expanders, balloons inserted under the skin and slowly filled with saline or air to stretch the skin, so there will be enough skin to cover the area where the other twin's body used to be. It requires a whole hospital full of specialties to separate conjoined twins, from general surgeons, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, neurosurgeons, neonatologists, cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, and maternal-fetal medicine specialists, among others.  In fact, the longest surgery of all time was a conjoined twin separation.  Separation surgeries often last an entire day; this one required 103 hours.  If they started at 8am Monday, the team finished the surgery at 3pm Thursday.  In 2001, a team of 20 doctors at Singapore General Hospital worked in shifts to separate Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha, 11-month-old twins conjoined at the head.  Not only did the girls share a cranial cavity, their brains were partially fused.  Each tiny brain had hundreds of bitty blood vessels, each of which had to be traced and identified as belonging to one or the other of the girls.  Their brains were not only connected, they were wrapped around each other like a helix.  Plus, each twin's skull needed to be reshaped and added to, using a blend of bone material and Gore-Tex fibers.  Both babies survived the surgery.  Sadly, Ganga died of meningitis at age 7, but Jamuna has gone on to live a healthy life and attend school.   We interrupt this podcast script for an exciting article.  Meaning I was almost done writing it, then I found something I had to go back and include.  There was another pair of conjoined twins named Ganga and Jamuna, this pair born in 1970 in West Bengal.  The pairing of the names makes sense when you learn that the Ganga and Jamuna are sacred rivers.  The sisters are ischio-omphalopagus tripus, meaning joined at the abdomen and pelvis.  They have two hearts and four arms, but share a set of kidneys, a liver and a single reproductive tract.  Between then they have three legs, the third being a nine-toed fusion of two legs, which was non-functional and they kept that one under their clothing.  They can stand, but they cannot walk and crawl on their hands and feet, earning them the show name "The Spider Girls".  Managed by their uncle while on the road with the Dreamland Circus, they exhibit themselves by lying on a charpoy bed, talking to the spectators who come to look at them.  They earned a good living, making about $6/hr, compared to the average wage in India of $.40.   Ganga and Jamuna have two ration cards for subsidized grain, though they eat from the same plate.  They cast two votes, but were refused a joint bank account.  They also share a husband, Gadadhar, a carnival worker who is twenty years their senior.  When asked which he loves more, Gadadhar replies, "I love both equally."  In 1993, the twins had a daughter via Caesarean section, but the baby only lived a few hours.  Though the sister would like to have children, doctors fear that pregnancy would endanger their lives.  Doctors have offered them separation surgery, but they're not interested.  They feel it would be against God's will, be too great of a risk, and put them out of a job.  "We are happy as we are. The family will starve if we are separated."   Not all parasitic twins are as obvious as a torso with arms and legs.  The condition is called fetus in fetu, a parasitic twin developing or having been absorbed by the autosite twin.  It's extremely rare, occurring only once in every 500,000 births and twice as likely to happen in a male.  The question of how a parasitic twin might develop is one that currently has no answer.  To say the fetuses in question are only partially developed is still overstating thing.  They are usually little more than a ball of tissues with perhaps one or two recognizable body parts.  One school of thought holds that fetus in fetu is a complete misnomer.  Adherents contend that the alien tissue is not in fact a fetus at all, but a form of tumor, a teratoma, specifically.  A teratoma, also known as a dermoid cyst, is a sort of highly advanced tumor that can develop human skin, sweat glands, hair, and even teeth.  Some believe that, left long enough, a teratoma could become advanced enough to develop primitive organs.   There have only been about 90 verified cases in the medical record.  One reason fetus in fetu is rare is that the condition is antithetical to full-term development.  Usually, both twins die in utero from the strain of sharing a placenta.  Take 7 year old Alamjan Nematilaev of Kazakstan, who reported to his family abdominal pain and a feeling that something was moving inside him.  His doctors thought he had a large cyst that needed to be removed.  Once they got in there, though, doctors discovered one of the most developed cases of fetus in fetu ever seen.  Alamjan's fetus had a head, four limbs, hands, fingernails, hair and a human if badly misshapen face.    Fetus in fetu, when it is discovered, is usually found in children, but one man lived 36 years, carrying his fetal twin in his abdomen.  Sanju Bhagat lived his whole life with a bulging stomach, constantly ridiculed by people in his village for looking nine months pregnant.  Little did they know, eh?  Fetus in fetu is usually discovered after the parasitic twin grows so large that it causes discomfort to the host.  In Bhagat's case, he began having trouble breathing because the mass was pushing against his diaphragm.  In June of 1999, Bhagat was rushed to Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India for emergency surgery.  According to Dr. Ajay Mehta, "Basically, the tumor was so big that it was pressing on his diaphragm and that's why he was very breathless.  Because of the sheer size of the tumor, it makes it difficult [to operate]. We anticipated a lot of problems."   While operating on Bhagat, Mehta saw something he had never encountered.  The squeamish may wish to jump30 and think about kittens, though if you've made it this far, you're cut from strong cloth.  As the doctor cut deeper into Bhagat's stomach, gallons of fluid spilled out.  "To my surprise and horror, I could shake hands with somebody inside," he said. "It was a bit shocking for me."   One unnamed doctor interviewed in the ABC News story described what she saw that day in the operating room:  “[The surgeon] just put his hand inside and he said there are a lot of bones inside,” she said. “First, one limb came out, then another limb came out. Then some part of genitalia, then some part of hair, some limbs, jaws, limbs, hair.”  There was no placenta inside Bhagat -- the enveloped parasitic twin had connected directly to Bhagat's blood supply. Right after the surgery, Bhagat's pain and inability to breathe disappeared and he recovered immediately.  Upon recovery from the surgery, in which his twin was removed, Bhagat immediately felt better. But he says that villagers still tease him about it. The story I was referring to was made into a plot point on AHS:FS, the tale of Edward Mordrake, the man with two faces.  In 1895, The Boston Post published an article titled “The Wonders of Modern Science” that presented astonished readers with reports from the Royal Scientific Society documenting the existence of “marvels and monsters” hitherto believed imaginary.   Edward Mordrake was a handsome, intelligent English nobleman with a talent for music and a peerage to inherit.  But there was a catch.  With all his blessings came a terrible curse.  Opposite his handsome was, was a grotesque face on the back of his head.  Edward Mordrake was constantly plagued by his “devil twin,” which kept him up all night whispering “such things as they only speak of in hell.”  He begged his doctors to remove the face, but they didn't dare try.  He asked them to simply bash the evil face in, anything to silence it.  It was never heard by anyone else, but it whispered to Edward all night, a dark passenger that could never be satisfied.  At age 23, after living in seclusion for years, Edward Mordrake committed suicide, leaving behind a note ordering the evil face be destroyed after his death, “lest it continues its dreadful whispering in my grave.”   This macabre story ...is just that, a story, a regular old work of fiction.  “But, but, I've seen a photograph of him.”  Sadly, no.  You've seen a photo of a wax model of the legendary head, Madame Toussad style.  Don't feel bad that you were convinced.  The description of the cursed nobleman was so widely accepted that his condition appeared in an 1896 medical encyclopedia, co-authored by two respected physicians.  Since they recounted the original newspaper story in full without any additional details, gave an added air of authority to Mordrake's tale.   “No, there's a picture of his mummified head on a stand.”  I hate to puncture your dreams, but that's papier mache.  It looks great, but the artist who made it has gone on record stating it was created entirely for entertainment purposes.  If you were to look at that newspaper account of Mordrake, it would fall apart immediately.  “One of the weirdest as well as most melancholy stories of human deformity is that of Edward Mordake, said to have been heir to one of the noblest peerages in England. He never claimed the title, however, and committed suicide in his twenty-third year. He lived in complete seclusion, refusing the visits even of the members of his own family. He was a young man of fine attainments, a profound scholar, and a musician of rare ability. His figure was remarkable for its grace, and his face – that is to say, his natural face – was that of Antinous. But upon the back of his head was another face, that of a beautiful girl, ‘lovely as a dream, hideous as a devil.'”  What did we say at the top?  Conjoined twins are identical, meaning among other things, the same gender.   And that… though we'll finish up out story of the twin Jims.  Their lives were so unbelievably similar, if you saw it in a movie, you'd throw your popcorn at the screen.  Both Jims had married women named Linda, divorced them and married women named Betty.   They each had sons that they named James Alan, though one was Alan and the other Allan.  Both smoked, drove a Chevrolet, held security-based jobs, and even vacationed at the exact same Florida beach, though one assumes not at the same time.  After being reunited at age 37, they took part in a study at University of Minnesota, which showed that their medical histories, personality tests, and even brain-wave tests were almost identical.  Remember, you can always find… Thanks…  

Season of Soul
43. Beauty and the Broth: The Anti-Aging Properties of Bone Broth with Melissa Bolona

Season of Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:07


I am so excited to bring you this new episode with the gorgeous Melissa Bolona as she talks about the regenerative properties of bone broth, and her very special bone broth business Beauty and the Broth. In this episode we discuss the beauty and health benefits of bone broth, how Melissa built her wildly successful business with no prior experience in business or the food industry, and what bone broth can do for you. Inside Tracker is an ultra-personalized nutrition and wellness platform that analyzes data from your blood, DNA, and lifestyle to help you optimize your body and reach your goals. Take control of your health and wellness with the Ultimate Plan, their most comprehensive package at the link in the show notes. You'll receive 25% off with the code DORAVANDEKAMP. In this episode, Melissa and I discuss: What makes a good bone broth? What are the beauty benefits of bone broth? How did Melissa build her business with no previous experience? Why should you trust your gut? How to stay committed to a vision when the outlook is bleak? How did Melissa source animal bones and bone broth ingredients for her broth? What is the connection between bone broth and inflammation? How to gain trust from customers The intricacies of the organic food industry How did Melissa come up with the small packets idea for Beauty and the Broth? What's in the vegan bone broth that Beauty and the Broth has created for those p What are the mental health benefits of drinking bone broth? What recipes can you incorporate bone broth into? Melissa's beauty tips Melissa Bolona Resources Melissa's Instagram Beauty and the Broth Instagram Shop Beauty and the Broth Dora Vandekamp Resources Instagram: @doravandekamp YouTube biohackyourbeauty.com Medical Disclaimer. The information on this podcast and website is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Deborah Kobylt LIVE
Martin Cooper, Cellphone Founder & Author

Deborah Kobylt LIVE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 22:59


Cell phones are as much a part of our DNA as driving, and we wouldn't leave home without them. Let's fact it, everything from phone numbers to our bank accounts are stored in there, and without it, we'd be lost. Well, on our show today, we speak with the brilliant engineer who invented the first cell phone and the first to use his invention on the streets of New York, Martin Cooper, Martin is a brilliant engineer and author who recently penned the book, “Cutting the Cord,” about what went on behind the scenes in corporate and political world before the cell phone became mainstream. He takes us on a ride from drawing board to every day use, and his story is fascinating. We also talk about how the cell phone not only revolutionized the entire world, but how it can be the key to future innovations and global equity. Please join us for this fascinating conversation, and invite your friends, too. #DeborahKobyltLIVE on all audio and video platforms.

The David Knight Show
Wed 13Oct21 Airlines Ignore Abbott's Weak Exec Order — Revolution Will Come from Grassroots

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 181:39


* Airlines decide Abbott's Exec Order is “All Hat, No Cattle” — unable to defeat a mere Press Release from Biden* For the woke aspect of Bond's “No Time to Die” — look at the predictive pandemic programming plot line * AWOL GOP/Govs — Republican Governors and state legislative leaders are blocking effective measures to protect #InformedConsent by some Republican legislators doing what the grassroots wants* MUST HEAR: “Spartacus” Manifesto* SUPPLY SHORTAGES are here to stay — not an accident, but a business & political model* Merck's new “therapeutic” COVID pill isn't just a model of corporate greed and regulatory capture — it's also part of the new breed of DNA drugs and scientists are sounding the alarmTOPICS by TIMECODE2:04 AWOL Toothless GOP Governors: “All Hat, No Cattle”. No teeth in TX Executive Order. GOP governors across the country — AR, TN, SD,OK, IN specifically covered — are fighting the small resistance within GOP controlled legislatures. Big companies (like Southwest & American) WANT to fire people even though there is currently NO Biden Exec Order, NO OSHA rule.29:11 The Revolution Will NOT Be Televised — or on Social Media. A revolution has started. We didn't start it — they did. A year ago. But we will finish it or they will finish us1:11:44 Anonymous SPARTACUS: Defiant, Detailed, Comprehensive. Anonymous “SPARTACUS” letter lays out, in detail and defiance what has happened and what we will not allow to happen1:26:26 “No Time to Die” Pandemic Predictive Programming. Who knew? What a coincidence. Joins Contagion and even Kingsmen: The Secret Service. And the ratings on Fauci's hagiography show media is trying to conceal that the public ain't buying the BS1:33:19 Canada church persecution continues on its Thanksgiving Day1:37:02 Fauci hagiography's reviews and box office are as big a cover-up as his “science"1:40:08 Melbourne's lockdown fatigue. Popular at first, the population has now turned1:58:54 Merck's Dangerous DNA-Altering Therapeutic. Just when you thought it was about unmitigated greed and corruption, something deeper is involved2:33:10 Listener letters. Mandates look like the George Bailey treatment for millions of people, fired just before Christmas. Is Trump Cyrus or Nebuchadnezzar?2:39:05 Father whose 9th grade daughter was sexually molested by male in a skirt thanks to LGBT policy is thrown out of School Board meeting, beaten, bloodied and arrested 2:42:35 The collapse of supply chains and scarcity is permanent. It's a business model for the globalist multinationals.Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

The REAL David Knight Show
Wed 13Oct21 Airlines Ignore Abbott's Weak Exec Order — Revolution Will Come from Grassroots

The REAL David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 181:38


Airlines decide Abbott's Exec Order is “All Hat, No Cattle” — unable to defeat a mere Press Release from Biden For the woke aspect of Bond's “No Time to Die” — look at the predictive pandemic programming plot line AWOL GOP/Govs — Republican Governors and state legislative leaders are blocking effective measures to protect #InformedConsent by some Republican legislators doing what the grassroots wants MUST HEAR: “Spartacus” Manifesto SUPPLY SHORTAGES are here to stay — not an accident, but a business & political model Merck's new “therapeutic” COVID pill isn't just a model of corporate greed and regulatory capture — it's also part of the new breed of DNA drugs and scientists are sounding the alarm TOPICS by TIMECODE 2:04 AWOL Toothless GOP Governors: “All Hat, No Cattle”. No teeth in TX Executive Order.  GOP governors across the country — AR, TN, SD,OK, IN specifically covered — are fighting the small resistance within GOP controlled legislatures.  Big companies (like Southwest & American) WANT to fire people even though there is currently NO Biden Exec Order, NO OSHA rule. 29:11 The Revolution Will NOT Be Televised — or on Social Media. A revolution has started.  We didn't start it — they did.  A year ago.  But we will finish it or they will finish us 1:11:44 Anonymous SPARTACUS: Defiant, Detailed, Comprehensive. Anonymous “SPARTACUS” letter lays out, in detail and defiance what has happened and what we will not allow to happen 1:26:26 “No Time to Die” Pandemic Predictive Programming. Who knew? What a coincidence.  Joins Contagion and even Kingsmen: The Secret Service.  And the ratings on Fauci's hagiography show media is trying to conceal that the public ain't buying the BS 1:33:19 Canada church persecution continues on its Thanksgiving Day 1:37:02 Fauci hagiography's reviews and box office are as big a cover-up as his “science" 1:40:08 Melbourne's lockdown fatigue.  Popular at first, the population has now turned 1:58:54 Merck's Dangerous DNA-Altering Therapeutic. Just when you thought it was about unmitigated greed and corruption, something deeper is involved 2:33:10 Listener letters.  Mandates look like the George Bailey treatment for millions of people, fired just before Christmas.  Is Trump Cyrus or Nebuchadnezzar? 2:39:05 Father whose 9th grade daughter was sexually molested by male in a skirt thanks to LGBT policy is thrown out of School Board meeting, beaten, bloodied and arrested 2:42:35 The collapse of supply chains and scarcity is permanent.  It's a business model for the globalist multinationals.   Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.com If you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-show Or you can send a donation through Zelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.com Cash App at:  $davidknightshow BTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7 Mail:          David Knight          POB 1323          Elgin, TX 78621

Elements of Success
22. The 3 DNA Components that Make Up our Success

Elements of Success

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:13


Values, attitude, and skills. These three elements play a significant role in our success.  They're also encoded in our DNA. This week, Johnny uncovers how values, attitudes, and skills contribute to our success in life. By using real-life experiences and stories, he reveals easy ways you can start elevating these three components to pave your … Continue reading 22. The 3 DNA Components that Make Up our Success →

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch
From New Orleans to Mars

It's New Orleans: Out to Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 33:40


Sometimes living in New Orleans can make you want to tear your hair out. You can barely drive around the city for more than 10 minutes without hitting at least one suspension-threatening pothole. It only has to rain hard for 30 minutes and streets are flooding. At least once a year we're hit with a “Boil Water Advisory.” And the power goes out with alarming frequency because our electrical grid is apparently in a constant state of precariousness. If your observations of our engineering abilities stopped there, you'd be justified in concluding we're a bunch of inept losers. But, if you look just a little harder, and a little further east, you're going to get a different impression. A very different impression. Heading east on the I-10, after you pass the remnants of another piece of failed engineering, the long-abandoned Six Flags theme park, you pass an innocuous looking highway sign that says “NASA Michoud Assembly Facility.” If you took that exit, you'd find yourself at one of the largest manufacturing plants on Earth. There are over 43 acres of manufacturing space under one roof. You'll find 3,200 people working there. 1,200 of these people are directly involved in building a rocket. That rocket is called the Space Launch System. It's a part of a NASA program, called Artemis. When it's finished, this will be the most powerful rocket ever built. It's going to take astronauts to Mars. We can't fix the streets or keep the power on in New Orleans, but we can build a rocket to take astronauts to Mars. The current Director of the NASA Michoud Assembly Facility is Lonnie Dutreix III.  If you raise your gaze off the potholed streets of New Orleans, you don't have to look as high as deep space to see some other impressive engineering, and  architectural, achievements. For example, the new Higgins Hotel and Conference Center that's part of the impressive World War 2 Museum. Or, the Carondelet Street hospitality corridor, including the Ace Hotel. And then there's the St Vincent Hotel, and the 100,000 square foot co-working space at the CAC. All of these, and many other notable examples of new and renovated construction in New Orleans, are the projects of a construction company called Palmisano. Palmisano started out in construction in 1950, and it's been in business continuously since. Oh, and by the way, when you drive on a smooth section of New Orleans roadway and say “Thank God they fixed this street,” that's possibly the work of Palmisano's civil engineering division. The Market Leader at Palmisano is Nick Moldaner.  It's not unusual for people who live in small towns to believe they're the center of the universe. You don't have to go very far to find the self-described “Strawberry Capital of the World” - Ponchatoula. Or the even more quaintly delusional, “Rice Capital of the World” – Crowley Louisiana. In New Orleans, we don't have a grandiose slogan to market ourselves with. If there's anything like it, it's “Laissez le bon temps roulez.” While it's an attractive part of our DNA not to take ourselves too seriously, it's also worthwhile celebrating the enormous achievements in business, engineering, and science in New Orleans. The folks at NASA Michoud in New Orleans East are taking us to another planet. And Palmisano is well into the third generation of building the city itself. It's worth noting once in a while that we have more to be proud of in New Orleans than our food and music. Out to Lunch is recorded live over lunch at NOLA Pizza in the NOLA Brewing Taproom. You can see photos from this show by Astor Morgan at our website. For more lunchtime business and construction conversation, check out Wes Palmisano's visit to Out to Lunch.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

LISK: Long Island Serial Killer
NEW PODCAST: "An Absurd Result" coming October 27th

LISK: Long Island Serial Killer

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 2:18


The 7-part series explores the story of a 1987 home invasion and sexual assault of a young girl. Now grown, Linda Glantz, shares her story, the family's attempts to deal with the attack and Linda's maddening search for justice. DNA evidence will ultimately exonerate one man while definitively pointing to another as the assailant, but the US Supreme Court prevents the legal system from ever convicting him. Learn about this decades-long saga and why the law can't keep up with science. Hosted by Jule Banville.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Home Schooled Podcast
#404 V & Joe "V for Vendetta"

Home Schooled Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 58:12


Our guests have asked to remain anonymous so we are calling them V & Joe for conflicting reasons. My guests study in Natural & Ancient Medicine as well as have hard opinions on Vaccines, DNA altering and the freedoms of choice. Please enjoy this episode from critical thinkers and Non-Sheep. See me Live: https://www.agostinocomedian.com/tour Use this link for MasterClass: https://www.masterclass.com/?utm_content=Text&utm_campaign=MC&utm_source=Paid&utm_medium=Affiliate&utm_term=Aq-Prospecting&sscid=a1k5_d723c

Science Faction
SF582: Where Pee is Stored

Science Faction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 20:03


The guys discuss whether or not 125 million year old dinosaur DNA is real, the most important (non-Covid) vaccine in human history just getting approved, and the worst kind of ghost.

Clueston: True Crime in Houston, Texas
Clueston 41: LGBTClue. The Murder Of Aaron Scheerhorn And The Prosecution Of Lydell Grant

Clueston: True Crime in Houston, Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:00


The brutal and heartbreaking murder of Aaron Scheerhorn in Houston's Montrose neighborhood and the investigation that led to the prosecution of Lydell Grant for the homicide.

The Long Run with Luke Timmerman
Ep100: Christian Henry on Long Read DNA Sequencing

The Long Run with Luke Timmerman

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 69:51


Christian Henry, CEO of PacBio, on long read DNA sequencing applications.

The Bert Show
Update: She Just Found Out The Man She's In Love With Is Her Biological Brother! 

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:05


Her parents have been friends with another couple since before she was born. This couple is like her second set of parents, and she grew up with their kids.Last year she started crushing on their oldest son. The two started dating, and they've been in love ever since.Here's the problem: She recently found out she has a half-brother through a DNA test. Who's her half-brother? The current man she's dating!  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Essential Ingredients Podcast
004: Developing A Sustainable Business with Joaquim Macedo de Sousa

Essential Ingredients Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 25:53


“Try to evolve into innovative ideas. Farmers are very important, but you should try to turn their mindsets into business people...that's definitely what will change the landscape of the food industry and will bring it more innovation and more sustainability.”  - Joaquim Macedo de Sousa   Episode Description: The Habitat for Business Innovation in Strategic Sectors (HIESE) serves as an innovation space that promotes entrepreneurship in rural areas. Launched in 2016, this business incubation facility in Quinta Vale do Espinhal, Penela, Portugal has 15 offices that accommodate companies in the critical early stages of their business. HIESE offers various services including physical and virtual incubation and acceleration programs, internationalization, training, and business planning.     Business incubation is a process employed to help start-ups innovate and accelerate their growth. Learn more about this and other business development programs on this episode as Justine talks with Joaquim Macedo de Sousa, Executive Director of Rural Smart HIESE.  Joaquim shares the idea behind incubation and why it is especially needed in rural areas.  Justine and Joaquim also discuss how HIESE can help you turn your ideas into a successful business, how much it costs, how to apply (and get accepted) and more!  Entrepreneurs have a unique “DNA” that makes them distinct, and also capable of creating impact in a shorter period of time. The key is to continuously develop and make that impact sustainable. Failing is an expensive lesson, so before you launch, tune in and learn how you can turn hurdles into golden opportunities!  Connect with Joaquim Macedo de Sousa:  Born in 1978 in Braga, Joaquim lives in Coimbra, is married and has four children. He  is  currently  the Executive  Director  of  HIESE  Habitat  for  Business  Innovation  in  the Strategic Sectors, a business incubator focused on entrepreneurship and innovation in rural  areas,  resulting  from  a  partnership  between  IPN Incubator and  the  Municipality of Penela.  He  is  also a Professor  of  Entrepreneurship  and  Management  at  the  Coimbra Institute  of  Engineering.  As  an  entrepreneur, Joaquim  was the co-founder  of  several companies related to the food sector (technologies, agriculture and aquaculture).   LinkedIn   Connect with Smart Rural HIESE:  Website  Facebook LinkedIn Instagram   Connect with Justine:  Website Facebook Instagram LinkedIn   Connect with NextGenChef: Website  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  YouTube NextGenChef App (Apple) NextGenChef App (Android)    Episode Highlights: 01:14 Rural Incubation 05:02 What Makes Entrepreneurs Unique  11:20 From Problem to Opportunity  15:03 What is a Business Incubator?  22:40 Geared Towards Sustainable Innovation 

Marni on the Move
191. Maria Karr, Co-Founder Rumore Beauty, Talks Beauty, Entreprenurship and Running

Marni on the Move

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:59


Maria Karr is the founder of the groundbreaking beauty company Rumore Beauty,  Rumore is the first Russian-focused online beauty shop to launch in the US, with a curated selection of emerging and popular Russion skncare brands and products, that highlight the simple, nature-forward, and elegant foundations of the Russian approach to skincare. Maria and I sync up about her background in PR and communications within the beauty world, and how that inspired her to innovate and launch Rumore. We talk about what it was like starting a company in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, and how this new venture amplifies her passion for her home country of Russia. Maria details the core values of Russian beauty and discusses some of her favorite products. Maria is also a runner and 4x Marathoner.  She chats with me about the intersection of fitness and skincare, like the importance of proper hydration and wearing a lot of sunscreen. We also sync up about her journey to running a marathon, and what the training process was like for her, and the parallels she draws from sport to entrepreneurship. CONNECT Rumore Beauty on  Instagram, TikTok, and Facebook Marni On The Move Instagram, Facebook, TikTok, LinkedIn, or YouTube Marni Salup on Instagram and Spotify SUBSCRIBE Sign up for our weekly newsletter, The Download for Marni on the Move updates, exclusive offers, invites to events, and exciting news! TRAIN Meet me on Zwift, Strava, or Peloton OFFERS Take control of your health and wellness journey with InsideTracker, the ultra-personalized nutrition platform that analyzes your blood, DNA, and lifestyle to help you optimize your body from the inside out. Transform your body's data into meaningful insights and a customized action plan of the science-backed nutrition recommendations you need to optimize your health!  Get 25% percent off today at InsideTracker with our code CHEERSMARNI Head over to our SHOP page for additional offers from Marni on the Move partners, sponsors, and guests SUPPORT THE PODCAST Leave us a review on Apple. It's easy, scroll through the episode list on your podcast app, click on five stars, click on leave a review, and share what you love about the conversations you're listening to. Tell your friends to what you love on social. Screenshot or share directly from our stories the episode you're listening to, tag us and the guests, and use our new Marni on the Move Giphy! SPECIAL THANKS Emma Steiner for help with show notes, guest research, and social media. Skye Menna for help with guest research and outreach, social media, and public relations    

Dharma Glimpses with Judy Lief
Episode 38: Awareness, Kindness, Openness

Dharma Glimpses with Judy Lief

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:16


According to the Buddha, all sentient beings have buddhanature or bodhichitta  •  Trungpa Rinpoche spoke in terms of having “enlightened genes” — we have the DNA of buddhanature within us  •  our natural tendency is to awaken and to flourish, but how do we get a glimpse of this?  •  bodhichitta can be described as having three qualities: awareness, kindness, and openness  •  awareness refers to those moments when clarity seems to spring up effortlessly in our mind; whan that happens, that is bodhichitta saying “hello”  •  the second quality, kindness, also arises unconstructed when we spontaneously think a kind thought or have a little tenderness; it just appears because it is part of our nature  •  the third quality of buddhanature, openness or spaciousness, pops up in those moments when our heavy-handedness is suddenly seen through  •  it is  a kind of lightness and openness, a feeling of spaciousness and possibility  •  these three qualities often intersect together: a moment of softness helps some clarity arise, or a moment of spaciousness breaks down a stuckness or frozen quality  •  these three qualities are like little doorways or peepholes  through which we begin to have glimpses of the multifaceted nature of this heart of the Buddha

Your Better Life
Ep 113: Obesity, The Real Pandemic – Cause, Effect and The Solution

Your Better Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


As we fly through the universe of crazy these days, we are ignoring the biggest elephant (figuratively and literally) in the room, causing the most harm in this country: obesity. In America, it will not be a murky virus, economic ruin, or even terrorism that does us in--it appears it will be our inability to put down a fork and knife. Our waistlines are exploding, we are on numerous pharmaceutical drugs, yet we ignore the easiest solution to our weight gain woes: regular exercise and eating healthy. But what does that really mean? We will dig into the numbers, and I will warn you they are not pretty. To say we are fat as a nation is putting it nicely. The facts tell a very disturbing problem in our society, and it is getting worse at an alarming rate. Today I bring on my favorite scientist and data analyst to help me go through the numbers--Madame X. Yes, she has to use an alias, well, because people are crazy.  Topics Discussed: * What the do the statistics really say about obesity * What is the “Healthcare Industrial Complex” * Why there is no money in healthy people * Why being fat is not beautiful and definitely not healthy * Why optimal health is the key to not getting Covid, not getting vaccinated  * Is it possible some of us are genetically skewed to be overweight, or obese * Can you beat bad genetics and still live a life of optimal health and wellness * Why it is easy to maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle if you just pay attention * Why health fads are fads for a reason * Why your poor health negatively impacts everyone around you Episode Resources: * Link to Gary's World Famous Health Book: https://www.thesimplelifenow.com/product/the-simple-life-guide-to-optimal-health-softcover/ * The Simple Life Website: https://www.thesimplelifenow.com  *Make sure to signup and be a member of The Simple Life Insider's Circle at: https://www.thesimplelifenow.com/the-simple-life/ Show Links: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/prevalence-incidence/ Divino et al , J Manag Care Spec Pharm_2021 Feb;27(2):210-222.   Qian at el J Med Econ 2015;18(12):1020___ Prevalence and healthcare costs of obesity related comorbidities: evidence form an electronic medical records system in the United States  Ravelli GP, Stein ZA, Susser MW. Obesity in young men after famine exposure in utero and early infancy. N Engl J Med 1976; 295: 349–353. Huang C, Li Z, Wang M, Martorell R. Early life exposure to the 1959-1961 Chinese famine has long-term health consequences. J Nutr 2010; 140: 1874–1878. age' > 85th percentile vs infants in WFA < 85th percentile Parrillo L et al International Journal of Molecular Sciences 19 June 2019 Nutritional Factors, DNA Methylation and risk of Type2 diabetes and Obesity- Perspectives and Challenges Newborns of obese parents have altered DNA methylation patterns at imprinted genes  Soubry et al, International Journal of Obesity (2015) 39, 650-657 Insulin like growth factor (IGF2) and H19 methylation at birth and risk of overweight and obesity in children.  Perkins, E. et al J Pediatrics Jul 16(1)31-39 Valleso,L,et,al_IntJObes(2011)Dec;35(12)_Altered Hypothalamic Function in Diet-Induced Obesity Review of animal studies  Alexander,J_JClinInvest(2017);127(1)24-32, Hypothalamic Inflammation in obesity and metabolic disease remarkable how rapidly overconsumption of a fat-rich diet results in acute changes in the feedback to metabolic endocrine signals (such as leptin and insulin signaling) and in hypothalamic inflammatory responses Obri et al_Cell Stress | JULY 2019 | Vol. 3 No. 7_Role of Epigenetics in hypothalamic energy balance control: implications for obesity Thomas K., et al, NatureResearch (2019)9:17373 Fotuhi et al Practical Neurology July 2013 Kim J et al, International J of Obesity 44, 1197 (2020)

SuperFeast Podcast
#137 Love, Sex and Psychedelics with Dr. Molly Maloof

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 73:52


We have one of our favourite returning guests on the podcast today, entrepreneur and practicing MD Molly Maloof, who is back this time going straight to the heart of health and happiness; Love, sex, relationships, and the harmonious intersection of medicine and love. One of the many reasons we love the work of Dr. Molly is she's all about maximising potential and better function within the human body. Evolving in her practice and true to form with her ever-innovative mind, Dr. Molly's work has recently taken a more focused move into the space of relationships and how the quality of our close relationships significantly determines our long-term health. Healthy relationships help us cope better and defuse the external stresses of life; So why not focus on improving relationships? Inspired by years of experience and research in psychedelics, the neurobiology of love, and drug-assisted therapy, Dr. Molly is developing a company that aims to improve relationships and strengthen bonds through drug-assisted therapy. A complete paradigm shift in the way we view modern medicine and an upgrade to the human condition and relationships. As always with Mason and Dr. Molly, this episode is energised and thought-provoking. They explore the topics of psychedelic-assisted therapies, sexual dysfunction and the root causes of relationship problems, the history of MDMA and couples therapy, where modern medicine is falling short, and so much more. Tune in for good convo and sovereign health.   "I think technology is where we see these bonds decay. We're seeing people give up their marriages, we're seeing people walk away from long-term relationships, and we're seeing families and children affected. One of the most adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is a divorce. Why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, honourable, that's scientifically sound, and will leave people better than we found them".   - Dr. Molly Maloof     Mason and Molly discuss:   Natural Aphrodisiacs. Entactogens (empathogens) The psychedelic movement. Psychedelic assisted therapy. Combatting stress through love. Relationships, community, and happiness. How relationships affect long-term health. Exploring root trauma and healing sexuality. Technology and the decay of relationships. Sexual dysfunction and relationship problems. Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Oxytocin, and Serotonin.   Who is Molly Maloof? Dr. Molly Maloof's goal is to maximise human potential by dramatically extending the human healthspan through medical technology, scientific wellness, and educational media. Her fascination with innovation has transformed her private medical practice, focused on providing health optimisation and personalised medicine to San Francisco & Silicon Valley investors, executives, and entrepreneurs. Molly's iterative programs take the quantified self to the extreme through comprehensive testing of clinical chemistry, metabolomics, microbiome, biometrics, and genomic markers.   CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Cordyceps Deer Antler Molly's Twitter   Molly's Linkedin  Molly's Website Molly's Facebook Molly's Instagram  Psychedelic News Hour with Dr Molly Maloof Maximising Your Human Potential with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#47) Spiritual Awakening and Biohacking with Dr. Molly Maloof (EP#108)   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher, CastBox, iHeart RADIO:)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:03) Molly, how are you?   Molly Maloof: (00:05) I'm alive and well in the middle of a chaotic world. And somehow I feel like one of the more sane people in the room these days.   Mason: (00:14) You're the sane person. It's great because I like the fact that the sane person and one of the sane people on Instagram. I love your Instagram endlessly.   Molly Maloof: (00:23) Thanks.   Mason: (00:23) And I love you're the doctor whose drugs I want to take.   Molly Maloof: (00:28) Yeah, right. Like I kept on asking myself, "What if we made drugs that people wanted to take? What if we made drugs that actually improve the human condition?" What if we made drugs that actually improved resilience and improved our relationships? How come that's not medicine?   Mason: (00:46) Now, let me start with this little light question.   Molly Maloof: (00:48) Yeah.   Mason: (00:49) Where does the intersection of medicine and love begin and integrate?   Molly Maloof: (00:56) Yeah, right? Okay. Here's what occurred to me. And I haven't really even announced my company because I've been stalled, but I can talk about the big picture because I think it's really important. I spent my entire life trying to figure out how and ever since I was a child, and I was like, wanting to become a doctor at a young age, and then hit puberty in all sorts of hormonal disarray. And I was just like, "What is this happening to my body?" I remember thinking, someday I'm going to figure out my whole body, and I'm just going to understand all this weird shit that's happening to me. And so I spent a lot of my life trying and testing out things to see what would they would do. I would take supplements when I was in ninth grade. I was just constantly doing weird stuff to see what I could do to make my body function better.   Molly Maloof: (01:41) And then, left my residency, started my own medical practise, and really was like, "Fuck, I want to make a practise around optimising health, instead of just fixing sickness." So I want to understand health from first principles. So I spent all this time studying and practising . And fortunately, I had patients who would pay me a lot of money to like, be my lab rats. And they were willing, they were coming to me with experiments that they're like, "I want to do this, will you be help me?" And I'm like, "Sure." So I was one of those doctors that was just like, helping executives find greater performance. And then I had a bit of a come to Jesus moment.   Molly Maloof: (02:18) And I was just like, I did not go into medicine to be doctor just to rich people. That's not cool. And this is like been an interesting experiment. But I should probably be doing more with my life than just helping rich people stay healthy. So it really was that. That was really going through my head. I was at Esalen Institute, and I was just like, "Yeah. I'm pretty sure that there should be more to life than this."   Mason: (02:39) It's an elephant a lot of the time in the health sector.   Molly Maloof: (02:42) Yeah. But at the same time, I'm super grateful that I actually was able to do what I did because A, I could show I actually was part of like a massive trend movement, which was like, precision medicine for individuals was like, not a thing until, a few years after I started practising . So I've always been a bit ahead of the curve. But I've always also been one of those people who's just like, I can't settle for like surface level anything. So I have to get under the surface. So I got asked to teach at Stanford, a course. And she was like, "You seem to be this healthspan expert. So why don't you teach about it?" And I was like, well, of course, I got really insecure. And I was like, "Well, I know a lot. But I can't know enough to teach a second best school in the country." So I went and I started researching even deeper and started studying even more and started like coming up with this framework of what health was about.   Molly Maloof: (03:28) And in my process of studying everything, I was creating electron relationships. And I started figuring, I saw a couple TED Talks, and I started looking into the research of these two psychologists and this researcher from Stanford. And basically, the conclusion was that long term health and happiness is literally dependent on your relationships, like the number one factor in whether you're going to live long and healthy or not is your relationships. And why do you think that is? Well, usually they're the biggest source of stress or stress relief. And we know that stress is a huge source of disease, and yet everybody talks about stress, but nobody talks about what to do about it. Even like some of the best most famous doctors in America.   Molly Maloof: (04:11) Well, even doctors are on stress, like sit around talking about how they don't know what to do with stress. So I was like, "I wonder if we could actually create medicine, that improved relationships." And so I started figuring out through the psychedelic movement, that a lot of what entactogens do is they fundamentally reproduce the neurobiology of love. And so I started digging into the neurobiology of love and I was like, oh, so dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and serotonin are essentially like some of the bigger molecules involved with love and connection as well as hormones. So to me, it was like kind of a lightbulb moment happened when I was like, "Whoa, what if we actually were to create medicine that can reproduce the love that you had early in your relationship when you first got married, when you first started dating?" What would happen if you could actually reintroduce that feeling again, in your relationship, when you've been together for 10 years, and you're already annoyed by each other constantly. And there's all this resentment built up?   Molly Maloof: (05:17) And what if you could work on that resentment, work on your attachment issues, work on your relationship and your bond and strengthen that bond, through drug assisted therapy? And so that's kind of what I came up with as an idea. And so I'm in this process of investigating the possible ways to do this. But really, it's like a complete paradigm shift in modern medicine because A, it's not about individuals taking drugs, it's about two people taking a drug together. And B, it's not about doctors just handing people drugs, but it's drugs plus therapy. Drugs plus a therapeutic journey that you take, in order to achieve a certain outcome. So not only does medicine have to change in a few different ways, like A, we have to like see if the FDA will even let us give two people drugs. But B like, the payment system of medicine is about you go to a therapist, you go to a doctor, you get a drug, and the doctor is paid for that visit. And that psychologist is just paid for that visit.   Molly Maloof: (06:14) So I have friends that are in payments systems, and they're developing like bundled payment programmes because essentially you need to like create an entire outcome based experience that is paid for in a lump sum. And so there's a lot of things that need to change about in medicine. But I think that fundamentally the human bonds that we create, like are the hugest source of survival that we have. And a lot of people have overlooked this in this pandemic. We know now from isolation, that there's nothing healthy about people being by themselves in their homes, especially the elderly. Come on, and young people and children with families in one house, like we're meant to be in community, we're meant to be touching other people, we're meant to be around other people. And I think it's really a shame that we have ignored this factor for so long, and we're continuing to ignore it while people are killing themselves with alcohol and drugs and other substances.   Molly Maloof: (07:07) And it's just like, and even food, right? Like kids are gaining weight at record rates, people are gaining weight at record rates. And it's all because we're not supposed to be alone. We're not supposed to be indoors by ourselves isolated, like it's not productive, and it's the antithesis of health. So that's my shtick in my soapbox description. And I'm just going to say this, this is a really ambitious endeavour, there is a very good chance that it will not work because the government will stop me. That doesn't mean that people shouldn't be doing stuff like this because we actually need to change the way that people think about medicine. We actually need to change how medicine is delivered.   Mason: (07:42) You know what, like what brings up, I've been reading a lot of like management books because I'm at that stage by my business where I was like Peter Pan and I'm back in the real world a little bit where am I growing up and becoming a little bit adulty.   Molly Maloof: (07:56) We're both becoming adults, dude.   Mason: (07:57) We're both adulting the shit out of life right now.   Molly Maloof: (08:01) We're adulting the shit out of life.   Mason: (08:04) The one Tani got like the whole management team to raid was like a Patrick Lencioni one. I don't think that's how you pronounce his name, but he's got business fables, and it's the Five Dysfunctions of a Team and one of the dysfunctions, I can't remember if it's an exact dysfunction or just something I took out of the fable, but it's like you get an executive team and you go through all the different departments like what's our goalposts? Like what are we all agreeing on that we're looking at as like what we're all trying to get? Is it like customer acquisition? Is it customer happiness ratings? Is it revenue? It doesn't matter what the hell it is, we just focus on that and we go for it and then that unifies you. I think most people and including people that get into health and are entrepreneurs in the health same doctors what the thing that happens is they still they can't get over the hangover of getting dumped.   Mason: (08:53) The goalposts been put on you by a pretty old medical system that just like, just keep people alive. Just improve the condition somewhat. And I think why when you speak and when people listening, I know people like loving my team like listening to your last podcast in the community really excited is because the boldness that you have and it's screaming me, you're like, "No, I'm creating my own goalpost, not taking on that one, and I can see the bridge, and I'm going..." Like you actually can bridge it. It's not just, I'm defying you. It's like, "No," I'm just like, I can work with in that and I can see what you're focused on. And I'm very clear about what I'm focusing on. It's like relationship and then measure the markers to see that your relationships have improved and we know it because we have these markers. And that focus is really inspiring. It's really intimidating for people that have just allowed themselves to be handed what the goalpost is. So cheers you, I raise my hot chocolate to you.   Molly Maloof: (10:00) It's like I ask myself, "Okay, I've got this personal brand. If I like go and be Dr. Molly brand, Dr. Molly, how is that going to like..." Okay. So let's say there's Andrew Weil, there's Dr. Oz, there's all these, like leaders in the space. I could do that. And I can always fall back on that if this thing doesn't work, like I'll only be 40 by the time I fail at this, right? So I think I'm going to give myself like solid three years before I give up. Look, it's really hard to do this thing, but I'm going to give myself some significant time and commitment, like five to 10 years, then we'll see what happens. If I can get through past three years, I'll be fucking stoked. So point is, is like I can always fall back on like the Dr. Molly brand because it's like, that's cool. But that's just an evolution, right? That's just like, me becoming branded doctor 2.0. But the thing about this other thing is like, if we actually were to accomplish this, this just fundamentally changes medicine, and also could transform human relationships, which are falling apart.   Molly Maloof: (11:02) People are getting divorced after eight years, and kids are getting damaged by these relationships. Kids are missing their relationships with their parents, parents are not bonding, kids are feeling neglected. We've got to save the family unit and I think it starts with the primary relationship. And to me, this is something that is interesting to me that, I just don't think a lot of people work on their relationships, like I don't think it's something that a lot of people consider to be a thing that they should be doing every day. But it's actually so fundamental to survival, right? And yet, it's like when things are getting really bad, that's when they get to work. So we are looking at different indications. But fundamentally, the big picture, what I'm trying to do, it's kind of like bring what people have been doing underground above ground.   Molly Maloof: (11:49) The history of MDMA was like couples therapy, right? And Shulgin was giving it to psychologists to improve couples relationships. And it turns out, like underneath a lot of dysfunction, a lot of sexual dysfunction in men and women is relationship problems. So if you just keep on getting to the root cause of anything, it's like, "Oh, why don't we just like deal with the root cause? And go with that?" So it's pretty-   Mason: (12:15) I've definitely experienced with underground MDMA.   Molly Maloof: (12:17) Yeah.   Mason: (12:19) Therapy?   Molly Maloof: (12:19) Sure. Exactly.   Mason: (12:22) Yeah. With my wife. Can you just enlighten people about how you'd use it in like a clinical setting and why in particular it has been used there?   Molly Maloof: (12:37) So MDMA, we're not technically using MDMA, unless we can't use the substance we're going to work on toward developing which there's a lot of reasons why, like drug developments hard, right? But MDMA would be a good backup solution because of its history. MDMA is essentially an entactogen. So what it does is it means to touch with that it means to generate, it's also known as enpathogen. So it creates a deep sense of empathy and human connection. And that empathy reminds you of like, "Oh, there's this person next to me." And I can actually feel how they feel right now.I can actually, more noticeably understand their emotional experience. And I can be a part of that experience, rather than feeling so separate from someone else. And fundamentally, it also works on the neurobiology of love. So it's a love drug. So it creates a similar experience to what I call post coital bliss, which is kind of like right after you had sex, and you're feeling like really comfortable and really blissed out, it's like, that's kind of the MDMA experience.   Molly Maloof: (13:42) And the interesting thing is that through different types of combinations of different chemicals, we're going to be able to modulate consciousness in ways that we never thought we could do and it's fascinating, just this whole field of psychedelic medicine because it's just beginning like this whole revolution is just beginning. And it's like happening from a place of like deep interested in science and understanding the brain, but also from like a deep reference to the past. So like MDMA, for example, in the past was used in couples therapy. So two couples would come in and take the medicine with the therapist. And the therapist will help them work through their issues whether it be like attachment trauma, or deep seated resentment that's been carried or anger or betrayal or just trust issues. And therapist would use this medicine to help people come together again.   Molly Maloof: (14:32) And one of the rules interestingly, for couples therapy with when Ann Shulgin was doing it and was giving it to other therapists was no sex. So it's funny because I actually think that psychedelics go great with sex. And I think that like, you have to know what you're doing, you have to know the dose, but I do think that there will be a role in the future for psychedelic assisted therapy, and there should also be a role for psychedelic aphrodisiacs.   Mason: (15:00) Speak more about that.   Molly Maloof: (15:02) Well, okay, so I'm giving a talk at delic on this is actually quite kind of interesting. I'll give you a little preview of my talk. So it turns out that psychedelic aphrodisiacs have probably been used since like the beginning of human history.   Mason: (15:17) Cool thing. The two best things.   Molly Maloof: (15:21) Right? So people are fascinating, right? So turns out that there's like a whole bunch of categories of psychedelic aphrodisiacs. And they're so interesting. So there's the Acacia DMT, harmelin combo, there's an Alaska DMT harmelin combo, there's also the combination, that combo the drug. There's also MDMA, and MDA, which is the entactogen class of synthetic love drugs. There's LSD and psilocybin, which are the tryptamines. There's actually like a salamander that in Romania, they put into a vodka, and they use it as aphrodisiacs. There's also toads that people use as aphrodisiacs. There's Morning Glory, which is an LSD derivative, there's Hawaiian woodrose, there's all sorts of cool plants and animals that have been used since primitive times that are psychedelic, and that can turn you on.   Molly Maloof: (16:25) And there's also dangerous ones things like scopolamine, which is not technically a psychedelic, but it's a deliriant. And you don't really want to take like the tour up. But people in Brazil apparently, occasionally accidentally get dosed by like prostitutes, who are trying to take advantage of them. So there's actually a pretty good Vice episode on that. But turns out that it's not exactly a psychedelic, but you can't have psychosis and hallucinations. So I was like, "Wow, these are really interesting. There's all sorts of different mushrooms and fungi that people use, there's also like, what is it called? There's a type of fungus. Actually, let me look it up. I've got my computer right here. So why don't I come out and give you a little bit more detail on this because it's kind of getting good.   Molly Maloof: (17:14) So there's like this substance, there's actually a fruit in Southeast Asia called my Marula bean. And it has all sorts of weird ingredients in it, that can make you trippy. And then interestingly, alcohol has the effect of creating beta-carboline in the body, which I didn't know. So it's actually technically slightly psychedelic, which I never knew this. And then absinthe has wormwood which has thujone in it, which is mildly psychedelic as well. So it's essentially there's different doses of different ingredients that are kind of used for different reasons, right? And so there's basically like the medicinal dose, they said, which is the lowest dose, like the sort of the micro dose of medicine. And that's kind of like people taking things just for overall improvement of their health, mental health. And then there's the sort of aphrodisiac dose, which is a little bit higher than that. So it's enough to get you to start noticing a shift in your perception, but not so much to make the trip really hard.   Molly Maloof: (18:12) And then there's the shamanic dose, which is like what's being used in a lot of clinical studies, which is like people try to get to the root of really deep trauma. And oftentimes, getting to the root of trauma is actually what a woman or man needs to do in order to actually heal their sexuality. So I got particularly interested in this space because MDMA kind of accidentally helped heal my sexual dysfunction that I had in my 20s because of some trauma that I had in college, that I didn't even realise was causing sexual dysfunction because I didn't know I had sexual dysfunction. I just knew that I wasn't aroused. I was in pain every time I had sex, and it wasn't orgasming. And then I met a guy, we were using MDMA together and all these problems went away. And I was like, "What just happened"? And I had my first orgasm with a guy. I had orgasmed on my own, but never with a man before because of unfortunately, my history of sex was not positive.   Molly Maloof: (19:07) So I basically been trying to figure this out, "Wow, it seems like there's an opportunity for healing sexual dysfunction." Because a lot of the root causes of sexual dysfunction are relationship problems and trauma. And so then I started uncovering the whole trauma, Pandora's box, and I started discovering natural numbers on sexual trauma. And it became this whole holy shit moment, like fuck the world is so fucked up when it comes to sex. Talk about like, this Me Too movements, just the tip of the iceberg. Underneath all of it is like, clearly dysfunctional sexual upbringing that most people have because of our completely outdated religious culture, right? Basically really religiosity in a lot of ways really ruins sexuality for people because it makes it into this forbidden fruit and then in that you start wanting all sorts of things that are wrong because you're like, "Oh, I can't have it. So I want all these things that I can't have."   Mason: (20:05) Forbidden fruit. And the guys our snake tells us you want the fruit.   Molly Maloof: (20:09) Oh yeah, and women want it too, by the way. I was like, when I discovered masturbation was a sin in like fifth grade. I was like, "Oh, dear god, I've been masturbating my entire life." So funny, right? And there was just this moment I had growing up being like, really feeling like I went from like a really good Christian girl to like, a very bad child because I masturbated. And that's just not okay. So then I get into the history of psychedelics. And this talk and essentially, before Christianity, psychedelics were being used by medicine women and priestesses, and medicine men, and they were given to people as a tool for enhancing their virility and their fertility and their sexual function. And it was like, part of nature, sex was something beautiful, it was something acceptable, it is something that was part of life, right? It was celebrated. And then Christianity basically turned polytheism into this monotheistic culture, and basically started burning witches, and saying that these love potions are evil, and that anything related to sex was wrong.   Molly Maloof: (21:09) And now sex is the thing that you have to have in the bounds of marriage, which the church of course has to govern. And if you do anything outside of that, or let alone, you're homosexual, you're now a deeply evil person, and you deserve to be harmed. And you really think about this history. It's kind of epically fucked how much, no offence to men, but like patriarchy, took over religion, and basically made it all about men being in charge of the religious experience. Even though women were actually very much part of like polytheistic religious culture, and sexuality was part of that culture. And so it's like all this stuff is really went downhill from there.   Molly Maloof: (21:50) And now we live in this modern time where like, the Catholic Church has unending problems with brutalising children sexually. And we have not woken up to this reality that sex is not evil. It's part of life. It's a beautiful part of life. It's a part of life that is one of those magical mystical, if not psychedelic experiences. And it shouldn't be demonised, but I do think we need to return it back into a place of wholesomeness and respect and love and really treating people the way we would want to be treated and I don't think any woman or man wants to be raped.   Molly Maloof: (22:29) I don't think any woman or man wants to be assaulted, and I don't think if any child grows up thinking that, that's normal. And I don't know what changes in culture that makes it okay for kids and adults to like mistreat each other, but I really think that like part of my mission in life is actually to create a better culture around sex and love and really this company that I started called the Adamo Bioscience is basically a company that's dedicated to studying the science of love because I think that if we understood it better, we might be able to create more of it, and through multiple pathways and products and services. And yes, I have a commercial interest, but mostly because like it seems totally a better thing to be spending my life making money off of than anything else right now, which is like why not try to create more love in the world? I think there should be like 15 to 20 companies trying to do this.   Mason: (23:22) I think there will be once you show them the way. That's the that's the beautiful thing about being someone who's charging and leading the way. Something as a couple, I was just like thank you, epic download by the way and I saw... And I think it's nice openly talking about religion this way, we can see that it's gone far away from the natural and the original intentions. And I saw you like, I can just see you reshare the meme the other day. It tickled me the most of it was just like white Jesus cuddling someone going, "I'm sorry I made you a drug addict. Let me a book before I send you to hell." It just popped me in school I was like doing things that potentially was going down the way of being like condemned and told by teachers, "Well, your stepfather is going to go to hell because he believes in evolution."   Molly Maloof: (24:16) Oh my god, I remember being in sixth grade being like, "I think evolution is real and my school thinks I'm..." But they don't believe in it. Like, holy shit, that was our lives.   Mason: (24:28) Oh man, I got a few pop moments. I was like, "Hang on. So I'm going down this route. Where I'm sinning because I'm trying to think critically here and so now I'm going to go to hell, but you created me in your image and I'm doing? You set me off. You know all, you know I'm going to end up here. And then you're going to send me to hell?" I'm like, "You asshole. You sadist." Anyway, that was my pop.   Molly Maloof: (24:54) What got me to like what really challenged my beliefs when I was 18 was talking to a guy who went to Harvard and messenger, you're in messageboard you're talking to people smarter and older than you. And I remember talking to this guy and he asked me this question. He's like, "How can God be omnipotent, omniscient and omnipresent and how can there be a hell? If he's everywhere all the time all at once? How can it be ever a separation from God because hell is a separation from God?" And I was like, brain explode like oh that's impossible logical, total it felt like this doesn't work, right? Like does that work does not compute. And my brain just exploded I went into the bathroom and cried and cried in front of the mirror. I was like, "Oh my god, it means I'm all alone." I actually still believe in God now, but like my belief in God is much different than the patriarchal God that I grew up.   Molly Maloof: (25:50) I still pray to Jesus because I'm used to it's like a pattern, but I don't think Jesus is the only God. I think there's plenty of Gods you can pray to. But realistically I think that God is like infinite intelligence and beauty underneath everything that whether, and it's totally no gender or God can't have a gender.   Mason: (26:09) I'm going to send you my podcast with George Kavassilas. It's another mind blowing one. It's talking about the God matrix and the universe, the natural, the synthetic it's like really, really clear.   Molly Maloof: (26:25) Oh, cool.   Mason: (26:25) I'll send you because it's a very good one. And you know what, you were saying things that don't work and you know what I like that does work is aphrodisiac. So this is like telling before we move on from that point it's something that really jumped out at me that I really love and I might go a little bit of a tangent because I just wrote about it this kind of topic, this nuance. Yesterday we sent out a newsletter around lion's mane and I'm like I really love Lion's Mane because it's a bridge herb and for so often people are looking at, "I want a nootropic and so they go into a narrow," which is nice sometimes. It's nice to go reductionist. And you go, "I want something that's going to increase output and give me something now and I'm going to use this nootropic in order to get something. And then they eventually fall to Lion's Mane as like a nootropic and the word sits there very medical and very [inaudible 00:27:20], which is nice as well I use it.   Mason: (27:24) But then Lion's Mane is one if you get like a complete non grown on grain, you get one grown on wood, it's got elements of wild to it, all of a sudden you look past the textbook written black and white, in the tropic and you got the same intention here and then you look up at nature and you see, "Wow, my brain is so much more than what I thought it was and the output of my brain and the way the way that it operates in conjunction with my organs in my blood and my outlook in my life, it's connected to where I'm going to be. What I do now is connected to how I'm going to be when I'm 90 years old."   Molly Maloof: (27:59) Totally.   Mason: (28:00) it's not just take something get some output, it's like this pattern you can see the brain function connecting to the constant pattern of like, like the waves in never ending. Internally there are things that are like constantly happening that I can cultivate and work with and look at and ease into that are going to have my brain on the sea of marrow is the Daoists.   Molly Maloof: (28:21) I love that. The sea of marrow.   Mason: (28:26) And the aphrodisiacs are the same like that. And it's a fun one because people go, "Oh, aphrodisiacs great, it'll get your horny." And what you're talking about it's like a carrot that leads like you go and that's what I see. Like how I see Daoist aphrodisiacs as well, like deer antler in your pants.   Molly Maloof: (28:46) Yeah.   Mason: (28:48) Horny goat weed, like epimedium. These herbs cordycep, Eucommia, schisandra. People say the word aphrodisiac, and you go, "Great, okay, cool. I'm going to engage because I want to be horny." And you think there's more substance too, behind it. And then you get onto these aphrodisiacs and you start engaging with your sexuality, and all of a sudden it's an opportunity to connect to yourself and the word aphrodisiac falls away, and you start connecting to the sexuality. And I just heard it, then you're saying we're using aphrodisiacs to go and connect to the sexual trauma so we can connect to ourselves and our partner. And I think it's beautiful. I love it.   Molly Maloof: (29:32) Well, it's actually that the sexual trauma can damage your relationship to sex. So because it actually programmes your brain. There's this thing called the Garcia effect, and it's like when you eat something that makes you sick, you don't want it anymore because your brain associates that with feeling sick. Now not all women or men who have trauma end up with having sexual dysfunction, but a large percentage of women do that. In fact, like somewhere between 60 to 80% of women who had sexual trauma have some form of sexual dysfunction. And like in America, the numbers, which I think are underreported, are like one in five women are raped, one in four women are abused as children, one and three are assaulted in her lifetime. And so there's quite a lot of women who have sexual dysfunction because of the fact that their sexual experience was not pleasant. And it was, in fact, potentially scary and dangerous.   Molly Maloof: (30:26) So now their brain says, "Oh, that experience that's not good. I don't like that. And that's scary." And so it's kind of programmed as a traumatic memory. Now, only 30% of women with sexual trauma end up with PTSD, which is interesting. So there's actually more women with sexual dysfunction, than PTSD from sexual trauma, which is fascinating. So the theory is, is that with MDMA assisted therapy, that the medicine can actually help you revisit the trauma from a place of feeling safe and feeling okay and loved with a partner, preferably with a partner, if you're with someone that you feel safe with. And you can revisit that trauma, and then it gets reprogrammed in your brain, reconsolidated as, "Oh, this is not the worst thing in the world anymore." This is not something I need to like, fear or be afraid of anymore. That was just an event that happened. And in fact I think the real magic will come from when women can experience pleasure, again, through psychedelic medicine. As I did.   Mason: (31:32) How ironic that there's an aphrodisiac involved in that process.   Molly Maloof: (31:36) Well, you think, right? You think that like, that would make sense. It's just funny. I think we're just beginning to understand space. But I don't know if people even though this, but there's actually like three phases of neurobiology of love. The first is like the intense sex drive, which is like, our body is designed to get us to fuck a lot of people when you're young. Actually, the sex drive is like oestrogen and testosterone. And then like, you're horny, and you're young, and you want to have sex, and not everybody does. A lot of young people aren't these days, but the point is, is that it's designed to get you to be turned on and attracted to a lot of people. And then when you meet someone and you have sex with them, what happens is, is that you start activating other hormones. So dopamine starts getting released, oxytocin gets released after orgasm, and that can actually increase the attachment to this person.   Molly Maloof: (32:29) So especially in women particular. So then we start moving on to romantic love, which is actually an attachment device that's designed like we really evolved it in order to basically bond ourselves to someone, become obsessed and addicted to someone, so that we're more likely to have a baby with that person. And then keep that baby alive long enough that they will not die, right? And so the romantic love starts to switch over to pair bonding. And pair bonding is actually designed to keep that baby alive and family unit strong. Because pair bonding hormones are very similar to familial bonds. Like they think it's all mostly oxytocin vasopressin. So like, you actually look at the neurobiology of all this. It's highly adaptive, and it's a huge survival advantage to have love in your life, huge survival advantage to find someone to care about them. You're more likely to reproduce, you're more likely to make a child and a family and you're more likely to have a healthy family if there's healthy bonds.   Molly Maloof: (33:26) And so I think that we should be really looking at these things from the lens of science because a lot of what's happening in society today because I think technology is seeing these bonds decay, we're seeing people give up their marriages. We're seeing people walk away from long term relationships, and we're seeing families affected and children affected. And one of the main adverse childhood experiences a kid will have is divorce. So I'm just like, "Fuck, why are we not looking at these fundamental facets of society and saying, gosh, why can't we do better?" And maybe there's a way we can do better that's ethical, and that's honourable and that's scientifically sound and that will actually leave people better off and we found them. But again, this is like very much new territory. I don't think anybody has tried to do this or thought about doing this. And I'm actually giving you a lot of information that I like is going to keep kind of quiet but whatever you like might as well announce it to like your community first.   Mason: (34:20) Yeah. I think we're worth the drop. It's interesting, it's such a return to the natural. And I've been using that a lot because I feel like I'm saying for the matrix. I'm like nailing all over the bloody place at the moment like people.   Molly Maloof: (34:36) All the time.   Mason: (34:39) And it's so confronting for people which and I agree, as a system we haven't... What you're doing is going like, "Screw it, go to the core and think, multiple generations around leading to the core. Like, let's look at the divorce rates, let's look at the unhappiness and the lack of love in relationships and how that impacts ourselves and children." And I think about it a lot. And it gives me that raw, even talking about it now, there is tingling and there's a rawness and a raw excitement, when you know you're actually in the right place. But it's very confronting, looking at just how much healing there is to be done.   Molly Maloof: (35:18) Yeah. Well, someone told me when I was like, everyone was like, "No one's going to invest in this, and no one's going to do this. And this is crazy." I know, actually, I have a lead investor. So if investors are listening, I'm about to fundraise. So you should probably email me because it's going to be really good. It's going to be a really exciting time in the next few months because I'm actually going to be-   Mason: (35:37) I think I have like, probably $400 liquid at the moment.   Molly Maloof: (35:45) I'm not going to take your last $400. But maybe we could do something with-   Mason: (35:47) But that's not the last 400. We're being responsible in other areas.   Molly Maloof: (35:50) ... Lion's Mane. Yeah. No, but it's interesting. So like, I have a lot of people from biotech say, "This is absolutely never going to happen. It's impossible. Don't even try." And then I had a lot of people who are starting biotech companies say, "Fuck, if this problem is as big as you describe it is, then I'm pretty sure we should be throwing like a billion dollars at this." And I was like, "Fuck. Yeah, dude. Totally."   Mason: (36:16) Absolutely. Is there a market for this? If the people who would poohing it are probably the ones that just can't look in the mirror and be like, "I am the market." It's like, it's in your backyard. It's everywhere. Every time you go to a family reunion, every time you go to bed.   Molly Maloof: (36:40) I shouldn't say this out loud, but family members of mine-   Mason: (36:43) Just say it in a monologue.   Molly Maloof: (36:44) Yeah. I know my family story pretty well. I like deconstructed all of our problems at this point. I've plugged my computer in. And having deconstructed a lot of these problems, and really examined the people in my family who struggle with different problems. In my extended family, in particular, like my aunt and my grandmother, and just people I know. There's a lot to be said about early relationships, and about how important families are to the long term health of children. And when things go wrong in families, it can really, really hurt people long term. And I just looked at like, my great, great grandparents and their relationship with my grandmother. And I looked at my grandmother's relationship with her daughters, and I just looked at all this, and I was like, "Wow there's so many things that we don't realise that if we just fix that one thing, right, then it would have transformed the entire rest of a person's life."   Molly Maloof: (37:59) But there's a lot of things, we don't have solutions for. A lot of things we don't have pathways for, and a big one of those is healing trauma. And I recently did about 21 hours of deep, deep neuro somatic trauma healing from a friend of mine who's like a super gifted healer. And I can't explain in scientific terms what he did with me, but I do know one thing, and that's that we do not do a good job in our society, helping people who have trauma, heal, and express it immediately right over this happened. In fact, the medical system typically, when a girl has raped, she'll basically get a rape kit, and maybe sent to a psychologist. And if she's lucky, she'll get in, in a few months. And it's like, we don't actually have pathways for healing and caring for kids who've had major... I saw this, by the way, in health care system. I saw kids who were abused by their parents. And they go to social workers, and they kind of handed around the foster care system.   Molly Maloof: (39:00) And it's really crazy how much people experienced trauma in society. And there's really not a lot of good solutions besides talk therapy. And if talk therapy worked so well, we probably not be seeing so many problems. Like if talk therapy was like a really effective solution for all of our problems, we'd probably be seeing a lot of problems solved. Now I'm not saying talk therapy doesn't work.   Mason: (39:23) It doesn't pop the champagne. I think that's where I'm with you on that. I'm at the point in my journey where I'm like talk therapy with someone who's got a Jungian background is like perfect for me because I went so hard on psychedelics. And so I'm loving just the groundedness of it. But to get it going-   Molly Maloof: (39:36) Totally. I'm not saying it doesn't work. I think talk therapy is very much like working on your consciousness, right? Your conscious brain. Everyone actually need to talk therapy in order to fundamentally create sense, sense making around their life experience. Like that's the best thing it does. Is it creates a framework of understanding of like, "This happened to me, this happened to me, this happened to me and I understand why, and I understand how I dealt with it." And I'm trying to do a better job at it, right? But I think what's really more interesting about like, what's happening in psychedelic medicine is what's on a subconscious and the unconscious level, right? Like hypnotherapy does a pretty decent job at getting into the subconscious level.   Molly Maloof: (40:27) But what's fascinating is like all this stuff that's buried in the unconscious, right? That comes out in your dreams, that comes out in your... A lot of people have nightterors. That is most definitely a bunch of unconscious process trauma, like unprocessed trauma that needs to be like addressed. And I don't think people see it that way. They're just like, "Oh, it's a nightmare disorder." It's like, "No, you probably have like a major unresolved trauma from your childhood that you really should look at." And oftentimes, I know, multiple people who've taken psychedelics, and it just comes up to them. They're like, "Oh, my God, I was raped in high school by a few guys." And it just like comes up. Or they're like, "Oh, my God, I was sexually assaulted as a child." And this stuff comes up underneath because it's lifted out of the subconscious and unconscious.   Molly Maloof: (41:21) And that's what we don't talk enough about in like modern medicine. And even like psychology, I think, is this like, "Oh, wow," like everybody has deep trauma. But if you do have deep trauma, and it's like running in the background, it's like malware, it's just draining your energy. It's draining CPUs, it's actually playing a huge role in your behaviours and your triggers and how you interact with people. And if it's not looked at or addressed, and especially if they're things like internal family systems, like there's a lot of good forms of talk therapy that can really do a good job of bringing you back to your childhood or bringing you back these moments. And I don't even think drugs are completely necessary to get to these places. Meditation is also a phenomenal tool that a lot of people don't take advantage of. And there's a bunch of different types of meditation that are fairly obscure that can do a great job at helping people get underneath the surface of their pain.   Molly Maloof: (42:11) But a lot of this stuff is isn't mainstream. And it's a shame because a lot of people are still just like, "Where do I go to deal with all this stuff?" Most of the stuff that's worked really well for me has been very obscure stuff that I have had to find through word of mouth. And it's like not highly advertised experiences and therapies and meditation schools and it's like a lot more on the realm of like woo, but it works these things have worked. And it's like strange to me that they're not more well studied and in the mainstream.   Mason: (42:46) Yeah. We've got such a wide array of people with such a wide array of histories at different stages in their processes. And there's naturally going to be different therapies and different angles that are going to pierce the veil to whatever is sitting there behind the curtain in the subconscious and I definitely, like for me it was like personal development back in the day going like you know landmark forum was like one of the things to kind of like a bang. And I could see behind it and then okay that lost its relevance at some point. And then psychedelics became very relevant, got me probably went a little bit too hard into identifying with that community and the mannerisms around taking medicine and like that feeling like I finally belonged rather than doing the work. And then getting beautiful lessons and now it's like getting to the point where talk therapy for me 10 years ago just would have been like I think just sort of lapping up against a great wall.   Mason: (43:48) Whereas now I know how to scale that concrete wall, and I know what it looks like when I do connect to the subconscious. And I understand my processing bringing it out and what my process is, thanks to the work I did with psychedelics. I know how I'm going to bring that into awareness in my everyday and that's when personal practise comes in. That's where I know to the extent of like, with my exercise regime, I know keeping me strong enough and healthy enough to be able to handle staying in that space, where I can constantly acknowledge that part of me that wants to hide behind that veil and run everything. And I know someone like Tani she's like, there was a point where psychedelics were like, incredible. She goes, "I know I need that." And then she's like, "I don't need that anymore." And my meditation practise is exactly where I need to be and that's where I'm going to get the biggest bang.   Mason: (44:39) Not that it's about a bang, but she's going to get the rubber hitting the road. So I think that's like that integration because you see a lot of people in the psychedelic world, kind of pooh poohing therapy going like modern therapies like this domesticated little dog and psychedelics are this big dog in terms of what it can do. And it's like, true in one context, and in another context, if it's just integrated, you have an array of ways of approaching as you're talking about them. Then all of a sudden, the approach becomes multicoloured and multifaceted. And hopefully, it becomes more effective.   Molly Maloof: (45:16) I really think that we just maybe just need to marry them more. Even like MDMA assisted therapy today, is largely like, hands off. It's largely don't talk to the patient, let them do, they have their own experience, and let them do whatever they need to do to heal, it's not really guided at all. It's mostly kind of like, it's guided, but it's not really like lead. It's like, you're there. You're like going through this process, and you're having these experiences, but they're not actually trying to get you to go anywhere on your trip, they're trying to let you have your experience. Whereas like, I think that, in particular, it may be possible that like, we can give people medicine that gives them have the... I think that the idea is that you have the preparation. And then you have the creating the right set and setting. And then you take the medicine, and then you have this like deep integration experience. And that's typically what the experiences for psychedelic assisted therapy today. The question is, will the FDA let us give people drugs that turn them on unsupervised?   Molly Maloof: (46:26) Because you kind of need to be a little bit... You don't really want anyone watching you while you are with your partner. So I got a lot of questions, I need to figure out to make this thing, an actual proper model. But I think that it'll be really interesting to see how this thing evolves because I'm at the very beginning of this journey. I have an idea of what I think that this business model could look like. I have no idea what I think this therapy could be. But a lot of it is I'm like figuring it out, right? I'm like in this total creative mode of what will the future of medicine look like, if you could create it from scratch? And I've already done this once, and it turned out really great for me. And I could easily have just gone and scaled personalised medicine clinics for wealthy people. But now I'm like, "Let's see if we can create a democratised version of this medicine that actually is like it's going to start out expensive, but let's figure out how we can make this something that's eventually affordable for people." That's the goal.   Mason: (47:28) I think the other thing, that's why it feels like a safe bets. And interesting way to put it, but it makes sense, and has substance is because I think a lot of people approach this, and what we've always been taught how to do, lecture people on how they should be, and I'm going to create a product based on how I think you should act. Whereas what you're talking about, is going there's, let's say we're looking at, like morality around let's stay in our marriage, so that we don't destroy this family unit. There's a way that, that's been happened, we've been told what to do by the media. And therefore the part of us goes, if someone goes you have to stay on your marriage because it's the morally right thing to do. You're bad if you do that, there's no attraction there because it's an external like judgement , and we want to revolt against being told what to do, especially by society.   Mason: (48:31) It's why we get your rage against the machine, etc. And then, if you just understand the patterns that emerge when people do connect back to themselves, and do deal with their trauma within a relationship, what's natural for people and seems to be the pattern is people do naturally resonate with maintaining the relationship that they've chosen or maybe in some instance. Like a very conscientious uncoupling in a way that you're very connected and aware to the way that children are going to be affected by it and minimising that impact. Either way, there's an emergence of morality an emergence of ethics, rather than being told what to do.   Molly Maloof: (49:19) Yeah. There's emergence of just like, knowing what's right and wrong. Like, "Oh, yeah. We're not meant to be together. But we're also not meant to destroy each other's lives as we get divorced." I think if we were to be able to help people stay together, that would be ideal. But if we're also able to help people consciously uncouple in a way that doesn't destroy their lives. And I've heard this from multiple people, like one of my friends did MDMA with his ex wife when they were getting divorced and it completely transformed the divorce process because they were actually able to love each other through the process, and they're now really good friends. They're like super good friends. They just didn't want to be married. And it's like, that's appropriate, right? Like, it's also appropriate not to hate people for years. Just the number of people I know that have deep seated resentment for their exes. And it's like, that's not healthy for your nervous system, that's not healthy for your long term health. That's not going to keep you well.   Mason: (50:20) So we've both dived into exploring what health is, especially in the context of, and in this what we're talking about in this context of like synthetic morality, versus what emerges as right. I've just started in the last few months really feeling icky about the way I've used the word health and the way it's been used because it's natural, if you talk about healthy, then naturally, there's an opposition of unhealthy there. And so much of what's implied is basing yourself on, "I'm healthy because I'm not that." And so there's this intrinsic opposition, that... An opposition and kicking back against something in order to form identity around health. And we need the word because healthy, it's just a fun word that everyone knows. But kind of similar and synonymous with what we're talking about, and the emergence of morality and the emergence of ethics coming just through whether it's psychedelic therapy or whatever, how are you relating to health now?   Mason: (51:28) Because I definitely am finding, the more I move away from being wrapped in and around that world of being healthy versus unhealthy, and the more I kind of sit in that middle and see. What's emerging through the patterns of myself doing, I don't know, finding harmony for myself, delving into my shit, coming out the other side. Doing things that are maybe I've seen is unhealthy in one way, in one ideological circle. So I want to talk about dropping that coming back to what emerges within me. It makes the space, I don't know, I feel very roared and identified in terms of, even though we're leaders in the health space, I feel very, unidentified with anything that revolves around that word healthy. I'm curious as to where you're at, in your relationship to what is healthy.   Molly Maloof: (52:25) I used to think it was what the WHO said, which was like the complete absence of disease or infirmary. And then I was like, "No, it's not realistic." Health is actually a dynamic function of life. And to me, I have a very unique perspective on how I think, and it all stemmed from this other definition, that was the ability to adapt and self managed in the face of adversity. But I started digging under the surface, and I really started understanding things like biology, and fundamental human anatomy, and microbiology and physiology and molecular and cellular biology. And I was really thinking about it from like a mechanistic perspective as well. And I think that if you actually just look at any system, you can ask how healthy a system is based on its capacity. And whether it's able to perform its functions properly, basically, whether it's able to maintain its integrity of its structure. And that's usually a function of how much energy and how much work capacity is available.   Molly Maloof: (53:31) So, for example, the healthcare system, deeply unhealthy in America. Demands outspent capacity and it just completely started crumbling, right? Like just did not work, was not resilient, was not flexible, it was actually really struggling and breaking a lot and a lot of people have been broken through the experience of going to the healthcare system. So capacity and demands, if there's more capacity than demands, you're usually in a really good healthy state because you have enough energy to maintain the structure to do work. Now, when your demands are really high, and your capacity is really low, shit starts to break down. And so this is like the mitochondrial theory of ageing, which is fundamentally that when we lose about 50% of our functional capacity of organs, they start to malfunction, they actually start producing the ability to do the work functions that they had. And then we start to break down.   Molly Maloof: (54:27) And largely this is driven by metabolic dysfunction and stress. And like lack of exercise is really a big huge driver of disease because it's the number one signal for making more energy. So basically, I look at how we... If you actually think about like the biology of like metabolism, when we breathe air, we drink water, we eat food, it goes into our cells, it gets turned into substrates, those get put into the mitochondria, which are like little engines that could of our cells, and they have this called the electron transport chain which pulls off electrons kind of like power line. Like electrons are running through this electron transport chain. And they're powering this hydrogen turbine that creates an electrochemical gradient. And that gradient creates a battery and a capacitor. So a battery is like a differential charge between two, it's like a charge polarity. And then the capacitor is like a differential charge between two late membranes.   Molly Maloof: (55:22) And then so capacitors can deploy energy quickly. Batteries store energy as potential energy. So when you really look at it, like most people have broken their metabolisms in modern society, there's so many people with diabetes, so many people with heart disease, somebody with cancer, so many people with dementia. And those are really symptoms of broken metabolism, broken mitochondrial function. And it's funny because like, we look at all these things as separate diseases, but actually, they have the same root causes and like half of cancers are made up of metabolic in nature. So everyone's been kind of obsessed with this like, DNA and genetics theory of ageing. I'm just so unconvinced because it's kind of like, okay, that's like the architectural plans of the body. But in order to actually express those plans, you need energy. You actually need to make energy to take the plants and turn into a structure, which is proteins, right?   Molly Maloof: (56:15) So my perspective is that, like life is this interplay between energy matter and information. And essentially, like life itself, is negative entropy. So we're just constantly trying to fight against entropy, and the best way we know how to do that is like, maintain our functional capacity and be able to repair ourselves. And so this lack of being able to repair ourselves is often a function of the fact that a lot of people are just like, the biggest complaint in medicine is, "I'm tired," right? Being tired all the time is actually a reflection of energetic inefficient, insufficient energy production.   Mason: (56:56) Is that in particular with like the battery storage as you work-   Molly Maloof: (56:59) Yeah, exactly.   Mason: (57:00) Which is funnily used when you talk about, like his Yin and Yang.   Molly Maloof: (57:05) Yes. There you go. Right? We need time off to store energy. The most interesting thing about the Yin and Yang, is that there's this clear relationship between this toggling of switching between different states in biology to flourish. So you actually have to go from intense work to relaxation or rest. You have to go for ideally if you actually just look at all the best [inaudible 00:57:30] stressors, it's like, hyperoxia hypoxia breathwork. What is that? It's breathwork. Right? If you look at cold and heat, that's sauna and coal plant right? What are these things work so damn well, for making us feel healthy and feel good? Well, they're literally boosting mitochondrial biogenesis. And in some cases, like eating fasting is my toffee G, right? It's throwing-   Mason: (57:53) Being awake, being asleep.   Molly Maloof: (57:56) Being outside being indoors, like we actually need to spend way more time outdoors than we're doing. And like being in buildings and having your feet grounded into the earth, like being alone being with people, like life is this constant interplay, right? Yeah, there you go.   Mason: (58:14) That was earthing that I just mumbled.   Molly Maloof: (58:16) Yeah. So like today I've been experimenting with like different ways of movement throughout my day because I'm kind of sick of being in front of the computer constantly. And it makes me feel really unhappy. And there's this great meme you posted, feel dead inside, go outside. Fucking love that meme. And it's like, everybody loved that meme. I got it posted so many times. And it was like, actually, I spent two hours today on phone calls outside. And like, people get annoyed when you're not on a Zoom call. But I'm like, "Look, if I can walk, I will walk." And I got two separate workouts and that were like about 10 minutes each in the gym that were like broken up throughout the day. And it's like, holy shit, did I feel better today than I did for like many other previous days where I was just in front of a computer the whole time? Like, we're not meant to be in front of screens all day long. It's not healthy.   Molly Maloof: (59:06) It's not a healthy period. So the more that we can try to align our lives as much as possible with something with how we're actually like primitively programmed because our genes have not evolved since primitive times. We're the same genetically, there's been a few changes, but fundamentally, we're basically the same people as we were in hunting and gathering times. So it's no question that we've lost a lot of our health in the process of becoming more modern because we basically hijacked all of these different pathways that are actually ancient pathways of survival that are now being used to take advantage of people. Like the salt, sugar and fat in foods, the convenience of cars, right? Like humans are designed to conserve energy and to find food.   Molly Maloof: (59:53) So the society is now designed to like make everything ultra convenient, and eat too much. And it's like, okay. We don't move our bodies enough, we drive everywhere, we know what that's done to society. And so it's kind of like the real process of becoming a truly modern human is to actually try to like life according to your genetics, while also existing in a modern culture. It's a huge challenge.   Mason: (01:00:19) Can be a great thing. This is like the Daoist and the Yogi's would need to go outside of society to go and live in a cave so their life could revolve a

All Things Crime
Protecting the Most Vulnerable In Society From Sex Predators - Jim Clemente Part 3

All Things Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:43


BONUS! Hear Jim describe the funniest incident he experienced as an FBI agent, and it has nothing to do with crime! But before that, Jim and Jared discuss the West Memphis 3, which is a tragic case where three 8yr old boys were murdered, and three young men were accused and sentenced to serve decades in prison for a crime they didn't commit.Stranger Danger! That's what many parents teach their children. Is it a good idea? Is it reality? The short answer is no. WHY? Because most child abusers are NOT strangers! So how do we talk to our kids about sex, how to avoid abuse and avoid pitfalls? Jim and Jared discuss it!Why does Hollywood and the Media glamorize sexual predators, psychopathic pedophiles etc? We all know why. But it's sick and wrong and in the real world it's a major problem and the damage done to children, even teenagers, when they are taken advantage of is incredible. In this extremely important episode Jared talks with Jim Clemente about how kids are groomed and abused by sexual child predators. As Co-Founder of XG Production and Chairman of The Board, Jim Clemente brings to XG decades of experience as an FBI Supervisory Special Agent/Behavioral Profiler and former Prosecutor for the New York City Law Department. During his 22-year career with the FBI, he investigated hundreds of cases, from bank robberies to serial killers. He has also investigated sex crimes, public corruption, white collar and violent crime.Jim began his career in Hollywood as a Technical Advisor for Criminal Minds in 2005. He served as the Technical Adviser and Writer/Producer for the entire 15 yrs of the show. Jim is also a highly acclaimed creator and writer, and was recently nominated for a WGA Award for the highly acclaimed series, Manhunt: Unabomber (Discovery/Netflix), and created the series, The Case Of: JonBenet Ramsey for CBS in 2017. In addition to the company's work in scripted and non-scripted TV and film, XG also produces 3 popular podcasts on iTunes, including Real Crime Profile and Best Case Worst Case. Jim recently published his first book, Without Consent, in 2017 (Rothco Press).For over a decade Jim was an FBI Profiler investigating serial violent and sexual crimes. He is an internationally recognized expert in the fields of Criminal Behavioral Profiling, Child Sexual Victimization, Sexual Homicide and Child Abduction. All Things Crime is a new, comprehensive video series that will explore every aspect of crime and the ensuing investigation, one video interview at a time. The host, Jared Bradley, is the President of M-Vac Systems, which is a wet-vacuum based forensic DNA collection system, and has experience traveling the world training all levels of law enforcement and crime lab DNA analysts in using the M-Vac to help solve crime. Along the way he has met people from all walks of life and experience in investigating crimes, so is putting that knowledge to use in another way by sharing it in these videos.If you are interested in more videos about the M-Vac, DNA and investigations, also check out the M-Vac's channel @https://www.youtube.com/c/MVacSystems...

Curiosity Daily
Muscles Remember Training and a Black Hole Made a Star Explode

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 10:43


Learn how quickly previously trained muscles bounce back after inactivity; and how a black hole made a star explode. Previously trained muscles bounce back after inactivity by Grant Currin Seaborne, R. A., Strauss, J., Cocks, M., Shepherd, S., O'Brien, T. D., van Someren, K. A., Bell, P. G., Murgatroyd, C., Morton, J. P., Stewart, C. E., & Sharples, A. P. (2018). Human Skeletal Muscle Possesses an Epigenetic Memory of Hypertrophy. Scientific Reports, 8(1). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-20287-3  Prior training can accelerate muscle growth even after extended idleness. (2021, August 18). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/925769  Wen, Y., Dungan, C. M., Mobley, C. B., Valentino, T., von Walden, F., & Murach, K. A. (2021). Nucleus Type-Specific DNA Methylomics Reveals Epigenetic “Memory” of Prior Adaptation in Skeletal Muscle. Function, 2(5). https://doi.org/10.1093/function/zqab038  Episode about previous research: https://www.curiositydaily.com/individuals-really-can-slow-climate-change-muscle-memory-is-real-and-penguin-waddles/  A black hole collided with a star and made it explode in a merger-triggered supernova by Briana Brownell Dong, D. Z., Hallinan, G., Nakar, E., Ho, A. Y. Q., Hughes, A. K., Hotokezaka, K., Myers, S. T., De, K., Mooley, K. P., Ravi, V., Horesh, A., Kasliwal, M. M., & Kulkarni, S. R. (2021). A transient radio source consistent with a merger-triggered core collapse supernova. Science, 373(6559), 1125–1129. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abg6037  Stellar collision triggers supernova explosion. (2021, September 2). EurekAlert! https://www.eurekalert.org/news-releases/927166  ‌A Black Hole Triggers a Premature Supernova – First Observation of a Brand-New Kind of Supernova. (2021, September 5). A Black Hole Triggers a Premature Supernova – First Observation of a Brand-New Kind of Supernova. SciTechDaily. https://scitechdaily.com/a-black-hole-triggers-a-premature-supernova-first-observation-of-a-brand-new-kind-of-supernova/  ‌Plait, P. (2021, September 6). So, a star may have eaten a black hole and exploded. SYFY WIRE; SYFY WIRE. https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/so-a-star-may-have-eaten-a-black-hole-and-exploded  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Biohacking Superhuman Performance
Episode 64: A Simple Solution To Hair Loss, Steeped In Science, with Ian Mitchell & Dr. Tami Meraglia

Biohacking Superhuman Performance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 71:23


My guests this week are Tami Meraglia MD and Ian Mitchell. In this episode, Dr. Meraglia, Ian, and I discuss how the Hair Science System works, why it's so successful, what kind of hair loss issues it can resolve (all of them so far), and peptides. Learn more about Hair Science System here. Use discount code BIONAT10 to save 10% on your first order! Ian MItchell is a research scientist, founder, and developer of Neural RX and Hair Science System. He has developed multiple novel therapeutics using Lipofullerenic-Conjugates and holds multiple patents in the field of nano-medicine. Additionally, he developed multiple products focused on the convergence of mobile telecommunications and biomedical engineering, as well as nanofluidic multi-assay systems for use with Lab-on-Chip (LoC) devices, and holds joint patents with the University of Tulsa for viral inhibitors.  Dr. Tami Meragli is the author of the bestselling book The Hormone Secret and the CEO of the Seattle Stem Cell Center and Bio-Renati Stem Cell and Regenerative Center in Puerto Vallarta Mexico, as well as the Hormone Medical Clinic and Hair Science System. Learn more about Hair Science System at https://hairsciencesystem.com/ https://drtami.com/   Thank you to Oxford HealthSpan for sponsoring this episode. Primeadine, by Oxford Healthspan, is the best formulated Spermidine supplement on the market! What makes it stand out – it includes Spermine & Putrescine two other Polyamines that work hand in hand with Spermidine PLUS FOS, a prebiotic to feed the bacteria in your gut that make Spermidine! I take Spermidine daily as do my family and my clients – it has become a solid member of my “foundation stack”. Research has shown that Spermidine upregulates autophagy, helps the immune system to rejuvenate and it protects DNA – visible benefits experienced by myself and my clients include better sleep, hair, skin and nails! Sponsor offer: Visit Primeadine.com and use promo code BIONAT15 to save 15% EPISODE TAKEAWAYS [10:20] About Ian… [13:10] About Dr. Mereglia… [16:25] How Ian and Dr. Mereglia met… [18:00] How important are hormones and nutrition with hair loss? Can one formula alone work for everyone?.. [28:35] What are the different levels to the hair loss program?.. [30:53] Does the Hair Science System work for repigmenting hair?.. [34:00] The program levels: fast, faster, fastest and deep… [39:36] Longhaul syndrome and hair loss… [46:44] Hair Science Systems for post chemotherapy hair loss… [52:10] What is in this secret formula that helps with hair growth?.. [58:00] Should we be worried about getting too much copper with this product? .. [64:05] What's the oldest person that this system has worked for?.. FOLLOW NAT Facebook Facebook Group  Instagram Work with Nat: Book Your 20 MInute Optimization Consult

Crime in Sports
#275 - Eating Your Children & Ears - "Iron" Mike Tyson - Part 3

Crime in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 193:28


This week, we finish off the saga of Mike Tyson, with an action packed episode, covering his "Baddest Man On The Planet" years. The whole thing is full of rage, and terrible impulse control! He grabs women, he kicks men, he punches everyone. But you're lucky to just be punched, because some weren't so lucky, with Evander Holyfield coming away with a little less of his ear, in the process. Lawsuits, accidents, arrests, cocaine... Let's just say that Mike didn't slow down, too much, and we follow him, every step of the way! Punch a woman in the chest & kick a man in the groin, "throw" your Ferrari through a store window, and spit your opponents chewed up body part on to the canvas with "Iron" Mike Tyson!! Check us out, every Tuesday! !We will continue to bring you the biggest idiots in sports history!!  Hosted by James Pietragallo & Jimmie Whisman  Donate at... patreon.com/crimeinsports or with paypal.com using our email: crimeinsports@gmail.com  Get all the CIS & STM merch at crimeinsports.threadless.com  Go to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things CIS & STM!!  Contact us on... twitter.com/crimeinsports crimeinsports@gmail.com facebook.com/Crimeinsports instagram.com/smalltownmurder

Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast
Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast for Monday 10/11/21

Al & Jerry's Postgame Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:05


Al & Jerry Discuss: Running out of gas while driving, Dog poop DNA kits, Advice for going to college with your girlfriend and Trading places with your 19 year old self Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dark Downeast
The Undetermined Death of Marcia Moore

Dark Downeast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 29:11


FROM AWAY, 1979: It took over 10 years for remains found in the woods of Stacyville, Maine to finally be identified. Thanks to a true crime podcast, a listener who trusted her gut, and DNA testing, Mr. Christopher Roof had his identity back.  With a name and a face to a man previously known as the Stacyville John Doe, one Maine reporter was tasked with learning more about Christopher Roof. It started with a survey of property records in Concord, Massachusetts, but Alex MacDougall's search took him far beyond New England to another undetermined death in the same family decades earlier and over 3000 miles away. We're taking a look at the connection Alex MacDougall uncovered and the curious life of Christopher Roof's mother, Marcia Moore. Source material is listed at darkdowneast.com. Follow along on Instagram @darkdowneast. Get 10% off your Ana Luisa order

American Conservative University
Programming of Life. Documentary on Intelligent Design.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 41:13


Programming of Life. Documentary on Intelligent Design.  Watch this beautiful documentary free at- https://youtu.be/00vBqYDBW5s 438,849 views Sep 19, 2011 Programming of Life The highly anticipated sequel "Programming of Life 2: EARTH" is now available to watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPkBE... An exploration of microbiology, information science, and the origin of life. Information is an essential part of our lives. The code that's in every cell, every piece of DNA and all living things. Even though we've made many breakthrough discoveries in science there's still so much more to be discovered. Learn how the most common world view of life's origin, chemical evolution, conflicts with our knowledge of Information Science. Information Science is changing the way we think about all living systems. HELP ACU SPREAD THE WORD!  Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks. Forward this show to friends. Ways to subscribe to the American Conservative University Podcast Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via RSS You can also subscribe via Stitcher FM Player Podcast Addict Tune-in Podcasts Pandora Look us up on Amazon Prime …And Many Other Podcast Aggregators and sites   Please help ACU by submitting your Show ideas. Email us at americanconservativeuniversity@americanconservativeuniversity.com Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks.