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Molecule that carries genetic information

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    Latest podcast episodes about DNA

    Astonishing Legends
    The Somerton Man - Mystery Solved?

    Astonishing Legends

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 128:57


    On December 1, 1948, an unknown man was found lying dead on the sand on Somerton Beach next to the neighborhood of Glenelg, about 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Adelaide, South Australia. He had no money or identification on him, the labels in his clothing were cut off, and his minimal possessions yielded no clues. Further adding to the mystery, a rolled-up scrap of paper with the Persian phrase "tamám shud," translating to "is over" or "is finished," was found in the man's watch pocket around the time of his autopsy. The scrap was later discovered torn from a copy of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, a circa 11th-century collection of poems by Khayyam, known as "the Astronomer-Poet of Persia." The book found tossed into a car after a public appeal by the police appeared to have previous writing indentations on a page adjacent to the torn-out one, revealing a local phone number and text speculated to be a coded message. With no further clues as to the Somerton Man's identity other than an abandoned suitcase left at the Adelaide railway station, a plaster cast was made of the man's bust following the coroner's inquest, and the body was embalmed nine days after its discovery and buried. For almost 74 years, the mystery of the Somerton has intrigued authorities, amateur sleuths, and the general public, including physicist, Electrical and Electronic Engineering professor Dr. Derek Abbott. For over a decade, Dr. Abbott and his team of grad students at the University of Adelaide worked on cracking the code found in the Rubaiyat and attempting to arrange a genetic DNA analysis. In partnership with internationally recognized forensic genealogist Dr. Colleen Fitzpatrick, Abbott and Fitzpatrick announced on July 26, 2022, that they have finally uncovered the identity of Australia's most famous "John Doe." Extracting DNA from chest hairs found in the Somerton Man's plaster cast has led them to a name and an occupation. But will this name lead to solving the remaining puzzle pieces? Pathologists at the time believed he was likely poisoned, but why, and by whom? Was there a Cold War connection, and why did he spend his last day in Adelaide? Circling back to the alternate name for this case, tamám shud, is this mystery really over, is it finished? Visit our webpage on this episode for a lot more information.

    3 Men And A Mystery
    The Colonial Parkway Murders Part 1

    3 Men And A Mystery

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 127:23


    Episode 5 The Colonial Parkway Murders Part 1When 27 year-old Cathy Thomas, and her girlfriend 21 year old Rebecca Ann Dowski were found brutally murdered in October, 1986 inside Cathy's White 1980 Honda Civic along Virginia's idyllic Colonial Parkway, police were at a loss over the brutality and senselessness of the murders. Both women had been bound, strangled, and their throats were cut. Their killer, or killers, had moved their vehicle and pushed it down on embankment towards the water after failing to burn the vehicle using kerosene. Cathy, a stockbroker who had a stellar background as a US Naval academy grad, and Rebecca, a senior at the college of William and Mary, did not seem to have enemies. But a closer look into their background revealed possible motives for the murders. Cathy had essentially been forced out of the Navy because of rules at that time that prohibited gay or Lesbian soldiers from serving in the military. Rebecca also had an ex-boyfriend who was upset with her for leaving him and starting a relationship with Cathy. While there were possible motives for the murders, investigators also needed to consider whether the two women were killed by a random stranger, and were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time. It wouldn't be until more couples were murdered or went missing in the same area, that authorities began to suspect that a serial killer was roaming the Colonial Parkway. But were all of the cases actually connected, and was the same person or persons responsible for all of the cases? In part 1 of our 2 part coverage of the Colonial Parkway Murders, we look very closely at the murders of Cathy Thomas and Rebecca Ann Dowski, aided by Cathy's brother, Bill Thomas, a staunch advocate for not just his sister's case, but all of the familied and cases in the Colonial Parkway series. He has worked tirelessly for over 3 decades trying to get answers in this case, one that remains unsolved to this day, and he shares the bumpy road he's had to travel to get justice; one that often has left him at odds with the investigators working the case, in particular the FBI. We are also joined by DNA expert Suzanna Ryan who shares her insights and expertise regarding the clues and physical evidence left behind by the killer, or killers.If you have information about the Colonial Parkway Murders, please contact the Norfolk FBI at 757-455-0100 or send an e-mail to Colonial_Parkway_Murders@ic.fbi.govTo visit the most comprehensive online resource on the net for the case, visit https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/To contact DNA expert Suzanna Ryan, or learn more about her work, visit her website:http://ryanforensicdna.com/about/Check out a preview at the beginning of this episode for Mind Over Murder, co-hosted by Bill Thomas. https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/To find out how to join us live as we record each new episode of Citizen Detective, follow us on Social Media.Twitter- https://twitter.com/CitizenDPodFacebook Home Page- https://www.facebook.com/CitizenDetectivePodcastFacebook Discussion group- https://www.facebook.com/groups/233261280919915Instagram- https://www.instagram.com/citizendpod/?hl=enYoutube- https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSgvqIuf4-sEF2aDdNGip2wTo support this podcast on Patreon and gain access to ad-free episodes, bonus content, and our after-show 'The Scrum' visit Patreon.com/CitizenDetective Continue the conversation about this case with fellow Citizen Detectives over at Websleuths: https://www.websleuths.com/forums/forums/citizen-detective-true-crime-podcast.719/The Citizen Detective team includes:Co-Hosts- Mike Morford, Naama Kates, and Dr. Lee MellorWriting and Research- Alex RalphTechnical Producer- Andrew GrayProduction Assistant- Ashley Monroe

    Hike: Explore | Wander | Live
    Southern Appalachia is my DNA

    Hike: Explore | Wander | Live

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 7:24


    In this episode Lori shares how even though you may leave a place like Appalachia it exists within your DNA. Hear words from her Father and Lori also shares words from special contributor Patricia Price. Connect with Lori:Instagram: @thehikepodcastTwitter: @thehikepodcastBlog: thehikepodcast.wordpress.comFacebook: @thehikepodcastEmail: hikepodcast@gmail.com Support the show

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
    Balancing a Demanding W2 Position While Creating a High Momentum Investing Business

    How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 20:43


    You don't have to quit your day job to become an investor.   This is what Andrew Schutsky lives by. He is the founder of Redline Equity, LLC and has built 15 years of real estate expertise while enjoying a career as a CIO of a medical technology company. He talks about how he got into multifamily real estate and how they are remaining competitive in the current market, and how he's able to be successful in both real estate and his W2.    [00:01 - 14:55]  1100+ Units and Growing  Andrew shares his journey from house hacking to short-term rentals to multifamily  Finding opportunities in the multifamily space There's still a lot of demand for multifamily  Things are tilting in favor of the buyer Syndicators are becoming conservative Why Andrew is a fan of fixed-rate debt Submarket knowledge is an advantage How to earn “other income” Add value through valet trash and cable and internet packages Talk with the local township to learn about tax abatements   [14:56 - 19:11] Working a Full-Time Job and Investing in Real Estate He talks about how he's bringing technology to real estate and the entrepreneur mindset to his day job Building a team and learning to focus helped him avoid burning out   [19:12 - 20:42] Closing Segment Reach out to Andrew!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes   “It can't just be a guess. It has to be submarket knowledge we apply to win that deal.” - Andrew Schutsky “I think it's what sets me apart from a lot of my peers and my competition is I'm bringing that proprietor, business owner, entrepreneur mindset back to my day job.” - Andrew Schutsky -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Andrew at the Redline Equity website and check out their podcast, blog, and their FREE 8+ part learning series.   Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   [00:00:00] Andrew Schutsky: We're in a couple of submarkets that we know really, really well. We own and operate assets in those markets like Greenville, South Carolina, for example, we got another one locked up right now and we know there's certain things that we go after, and it's very infrequent in today's times that you'll win a deal or we will even get close in the top of the best end funnel with just rent increases. So we're looking at a bucket called other income. Those listing may do very well in this bucket, but that seems to be the differentiating factor for us.  [00:00:38] Sam Wilson: Andrew Schutsky is a passionate multifamily real estate investor who balances ownership in 1100 plus units with a full-time job as a CIO of a medical device company along with also being a family man. Andrew, welcome to the show.  [00:00:50] Andrew Schutsky: Thanks so much, brother. It's a pleasure to be here.  [00:00:52] Sam Wilson: Hey man. Pleasure is mine. There are three questions I ask every guest who comes on the show: in 90 seconds or less, can you tell me where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there? [00:00:59] Andrew Schutsky: Yeah, absolutely. So real estate journey for me has begun back in 2007 and I started before anybody called this house hacking I'm using my air quotes, so they can't see the video. My first home was on the road 50 weeks a year, doing the consulting thing, learned a lot, quickly realized I wasn't utilizing my whole house at the time, put an ad on Craigslist with my wife at the time, or I guess like my fiancée, at the time found really creepy, but it was my entryway into learning what, you know, a house could, is not just a place to live in. It's a source of income. And from there I thought my journey was going to be great. I know I don't want to work for 20, 30 years. I got to start planting some seeds. So I thought I was going to do a series of single-family houses, you know, regardless of having, you know, that, that great bonus or stock structure coming up year after year, you run out of money pretty quickly. About a decade later, I found short-term rentals. I still do those and I enjoy them, but same constraints. Regardless, even with one or two really good W2-based incomes or other sources of income, you can only go so fast, fast forward to 2019, found a 60-something page thread on BiggerPockets. You may have heard of that site before around multifamily. It was actually a local guy syndicating, read his story, he was a CPA before and it opened my mind to this whole new world of possibilities, which I can't believe it took me that long to find it. It's almost embarrassing to admit. And from there I kind of went full tilt. You know, 30, 40 books digest every podcast I could listen to nagged anybody who had listened to my questions and joined a mastermind program, got a mentor, went all in, really, and just started to dial in on honing different crafts and just crafting new skills.  [00:02:30] Sam Wilson: That is really cool, Andrew. I love that. So you've been long multifamily since 2019. [00:02:36] Andrew Schutsky: Correct. [00:02:37] Sam Wilson: That's awesome. Okay. Very, very cool. Tell me what, when you say on the, on the short term rental side, you said that that was a tougher business for you to scale just because it was kind of, it was kind of like just a glorified version of a single-family rental.  Is that what I was hearing there? [00:02:50] Andrew Schutsky: Yeah. I, I think what lured me to it is originally we wanted a house at the beach and we're like, okay, the only way we can make sense of this at the time, right? We had one young. And another one on the way. My wife's like, you're absolutely insane. We can't buy a property. I'm like, what if we could make it generate cash? So that was my foray into that. And I'm like, Hey, you know, the pros and cons, there are the pros are you're dealing with happy people. They're on vacation. You're getting paid in advance. There's no such thing as an eviction in that world. But the big con is as houses became, at least in our area and the Northeast in the Jersey side, became very, very expensive. So your down payments and your closing costs could be well over a quarter million dollars. So, you know, unless you're fortunate to already have a running start and have, you know, seven figures to play with and invest, really hard to get beyond the first 2, 3, 4 properties that way, right, within, you know, especially in your early thirties, like we were at the time. [00:03:38] Sam Wilson: Right. Yeah, absolutely. Tell us, what are you guys finding in the multifamily space right now? We're recording this on July 12th, 2022. So this will probably go live sometime mid-August of this year, but tell me, what are you guys finding in the multifamily space right now? That's making sense for you.  [00:03:55] Andrew Schutsky: We're in the Southeast generally Carolinas, Georgia, and even a little bit of the Midwest. Now we've got one property in Louisville. And still, you know, despite rising interest rates, despite all the chaos and the economy, there's a lot of demand still for multifamily. A lot of, you know, institutional and private equity are looking for a stable asset you know, hard, tangible assets to cash flow with tax advantages. And there's still tons of demand for multifamily. With that said, things do seem to be tilting just a little bit in favor of the buyer. You're seeing, you know, maybe not 25, 30 offers, but maybe 5. For the first time ever, I think 30 days ago, I saw the first price adjustment downward or guidance pricing came down. that was kind of actually relieving. You don't want to see terrible things happen in the economy, but also the silver lining of that is you get a little relief and you're not having to go. And it's not a blood bath as much as it was, you know, 60 days ago now. [00:04:48] Sam Wilson: What do you think is driving that? Like, I mean, is that just because projected rents are coming down? Is that just be, I mean, why is that happening?  [00:04:56] Andrew Schutsky: Well, I think we were, you know, in a weird time the past year seeing double-digit rent growth, especially the Southeast and Texas, and even, you know, the entire Sunbelt really, and it's not sustainable, right? I mean, we know income's not keeping up with that. So you start to see, you know, CoStar and others backing down their rent projections. There's no longer, you know, 9%, 10%, or 12% forecasted in every market. Maybe some markets selectively. Sure. But you look at that's starting to stabilize and starting to tail off. And you also look at the drastic rise in interest rates, you know, both in bridged and fixed rate debt. The cost of capital is much higher, right? So people start to get a little nervous. What happens, you know, therefore, you know, us and others, and a lot of other syndicators are starting to be a little bit more conservative with their exit cap projections. So that in turn is going to soften your offers a little bit.  [00:05:42] Sam Wilson: Right. Yeah, absolutely. And that's something that, I guess, let me ask you that as a nuance question on an exit cap projection, are you guys underwriting refinances anywhere in your deals, right now?  [00:05:53] Andrew Schutsky: Never have, and probably never will, unless there's a very unique circumstance to do so. [00:05:57] Sam Wilson: Got it. I like that answer. That's something that we commonly see in deals where it's like, Hey, you know, we're going to refinance, especially a couple of years ago when we felt like things were more predictable, like, okay, we're going to refinance three to five years from now or whatever it is. So, yeah, that answers the question. You're just not doing it.  [00:06:13] Andrew Schutsky: I know it's a, it sounds like a clear-cut answer and it is. I just it's not my philosophy. It's not any of my partner's philosophy to count on that, right? I don't have a crystal ball. I mean, I love to say, yeah, interest rates are going to be 1% higher at the end of the year, but you really don't know that. It'd be great. We always look at that as a scenario. What does that look like? But I never will make that our primary business case. I look at it like I'm investing a hundred percent of my own cash to buy a property. Just like if my investors are in or not, I look at it as like, I want to be as certain as I can be, right, and I know I can't predict interest rates. No one can, right, so I don't want to count on that as a variable.  [00:06:45] Sam Wilson: Right, that was going to be my question was how are you compensating, especially right now for the complete unknown of where in the world or interest rate going. That's how you figure it out or how you build that in you just don't. [00:06:56] Andrew Schutsky: And I'm being, I may be in the minority here, but I'm a big fan of fixed-rate debt. I know it does hurt cash flow. I know there's prepayment involved in, in years, you know, one and two, and it may inhibit your ability to exit early. But I really like that. Maybe I'm a little bit of old school and you know, I'm a little bit of old soul that way. I like that stability, my investors like that stability. So whenever possible, and it doesn't completely crush the deal. I, I really like, especially in today's times the fixed rate product.  [00:07:20] Sam Wilson: While we're on this topic. Tell me about this. How are you guys underwriting deals and getting 'em to make sense right now? Like, what's your guys' unique proposition when you guys acquire an asset?  [00:07:32] Andrew Schutsky: Well, I will tell you there's no magic bullet and there's still the majority of the deals that don't make a lot of sense, but. The few that do we're in a couple of submarkets that we know really, really well. We own and operate assets in those markets like Greenville, South Carolina, for example, we got another one locked up right now and we know there's certain things that we go after. And it's very infrequent in today's times that you'll win a deal or we'll even get close in the top of the best end funnel with just rent increases. So we're looking at a bucket called other income. Those listing may do very well in this bucket, but that seems to be the differentiating factor for us. If we're, you know, even close, remotely close, we start at looking at things like valet trash, cable and internet packages. And again, there's small things, but when you collectively add them up, it could be 50, a hundred dollars a month. And that can be the difference between winning or losing a deal. So again, that other income bucket has been a huge factor. Things like tax abatements and looking, working with the township or, you know, especially affordable housing. There's some things at play there. So you got to really know the submarkets to know if they're viable or not. And I always look, you know, of course. It's as competent as we are looking to have, you know, one or two of our property managers also verify, yeah, this makes sense. We've been planting this out. It's been proven elsewhere. So it can't just be a guess. It has to be submarket knowledge we apply to win that deal.  [00:08:44] Sam Wilson: Breakdown valet trash for me. I don't even know what that means.  [00:08:47] Andrew Schutsky: Yeah. It's actually not commonly known. I learned it from another partner that implemented it on dozens of properties and it's basically they'll come and pick up your trash at the door and bring it out for you. It sounds simple, but it could be $20, $25 a month, but that might be the difference between winning and losing. And it's almost always received very well at properties from what we've seen.  [00:09:07] Sam Wilson: And it's amazing to me what people are willing to pay for. 25 bucks a month. Okay. So you're telling me I don't have to walk my trash out and, and again, it depends on, I guess you're in the Southeast, so it's not even like it's, you know, three feet of snow because I guarantee, my wife and I would probably be stroking the 25 bucks a month. It's like, okay, it's zero outside. So yes, only $25, but in the Southeast, it's not, like, but people pay for it.  [00:09:33] Andrew Schutsky: Well, especially if you look at it, like some of the workforce housing we're in, these guys work a really long day, maybe second or third shift are exhausted. They're like, you know what, it's just not worth the hassle. Maybe you've got two or three young kids at the house. Just one of those things like, wow, this is something that, you know, is a small burden on you, but Hey, I'm exhausted. I don't want to spend time, I don't enjoy walking down three, four flights of stairs waiting for the elevator. Hey, you know, it doesn't work for everybody. We've had a lot of success with it.  [00:09:59] Sam Wilson: And that is an almost expense free, like, value add, like it's not even capital. There's no CapEx in it.  [00:10:08] Andrew Schutsky: No, a lot of times you can get the maintenance crew that's already on in-house to do that.  [00:10:12] Sam Wilson: Right, right. I love stuff like that. Anyway, that you can add value to a property without incurring, you know, more cost to do so, I mean, that just pads the bottom line right away. That's what we're doing right now in the RV resort space where it's like, we can add dynamic pricing and online booking for, I mean, it costs us a little bit, but not much. There's no infrastructure. We're not, you know, repaving drive aisles and adding sites and everything else. It's like, this is really very simple. And yet it changes the performance of a property dramatically. So I love stuff like that. Tell me about the bundle when you said bundled internet TV, things like that.   [00:10:48] Andrew Schutsky: Yeah, a lot of times we'll look to, and this is, I think probably more commonly known, this isn't such a, you know, well-kept secret, but you can go and get a larger bulk agreement with a service provider, like an Xfinity or whoever is happens to be in your area and negotiate, hey, I would like to buy a hundred packages at $35 a month. Tenants on their own might buy it for $70 a month. We sell it for 55 to 60, again, 10, 20, 30 bucks here and there adds up, right? So it just, again, it's, it's a win-win for the tenant and for us, like we get a little bit of the commission there and the bulk, you know, economies of scale and the tenant saves money, you know, versus the individual packages. [00:11:22] Sam Wilson: Right, right. Have you seen those, which we've done it at one of our properties, and there's another episode here on this podcast where I interview the company that actually handles this, but where the utility company via mostly the internet company, internet and TV will pay you as the property owner for the right to be on your property. Have you seen that? [00:11:42] Andrew Schutsky: We've underwritten deals that that was the case. We don't own any and operate already now, but yes, absolutely have seen that in the past. The same with even renting, renting space on the top of the building for a cell phone tower, like that can be common or something. Seriously. I mean, that can be a huge money maker.  [00:11:57] Sam Wilson: Sometimes the cell towers are worth more than the building.  [00:11:59] Andrew Schutsky: Correct.  [00:12:00] Sam Wilson: When you, when you look at those leases yeah, you don't realize, and again, we've had, you know, I've had Meir Waldman come on the show here, who is, you know, kind of the cell tower lease guy. And we talked all about that. It was like, oh my gosh, like there's more money in the cell tower lease than there is in the sale of the building. This is madness. So that's absolutely interesting. Tell me the last comment you made though said you guys are working on our tax abatements. How are you guys figuring it out? This is why I need you to correct me. When I look at a property, I go, okay, there's a, you know, multifamily property, like certainly there's no tax abatements. There's nothing left there. I mean, that's all been extracted long ago when this was built and, you know, brought online. Tell me why I'm wrong.  [00:12:38] Andrew Schutsky: It depends on the position of the property. A lot of times you're absolutely right. There's not much there. And if there is anything there, usually the broker will pick up the phone. If it's an unmarked property, they'll put it and they'll count on it and the underwriting, the projections that's already factored in, but the true gems are where you work with the township and it could be, you know, either the building already itself as a business already qualifies for this, or maybe as you slightly reposition it, Hey, it's not affordable, now it's affordable housing or based on that distinction, you may now qualify for a new exemption or a tax abatement. So something to look into, talk with that local township, as you get to know a submarket more and more as you start to buy more properties, you may copy and paste from one or the other and apply the same strategy. But if you're brand new to the market, it's worth exploring, 'cause that can save you thousands, hundreds of thousands of dollars over the course of your whole period.  [00:13:22] Sam Wilson: Right, right. Yeah. What I hear you saying is if you could reclassify a property potentially from one to the next. The township may be hard up for, like you said, foreclosed housing below, you know, that's priced 70% of whatever the adjusted median income is. [00:13:36] Andrew Schutsky: Yes.  [00:13:36] Sam Wilson: Cool. [00:13:37] Andrew Schutsky: Or, or, I mean, something we've looked at too is maybe you can designate a portion of it as commercial space. Like you have, you know, a coffee store. We even looked at doing an arcade in a building where you have a percent, it has to be a commercial occupied. And then you now qualify for new exemption or 'cause it brings new jobs to the area. So again, some of these may be a stretch, but it's worth exploring.  [00:13:57] Sam Wilson: Oh, for sure. Is there a consultant that you guys work with to help you kind of explore that? Or is this something just you've self-educated on?  [00:14:03] Andrew Schutsky: This has been a lot of self-education between my partners and I, and a lot of them have been educating me actually. So I'm kind of the student in this scenario, just applying what we've learned.  [00:14:12] Sam Wilson: Man. That's awesome. Thank you for taking the time to break down just some really simple ways. I mean, again, 'cause right now, especially in the multifamily market, people are desperate to find ways to add value to these assets. Like how do we make this make sense? And you've just given us three relatively simple. I say simple 'cause tax abatement still confuses the heck out of me, but you know, relatively simple ways to look at these and go there's there, there may be another way to take this deal down and have it make sense other than just get into a bidding war. [00:14:43] Andrew Schutsky: I mean, in summer you got to be creative these days, right? Unless you're wildly optimistic with your projections most likely to win, you're going to have to either accept lower returns or be really creative as to come up with a higher return, so bottom line.  [00:14:55] Sam Wilson:  Let's shift gears here and talk about your full-time job 'cause you currently work a full-time job as a CIO of a medical device company. What are your plans there?  [00:15:06] Andrew Schutsky: Yeah, so I guess first and foremost, I really enjoy what I do. I know I'm probably in the minority of the guests you have on the show who have a kind of counter on calendar crossing out days, marking the time where they can do this full time. But for me, I actually got, I got a lot of pleasure and enjoyment of my job. I get to travel a lot to cool places. And most importantly, I have a lot of flexibility at work from home when I'm not traveling. So I'm not having to get up at 4:55 AM every day. And if I do, it's so I can spend some time working on my business. So I find there's a lot of good parallels, you know, for example, I work in the technology realm. I love bringing technology through investment portals and websites and marketing and funnels to the investing business. And I love the stuff I learned in investing around just being that critical ROI calculation that you know, that business acumen. I love bringing that to my day job 'cause we look at, you know, managing millions of dollars in budgets and looking at what if I put a dollar in, what do I get back? So I love bringing that acumen and I think it's what sets me apart from a lot of my peers and my competition in the day job, bringing that, you know, proprietor, you know, business owner, entrepreneur mindset back to my day job. So they, they kind of work together really well. [00:16:12] Sam Wilson: That's really, really cool. Tell me, I guess when you look at the technology inside of what you guys are doing in medical sales, what are some things that are lacking in the commercial real estate space? You're like, man, this is a really cool way I can innovate over here in commercial real estate.  [00:16:24] Andrew Schutsky: There's still a lot. I mean, number one, when you look at structuring a deal and marketing a deal and just running all the intricacies and administrative parts of bringing in investors and marketing and then even the day-to-day operations and property management, there's a lot still pen and paper or email back and forth. So I look at things like automation of campaigns, you know, connecting people through, like, it's basically cutting out the manual task. I think that's really awesome. Whether it's the upfront part of like winning a deal and doing DocuSign, you'd be surprised how infrequently that stuff is leveraged, where I bring value to a team by saying, Hey, why aren't we using this? Or why are we do, why are we spending all the time doing this? We're highly paid professionals. We ship, this is a $50-a-month product. We could be saving hours a time. I love just doing simple things like that, like connecting Zappier, for example, to link a Google form back to my active campaign, to automatically create contacts and distribution lists. Just one simple example of what I think that's things are often overlooked.  [00:17:18] Sam Wilson: Right. Yeah. It's funny. I'm, I'm always torn maybe 'cause I can barely use email, right? Like I am, you and I are, are completely opposite ends of the spectrum. Like I suck at using things tech related. [00:17:29] Andrew Schutsky: All good. [00:17:29] Sam Wilson: Lots of help, but I get torn because sometimes like, okay, I do this task and I can get it done really quickly. Just doing it and, you know, trying to figure out how to make the tech work for me becomes more cumbersome than just getting it done. And it's like... [00:17:44] Andrew Schutsky: I think it's important on every team to have a guy or a gal that really understands how to make that less stressful for the rest of the team, right, 'cause without that, like you said, it's just so much easier to throw in the towel and it can be so overwhelming to people who don't have those reps in. So I've been doing this first since I've been four or five years old, where I grew up with like one of the first computers. So it was in my DNA, but I totally recognize for most people it's not. They don't want it to be, and that's completely fine. And actually that's a great value, you know, driver for me that I can help bring to the team.  [00:18:14] Sam Wilson: Absolutely. Absolutely. And last question here for you is let's talk a little bit about the team. How have you effectively scaled your team while working a full-time job? [00:18:22] Andrew Schutsky: Yeah, so for me, you know, it was a little bit of trial and error in the beginning, right, wanting to do everything, jump in and, and find my own deals and underwrite them, myself, and marketing myself. And I, I just found that wasn't effective. It was a quick way to burn out. So I've kind of dialed in. Let me just focus on, for the next year or two, becoming really good at one thing. Right now that happens to be investor relations, raising capital, you know, building decks and doing due diligence. Like I'm not going out. I'm actually stopped going to try to find my own deals. New market partners that I trust, I've got a few deals under my belt now. I knew who I trust. I know what I want out of a deal. I know what I don't want to be doing. I don't know what I'm not good at. Let me focus on what I'm good at. And then maybe a couple of years from now, I'll revisit and start to expand that repertoire. And maybe there comes a time where I'm doing this, you know, 40, 50, 60 hours a week on my own, and maybe I will still go back to the broker thing, but for now, just dialing in on what I'm good at and just continue to work that path.  [00:19:11] Sam Wilson: Man, that's fantastic. Andrew, thank you for taking the time to come on this show today. I certainly appreciate it. I've learned a heck of a lot from you, you know, talking about really easy ways to add income and value to properties that are maybe a little bit off the beaten path. We talked about your transition, you know, from house hacking into short-term rentals, and then finally discovering multifamily in 2019. And you also shared with us, you know, why you love your job. I think it's really cool that you're like, Hey man, I love what I do and I'm going to continue doing it, and maybe someday I'll transition out. That's not the comment, like you said that you or I probably hear very often where it's like... [00:19:42] Andrew Schutsky: That's right.  [00:19:43] Sam Wilson: I just kind of like what I'm doing. So if it ain't broke, don't fix it. So absolutely, and then you know, talking about the tech stack and what it means to bring technology to a deal. I think you've shared with us some really cool things today, and I certainly appreciate it. If our listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?  [00:19:59] Andrew Schutsky: Best way to go straight to our website, everything funnels through there, contact, we've got the podcast in there. It's investwithredline.com. Company is Redline Equity. We've got blogs and we've got, more importantly, a free 8-part investing course. Go check it out, sign up, and follow us.  [00:20:13] Sam Wilson: Awesome. Andrew, thank you again. Certainly appreciate it.  [00:20:15] Andrew Schutsky: No problem, brother. Great talking to you.

    The Gary Null Show
    The Gary Null Show - 08.12.22

    The Gary Null Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 60:17


    Moderna Clinical Trials Terribly Flawed — and FDA Knew It, Former Pharma Executive Tells RFK, Jr. South African FM: ‘Patronizing bullying' not acceptable Prescription Playground: Why so many children are now taking ADHD drugs | 60 Minutes Australia   HEALTH NEWS Chili peppers for a healthy gut: Spicy chemical may inhibit gut tumors How Tart Cherries Reduce Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Uncovering the links between diet, gut health and immunity Southern-style diet ‘increases death risk' in kidney disease patients Could Hibiscus Tea be Better than High Blood Pressure Drugs? Can breast milk feed a love of vegetables? Chili peppers for a healthy gut: Spicy chemical may inhibit gut tumors University of California, San Diego   August 1, 2022 Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin — the active ingredient in chili peppers — produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors. The receptor or ion channel, called TRPV1, was originally discovered in sensory neurons, where it acts as a sentinel for heat, acidity and spicy chemicals in the environment. TRPV1 was quickly described as a molecular ‘pain receptor.'  But Raz and colleagues have found that TPRV1 is also expressed by epithelial cells of the intestines, where it is activated by epidermal growth factor receptor or EGFR. EGFR is an important driver of cell proliferation in the intestines, whose epithelial lining is replaced approximately every four to six days. “These results showed us that epithelial TRPV1 normally works as a tumor suppressor in the intestines,” said de Jong. In addition, molecular studies of human colorectal cancer samples recently uncovered multiple mutations in the TRPV1 gene, though Raz noted that currently there is no direct evidence that TRPV1 deficiency is a risk factor for colorectal cancer in humans. The current study suggests one potential remedy might be spicy capsaicin, which acts as an irritant in mammals, generating a burning sensation in contact with tissue.  The researchers fed capsaicin to mice genetically prone to developing multiple tumors in the gastrointestinal tract. The treatment resulted in a reduced tumor burden and extended the lifespans of the mice by more than 30 percent. The treatment was even more effective when combined with celecoxib, a COX-2 non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug already approved for treating some forms of arthritis and pain. “Our data suggest that individuals at high risk of developing recurrent intestinal tumors may benefit from chronic TRPV1 activation,” said Raz. “We have provided proof-of-principle.” How Tart Cherries Reduce Inflammation and Oxidative StressNorthumbria University (UK),  August 4, 2022Michigan researchers had previously shown that a cherry-enriched diet not only reduced overall body inflammation, but also reduced inflammation at key sites (belly fat, heart) known to affect heart disease risk in the obese.This study offers further promise that foods rich in antioxidants, such as cherries, could potentially reduce inflammation and have the potential to lower disease risk.”

Two daily doses of the tart cherry concentrate was associated with significantly lower levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), compared to placebo, according to findings published in Nutrients.

”This is the first study to investigate the impact of cherries on systemic inflammatory and oxidative stress induced by a series of metabolically challenging cycling bouts. Despite both groups demonstrating a similar drop off in performance and no differences in time trial performance, the results show that both oxidative stress and inflammatory responses were attenuated with Montmorency cherry concentrate supplementation versus placebo.” 

”With millions of Americans looking for ways to naturally manage pain, it's promising that tart cherries can help, without the possible side effects often associated with arthritis medications,” said Kerry Kuehl, M.D, Dr.PH., M.S., Oregon Health & Science University, principal study investigator. “I'm intrigued by the potential for a real food to offer such a powerful anti-inflammatory benefit — especially for active adults.”

Darren E. Huxley, MD says that a natural alternatives to pain medications are proving effective without unwanted side effects. “In this case we have cherries, another potent, natural antioxidant proving to be as, if not more effective than pain medications because of the ability for sustained long-term use without side effects in common anti-inflammatory drugs.Tart cherries have also been shown to contain naturally high levels of melatonin, a key compound in the human sleep-and-wake cycle, and new research in the European Journal of Nutrition confirms that melatonin from tart cherries is absorbed by humans.

In 2001, Burkhardt et al. even observed that the Montmorency variety, in particular, contains about six times more melatonin than the Balaton variety.  Uncovering the links between diet, gut health and immunity University of Sydney, August 5, 2022 A preclinical study from the University of Sydney has found a high-protein diet can change the microbiota of the gut, triggering an immune response. Researchers say the study takes us a step closer to understanding the way diet impacts gut health and immunity. “The focus of our work is on how the gut microbiota—the trillions of bacteria that inhabit the gut—affects the immune system,” said Associate Professor Laurence Macia from the University's Charles Perkins Center and Faculty of Medicine and Health. Traditionally, however, scientists have focused on the role of dietary fiber in maintaining a healthy gut. In this first-of-its-kind study, published in Nature Communications, the team from the Charles Perkins Center used sophisticated modeling to explore the impact of 10 diets with a different makeup of macronutrients—protein, fats and carbohydrate in mice. Mice fed a high protein diet increased their production of bacterial extracellular vesicles, complex cargo containing bacterial information such as DNA and protein. The body subsequently viewed this activity as a threat and triggered a sequence of events where immune cells traveled into the gut wall. “Here we found protein had a huge impact on the gut microbiota and it was not so much about the type of bacteria that were there, but the type of activity. In essence, we discovered a new way of communication between the gut bacteria and the host which was mediated by protein,” said Associate Professor Macia. While it is too early to say if this research might translate in humans, the researchers say activation of the immune system can prove either good or bad news. “By increasing antibodies in the gut you may see strong protection against potential pathogens, for example salmonella, but on the downside, an activated immune system could mean you are at increased risk of colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease, or autoimmune conditions like Crohn's,” said lead author and post-doctoral researcher Jian Tan. The results appear consistent with the population impacts of modern-day diets, with the Western world seeing lower rates of gastrointestinal infection but higher rates of chronic disease.  Southern-style diet ‘increases death risk' in kidney disease patients University of Alabama  1 August 2022 New research published in the National Kidney Foundation's American Journal of Kidney Diseases suggests that eating a “Southern-style diet” is linked with higher death rates in kidney disease patients. Investigating the influence of diet on kidney disease patients, the researchers studied  3,972 participants with stage 3-5 chronic kidney disease who had not started dialysis. Analyzing the dietary habits of the participants, the researchers found that those who regularly consumed foods familiar to Southern diets had a 50% increase in risk of death across the 6.5-year follow-up period. Foods that the authors identify as being part of a Southern diet include processed and fried foods, organ meats and sweetened beverages. Could Hibiscus Tea be Better than High Blood Pressure Drugs? Tufts University,  August 4th, 2022 Naturally healing foods, including hibiscus, don't carry the side effects of pharmaceuticals and can often offer similar (or better) benefits, without padding the pockets of Big Pharma companies. This is one example of a natural solution for high blood pressure. When it comes to high blood pressure, a completely preventable condition, there are many natural solutions. Things like cayenne pepper, apple cider vinegar, and celery are just a few alternatives, along with broad dietary and lifestyle changes. But many people aren't aware of the blood pressure lowering benefits of hibiscus. Dr. Diane McKay presented her own research on hibiscus Dr. McKay, of Tufts University, conducted a study on 65 people between the ages of 30 and 70 who had been diagnosed with prehypertension or mild hypertension. After receiving hibiscus tea daily for six weeks, participants experienced reduced diastolic, systolic, and mean arterial pressures when compared with those who received a placebo. The effects were most pronounced in those with the highest beginning baseline blood pressures. In another study, scientists received a surprise when looking at the effects of hibiscus tea on blood sugar. The study compared the effects of hibiscus and black teas and found that both impacted cholesterol levels. While the black tea positively influenced HDL levels, hibiscus tea helped keep LDL, HDL, and overall cholesterol at healthy levels. Can breast milk feed a love of vegetables?  Monell Chemical Senses Center, August 4, 2022  Want your preschooler to eat veggies without a fuss? Try eating veggies while you're breast-feeding. That's the message from a new study of lactating mothers and their breast-fed babies. The study found that those infants who took in veggie-flavored breast-milk were less likely to turn away from similar-tasting cereal when they graduated to more solid food. “Every baby's sensory experience is unique, but the flavor of their first food, beginning in utero, is dependent on what mom is eating,” said Julie Mennella. She is a biopsychologist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia, and led the study. “The way I see it is: Mother's milk is the ultimate in precision medicine,” Mennella said. When an expectant mother eats vegetables, they flavor her amniotic fluid—and later, her breast-milk—and those flavors get passed along to her baby. As a result, the researchers said, if the baby learns early how veggies taste, he or she will be less apt to squawk when offered that first spoonful. For her study, Mennella randomly assigned 97 breast-feeding mothers to one of five groups. For a month, three groups drank a half-cup of carrot, celery, beet or vegetable juice before nursing. One group began when babies were two weeks old, another at 1-1/2 months of age and the third at 2-1/2 months. A fourth group of moms drank juice for three months, starting when their babies were two weeks old. A fifth group—the “control” group—did not use juice. The takeaway: Babies who'd been exposed to vegetable flavors in breast-milk preferred carrot-flavored cereal over plain cereal or cereal with the unfamiliar taste of broccoli. Only 8 percent rejected all of the foods, the findings showed.

    The Casual Criminalist
    The Real-Life Harley Quinn

    The Casual Criminalist

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 99:19


    In the late 1970s, the Hillside Strangler had been captured, and two men now awaited trail. But one of them, Kenneth Bianchi, had a plan for escaping a life sentence - fake a Hillside Strangler attack, complete with DNA. Enter Veronica Compton, Bianchi's own Harley Quinn. Firmly under Bianchi's spell, she would go on to attempt to kill another woman before being caught by the police and ruining Bianchi's plans. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Small Town Murder
    #307 - STM Express - Smart People, Stupid Murder - Barrington, Rhode Island

    Small Town Murder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 67:43


    This week, in Barrington, Rhode Island, a very educated & upright couple become friends with their financial advisor, until red flags start to appear. Red flags, like the family disappearing, and being found two months later, in a shallow grave. But who could have killed this seemingly upstanding family? Well, the main suspect says it was actually the Asian mafia, and that this family wasn't all that it seemed to be. Is that true, or is it just one depraved man, with a bloodlust? It's quite the crazy path of blood, crossbows & teeth to find out!!Along the way, we find out that Rhode Island is REALLY tiny, that the mafia generally doesn't kill librarians, and that your life can sure fall apart... FAST!! Hosted by James Pietragallo and Jimmie WhismanNew episodes every Thursday!Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com and use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.comGo to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!Follow us on...twitter.com/@murdersmallfacebook.com/smalltownpodinstagram.com/smalltownmurderAlso, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Wondery, Wondery+, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    Abnormal Realities with Ron Phillips and Rocci Stucci
    Virtual Babies, Using Your DNA to Kill You, and Zombies - Abnormal Realities

    Abnormal Realities with Ron Phillips and Rocci Stucci

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 52:01


    Thursday - 8/11/22According to an artificial intelligence expert, virtual children who can play with you, hug you and even look like you could help fight overpopulation.US Congressman Jason Crow has stated that there is a biological weapon that uses DNA to kill people. He issued a similar warning during the Security Forum in Aspen, Colorado.A zombie apocalypse resulting from the outbreak of a mysterious epidemic is a common setting for many films and games, but can something like this happen in reality?We're live tonight! Join us.###You can watch us live 8-9p ET: OdysyRadio.com, YouTube.com, Twitch.com, AbnormalRealities.com/ARTVFollow Us:https://abnormalrealities.comhttps://twitter.com/abnormalshowhttps://instagram.com/abnormalrealitieshttps://facebook.com/abnormalrealitiesSupport our Show:https://www.abnormalrealities.com/shophttps://www.abnormalrealities.com/donatehttps://www.romikadesigns.com/?ref=abnormalrealitieshttps://www.insanecustomtumblers.com/abnormal?ref=Abnormal#OdysyRadio #UFO #Paranormal #UAP #ShadowPeople #SpiritBox #GhostVoices #AbnormalRealities #RonPhillips #RocciStucci #Bigfoot #Conspiracy #ConspiracyTheories #WhatTheHellIsThat

    Best Drum and Bass Podcast
    Podcast 396 - Bad Syntax & Meraki [Sponsored by Adam Audio]

    Best Drum and Bass Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 89:21


    GIG DAY! Im beyond excited to be bringing that Bad Syntax sound back to the San Fran area TONIGHT at DNA lounge! Before that though, we have your pre party playlist! One of the baddest man to come out of the San Fran area, and my personal good friend, MERAKI is in with a WICKED guest mix! Lock it in, we are ready to rock out!TONIGHT! Catch Bad Syntax in San Francisco!More info on the event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1509163722847640This Episode is sponsored by Adam Audio!In case you haven't heard yet, Adam Audio just completely revamped the entire "A Series", which was already the industry standard for top of the line production speakers. I can tell you first hand, that the new A7V is the most life changing speaker I have ever had the good fortune to own. Click the link below to find out more!Read more about the new A7V speaker here: https://bestdnb.podlink.to/adam-audioLike what you hear? Drop a donation at https://streamlabs.com/badsyntaxdnbSubscribe to the podcast: bestdrumandbass.podlink.to/podcastTracklist and more info: https://www.bestdrumandbass.com/podcast396/ Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Midnight, On Earth
    Episode 106 - Beyond The News - August 2022

    Midnight, On Earth

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 83:33


    In this episode, we take another dive into current human culture and explore...the news! Brynn Anderson and I take a look at some of the strange, wild, and unreal stories that have popped up on Earth's news feed recently. This episode features a look at new advancements in cloning technology, DNA sized motors, open source AI, and other interesting global developments... As we share these stories with you, we discuss some of their finer points.. Listen In!Brynn Anderson Bio:Life long lover of all things nature, Brynn Anderson has been studying herbs for over 27 years...Her natural mindset has led her to a life of herbology, and a life of teaching. She operates the company 'Vital Force Herbs' an organic herbalism company based in Portland, OR.All the products Brynn creates are made with ingredients grown in her own organic garden.Brynn's service is rooted in providing an outlet for the plant spirit to assist all life on Earth. Get bonus content on Patreon Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Ben Greenfield Fitness
    How Two Middle-Aged Entrepreneurial Parents Completely Transformed & Biohacked Their Health, Fitness, Sex Life & More

    Ben Greenfield Fitness

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 58:39 Very Popular


    For a while now, I've been working with an entrepreneurial couple named Jim and Jamie Sheils to improve their fitness, health, nutrition, and longevity... ...and we've become dear friends in the process. Jim and Jamie Sheils are the fit, sexy parents of four children ranging in age from toddler to teen. They are also the founders of a fantastic company called 18 Summers, which refers to the number of summers you have with your children. The goal of 18 Summers is to help support families with a formula for lifelong parent-child connection, trust, bonding, respect, and experience. Jim and Jamie have also authored the popular ebook The Family Board Meeting, which outlines three simple steps parents can take to create lasting connections with their children. Jim Sheils is an entrepreneur who consults with world-class organizations such as Harvard University and Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO) to help their members succeed at home. In keynote presentations, workshops, team events, and private consulting, Jim has helped hundreds of the top entrepreneurs and thought leaders around the world focus and implement where it really counts, at home. He is affectionately known as "Crazy Glue For Families." Jamie Sheils founded Florida's only Waldorf-inspired public charter school and directed a Public Montessori Charter School. She has also developed and implemented programs in several other public and private schools. When Jim and Jamie first met, they found themselves facing interesting challenges as a blended family. Suddenly, they had to contend with the everyday trials of disconnection and time scarcity. It was Family Board Meetings that bridged the gap, helping a new family connect, and helping the kids find sure footing on uncertain ground. Now, through 18 Summers, Jim and Jamie reach families and organizations around the world, helping them discover the benefits of quality time and enduring relationships. In this episode, we talk about homeschooling, creative freedom, sex drive, and even (how to avoid!) "Dad bod." Episode sponsors: -The DNA Company:  If you value your health and want the tools to help you avoid serious diseases, then go ahead and order this DNA test from The DNA Company. All listeners are eligible to receive a $50 discount using code BEN at checkout. -Butcher Box: Butcherbox is giving new members 1 pack of bacon for FREE in EVERY box, plus $20 off each box for the first 5 months of your membership. That's free bacon for life and up to $100 off! -ChiliSleep: These luxury mattress pads keep your bed at the perfect temperature for deep sleep, whether you sleep hot or cold. These sleep systems are designed to help you fall asleep, stay asleep and give you the confidence and energy to power through your day. Save up to 30% off the purchase of any new sleep system -Kion Aminos: Building blocks for muscle recovery, reduced cravings, better cognition, immunity, and more. -Ben Greenfield Coaching: Personally vetted and trained by Ben Greenfield, these coaches will personalize your diet and lifestyle, and get you looking and feeling your best.

    Small Town Murder
    #306 - The Zombie Apocalypse Has Begun - Coeur d'Alene, Idaho

    Small Town Murder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 157:47 Very Popular


    This week, in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, an upstanding young family is seemingly set on the right path, with small children, and the husband even running for local office... Until it all falls apart, in a very crazy way. In addition to both parents being on a lot of drugs, the father is absolutely preparing for what he calls "the inevitable zombie apocalypse". Complete with training sessions for the kids, and a plan to survive the inescapable mortal zombie combat, that is sure to come. This whole thing takes another complete left turn, when a terrifying bloodbath occurs, one night, but the results are nothing that anyone could ever have predicted!!Along the way, we find out that people have mixed feelings about northern Idaho, that the zombie apocalypse shouldn't be more of a concern than paying your rent, and that just when you think a situation can't get any worse, it most certainly does!!Hosted by James Pietragallo and Jimmie WhismanNew episodes every Thursday!Donate at: patreon.com/crimeinsports or go to paypal.com and use our email: crimeinsports@gmail.comGo to shutupandgivememurder.com for all things Small Town Murder & Crime In Sports!Follow us on...twitter.com/@murdersmallfacebook.com/smalltownpodinstagram.com/smalltownmurderAlso, check out James & Jimmie's other show, Crime In Sports! On Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Amazon Music, Wondery, Wondery+, Stitcher, or wherever you listen to podcasts!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

    NPE Stories
    Joy A's Story

    NPE Stories

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 43:51 Very Popular


    Joy was made out to be the villain by her family members. Resources:NPEguide.comThe Lost Family by Libby CopelandPodcasts:Missing Pieces - NPE LifeEverything's Relative with Eve SturgesThe Secret in my DNADNA SurprisesCut off Genes PodcastFamily Secrets

    The Genetics Podcast
    EP83: Daphne Koller, Founder & CEO of Insitro - Integrating machine learning and biology at scale to reimagine drug discovery

    The Genetics Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 45:10


    About this Episode: This week's guest, Daphne Koller, is the Founder and CEO of Insitro - a company shifting the paradigm of new drug discovery using predictive models. Patrick and Daphne talk about why she founded Insitro, how to create unified datasets, and the importance of being realistic about drug discovery.

    Mind Over Murder
    BONUS: Lisa Zambetti of Real Crime Profile and Killer Casting (Part 1)

    Mind Over Murder

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 43:27


    Lisa Zambetti, who in addition to being the longtime Casting Director on CBS' hit TV show "Criminal Minds," is also the co-host of the podcasts "Real Crime Profile" and "Killer Casting" joins "Mind Over Murder" hosts Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley This is Part 1 of 2 parts.Real Crime Profile Podcast: https://www.realcrimeprofile.com/Killer Casting Podcast: https://killercasting.libsyn.com/Lisa Zambetti Casting: https://www.lisazambetticasting.com/Othram DNA Solves: You can help solve a case. Help fund a case or contribute your DNA. Your support helps solve crimes, enable the identification of John & Jane Does, and bring closure to families. Joining is fast, secure, and easy.https://dnasolves.com/Join the discussion on our Mind Over Murder and Colonial Parkway Murders pages on Facebook.Mind Over Murder on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mindoverpodcastColonial Parkway Murders Facebook page with more than 14,000 followers: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCaseYou can also participate in an in-depth discussion of the Colonial Parkway Murders here:https://earonsgsk.proboards.com/board/50/colonial-parkway-murdersMind Over Murder is proud to be a Spreaker Prime Podcaster:https://www.spreaker.comNew Article in Virginia Gazette: 35 Years Later, Victims' Families in Colonial Parkway Murders Still Searching for Answers, Hope DNA Advances will Solve Case By Em Holter and Abigail Adcoxhttps://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-colonial-parkway-murders-anniversary-1024-20211022-76jkpte6qvez7onybmhbhp7nfi-story.htmlNew Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer" By Justin Rohrlichhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCitizens! Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasYou can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportFour one-hour episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!We launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning, and a bonus episode every Thursday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/New Article in Virginia Gazette: 35 Years Later, Victims' Families in Colonial Parkway Murders Still Searching for Answers, Hope DNA Advances will Solve Case By Em Holter and Abigail Adcoxhttps://www.dailypress.com/virginiagazette/va-vg-colonial-parkway-murders-anniversary-1024-20211022-76jkpte6qvez7onybmhbhp7nfi-story.htmlNew Article in Medium: The Colonial Parkway Murders — A Tale of Two Killers? By Quinn Zanehttps://medium.com/unburied/the-colonial-parkway-murders-a-tale-of-two-killers-1e8fda367a48Washington Post: "Crimes of Passion"https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1997/08/15/crimes-of-passion/0a38e8f9-6d04-48e4-a847-7d3cba53c363/New feature article in the Daily Beast: "Inside the Maddening Search for Virginia's Colonial Parkway Serial Killer" By Justin Rohrlichhttps://www.thedailybeast.com/what-happened-to-cathleen-thomas-and-rebecca-dowski-inside-the-hunt-for-the-colonial-parkway-killerCitizens! Check out our new line of "Mind Over Murder" t-shirts and other good stuff !https://www.teepublic.com/stores/mind-over-murder-podcast?ref_id=23885Washington Post Op-Ed Piece by Deidre Enright of the Innocence Project:"The FBI should use DNA, not posters, to solve a cold-case murder" https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/06/25/julie-williams-laura-winans-unsolved-murder-test-dna/Oxygen: "Loni Coombs Feels A Kinship To 'Lovers' Lane' Victim Cathy Thomas"Loni Coombs felt an immediate connection to Cathy Thomas, a groundbreaking gay woman who broke through barriers at the U.S. Naval Academy before she was brutally murdered along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia.https://www.oxygen.com/crime-news/loni-coombs-feels-a-kinship-to-colonial-parkway-victim-cathy-thomasYou can contribute to help "Mind Over Murder" do our important work:https://mindovermurderpodcast.com/supportFour one-hour episodes on the Colonial Parkway Murders are available on Oxygen as "The Lover's Lane Murders." The series is available on the free Oxygen app, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, and many other platforms. https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders Oxygen" "Who Were The Colonial Parkway Murder Victims? 8 Young People All Killed In Virginia Within 4 Years" https://www.oxygen.com/lovers-lane-murders/crime-news/who-were-the-colonial-parkway-murder-victims Washington Post Magazine: "Victims, Families and America's Thirst for True-Crime Stories." "For Bill Thomas, his sister Cathy's murder is a deeply personal tragedy. For millions of true-crime fans, it's entertainment." https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/magazine/wp/2019/07/30/feature/victims-families-and-americas-thirst-for-true-crime-stories/Daily Press excellent series of articles on the Colonial Parkway Murders: "The Parkway" http://digital.dailypress.com/static/parkway_cottage/main/index.htmlColonial Parkway Murders website: https://colonialparkwaymurders.com Mind Over Murder Podcast website: https://mindovermurderpodcast.comPlease subscribe and rate us at your favorite podcast sites. Ratings and reviews are very important. Please share and tell your friends!https://lovethepodcast.com/jpHq3qWe launch a new episode of "Mind Over Murder" every Monday morning, and a bonus episode every Thursday morning.Sponsors: Othram and DNAsolves.comContribute Your DNA to help solve cases: https://dnasolves.com/user/registerFollow "Mind Over Murder" on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MurderOverFollow Bill Thomas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BillThomas56Follow "Colonial Parkway Murders" on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ColonialParkwayCase/Follow us on InstaGram:: https://www.instagram.com/colonialparkwaymurders/Check out the entire Crawlspace Media network at http://crawlspace-media.com/All rights reserved. Mind Over Murder, Copyright Bill Thomas and Kristin Dilley, Another Dog Productions/Absolute Zero Productions

    Passion Struck with John R. Miles
    Dr. Kara Fitzgerald on How to Become a Younger You by Reversing Your Biological Age EP 174

    Passion Struck with John R. Miles

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 61:01


    In today's episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles, I interview Dr. Kara Fitzgerald about her groundbreaking work in understanding how you can reverse your biological age and become a younger you. | Brought to you by Gusto. Go to (https://www.gusto.com/passionstruck)  for three months free. Dr. Kara Fitzgerald, ND, IFMCP, is the first-ever recipient of the Emerging Leadership Award from the Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute in recognition of her work on DNA methylation. Dr. Fitzgerald directs a large, integrative in-person and virtual clinical practice in Connecticut. She is engaged in clinical research on the DNA methylome using a diet and lifestyle intervention developed in her clinic. Her first study was published in the journal Aging. Earlier this year, she published Younger You: Reduce Your Bio Age and Live Longer, Better, an application-based program based on the study. * Purchase Younger You: https://amzn.to/3BZwFiP  (Amazon Link) --► Get the full show notes: https://passionstruck.com/dr-kara-fitzgerald-become-younger-you/  --► Subscribe to My Channel Here: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnRMiles --► Subscribe to the podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/passion-struck-with-john-r-miles/id1553279283 *Our Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/passionstruck. Thank You to Our Sponsors This episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles is brought to you by Gusto, which provides cloud-based payroll, benefits, and human resource management software for businesses based in the United States. For three months free, go to https://www.gusto.com/passionstruck. What I Discuss With Dr. Kara Fitzgerald About How You Reverse Your Biological Age Through Lifestyle and Diet Choices Dr. Fitzgerald and I discuss how there is a link between aging and chronic disease, and it has everything to do with epigenetics and their effect on aging. Biological age looks at specific patterns of a key epigenetic mark called DNA methylation. These DNA methylation patterns can reliably predict how fast our body is aging. Methylation is as essential to our bodies as breathing and is happening in our bodies and within our cells all of the time. Therefore, if you can give yourself the DNA methylations of a younger you, you can reset your biological aging process. She provides key ways to do this throughout our interview that are based on her years of experience backed by clinical trials.  Why do most adults spend the last 16 years of their lives suffering from chronic conditions and taking multiple medications? Why reversing biological age is key. Why it's epigenetics and not your genetics that determines your level of health and age How is epigenetic expression greatly influenced by DNA methylation? How do our diet and lifestyle choices impact DNA methylation? The results of her research and a groundbreaking clinical trial showed a reduction of biological age by three years. Why it is our daily choices and routines that add years to your life or reduce them Her diet and lifestyle program which increases healthspan and reduces your biological age. And so much more. Where to Find Dr. Kara Fitzgerald: * Website: https://www.drkarafitzgerald.com/  * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kara-n-fitzgerald-b77265b/  * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drkarafitzgerald/  * Twitter: https://twitter.com/kfitzgeraldnd  * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrKaraFitzgerald/  Show Links * My solo episode on how to reverse aging: https://passionstruck.com/the-reverse-aging-effect-stay-young-and-healthy/  * My solo episode on how to heal from the consequences of abuse: https://passionstruck.com/heal-from-the-shattering-consequences-of-abuse/  In my interview with Colin O'Brady on his new book The 12-Hour Walk, we discuss how to conquer your mind: https://passionstruck.com/colin-obrady-12-hour-walk-transform-your-life/  * My interview with Air Force Veteran, Entrepreneur, and Speaker D.J. Vanas about unleashing the warrior within: https://passionstruck.com/dj-vanas-on-unleashing-your-warrior-within/  * My interview with screenwriter and director Abi Morgan on the power of Hope in our lives: https://passionstruck.com/abi-morgan-on-the-importance-of-hope/  * My interview with Kara Robinson Chamberlain on how she escaped from a kidnapp ning by a serial killer: https://passionstruck.com/kara-robinson-chamberlain-be-vigilant/  * My interview with Jean Oelwang on the power of partnerships: https://passionstruck.com/jean-oelwang-what-will-you-love-into-being/  * My interview with Katy Milkman, Ph.D. on how to create lasting behavior change: https://passionstruck.com/katy-milkman-behavior-change-for-good/  * My solo episode on why micro choices matter: https://passionstruck.com/why-your-micro-choices-determine-your-life/ * My solo episode on why you must feel to heal: https://passionstruck.com/why-you-must-feel-to-find-emotional-healing/   -- John R. Miles is the CEO, and Founder of PASSION STRUCK®, the first of its kind company, focused on impacting real change by teaching people how to live Intentionally. He is on a mission to help people live a no-regrets life that exalts their victories and lets them know they matter in the world. For over two decades, he built his own career applying his research of passion struck leadership, first becoming a Fortune 50 CIO and then a multi-industry CEO. He is the executive producer and host of the top-ranked Passion Struck Podcast, selected as one of the Top 50 most inspirational podcasts in 2022. Learn more about John: https://johnrmiles.com/  ===== FOLLOW JOHN ON THE SOCIALS ===== * Twitter: https://twitter.com/Milesjohnr * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnrmiles.c0m * Medium: https://medium.com/@JohnRMiles​ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_r_miles * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesjohn/ * Blog: https://johnrmiles.com/blog/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_sruck_podcast

    gone cold podcast - texas true crime
    Case Updates, Summer 2022 Part 2

    gone cold podcast - texas true crime

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 32:55


    This episode, we discuss developments in a few more Texas cases, including the 1992 murder of Shenda Denise Hayes, the identification of the remains of 16-year-old Sylvia Nicole Smith, the apprehension of a 75-year-old serial killer in Fort Worth, the murders of Heather Willms and Esmeralda Herrera in 2005 and 2011 respectively, and the 2002 robbery / murder of Subir Chatterjee. Also, a little about the newly passed law known as Homicide Victims' Families' Rights Act of 2021 at the top.If you have any information about the murder of Sylvia Nicole Smith, please contact the Texas Crime Stoppers hotline at 1-800-252-TIPS (8477)Check out the great podcast Remnant Stew here: remnantstew.com/Please donate to help get #JusticeForLeonLaureles at gofundme.com/f/leon-laureles-private-detective-and-memorial/If you'd like to donate to law enforcement investigations that need funding or upload your DNA into a database used only for law enforcement investigations, go to DNAsolves.com/The Fort Worth Police Department still has nearly 1,000 unsolved cases dating back to 1959. You can help our diligent Cold Case Detectives by donating to the Fort Worth Cold Case Support Group at fwpdcoldcasesupport.org/Find gone cold – texas true crime on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by using @gonecoldpodcast and on YouTube at: youtube.com/c/gonecoldpodcastSources for this episode:Subir Chatterjee:https://www.lakeconroe.com/detective-seals-dna-conviction-in-montgomery-county-cold-case-murder/https://www.yourconroenews.com/neighborhood/moco/news/article/DNA-testing-leads-to-20-year-old-cold-case-murder-17274640.phphttps://www.chron.com/neighborhood/article/Murder-victim-handled-millions-of-dollars-9921180.phpSylvia Nicole Smith: https://www.dps.texas.gov/coldCase/Home/Details/233https://www.khou.com/article/news/local/texas/dps-missing-teen-midland/285-c44b8f9b-688f-4350-a0fb-95bb261f69d3https://www.star-telegram.com/news/nation-world/national/article262941423.htmlHeather Willms & Esmeralda Herrera:https://lawandcrime.com/tag/jose-baldomero-flores-iii/https://www.dps.texas.gov/news/convicted-killer-texas-ranger-cold-case-gets-two-life-sentenceshttps://www.expressnews.com/news/local/article/San-Antonio-man-gets-three-life-terms-for-brutal-17328250.phphttps://news4sanantonio.com/news/local/unsolved-for-11-years-leon-valley-police-make-arrest-in-young-womans-brutal-murderhttps://www.expressnews.com/news/local/article/Capital-murder-indictments-returned-in-two-San-10949310.phpSherri Herrera & Shenda Denise Hayeshttps://centralrecorder.com/accused-killer-charged-with-2nd-cold-case-murder-in-slaying-of-california-mother-of-4-prosecutors-say/https://www.expressnews.com/news/local/article/douglas-thomas-riverside-titus-murder-charge-17238286.phphttps://www.kltv.com/2022/08/05/man-indicted-charges-murdering-sex-workers-texas-california-dating-back-30-years/https://wacotrib.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/texas-rangers-dna-links-retired-mclennan-county-trucker-to-killings-from-1990s/article_1844b63e-ec2e-11ec-8228-575b2b2a7d6c.htmlBilly Ray Richardson:https://www.star-telegram.com/news/local/crime/article263508473.htmlhttps://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-07-14/texas-man-arrested-los-angeles-area-cold-case-killings-dating-to-1980https://da.lacounty.gov/media/news/texas-man-charged-four-decades-old-murdershttps://www.lapdonline.org/newsroom/cold-case-arrest-of-billy-ray-richardson-in-fort-worth-texas-nr22201ah/#Texas #TX #GoneCold #GoneColdPodcast #TexasTrueCrime #TrueCrime #TrueCrimePodcast #Podcast #ColdCase #UnsolvedMysteries #UnsolvedMurder #Murder #JaneDoe

    Screaming in the Cloud
    Creating Conversations on TikTok with Alex Su

    Screaming in the Cloud

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 33:46


    About AlexAlex Su is a lawyer who's currently the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, the #1 contract lifecycle management technology company that's backed by Accel, Sequoia, Y Combinator, and other leading investors. Prior to joining Ironclad, Alex sold cloud software to legal departments and law firms on behalf of early stage startups. Alex maintains an active presence on social media, with over 180,000 followers across Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and TikTok. Links Referenced: Ironclad: https://ironcladapp.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexander-su/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/heyitsalexsu Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyitsalexsu/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@legaltechbro TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate. Is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other; which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability: it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I've been off the beaten path from the traditional people building things in cloud by the sweat of their brow and the snark on their Twitters. I'm joined today by Alex Su, who's the Head of Community Development at Ironclad, and also relatively well-renowned on the TikToks, as the kids say. Alex, thank you for joining me.Alex: Thank you so much for having me on the show.Corey: It's always been an interesting experience because I joined TikTok about six months or so ago, due to an escalatingly poor series of life choices that continue to fail me, and I have never felt older in my life. But your videos consistently tend to show up there. You are @legaltechbro, which sounds like wow, I hate all of those things, and yet your content is on fire.How long have you been doing the public dance thing, for lack of a better term? I don't even know what they call it. I know how to talk about Twitter. I know how to talk about LinkedIn—sad. LinkedIn is sad—but TikTok is still something I'm trying to wrap my ancient brain around.Alex: Yeah, I felt out of place when I first made my first TikTok. And by the way, I'm known for making funny skits. I have actually never danced. I've always wanted to, but I don't think I have that… that talent. I started posting TikToks in, I will call it—let's call it the fall of 2020. So, after the pandemic.Before that, I had been posting consistently on LinkedIn for, gosh, ever since 2016, when I got into legal tech. And during the pandemic, I tried a bunch of different things including making funny skits. I'd seen something somewhere online if somebody's making fun of the doctor life. And so, I thought, hey, I could do that for legal too. And so, I made one with iMovie. You know, I recorded it on Zoom.And then people started telling me, “Hey, you should get on this thing called TikTok.” And so, I resisted it for a while because I was like, “This is not for me.” But at some point, I said, “I'll try this out. The editing seems pretty easy.” So, I made a couple of videos poking fun at the life of a law firm lawyer or a lawyer working for a corporate legal department.And on my fourth video, I went massively viral. Like, unexpected went viral, like, millions of—I think two million or so views. And I found myself with a following. So, I thought, “Hey, I guess this is what I'm doing now.” And so, it's been, I don't know, a year-and-a-half since then, and I've been continuously posting these skits.Corey: It's like they say the worst thing can happen when you go into a casino and play for the first time is you win.Alex: [laugh].Corey: You get that dopamine hit, and suddenly, well now, guess what you're doing for the rest of your life? There you go. It sounds like it worked out for you in a lot of fun ways. Your skits about big law of life definitely track. My wife used to work in that space, and we didn't meet till she was leaving that job because who has time to date in those environments?But I distinctly remember one of our early dates, we went out to meet a bunch of her soon-to-be-former coworkers at something like eight or nine o'clock in Los Angeles on a Friday night. And at the end of it, we went back to one of our places, and they went back to work. Because that is the lifestyle, apparently, of being in big law. I don't have the baseline prerequisites to get into law school, to let alone get the JD and then go to work in big law, and looking at that lifestyle, it's, “Yeah, you know, I don't think that's for me.” Of course, I say that, and then three days later, I was doing a middle of the night wake up because the pager went off.Like, “Oh, are you a doctor?” And the pager is like, “Holy shit. This SSL certificate expires in 30 days.” It's, yeah. Again, life has been fun, but it's always been one of those things that was sort of, I guess, held in awe. And you're putting a very human face on it.Alex: Yeah. You know, I never expected to be in big law either, Corey. Like, I was never good at school, but as I got older, I found a way to talk my way into, like, a good school. I hustled my way into a job at a firm that I never imagined I could get a job at. But once I got in, that's when I was like, “Okay, I don't feel like I fit in.”And so, I struggled but I still you know grinded it out. I stayed at the job for a couple of years. And I left because I was like, “This is not right for me.” But I never imagined that all of those experiences in big law ended up being the source material for my content, like, eight years after I'd left. So, I'm very thankful that I had that experience even if it wasn't a good fit for me. [laugh].Corey: And on some level, it feels like, “Where do you get your material from?” It's, “Oh, the terrible things that happened to me. Why do you ask?”Alex: That's basically it. And people ask me, they say, you know, “You haven't worked in that environment for eight years. It's probably different now, right?” Well, no. You know, the legal industry is not like the tech industry. Like, things move very slowly there.The jokes that made people laugh back then, you know, 10 years ago, even 20 years ago, people still laugh at today because it's the same way things have always worked. So, again, I'm very thankful that that's been the case. And, you know, I feel like, the reason why my content is popular is because a lot of people can resonate with it. Things that a lot of people don't really talk about publicly, about the lifestyle, the culture, how things work in a large firm, but I make jokes about it, so people feel comfortable laughing about it, or commenting and sharing.Corey: I want to get into that a little bit because when you start seeing someone pop up again and again and again on TikTok, you're one of those, “Okay, I should stalk this person and figure out what the hell their story is.” And I didn't have to look very far in your case because you're very transparent about it. You're the head of community development at a company called Ironclad, and that one threw me for a little bit of a loop. So, let's start with the easy question, I suppose. What is Ironclad?Alex: We're a digital contracting technology that helps accelerate business contracts. Companies deal with contracts of all types; a lot of times it gets bogged down in legal review. We just help with that process to make that process move faster. And I never expected I'd be in this space. You know, I always thought I was going to be a trial lawyer.But I left that world, you know, maybe six years ago to go into the legal technology space, and I quickly saw that contracts was kind of a growing challenge, contracting, whether it's for sales or for procurement. So, I found myself as a salesperson in legal tech selling, first e-discovery software, and then contracting software. And then I found my way to Ironclad as part of the community team, really to talk about how we can help, but also speaking up about the challenges of the legal profession, of working at a law firm or at a legal department. So, I feel like it's all been the culmination of all my experiences, both in law and technology.Corey: In the world in which I've worked, half of my consulting work has been helping our clients negotiate their large-scale AWS contracts and the other half is architectural nonsense of, “Hey, if you make these small changes, that cuts your bill in half. Maybe consider doing them.” But something that I've learned that is almost an industry-wide and universal truism, is that you want to keep the salespeople and the lawyers relatively separate just due to the absolute polar opposites of incentives. Salespeople are incentivized to sell anything that holds still long enough or they can outrun, whereas lawyers are incentivized to protect the company from risk. No, is the easy answer and everything else is risk that has to be managed. You are one of those very rare folks who has operated successfully and well by blending the two. How the hell did that happen?Alex: I'm not sure to this day how it happened. But I think part of the reason why I left law in the first place was because I don't think I fit in. I think there's a lot of good about having a law degree and being part of the legal profession, but I just wanted to be around people, I wanted to work with people, I didn't want to always worry about things. And so, that led me to technology sales, which took me to the other extreme. And so, you know, I carried a sales quota for five years and that was such an interesting experience to see where—to both sell technology, but also to see where legal fit into that process.And so, I think by having the legal training, but also having been part of a sales team, that's given me appreciation for what both teams do. And I think they're often at tension with one another, but they're both there to serve the greater goals of the company, whether it's to generate revenue or protect against risk.Corey: I think that there's also a certain affinity that you may have—I'm just spitballing wildly—one of the things that sales folks and attorneys tend to have in common is that in the public imagination, as those roles are not, shall we call it, universally beloved. There tend to be a fair number of well, jokes, in which case, both sides of that tend to be on the receiving end. I mean, at some level, all you have to do is become an IRS auditor and you've got the holy trifecta working for you.Alex: [laugh]. I don't know why I gravitated to these professions, but I do think that it's partly because both of these roles hold a significant amount of power. And if you look at just contracting in general, a salesperson at a company, they're really the driver of the sales process. Like, if there's no sale to be made, there's no contract. On the flip side, the law person, the lawyer, knows everything about what's inside of the contract.They understand the legal terms, the jargon, and so they hold an immense amount of power over advising people on what's going to happen. And so, I think sometimes, salespeople and legal people take it too far and either spend too much time reviewing a contract and lording it over the business folks, or maybe the salesperson is too blase about getting a deal done and maybe bypasses legal and doesn't go through the right processes. By the way, Corey, these are jokes that I make in my TikToks all the time and they always go viral because it's so relatable to people. But yeah, that's probably why people always make jokes about lawyers and salespeople. There's probably some element of ridiculing people with a significant amount of power within a company to determine these transactions.Corey: Do you find that you have a better affinity for the folks doing contract work on the seller side or the buyer side? Something they don't tell you when you run companies is, yeah, you're going to spend a lot of time working on contracts, not just when selling things, but also when buying things and going back and forth. Aspects of what you're talking about so far in this conversation have resonated, I guess, with both sides of that for me. What do you have the affinity for?Alex: I think on the sales side, just because of my experience, you know, I think when you go through a transaction and you're trying to convince someone to doing something, and this is probably why I wanted to go to law school in the first place. Like I watched those movies, right? I watched A Few Good Men and I thought I'd be standing up in court convincing a jury of something. Little did I know that that sort of interest [crosstalk 00:10:55]—Corey: Like, Perry Mason breakthrough moment.Alex: That moment where—the gotcha moment, right? I found that in sales. And so, it was really a thrill to be able to, like, talk to someone, listen to them, and then kind of convince them that, based on what challenges they're facing, for them to buy some technology. I love that. And I think that was again, tied to why I went to law school in the first place.I didn't even know sales was a possible profession because I grew up in an immigrant community that was like, you just go to school, and that'll lead to your career. But there's a lot of different careers that are super interesting that don't require formal schooling, or at least the seven years of schooling you need for law. So, I always identify with the sales side. And maybe that's just how I am, but obviously, the folks who deal with the buy side, it's a pretty important job, too.Corey: There's a lot of surprise when I start talking to folks in the engineering world. First, they're in for a rough awakening at times when they learn exactly how much qualified enterprise salespeople can make. But also because being a lawyer without, you know, the appropriate credentials to tie into that, you're going to have a bad time. There are regulatory requirements imposed on lawyers, whereas to be a salesperson, forget the law degree, forget the bachelor's, forget the high school diploma, all you really need to be able to do from an academic credential standpoint is show up.The rest of it is, can you actually sell? Can you have the conversations that convince people to see the outcome that benefits everyone? And I don't know what that it's possible, or advised necessarily, to be able to find a way to teach that in some formalized way. It almost feels like folks either have that spark or they don't. Do you think it's one of those things that can be taught? Do you think it's something that people have to have a pre-existing affinity for?Alex: It's both, right, because part of it is some people will just—they don't have the personality to really sell. It's also like their interest; they don't want to do that. But what I found that's interesting is that what I thought would make a good salesperson didn't end up being true when I looked at the most effective sellers. Like, in my head, I thought, “Oh, this is somebody who's very boisterous, very extroverted,” but I found that in my experience in B2B SaaS that the most effective sellers are very, very much active listeners. They're not the people showing up and talking at you. They are asking you about your day-to-day asking about processes, understanding the context of your situation, before making a small suggestion about what you might want to do.I was very impressed the first time I saw one of these enterprise sellers who was just so good at that. Like, I saw him, and he looked nothing like what I imagined an effective sales guy to look like. And he was really kind and he just, kind of, just talked to me, like, I was a human being, and listened to my answers. So, I do think that there is some element of nature, your talent when it comes to that, but it can also be trained because I think a lot of folks who have sales talent, they don't realize that they could be good at it. They think that they've got to be this extroverted, happy hour, partying, storyteller, where —Corey: The Type A personality that interrupts people as they're having the conversation.Alex: Yeah, yeah.Corey: Yeah.Alex: So anyways, I think that's why it's a mix of both.Corey: The conversations that I've learned the most from when I'm talking to prospects and clients have been when I asked the quote-unquote, dumb question that I already know the answer to, and then I shut up and I listen. And wow, I did not expect that answer. And when you dig a little further, you realize there's nuance that—at least in my case—that I've completely missed to the entire problem space. I think that is really one of the key differentiators to my mind, that separate people who are good at this role from folks who just misunderstand what the role is based upon mass media, or in other cases—same problem with lawyers—the worst examples, in some cases, of the profession. The pushy used car salesperson or the lawyer they see advertising on the back of a bus for personal injury cases. The world is far more nuanced than that.Alex: Absolutely. And I think you hit the nail on the head when you said, you know, you ask those questions and let them talk. Because that's an entire process within the sales process. It's called discovery, and you're really asking questions to understand the person's situation. More broadly, though, I think pitching at people doesn't seem to work as well as understanding the situation.And you know, I've kind of done that with my content, my TikToks because, you know, if you look at LinkedIn, a lot of people in our space, they're always prescribing solutions, giving advice, posting content about teaching people things. I don't do that. As a marketer, what I do is I talk about the problems and create discussions. So, I'll create a funny video—Corey: I think you're teaching a whole generation that maybe law school isn't what they want to be doing, after all there is that.Alex: There is that. There is that. It's a mix of things. But one of the things I think I focus on is talking about the challenges of working with a sales team if you're an in-house lawyer. And I don't prescribe technology, I don't prescribe Ironclad, I don't say this is what you need to do, but by having people talk about it, they realize, right—and I think this is why the videos are popular—as opposed to me coming out and saying, “I think you need technology because of XYZ.” I think, like, facilitating the conversation of the problem space, that leads people to naturally say, “Hey, I might need something. What do you guys do, by the way?”Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friend EnterpriseDB. EnterpriseDB has been powering enterprise applications with PostgreSQL for 15 years. And now EnterpriseDB has you covered wherever you deploy PostgreSQL on-premises, private cloud, and they just announced a fully-managed service on AWS and Azure called BigAnimal, all one word. Don't leave managing your database to your cloud vendor because they're too busy launching another half-dozen managed databases to focus on any one of them that they didn't build themselves. Instead, work with the experts over at EnterpriseDB. They can save you time and money, they can even help you migrate legacy applications—including Oracle—to the cloud. To learn more, try BigAnimal for free. Go to biganimal.com/snark, and tell them Corey sent you.Corey: It sounds ridiculous for me to say that, “Oh, here's my entire business strategy: step one, I shitpost on the internet about cloud computing; step two, magic happens here; and step three people reach out to talk about their AWS bills.” But it's also true. Is that the pattern that you go through: step one, shitpost on TikTok; step two, magic happens here; and step three people reach out asking to learn more about what your company does? Or is there more nuance to do it?Alex: I'm still figuring out this whole thing myself, but I will say shitposting is incredibly effective. Because I'm active on Twitter. Twitter is where I start my shitposts. TikTok, I also shitpost, but in video format, I think the number one thing to do is figure out what resonates with people, whether it's the whole contracting thing or if it's frustrations about law school. Once you create something that's compelling, the conversation gets going and you start learning about what people are thinking.And I think that what I'm trying to figure out is how that can lead to a deeper conversation that can lead to a business transaction or lead to a sale. I haven't figured it out, right, but I didn't know that when I started creating content that spoke to people when I was a quota-carrying salesperson, people reached out to me for demo requests, for sales conversations. There is something that is happening in this quote-unquote, “Dark funnel,” that I'm sure you're very familiar with. There's something that's happening that I'm trying to understand, and I'm starting to see.Corey: This is probably a good thing to the zero in on a bit because to most people's understanding of the sales process, it would seem that you going out and making something of a sensation out of yourself on the internet, well what are you doing that for? That's not sales work? How is that sales? That's just basically getting distracted and going to do something fun. Shouldn't you be picking up the phone and cold calling people or mass-emailing folks who don't want to hear from you because you trick them into having a badge scanned somewhere? I don't necessarily think that is accurate. How do you see the interplay of what you do and sales?Alex: When you're selling something like makeup or clothing, it's a pretty transactional process. You create a video; people will buy, right? That's B2C. In B2B, it's a much more complex processes. There's so many touchpoints. The start of a sales conversation and when they actually buy may take six months, 12 months, years. And so, there's got to be a lot of touch points in between.I remember when I was starting out in my content journey, I had this veteran enterprise sales leader, like, your classic, like, CRO. He said to me, “Hey, Alex, your content's very funny, but shouldn't you be making cold calls and emails? Like, why are you spending your time doing this?” And I said, “Hey, listen, do you notice that I'm actually sourcing more outbound sales calls than any other sales rep? Like, have you noticed that?”And he's like, “Actually, yeah, I did notice that. You know, how are you doing it?” And I was like, “Do you not see that these two are tied? These are not people I just started calling. They are people who have seen my content over time. And this is how it works.”And so, I think that the B2B world is starting to wise up to this. I think, for example, Ironclad is leading the way on creating a community team to create those conversations, but plenty of B2B companies are doing the same thing. And so, I think by inserting themselves in a conversation—a two-way conversation—during that process, that's become incredibly effective, far more so than, like, cold-calling a lawyer or a developer who doesn't want to be bothered by some pushy salesperson.Corey: Busy, expensive professionals generally don't want to spend all their time doing that. The cold outreach emails that drive me nuts are, “Hey, can we talk for half an hour?” Yeah, I don't tend to think in terms of billable hours because that's not how I do anything that I do, but there is an internal rate that I used to benchmark and it's what you want me just reach into my pocket and give you how much money for a random opportunity to pitch me on something that you haven't even qualified whether I need or not? It's like, asking people for time is worse, in some ways, than asking for money because they can always make more money, but no one can make more time.Alex: Right, right. That's absolutely right.Corey: It's the lack of awareness of understanding the needs and motivations of your target market. One thing that I found that really aided me back when I was working for other folks was trying to find a company or a management structure that understood and appreciated this. Easy example, when I was setting out as an independent consultant after a few months I'd been doing this and people started to hear about me. But you know, it turns out that there are challenges to running a business that are not recommended for most people. And I debated, do I take a job somewhere else?So, I interviewed at a few places, and I was talking to one company that's active in the cloud costing space at the time and they wanted me to come aboard. But discussions broke down because they thought I was, quote, “More interested in thought leadership than I was and actually fixing the bills themselves.” And looking at this now, four years later or so, yeah, they were right. And amazing how that whole thing played out, but that the lack of vision around, there's an opportunity here, if we can chase it, at least in the places I was at, was relatively hard to come by. Did you luck out in finding a role that works for you in this way or did you basically have to forge it for yourself from the sweat of your brow and the strength of your TikTok account?Alex: It was uphill at first, but eventually, I got lucky. And you know, part of it was engineered luck. And I'll explain what I mean. When I first started out doing this, I didn't expect this to lead to any jobs. I just thought it would support my sales career.Over time, as the content got more popular, I never wanted to do anything else because I was like, I don't want to be a marketer. I'm not a—I don't know anything about demand gen. All I know is how to make funny videos that get people talking. The interesting that happened was that these videos created this awareness, this energy in our space, in the legal space. And it wasn't long before Ironclad found me.And you know, Ironclad has always been big on community, has always done things like—like, our CEO, our founder, he said that he used to host these dinners, never talking about Ironclad, but just kind of talking about law school and law with potential clients. And it would lead to business. Like, it's almost the same concept of, like, not pushing sales on people. And so, Ironclad has always had that in its DNA. And one of our investors, our board members, Jessica Lee from Sequoia, she is a huge believer in community.I mean, she was the CEO of another company that leveraged community, and so there's this community element all throughout the DNA of Ironclad. Now, had I not put myself out there with this content, I may not have been discovered by Ironclad. But they saw me, they found me, and they said, “We don't think about these things like many other companies. We really want to invest in this function.” And so, it's almost like when you put yourself out there, yes, sometimes some people will say, “What are you doing? Like, this makes no sense. Like, stop doing that.” But there's going to be some true believers who come out and seek you out and find you.And that's been my experience here, like, at Ironclad. Like, people were like, “When you go there, are they going to censor you? Is your content going to be less edgy?” No. Like, they pulled me aside multiple times and said, “Keep being yourself. This is what we want.” And I think that is so special and unique. And part of it is very much lucky, but it's also when you put yourself out there kind of in a big way, like-minded people will seek you out as well.Corey: I take the position that part of marketing, part of the core of marketing, is you've got to have an opinion. But as soon as you have an opinion, people are going to disagree with you. They're going to, effectively, forget the human on the other side of it and start taking you for a drag on social media and whatnot. So, the default reaction a lot of people have is oh, I shouldn't venture opinions forward.No. People are always going to dislike you for something and you may as well have it be for who you are and what you want to be doing rather than who you're pretending to be. That's always been my approach. For me, the failure mode was not someone on Twitter is going to get mad about what I wrote. No one's going to read it. That's the failure mode. And the way to avoid that is make it interesting.Alex: That is a hundred percent relatable to me because I think when I was younger, I was scared. I did worry that I would get in trouble for what I posted. But I realized these people I was worried about, they weren't going to help me anyways. These are not people who are going to seek me out and help me but then say, “Oh, I saw your content, so now I can't help you.” They were not going to help me anyways.But by being authentic to myself and putting things out there, I attracted my own tribe of people who have helped me, right? A lot of my early results from content came not because I reached my target customers; it was because somebody resonated with what I put out there and they carried my message and said, “Hey, you should talk to Alex.” Something special happens when you kind of put yourself out there and say an opinion or share a perspective that not everyone agrees with because that tribe you build ends up helping you a lot. And meanwhile, these other people that might not like it, they probably weren't going to help you either.Corey: I maintain that one of the most valuable commodities in the universe is attention. And so, often there's so much information overload that's competing for our attention every minute of every day that trying to blend in with the rest of it feels like the exact wrong approach. I'm not a large company here. I don't have a full marketing department to wind up doing ad buys, and complicated campaigns, and train a team of attacking interns to wind up tackling people to scan their badges at conferences. I've got to work with what I've got.So, the goal I've always had is trigger the Rolodex moment where someone hears about a problem in the AWS billing space—ideally—and, “Oh, my God, you need to talk to Corey about that.” And it worked, for better or worse. And a lot of it was getting lucky, let's be very clear here, and people doing me favors that they had no reason to do and I'll never be able to repay. But being able to be in that space really is what made the difference. Now, the downside, of course, when you start doing that is, how do you go back to what happened before?If you decide okay, well, it's been a fun run for you and Ironclad. And yeah, TikTok. Turns out that is, in fact, for kids; time to go somewhere else. Like, I don't know that you would fit into your old type of job.Alex: Yeah. No, I wouldn't. But very early on, I realized, I said, “If I'm going to find meaningful work, it's okay to be wrong.” And when I went to big law, I realized this is not right for me. That's okay. I'm just not going to get another big law job.And so, when people ask me, “Hey, now that you've put yourself out there, you probably can't get a job at a big firm anymore.” And that's okay to me because I wasn't going to go back anyways. But what I have found, Corey, is that there's this other universe of people, whether it's a entrepreneur, smaller businesses, technology companies, they would be interested in working with me. And so, by being myself, I may have blocked out a certain level of opportunities or a safety net, but now I'm kind of in this other world where I feel very confident that I won't have trouble finding a job. So, I feel very lucky to have that, but that's why I also don't worry about the possibility of not going back.Corey: Yeah, I've never had to think about the idea of, well, what if I go have to get a job again? Because at that point, it means well, it's time to let every one at the company who is depending on the go, and that's the bigger obstacle because, let's be honest, I'm a white guy in tech, and I look like it. My failure mode is basically a board seat and a book deal because of inherent bias in the system.Alex: [laugh]. Oh, my god.Corey: That's the outcome that, for me personally, I will be just fine. It's the other people took a chance on me. I'm terrified of letting them down. So far, knock on wood, I haven't said anything too offensive in public is going to wind up there. That's also not generally my style.But it is the… it is something that has weighed on me that has kept me from I guess, thinking about what would my next job be? I'm convinced this is the last job I'll ever have, if for no other reason that I've made myself utterly unemployable.Alex: [laugh]. Well, I think many of us aspire to find that perfect intersection of what you love doing and what pays the bills. Sounds like you've found it, I really do feel like I found it, too. I never imagined I'd be doing what I do now. Which is also sometimes hard to describe.I'm not making TikToks for a living; I'm just on the community team, doing events—I'm getting to work with people. I'm basically doing the things that I wanted to do that led me to quit that job many years ago, that big law job many years ago. So, I feel very blessed and for anybody who's, like, looking for that type of path, I do think that at some point, you do need to kind of shed the safety nets because if you always hang on to the safety nets, whether it's a big tech job or a big law job, there's going to be elements of that that don't fit in with your personality, and you're never going to be able to find that if you kind of stay there. But if you venture out—and, you know, I admire you for what you've done; it sounds like you're very successful at what you do and get to do what you love every day—I think great things can happen.Corey: Yeah, I get to insult Amazon for a living. It's what I love. It's what I would do if I weren't being paid. So, here we are. Yeah—Alex: [laugh].Corey: I have no sense of self-preservation. It's kind of awesome.Alex: I love it.Corey: But you're right. It's… there's something to be said for finding the thing that winds up resonating with you and what you want to be doing.Alex: It really does. And you know, I think when I first made the move to technology, to sales, there was no career path. I thought I would—maybe I thought I might be a VP of Sales. But the thing is, when you put yourself out there, the opportunities that show up might not be the ones that you had always seen from the beginning. Like if you ask a lawyer, like, “What can I do if I don't practice law?” They're going to give you these generic answers. “Work here. Work there. Work for that company. I've seen a lot of people do this.”But once you put yourself out there in the wilderness, these opportunities arise. And I've been very lucky. I mean, I never imagined I'd be a TikTokker. And by the way, I also make memes on Twitter. Couldn't imagine I'd be doing that either. I learned, like, Mematic, these tools. Like, you know, like, I'm immersed in this internet culture now.Corey: It is bizarre to me and I never saw it coming either. For better or worse, though, here we are, stuck at it.Alex: [laugh].Corey: I really want to thank you for taking so much time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about what you're up to and follow along for the laughs, if nothing else, where's the best place for them to find you?Alex: The best way to find me is on LinkedIn; just look up Alex Su. But I'm around and on lots of social media platforms. You can find me on Twitter, on Instagram, and on TikTok, although I might be a little bit embarrassed of what I put on TikTok. I put some crazy gnarly stuff out there. But yeah, LinkedIn is probably the best place to find me.Corey: And we will put links to all of it in the show notes, and let people wind up making their own decisions. Thanks so much for your time, Alex. I really appreciate it.Alex: Corey, thank you so much for having me. This was so much fun.Corey: Alex Su, Head of Community Development at Ironclad. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry insipid comment talking about how unprofessional everything we talked about is that you will not be able to post for the next six months because it'll be hung up in legal review.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

    WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

    Producers/Hosts: Holli Cederholm, Caitlyn Barker Editing: Clare Boland Common Ground Radio is an hour-long discussion of local food and organic agriculture with people here in the state of Maine and beyond. The August 2022 episode of Common Ground Radio is all about apples! Host Holli Cederholm is joined by Laura Sieger, orchard manager with the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA), and Lydia Pendergast, an orchard intern with MOFGA and self-described “fruit explorer.” They talked about the Maine Heritage Orchard, the importance of cultivar preservation, and how fruit exploration and genetic testing both play important roles in identifying apples at risk of extinction and protecting these fruits in perpetuity. -Historic apples -Fruit explorers -The Maine Heritage Orchard in Unity, Maine -Apple identification -DNA testing of apples -Apple propagation -Organic orcharding -Apples and climate change -Summer apples Guest/s: Laura Sieger, orchard manager, the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association (MOFGA) in Unity, Maine (mofga.org/maineheritageorchard) Lydia Pendergast, orchard intern with MOFGA and fruit explorer FMI Links: Maine Heritage Orchard Stewardship Apples, Fedco: fedcoseeds.com/trees/stewardship-apple-248 “What's in a name? The importance of identity in heirloom apple tree preservation,” published in Plants People Plant and co-authored by Sieger, Pendergast, et al. North American Fruit Explorers Washington State University's Apple Genome Project MyFruitTree, appleID: myfruittree.org Out On A Limb Apples (John Bunker) About the hosts: Holli Cederholm has been involved in organic agriculture since 2005 when she first apprenticed on a small farm. She has worked on organic farms in Maine, Vermont, Connecticut, Scotland and Italy and, in 2010, founded a small farm focused on celebrating open-pollinated and heirloom vegetables. As the former manager of a national nonprofit dedicated to organic seed growers, she authored a peer-reviewed handbook on GMO avoidance strategies for seed growers. Holli has also been a steward at Forest Farm, the iconic homestead of “The Good Life” authors Helen and Scott Nearing; a host of “The Farm Report” on Heritage Radio Network; and a long-time contributor for The Maine Organic Farmer & Gardener, which she now edits in her role as content creator and editor at MOFGA. Caitlyn Barker has worked in education and organic agriculture on and off for the last 17 years. She has worked on an organic vegetable farm, served on the Maine Farm to School network, worked in early childhood education and taught elementary school. She currently serves as the community engagement coordinator for MOFGA. The post Common Ground Radio 8/11/22: Apples! first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

    Hablando de Tecnología con Orlando Mergal | Podcast En Español | Discusión inteligente sobre computadoras, Internet, telé

    Hablar de YouTube es hablar de un mundo donde todos son bellos, esbeltos y felices. Es un mundo donde la gente viaja, guían carros lujosos y viven en grandes mansiones. Otros viven en una van, sin dirección de domicilio ni rumbo fijo. Es un mundo de fantasía con destellos de realidad. Lo difícil es identificar las diferencias. Y créeme, esas diferencias pueden hacer… bueno, toda la diferencia. Por eso, hoy hablamos de “7 Mitos y Realidades Sobre YouTube”. YouTube es un fenómeno de la era del Internet. Muchos lo catalogan como una red social, aunque eso no es del todo cierto. Se estableció el 14 de febrero del 2005. Y si esa fecha del 14 de febrero te resulta familiar. debe ser porque se trata del día de San Valentín. ¿Verdad? Pues da la casualidad de que ese fue el negocio inicial de YouTube. Se fundó como una página de citas para enamorados. En octubre dell 2006 pasó a manos de Google por la astronómica cantidad (para aquella época) de $1.65 billones. Hoy en día es el segundo motor de búsqueda más grande del mundo y está valorado en sobre $180 billones. Y aunque tiene ciertas características que lo asemejan a una red social, su DNA de motor de búsqueda es lo más que lo diferencia.. Cada día que pasa los usuarios suben más de 720,000 horas de video a YouTube. Eso equivale a 500 horas de video por minuto. Mucho de ese video pasa al cementerio del contenido digital. Sencillamente nadie lo ve. Otro se convierte en viral. Y claro, conocer la clave para estar en el segundo grupo y no en el primero es el sueño de cualquier productor. Hoy vamos a explorar “7 Mitos y Realidades Sobre YouTube” que surgen cada vez que se menciona su nombre. Todos piensan conocer la respuesta, pero la realidad es que YouTube la mantiene como “la formula de la Coca Cola”, muuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuy en secreto. Por último, quiero dejar claro que no me considero un experto en YouTube. Produzco mi videos y los coloco. Unas veces tienen éxito y otras no. No soy más que un más de los que andan en busca de respuestas. Pero, a diferencia de otros —que se quedan lo que conocen— yo lo comparto contigo para que a todos nos vaya mejor. Así que ahí lo tienes: “7 Mitos y Realidades Sobre YouTube”… ese es el tema de hoy. Enlaces: Desnudos Ante El Mundo La Atención Es El Producto Cero Clicks. ¿Qué Es, Por Qué Sucede Y Cómo Te Afecta? Cómo Corregir Las Goteras De Tu Propiedad De Internet OTROS EPISODIOS QUE TE PUEDEN INTERESAR: Transporte, Logística, Aduanas y Tecnología Los Miles De Usos Del WD-40 Accesibilidad, Usabilidad, Tecnología y Sociedad La Seguridad En Un Mundo Cibernético Conversando Con Maximiliano ©2022, Orlando Mergal, MA _________________ El autor es Experto En Comunicación Corporativa (Lic. R-500), Autor de más de media docena de Publicaciones de Autoayuda y Productor de Contenido Digital Inf. 787-306-1590 • 787-750-0000 Divulgación de Relación Material: Algunos de los enlaces en esta entrada son “enlaces de afiliados”. Eso significa que si le das click al enlace, y compras algo, yo voy a recibir una comisión de afiliado. No obstante, tú vas a pagar exactamente lo mismo que pagarías al visitar al comerciante directamente y de manera independiente.  Además, yo sólo recomiendo productos o servicios que utilizo personalmente y que pienso que añadirán valor a mis oyentes. Al patrocinar los productos o servicios que mencionamos en Hablando De Tecnología contribuyes para que el programa continúe. Hago esta divulgación en cumplimiento con con el "16 CFR, Part 255" de la Comisión Federal De Comercio de los Estados Unidos "Guías Concernientes al uso de Endosos y Testimonios en la Publicidad".

    True Crime Society
    Mysterious Doe Cases | The Somerton Man, Opelika Jane Doe & Artesia Jane Doe

    True Crime Society

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 62:31


    Join us for this episode of the True Crime Society Podcast as we discuss three fascinating Doe cases.   In October 2020, a quail hunter stumbled across human remains in a cattle float box in Artesia, AZ.  He assumed the remains belonged to a child as they were surrounded by toys.  When police investigated, further, they discovered the remains belonged to a female, likely aged between 13-22.  This Jane Doe was wearing what appeared to be a ‘witches robe', as well as a jacket covered with skull print. The remains of a young girl were found in Opelika, Alabama in January 2012.  She remains unidentified to this day.  In a twist to this case, police have photographs of the girl they believe to be Opelika Jane Doe, when she was alive.  Authorities believe she attended a bible school in the area.  No records of attendees at the school were kept, and none of the teachers recall her name.  This tiny girl had been so badly abused before her death, that police believe she had a very noticeable injury to her eye.  This injury can be seen in the photos they have. The mystery of the Somerton Man is one that has captured the public's attention for decades.  In 1948, a man was found deceased on Somerton Beach in South Australia.  All labels had been removed from his clothing and many medical experts believe that he died from poisoning.  Over the years, many theories about this man were discussed – was he a spy who had been murdered?  Or a ballet dancer – he had pointed toes and high calf muscles, similar to those displayed by dancers?  In July 2022, following extensive DNA testing, researchers announced that they had likely identified the Somerton Man.  (Right before we aired this episode, as usual!) Read our blogs for these cases – TrueCrimeSocietyBlog.com This episode is sponsored by: Microdose Gummies - Go to microdose.com and use code TCS for 30% off your first order of THC gummies. Mind Bullet – Want to increase your energy levels and creativity?  Visit mindbullet.com and use code TCS at checkout for 25% off your first order. Java House -  Cold brew coffee is a better cup of coffee.  Visit JavaHouse.com and use code TCS for 10% off. BetterHelp – BetterHelp is online therapy that offers video, phone and live-chat options.  Visit BetterHelp.com/society for 10% off your first month. 

    Country Squire Radio
    From The Library: Second Wave Tweed

    Country Squire Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 43:09 Very Popular


    The Library or Study has long been the haven of the contemplative pipe smoker. In our ‘From The Library' series, we take a look into the musings, writings, poetry, and more that pique our interest and consider the mind of the author and how we can, or perhaps can't, relate from our own experience. This week:" Second Wave Tweed" From The Lamp Join us in Vegas for our CSR Live From LVG! - Friday, Saturday & Sunday, October 21 – 23, 2022 | 5:00 pm to 7:oo pm Country Squire Radio – Jon David Cole & Beau York - Saturday, October 22nd! Details: Las Vegas International Pipe Show - The Premiere Show for Pipe Enthusiasts (vegaspipeshow.com) Pipe Question: (From Jack Roady) Howdy, Beau and Jon David! I need your recommendations, please. Thanks to the magic of DNA testing, I recently learned that I am 51% Scot -- which came as a complete suprise. I now find myself wanting to fully explore my heritage, and the journey will of course require an appropriate pipe and tobacco of Scottish descent. Would you be so kind as to steer me in the right direction? I'm looking for both pipe recommendations (I currently enjoy the Bing's Favorite and any bent bulldog design) and tobacco recommendations (preferably non-aromatics). Thanks so much for your help -- looking forward to discovering new favorites! Quick Fire Questions: From Jeremy 5)Straight or bent 6)Acrylic or vulcanite/ebonite stem 7)Large bowl or small bowl 8)Symmetrical or Asymmetrical design Listener Feedback: (From Nick Valdez) Hey fellas! I hope everyone is well. Listening to the recent “Miami Mailbag” episode & I wanted to point out something: you guys had this feeling that your being in Miami is more of a detour; however, Miami (aka North Cuba) might be (have been) a great place for you all to involve some topics relating to cigars - particularly Cuban cigars. As ambassadors of the tobacco leaf, you both are in a position to bring these types topics to the table, especially in a city like Miami. Cubaño people have a rich history & culture relating to the tobacco leaf industry. I feel you may have missed an opportunity to visit/explore some of those references. Regardless, your show is always great. You guys are amazing & please keep up the excellent work/product. - Nick

    Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
    1876: Ways to Speed Up Your Metabolism, How to Train After Being Sick, Powerlifting Competition Preparation Tips & More (Listener Live Coaching)

    Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 95:00 Very Popular


    In this episode of Quah (Q & A), Sal, Adam & Justin coach four Pump Heads via Zoom. Mind Pump Fit Tip: When you pull in your waist, suck it in using your transverse abdominis (TVA), you make it smaller! (3:34) Want to improve your mitochondrial health, take alpha lipoic acid! (13:17) Justin doesn't do well solo for too long. (23:14) Recapping Max's first movie theater experience! (25:26) Supporting your kids' passions and endeavors. (34:55) The penis pump story from hell! (40:51) Cannabis and its effect on your sperm DNA. (43:17) The impact of school closures on our children's mental health. (48:39) #ListenerLive question #1 - What is the best approach to a cut when wanting to speed up fat loss? (54:35) #ListenerLive question #2 - Why have I seen such a carryover from the basketball court by doing hypertrophy style training? (1:06:42) #ListenerLive question #3 - What is the best approach to put on size and gain strength for an upcoming powerlifting meet? (1:16:30) #ListenerLive question #4 - In general, how do you guys handle sick days while on a MAPS program? After a few days without lifting, do you pick up where you left off? (1:25:03) Related Links/Products Mentioned Ask a question to Mind Pump, live! Email: live@mindpumpmedia.com Visit LivON Labs for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Visit NED for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! August Special: TOP SELLING PROGRAMS COMBINED FOR ONLY $99.99! Frank Zane Vacuum Pose Shrink Your Waist with Stomach Vacuums | MIND PUMP Tips for the Stomach Vacuum (Shrink your waist) - Mind Pump Blog Depression is not caused by a ‘chemical imbalance' in the brain | Metro News Potential Research Fabrication Bombshell Threatens Amyloid Theory of Alzheimer's Disease Mind Pump #1875: Tainted Science with Max Lugavere Creatine — Health Benefits, Dosage, Side Effects | Examine.com Visit Joovv for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! How to fit fitness into your busy life - Relevant Radio Sperm DNA methylation altered by THC and nicotine: Vulnerability of neurodevelopmental genes with bivalent chromatin School mental health crisis: 70% see rise in students seeking treatment since COVID-19 began: study Visit MASSZYMES by biOptimizers for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code MINDPUMP10 at checkout** Mind Pump #1565: Why Women Should Bulk MAPS Fitness Anabolic MAPS Powerlift Mind Pump #1857: Are Squats Overrated?: A Debate With Eugene Teo Visit Drink LMNT for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Mind Pump #1397: 5 Ways To Maintain Muscle When You're Sick Or Injured Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Max Lugavere (@maxlugavere)  Instagram Patrick Bet-David (@patrickbetdavid)  Instagram Eugene Teo (@coacheugeneteo)  Instagram