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Best podcasts about Fortune

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Latest podcast episodes about Fortune

Business Resilience Decoded
The Four Vectors of Risk – Risk Management Strategies to Follow in 2022

Business Resilience Decoded

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 13:33


Episode 89: The Four Vectors of Risk – Risk Management Strategies to Follow in 2022 This episode is brought to you by Fusion Risk Management, Building a More Resilient World Together. Request a demo at https://bit.ly/FusionDECODED today! I sat down with James Donnelly of M Booth Public Relations to discuss our thoughts on the unique challenges emergency managers will be facing in a post-pandemic world. Together we came up with four vectors of risk that leaders in our field should be aware of to prepare for any scenario in 2022. The four vectors of risk are top-down risks, bottom-up risks, inside-out risks, and outside-in risks. For a more in-depth explanation and discussion questions of each vector, please visit https://bit.ly/FourVectorsofRisk. In this episode, you will learn: How to approach the four vectors of risk Why there's usually a shift in leadership after a disaster Why you should have a personnel contingency plan that includes building leadership from the bottom up How to maintain a steady stream of talent at all times to be prepared for a personnel shift What employees value about the companies they work for - and how they're holding them accountable How systems, industries, and society as a whole have shifted during the pandemic and what to expect post-pandemic Resources Mentioned: M Booth Agency: https://www.mbooth.com/expertise/issues-crisis-management/ Asfalis Advisors Blog Post: https://bit.ly/FourVectorsofRisk “American companies pledged $50 billion to Black communities. Most of it hasn't materialized” – Fortune https://fortune.com/2021/05/06/us-companies-black-communities-money-50-billion/ Disaster Recovery Journal: Register for DRJ's weekly (Wednesday) webinar series: https://drj.com/webinars/up-coming/ Register for DRJ Spring 2022: Resiliency Transformed: http://www.drj.com/spring2022 Asfalis Advisors: Visit our website here: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com Apply to be a guest on the podcast: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/decoded/ Download the 5 Step Crisis Strategy: https://www.asfalisadvisors.com/services/ Connect with the podcast! Please take part in our podcast listener survey: https://forms.gle/XDuYPcFjXaydkEXV6 Email us: podcast@drj.com Podcast website: https://drj.com/decoded/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BRDecoded LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/showcase/business-resilience-decoded/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNEIrqWlxuyDvkXB24h6Obw/videos Vanessa Mathews, host Vanessa Mathews is the founder and chief resilience officer of Asfalis Advisors, where they are focused on protecting the legacy of the leaders they serve through business resilience. Before becoming an entrepreneur, Mathews developed global crisis management and business continuity programs for government and private sector organizations to include Lowe's Companies, Gulfstream Aerospace, and the Department of Homeland Security. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vanessa-vaughn-mathews-mba-cbcp-70916b4b/ Book Mathews as a speaker: https://bit.ly/VanessaMathews Jon Seals, producer Jon Seals is the editor in chief at Disaster Recovery Journal, the leading magazine/event in business continuity. Seals is an award-winning journalist with a background in publication design, business media, content management, sports journalism, social media, and podcasting. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonseals/ Disaster Recovery Journal: https://drj.com/

Dose of Leadership with Richard Rierson | Authentic & Courageous Leadership Development
Peter Boghossian | Beyond Woke & Having Impossible Conversations

Dose of Leadership with Richard Rierson | Authentic & Courageous Leadership Development

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 70:48


Dr. Peter Boghossian's main focus is bringing the tools of professional philosophers to people in a wide variety of contexts. Peter has a teaching pedigree spanning more than 25 years and 30 thousand students - in prisons, hospitals, public and private schools, seminaries, universities, Fortune 100 companies, and small businesses. His fundamental objective is to teach people how to think through what often seem to be intractable problems. Check out Peter's New SubStack: boghossian.substack.com/ Check out Peter's Website: peterboghossian.com/  

PwC's accounting and financial reporting podcast
Finance 2025: How to unlock the promise of automation

PwC's accounting and financial reporting podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 43:49


In our Finance 2025 podcast series, we give listeners a look at the future of finance and the evolutionary road to get there. We're asking: what will the modern finance organization look like in the year 2025?This week Heather Horn sat down with Tabitha DeFrancisco,  partner in PwC's finance transformation practice, to discuss the tools and technology elements that are already available to help companies modernize their finance functions.In this episode you'll find:3:20 - What does “augmented finance” mean?7:20 - The transformational impact of tools and technology11:31 - The importance of leadership buy-in21:17 - How tools enable the demands of rapid decision making25:07 - Deciding where to invest attention and resources31:57 - Getting the most out of your implemented tools35:02 - How to navigate when there are resource constraints38:31 - Process intelligence and task miningWant to learn more?Check out PwC's Tech Effect, a digital resource for busy leaders.Listen to our previous podcasts in the series,  Finance 2025: Transformation made practical and Finance 2025: Transforming with a people-first mindset.Tabitha DeFrancisco is a partner in PwC's finance transformation practice. With over 15 years of client service experience, she advises leaders as they optimize the efficiency of their finance function and enhance the insights it provides to the business. Tabitha leads large-scale transformations to bring back-offices into the digital age. Her work focuses on consumer markets companies ranging from recent IPOs to the Fortune 50.Heather Horn is a Deputy Chief Accountant in PwC's National Office and leader of the thought leadership group, responsible for developing our communications strategy and conveying firm positions on accounting and financial reporting matters. She is the engaging host of PwC's accounting and reporting weekly podcast and quarterly webcast series, as well as periodic webcasts for the power and utilities industry. With over 30 years of experience, Heather's accounting and auditing expertise includes financial instruments and rate-regulated accounting.Transcripts are available upon request. Please send requests to us_podcast@pwc.com.

Best Morning Routine, Ever!
Teaching High-Performing Business Owners To Double Revenue w/ David Wood

Best Morning Routine, Ever!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 36:46


David is a former consulting actuary to Fortune 100 companies. He built the world's largest coaching business, becoming #1 on Google for life coaching and coaching thousands of hours in 12 countries around the globe. As well as helping others, David is no stranger to overcoming challenges himself, having survived a full collapse of his paraglider and a fractured spine, witnessing the death of his sister at age seven, anxiety and depression, and a national Gong Show! He coaches high-performing business owners to double revenue, and their time off by focusing on less and being 30% more courageous in their business or career. Let's see how he Get up, Dress up, and Show up! CONNECT WITH HIM https://focus.ceo    Personal transformation takes time, subscribe now, and let's grow together!  ----------------------------------------­­­­­­­----------------

Screaming in the Cloud
Learning to Give in the Cloud with Andrew Brown

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:40


About AndrewI create free cloud certification courses and somehow still make money.Links: ExamPro Training, Inc.: https://www.exampro.co/ PolyWork: https://www.polywork.com/andrewbrown LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrew-wc-brown Twitter: https://twitter.com/andrewbrown TranscriptAndrew: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief cloud economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is… well, he's challenging to describe. He's the co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro Training, Inc. but everyone knows him better as Andrew Brown because he does so many different things in the AWS ecosystem that it's sometimes challenging—at least for me—to wind up keeping track of them all. Andrew, thanks for joining.Andrew: Hey, thanks for having me on the show, Corey.Corey: How do I even begin describing you? You're an AWS Community Hero and have been for almost two years, I believe; you've done a whole bunch of work as far as training videos; you're, I think, responsible for #100daysofcloud; you recently started showing up on my TikTok feed because I'm pretending that I am 20 years younger than I am and hanging out on TikTok with the kids, and now I feel extremely old. And obviously, you're popping up an awful lot of places.Andrew: Oh, yeah. A few other places like PolyWork, which is an alternative to LinkedIn, so that's a space that I'm starting to build up on there as well. Active in Discord, Slack channels. I'm just kind of everywhere. There's some kind of internet obsession here. My wife gets really mad and says, “Hey, maybe tone down the social media.” But I really enjoy it. So.Corey: You're one of those folks where I have this challenge of I wind up having a bunch of different AWS community Slacks and cloud community, Slacks and Discords and the past, and we DM on Twitter sometimes. And I'm constantly trying to figure out where was that conversational thread that I had with you? And tracking it down is an increasingly large search problem. I really wish that—forget the unified messaging platform. I want a unified search platform for all the different messaging channels that I'm using to talk to people.Andrew: Yeah, it's very hard to keep up with all the channels for myself there. But somehow I do seem to manage it, but just with a bit less sleep than most others.Corey: Oh, yeah. It's like trying to figure out, like, “All right, he said something really useful. What was that? Was that a Twitter DM? Was it on that Slack channel? Was it that Discord? No, it was on that brick that he threw through my window with a note tied to it. There we go.”That's always the baseline stuff of figuring out where things are. So, as I mentioned in the beginning, you are the co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro, which is interesting because unlike most of the community stuff that you do and are known for, you don't generally talk about that an awful lot. What's the deal there?Andrew: Yeah, I think a lot of people give me a hard time because they say, Andrew, you should really be promoting yourself more and trying to make more sales, but that's not why I'm out here doing what I'm doing. Of course, I do have a for-profit business called ExamPro, where we create cloud certification study courses for things like AWS, Azure, GCP, Terraform, Kubernetes, but you know, that money just goes to fuel what I really want to do, is just to do community activities to help people change their lives. And I just decided to do that via cloud because that's my domain expertise. At least that's what I say because I've learned up on in the last four or five years. I'm hoping that there's some kind of impact I can make doing that.Corey: I take a somewhat similar approach. I mean, at The Duckbill Group, we fixed the horrifying AWS bill, but I've always found that's not generally a problem that people tend to advertise having. On Twitter, like, “Oh, man, my AWS bill is killing me this month. I've got to do something about it,” and you check where they work, and it's like a Fortune 50. It's, yeah, that moves markets and no one talks about that.So, my approach was always, be out there, be present in the community, talk about this stuff, and the people who genuinely have billing problems will eventually find their way to me. That was always my approach because turning everything I do into a sales pitch doesn't work. It just erodes confidence, it reminds people of the used mattress salesman, and I just don't want to be that person in that community. My approach has always been if I can help someone with a 15-minute call or whatnot, yeah, let's jump on a phone call. I'm not interested in nickel-and-diming folks.Andrew: Yeah. I think that if you're out there doing a lot of hard work, and a lot of it, it becomes undeniable the value you're putting out there, and then people just will want to give you money, right? And for me, I just feel really bad about taking anybody's money, and so even when there's some kind of benefit—like my courses, I could charge for access for them, but I always feel I have to give something in terms of taking somebody's money, but I would never ask anyone to give me their money. So, it's bizarre. [laugh] so.Corey: I had a whole bunch of people a year or so after I started asking, like, “I really find your content helpful. Can I buy you a cup of coffee or something?” And it's, I don't know how to charge people a dollar figure that doesn't have a comma in it because it's easy for me to ask a company for money; that is the currency of effort, work, et cetera, that companies are accustomed to. People view money very differently, and if I ask you personally for money versus your company for money, it's a very different flow. So, my solution to it was to build the annual charity t-shirt drive, where it's, great, spend 35 bucks or whatever on a snarky t-shirt once a year for ten days and all proceeds go to benefit a nonprofit that is, sort of, assuaged that.But one of my business philosophies has always been, “Work for free before you work for cheap.” And dealing with individuals and whatnot, I do not charge them for things. It's, “Oh, can you—I need some advice in my career. Can I pay you to give me some advice?” “No, but you can jump on a Zoom call with me.” Please, the reason I exist at all is because people who didn't have any reason to did me favors, once upon a time, and I feel obligated to pay that forward.Andrew: And I appreciate, you know, there are people out there that you know, do need to charge for their time. Like—Corey: Oh. Oh, yes.Andrew: —I won't judge anybody that wants to. But you know, for me, it's just I can't do it because of the way I was raised. Like, my grandfather was very involved in the community. Like, he was recognized by the city for all of his volunteer work, and doing volunteer work was, like, mandatory for me as a kid. Like, every weekend, and so for me, it's just like, I can't imagine trying to take people's money.Which is not a great thing, but it turns out that the community is very supportive, and they will come beat you down with a stick, to give you money to make sure you keep doing what you're doing. But you know, I could be making lots of money, but it's just not my priority, so I've avoided any kind of funding so like, you know, I don't become a money-driven company, and I will see how long that lasts, but hopefully, a lot longer.Corey: I wish you well. And again, you're right; no shade to anyone who winds up charging for their time to individuals. I get it. I just always had challenges with it, so I decided not to do it. The only time I find myself begrudging people who do that are someone who picked something up six months ago and decided, oh, I'm going to build some video course on how to do this thing. The end. And charge a bunch of money for it and put myself out as an expert in that space.And you look at what the content they're putting out is, and one, it's inaccurate, which just drives me up a wall, and two, there's a lack of awareness that teaching is its own skill. In some areas, I know how to teach certain things, and in other areas, I'm a complete disaster at it. Public speaking is a great example. A lot of what I do on the public speaking stage is something that comes to me somewhat naturally. So, can you teach me to be a good public speaker? Not really, it's like, well, you gave that talk and it was bad. Could you try giving it only make it good? Like, that is not a helpful coaching statement, so I stay out of that mess.Andrew: Yeah, I mean, it's really challenging to know, if you feel like you're authority enough to put something out there. And there's been a few courses where I didn't feel like I was the most knowledgeable, but I produced those courses, and they had done extremely well. But as I was going through the course, I was just like, “Yeah, I don't know how any this stuff works, but this is my best guess translating from here.” And so you know, at least for my content, people have seen me as, like, the lens of AWS on top of other platforms, right? So, I might not know—I'm not an expert in Azure, but I've made a lot of Azure content, and I just translate that over and I talk about the frustrations around, like, using scale sets compared to AWS auto-scaling groups, and that seems to really help people get through the motions of it.I know if I pass, at least they'll pass, but by no means do I ever feel like an expert. Like, right now I'm doing, like, Kubernetes. Like, I have no idea how I'm doing it, but I have, like, help with three other people. And so I'll just be honest about it and say, “Hey, yeah, I'm learning this as well, but at least I know I passed, so you know, you can pass, too.” Whatever that's worth.Corey: Oh, yeah. Back when I was starting out, I felt like a bit of a fraud because I didn't know everything about the AWS billing system and how it worked and all the different things people can do with it, and things they can ask. And now, five years later, when the industry basically acknowledges I'm an expert, I feel like a fraud because I couldn't possibly understand everything about the AWS billing system and how it works. It's one of those things where the more you learn, the more you realize that there is yet to learn. I'm better equipped these days to find the answers to the things I need to know, but I'm still learning things every day. If I ever get to a point of complete and total understanding of a given topic, I'm wrong. You can always go deeper.Andrew: Yeah, I mean, by no means am I even an expert in AWS, though people seem to think that I am just because I have a lot of confidence in there and I produce a lot of content. But that's a lot different from making a course than implementing stuff. And I do implement stuff, but you know, it's just at the scale that I'm doing that. So, just food for thought for people there.Corey: Oh, yeah. Whatever, I implement something. It's great. In my previous engineering life, I would work on large-scale systems, so I know how a thing that works in your test environment is going to blow up in a production scale environment. And I bring those lessons, written on my bones the painful way, through outages, to the way that I build things now.But the stuff that I'm building is mostly to keep my head in the game, as opposed to solving an explicit business need. Could I theoretically build a podcast transcription system on top of Transcribe or something like that for these episodes? Yeah. But I've been paying a person to do this for many years to do it themselves; they know the terms of art, they know how this stuff works, and they're building a glossary as they go, and understanding the nuances of what I say and how I say it. And that is the better business outcome; that's the answer. And if it's production facing, I probably shouldn't be tinkering with it too much, just based upon where the—I don't want to be the bottleneck for the business functioning.Andrew: I've been spending so much time doing the same thing over and over again, but for different cloud providers, and the more I do, the less I want to go deep on these things because I just feel like I'm dumping all this information I'm going to forget, and that I have those broad strokes, and when I need to go deep dive, I have that confidence. So, I'd really prefer people were to build up confidence in saying, “Yes, I think I can do this.” As opposed to being like, “Oh, I have proof that I know every single feature in AWS Systems Manager.” Just because, like, our platform, ExamPro, like, I built it with my co-founder, and it's a quite a system. And so I'm going well, that's all I need to know.And I talk to other CTOs, and there's only so much you need to know. And so I don't know if there's, like, a shift between—or difference between, like, application development where, let's say you're doing React and using Vercel and stuff like that, where you have to have super deep knowledge for that technical stack, whereas cloud is so broad or diverse that maybe just having confidence and hypothesizing the work that you can do and seeing what the outcome is a bit different, right? Not having to prove one hundred percent that you know it inside and out on day one, but have the confidence.Corey: And there's a lot of validity to that and a lot of value to it. It's the magic word I always found in interviewing, on both sides of the interview table, has always been someone who's unsure about something start with, “I'm not sure, but if I had to guess,” and then say whatever it is you were going to say. Because if you get it right, wow, you're really good at figuring this out, and your understanding is pretty decent. If you're wrong, well, you've shown them how you think but you've also called them out because you're allowed to be wrong; you're not allowed to be authoritatively wrong. Because once that happens, I can't trust anything you say.Andrew: Yeah. In terms of, like, how do cloud certifications help you for your career path? I mean, I find that they're really well structured, and they give you a goal to work towards. So, like, passing that exam is your motivation to make sure that you complete it. Do employers care? It depends. I would say mostly no. I mean, for me, like, when I'm hiring, I actually do care about certifications because we make certification courses but—Corey: In your case, you're a very specific expression of this that is not typical.Andrew: Yeah. And there are some, like, cases where, like, if you work for a larger cloud consultancy, you're expected to have a professional certification so that customers feel secure in your ability to execute. But it's not like they were trying to hire you with that requirement, right? And so I hope that people realize that and that they look at showing that practical skills, by building up cloud projects. And so that's usually a strong pairing I'll have, which is like, “Great. Get the certifications to help you just have a structured journey, and then do a Cloud project to prove that you can do what you say you can do.”Corey: One area where I've seen certifications act as an interesting proxy for knowledge is when you have a company that has 5000 folks who work in IT in varying ways, and, “All right. We're doing a big old cloud migration.” The certification program, in many respects, seems to act as a bit of a proxy for gauging where people are on upskilling, how much they have to learn, where they are in that journey. And at that scale, it begins to make some sense to me. Where do you stand on that?Andrew: Yeah. I mean, it's hard because it really depends on how those paths are built. So, when you look at the AWS certification roadmap, they have the Certified Cloud Practitioner, they have three associates, two professionals, and a bunch of specialties. And I think that you might think, “Well, oh, solutions architect must be very popular.” But I think that's because AWS decided to make the most popular, the most generic one called that, and so you might think that's what's most popular.But what they probably should have done is renamed that Solution Architect to be a Cloud Engineer because very few people become Solutions Architect. Like that's more… if there's Junior Solutions Architect, I don't know where they are, but Solutions Architect is more of, like, a senior role where you have strong communications, pre-sales, obviously, the role is going to vary based on what companies decide a Solution Architect is—Corey: Oh, absolutely take a solutions architect, give him a crash course in finance, and we call them a cloud economist.Andrew: Sure. You just add modifiers there, and they're something else. And so I really think that they should have named that one as the cloud engineer, and they should have extracted it out as its own tier. So, you'd have the Fundamental, the Certified Cloud Practitioner, then the Cloud Engineer, and then you could say, “Look, now you could do developer or the sysops.” And so you're creating this path where you have a better trajectory to see where people really want to go.But the problem is, a lot of people come in and they just do the solutions architect, and then they don't even touch the other two because they say, well, I got an associate, so I'll move on the next one. So, I think there's some structuring there that comes into play. You look at Azure, they've really, really caught up to AWS, and may I might even say surpass them in terms of the quality and the way they market them and how they construct their certifications. There's things I don't like about them, but they have, like, all these fundamental certifications. Like, you have Azure Fundamentals, Data Fundamentals, AI Fundamentals, there's a Security Fundamentals.And to me, that's a lot more valuable than going over to an associate. And so I did all those, and you know, I still think, like, should I go translate those over for AWS because you have to wait for a specialty before you pick up security. And they say, like, it's intertwined with all the certifications, but, really isn't. Like—and I feel like that would be a lot better for AWS. But that's just my personal opinion. So.Corey: My experience with AWS certifications has been somewhat minimal. I got the Cloud Practitioner a few years ago, under the working theory of I wanted to get into the certified lounge at some of the events because sometimes I needed to charge things and grab a cup of coffee. I viewed it as a lounge pass with a really strange entrance questionnaire. And in my case, yeah, I passed it relatively easily; if not, I would have some questions about how much I actually know about these things. As I recall, I got one question wrong because I was honest, instead of going by the book answer for, “How long does it take to restore an RDS database from a snapshot?”I've had some edge cases there that give the wrong answer, except that's what happened. And then I wound up having that expire and lapse. And okay, now I'll do it—it was in beta at the time, but I got the sysops associate cert to go with it. And that had a whole bunch of trivia thrown into it, like, “Which of these is the proper syntax for this thing?” And that's the kind of question that's always bothered me because when I'm trying to figure things like that out, I have entire internet at my fingertips. Understanding the exact syntax, or command-line option, or flag that needs to do a thing is a five-second Google search away in most cases. But measuring for people's ability to memorize and retain that has always struck me as a relatively poor proxy for knowledge.Andrew: It's hard across the board. Like Azure, AWS, GCP, they all have different approaches—like, Terraform, all of them, they're all different. And you know, when you go to interview process, you have to kind of extract where the value is. And I would think that the majority of the industry, you know, don't have best practices when hiring, there's, like, a superficial—AWS is like, “Oh, if you do well, in STAR program format, you must speak a communicator.” Like, well, I'm dyslexic, so that stuff is not easy for me, and I will never do well in that.So like, a lot of companies hinge on those kinds of components. And I mean, I'm sure it doesn't matter; if you have a certain scale, you're going to have attrition. There's no perfect system. But when you look at these certifications, and you say, “Well, how much do they match up with the job?” Well, they don't, right? It's just Jeopardy.But you know, I still think there's value for yourself in terms of being able to internalize it. I still think that does prove that you have done something. But taking the AWS certification is not the same as taking Andrew Brown's course. So, like, my certified cloud practitioner was built after I did GCP, Oracle Cloud, Azure Fundamentals, a bunch of other Azure fundamental certifications, cloud-native stuff, and then I brought it over because was missing, right? So like, if you went through my course, and that I had a qualifier, then I could attest to say, like, you are of this skill level, right?But it really depends on what that testament is and whether somebody even cares about what my opinion of, like, your skillset is. But I can't imagine like, when you have a security incident, there's going to be a pop-up that shows you multiple-choice answer to remediate the security incident. Now, we might get there at some point, right, with all the cloud automation, but we're not there yet.Corey: It's been sort of thing we've been chasing and never quite get there. I wish. I hope I live to see it truly I do. My belief is also that the value of a certification changes depending upon what career stage someone is at. Regardless of what level you are at, a hiring manager or a company is looking for more or less a piece of paper that attests that they're to solve the problem that they are hiring to solve.And entry-level, that is often a degree or a certification or something like that in the space that shows you have at least the baseline fundamentals slash know how to learn things. After a few years, I feel like that starts to shift into okay, you've worked in various places solving similar problems on your resume that the type that we have—because the most valuable thing you can hear when you ask someone, “How would we solve this problem?” Is, “Well, the last time I solved it, here's what we learned.” Great. That's experience. There's no compression algorithm for experience? Yes, there is: Hiring people with experience.Then, at some level, you wind up at the very far side of people who are late-career in many cases where the piece of paper that shows that they know what they're doing is have you tried googling their name and looking at the Wikipedia article that spits out, how they built fundamental parts of a system like that. I think that certifications are one of those things that bias for early-career folks. And of course, partners when there are other business reasons to get it. But as people grow in seniority, I feel like the need for those begins to fall off. Do you agree? Disagree? You're much closer to this industry in that aspect of it than I am.Andrew: The more senior you are, and if you have big names under your resume there, no one's going to care if you have certification, right? When I was looking to switch careers—I used to have a consultancy, and I was just tired of building another failed startup for somebody that was willing to pay me. And I'm like—I was not very nice about it. I was like, “Your startup's not going to work out. You really shouldn't be building this.” And they still give me the money and it would fail, and I'd move on to the next one. It was very frustrating.So, closed up shop on that. And I said, “Okay, I got to reenter the market.” I don't have a computer science degree, I don't have big names on my resume, and Toronto is a very competitive market. And so I was feeling friction because people were not valuing my projects. I had, like, full-stack projects, I would show them.And they said, “No, no. Just do these, like, CompSci algorithms and stuff like that.” And so I went, “Okay, well, I really don't want to be doing that. I don't want to spend all my time learning algorithms just so I can get a job to prove that I already have the knowledge I have.” And so I saw a big opportunity in cloud, and I thought certifications would be the proof to say, “I can do these things.”And when I actually ended up going for the interviews, I didn't even have certifications and I was getting those opportunities because the certifications helped me prove it, but nobody cared about the certifications, even then, and that was, like, 2017. But not to say, like, they didn't help me, but it wasn't the fact that people went, “Oh, you have a certification. We'll get you this job.”Corey: Yeah. When I'm talking to consulting clients, I've never once been asked, “Well, do you have the certifications?” Or, “Are you an AWS partner?” In my case, no, neither of those things. The reason that we know what we're doing is because we've done this before. It's the expertise approach.I question whether that would still be true if we were saying, “Oh, yeah, and we're going to drop a dozen engineers on who are going to build things out of your environment.” “Well, are they certified?” is a logical question to ask when you're bringing in an external service provider? Or is this just a bunch of people you found somewhere on Upwork or whatnot, and you're throwing them at it with no quality control? Like, what is the baseline level experience? That's a fair question. People are putting big levels of trust when they bring people in.Andrew: I mean, I could see that as a factor of some clients caring, just because like, when I used to work in startups, I knew customers where it's like their second startup, and they're flush with a lot of money, and they're deciding who they want to partner with, and they're literally looking at what level of SSL certificate they purchased, right? Like now, obviously, they're all free and they're very easy to get to get; there was one point where you had different tiers—as if you would know—and they would look and they would say—Corey: Extended validation certs attend your browser bar green. Remember those?Andrew: Right. Yeah, yeah, yeah. It was just like that, and they're like, “We should partner with them because they were able to afford that and we know, like…” whatever, whatever, right? So, you know, there is that kind of thought process for people at an executive level. I'm not saying it's widespread, but I've seen it.When you talk to people that are in cloud consultancy, like solutions architects, they always tell me they're driven to go get those professional certifications [unintelligible 00:22:19] their customers matter. I don't know if the customers care or not, but they seem to think so. So, I don't know if it's just more driven by those people because it's an expectation because everyone else has it, or it's like a package of things, like, you know, like the green bar in the certifications, SOC 2 compliance, things like that, that kind of wrap it up and say, “Okay, as a package, this looks really good.” So, more of an expectation, but not necessarily matters, it's just superficial; I'm not sure.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: You've been building out certifications for multiple cloud providers, so I'm curious to get your take on something that Forrest Brazeal, who's now head of content over at Google Cloud, has been talking about lately, the idea that as an engineer is advised to learn more than one cloud provider; even if you have one as a primary, learning how another one works makes you a better engineer. Now, setting aside entirely the idea that well, yeah, if I worked at Google, I probably be saying something fairly similar.Andrew: Yeah.Corey: Do you think there's validity to the idea that most people should be broad across multiple providers, or do you think specialization on one is the right path?Andrew: Sure. Just to contextualize for our listeners, Google Cloud is highly, highly promoting multi-cloud workloads, and one of their flagship products is—well, they say it's a flagship product—is Anthos. And they put a lot of money—I don't know that was subsidized, but they put a lot of money in it because they really want to push multi-cloud, right? And so when we say Forrest works in Google Cloud, it should be no surprise that he's promoting it.But I don't work for Google, and I can tell you, like, learning multi-cloud is, like, way more valuable than just staying in one vertical. It just opened my eyes. When I went from AWS to Azure, it was just like, “Oh, I'm missing out on so much in the industry.” And it really just made me such a more well-rounded person. And I went over to Google Cloud, and it was just like… because you're learning the same thing in different variations, and then you're also poly-filling for things that you will never touch.Or like, I shouldn't say you never touch, but you would never touch if you just stayed in that vertical when you're learning. So, in the industry, Azure Active Directory is, like, widespread, but if you just stayed in your little AWS box, you're not going to notice it on that learning path, right? And so a lot of times, I tell people, “Go get your CLF-C01 and then go get your AZ-900 or AZ-104.” Again, I don't care if people go and sit the exams. I want them to go learn the content because it is a large eye-opener.A lot of people are against multi-cloud from a learning perspective because say, it's too much to learn all at the same time. But a lot of people I don't think have actually gone across the cloud, right? So, they're sitting from their chair, only staying in one vertical saying, “Well, you can't learn them all at the same time.” And I'm going, “I see a way that you could teach them all at the same time.” And I might be the first person that will do it.Corey: And the principles do convey as well. It's, “Oh, well I know how SNS works on AWS, so I would never be able to understand how Google Pub/Sub works.” Those are functionally identical; I don't know that is actually true. It's just different to interface points and different guarantees, but fine. You at least understand the part that it plays.I've built things out on Google Cloud somewhat recently, and for me, every time I do, it's a refreshing eye-opener to oh, this is what developer experience in the cloud could be. And for a lot of customers, it is. But staying too far within the bounds of one ecosystem does lend itself to a loss of perspective, if you're not careful. I agree with that.Andrew: Yeah. Well, I mean, just the paint more of a picture of differences, like, Google Cloud has a lot about digital transformation. They just updated their—I'm not happy that they changed it, but I'm fine that they did that, but they updated their Google Digital Cloud Leader Exam Guide this month, and it like is one hundred percent all about digital transformation. So, they love talking about digital transformation, and those kind of concepts there. They are really good at defining migration strategies, like, at a high level.Over to Azure, they have their own cloud adoption framework, and it's so detailed, in terms of, like, execution, where you go over to AWS and they have, like, the worst cloud adoption framework. It's just the laziest thing I've ever seen produced in my life compared to out of all the providers in that space. I didn't know about zero-trust model until I start using Azure because Azure has Active Directory, and you can do risk-based policy procedures over there. So, you know, like, if you don't go over to these places, you're not going to get covered other places, so you're just going to be missing information till you get the job and, you know, that job has that information requiring you to know it.Corey: I would say that for someone early career—and I don't know where this falls on the list of career advice ranging from, “That is genius,” to, “Okay, Boomer,” but I would argue that figuring out what companies in your geographic area, or the companies that you have connections with what they're using for a cloud provider, I would bias for learning one enough to get hired there and from there, letting what you learn next be dictated by the environment you find yourself in. Because especially larger companies, there's always something that lives in a different provider. My default worst practice is multi-cloud. And I don't say that because multi-cloud doesn't exist, and I'm not saying it because it's a bad idea, but this idea of one workload—to me—that runs across multiple providers is generally a challenge. What I see a lot more, done intelligently, is, “Okay, we're going to use this provider for some things, this other provider for other things, and this third provider for yet more things.” And every company does that.If not, there's something very strange going on. Even Amazon uses—if not Office 365, at least exchange to run their email systems instead of Amazon WorkMail because—Andrew: Yeah.Corey: Let's be serious. That tells me a lot. But I don't generally find myself in a scenario where I want to build this application that is anything more than Hello World, where I want it to run seamlessly and flawlessly across two different cloud providers. That's an awful lot of work that I struggle to identify significant value for most workloads.Andrew: I don't want to think about securing, like, multiple workloads, and that's I think a lot of friction for a lot of companies are ingress-egress costs, which I'm sure you might have some knowledge on there about the ingress-egress costs across providers.Corey: Oh, a little bit, yeah.Andrew: A little bit, probably.Corey: Oh, throwing data between clouds is always expensive.Andrew: Sure. So, I mean, like, I call multi-cloud using multiple providers, but not in tandem. Cross-cloud is when you want to use something like Anthos or Azure Arc or something like that where you extend your data plane or control pla—whatever the plane is, whatever plane across all the providers. But you know, in practice, I don't think many people are doing cross-cloud; they're doing multi-cloud, like, “I use AWS to run my primary workloads, and then I use Microsoft Office Suite, and so we happen to use Azure Active Directory, or, you know, run particular VM machines, like Windows machines for our accounting.” You know?So, it's a mixed bag, but I do think that using more than one thing is becoming more popular just because you want to use the best in breed no matter where you are. So like, I love BigQuery. BigQuery is amazing. So, like, I ingest a lot of our data from, you know, third-party services right into that. I could be doing that in Redshift, which is expensive; I could be doing that in Azure Synapse, which is also expensive. I mean, there's a serverless thing. I don't really get serverless. So, I think that, you know, people are doing multi-cloud.Corey: Yeah. I would agree. I tend to do things like that myself, and whenever I see it generally makes sense. This is my general guidance. When I talk to individuals who say, “Well, we're running multi-cloud like this.” And my response is, “Great. You're probably right.”Because I'm talking in the general sense, someone building something out on day one where they don't know, like, “Everyone's saying multi-cloud. Should I do that?” No, I don't believe you should. Now, if your company has done that intentionally, rather than by accident, there's almost certainly a reason and context that I do not have. “Well, we have to run our SaaS application in multiple cloud providers because that's where our customers are.” “Yeah, you should probably do that.” But your marketing, your billing systems, your back-end reconciliation stuff generally does not live across all of those providers. It lives in one. That's the sort of thing I'm talking about. I think we're in violent agreement here.Andrew: Oh, sure, yeah. I mean, Kubernetes obviously is becoming very popular because people believe that they'll have a lot more mobility, Whereas when you use all the different managed—and I'm still learning Kubernetes myself from the next certification I have coming out, like, study course—but, you know, like, those managed services have all different kind of kinks that are completely different. And so, you know, it's not going to be a smooth process. And you're still leveraging, like, for key things like your database, you're not going to be running that in Kubernetes Cluster. You're going to be using a managed service.And so, those have their own kind of expectations in terms of configuration. So, I don't know, it's tricky to say what to do, but I think that, you know, if you have a need for it, and you don't have a security concern—like, usually it's security or cost, right, for multi-cloud.Corey: For me, at least, the lock-in has always been twofold that people don't talk about. More—less lock-in than buy-in. One is the security model where IAM is super fraught and challenging and tricky, and trying to map a security model to multiple providers is super hard. Then on top of that, you also have the buy-in story of a bunch of engineers who are very good at one cloud provider, and that skill set is not in less demand now than it was a year ago. So okay, you're going to start over and learn a new cloud provider is often something that a lot of engineers won't want to countenance.If your team is dead set against it, there's going to be some friction there and there's going to be a challenge. I mean, for me at least, to say that someone knows a cloud provider is not the naive approach of, “Oh yeah, they know how it works across the board.” They know how it breaks. For me, one of the most valuable reasons to run something on AWS is I know what a failure mode looks like, I know how it degrades, I know how to find out what's going on when I see that degradation. That to me is a very hard barrier to overcome. Alternately, it's entirely possible that I'm just old.Andrew: Oh, I think we're starting to see some wins all over the place in terms of being able to learn one thing and bring it other places, like OpenTelemetry, which I believe is a cloud-native Kubernetes… CNCF. I can't remember what it stands for. It's like Linux Foundation, but for cloud-native. And so OpenTelemetry is just a standardized way of handling your logs, metrics, and traces, right? And so maybe CloudWatch will be the 1.0 of observability in AWS, and then maybe OpenTelemetry will become more of the standard, right, and so maybe we might see more managed services like Prometheus and Grafa—well, obviously, AWS has a managed Prometheus, but other things like that. So, maybe some of those things will melt away. But yeah, it's hard to say what approach to take.Corey: Yeah, I'm wondering, on some level, whether what the things we're talking about today, how well that's going to map forward. Because the industry is constantly changing. The guidance I would give about should you be in cloud five years ago would have been a nuanced, “Mmm, depends. Maybe for yes, maybe for no. Here's the story.” It's a lot less hedge-y and a lot less edge case-y these days when I answer that question. So, I wonder in five years from now when we look back at this podcast episode, how well this discussion about what the future looks like, and certifications, and multi-cloud, how well that's going to reflect?Andrew: Well, when we look at, like, Kubernetes or Web3, we're just seeing kind of like the standardized boilerplate way of doing a bunch of things, right, all over the place. This distributed way of, like, having this generic API across the board. And how well that will take, I have no idea, but we do see a large split between, like, serverless and cloud-natives. So, it's like, what direction? Or we'll just have both? Probably just have both, right?Corey: [Like that 00:33:08]. I hope so. It's been a wild industry ride, and I'm really curious to see what changes as we wind up continuing to grow. But we'll see. That's the nice thing about this is, worst case, if oh, turns out that we were wrong on this whole cloud thing, and everyone starts exodusing back to data centers, well, okay. That's the nice thing about being a small company. It doesn't take either of us that long to address the reality we see in the industry.Andrew: Well, that or these cloud service providers are just going to get better at offering those services within carrier hotels, or data centers, or on your on-premise under your desk, right? So… I don't know, we'll see. It's hard to say what the future will be, but I do believe that cloud is sticking around in one form or another. And it basically is, like, an essential skill or table stakes for anybody that's in the industry. I mean, of course, not everywhere, but like, mostly, I would say. So.Corey: Andrew, I want to thank you for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about your opinions, how you view these things, et cetera. Where can they find you?Andrew: You know, I think the best place to find me right now is Twitter. So, if you go to twitter.com/andrewbrown—all lowercase, no spaces, no underscores, no hyphens—you'll find me there. I'm so surprised I was able to get that handle. It's like the only place where I have my handle.Corey: And we will of course put links to that in the [show notes 00:34:25]. Thanks so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Andrew: Well, thanks for having me on the show.Corey: Andrew Brown, co-founder and cloud instructor at ExamPro Training and so much more. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, along with an angry comment telling me that I do not understand certifications at all because you're an accountant, and certifications matter more in that industry.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE
Fortune Feimster (on Stand Up, Chelsea Handler, Mindy Kaling, Margaret Josephs & Real Housewives!)

BEHIND THE VELVET ROPE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 73:54


Fortune Feimster steps Behind The Rope. Comedian Extraordinaire, Actresses, Activist, Stand Up Legend, Real Housewives Lover. Fortune is here to chat about her new starring role alongside Paris Jackson and Margaret Cho in “Sex Appeal”. Fortune walks us down the road of early beginnings as an entertainment journalist, The Groundlings, Last Comic Standing to Chelsea Lately, The Mindy Kaling Show, and guest staring roles on many of our favorite shows - Glee, Claws, The L Word, Two Broke Girls and many more. Having appeared on Watch What Happens Live with many of our favs such as our very own Margaret Josephs, we chat about many current BravoVerse events - Erika Jayne, Jen Shah, Tre Giudice's New Man, The Upcoming Return of RHONJ, the return of RHONY and what to expect from some of our fav Bravolebs over the next few months. Did we mention just how f'ing funny Fortune is?  @fortunefeimster @behindvelvetrope @davidyontef BONUS & AD FREE EPISODES Available at - https://www.patreon.com/behindthevelvetrope BROUGHT TO YOU BY: BOMBAS - www.bombas.com/VELVET (Get 20% Off Any Purchase) TODAYTIX - www.todaytix.com/velvet ($10 Off First Purchase. Use Code “velvet”) INDEED - www.indeed.com/VELVET ($75 Job Credit to Upgrade Your Job Post. Valid Through March 31st, 2022.) ATHLETIC GREENS - www.athleticgreens.com/VELVET (Free 1 Year Supply of Vitamin D and Five Free Travel Packs With Your First Purchase) TALKSPACE - www.talkspace.com ($100 Off Your First Month. Use Code “velvet”) BEST FIENDS - (Download Best Fiends FREE Today on the App Store or Google Play.) WONDERY - (Listen to Even the Rich: Patty Hearst / Rich and Daily ad-free by joining Wondery Plus in the Wondery App) MERCH Available at - https://www.teepublic.com/stores/behind-the-velvet-rope?ref_id=13198 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tech Leader Talk
How to improve communication in technology companies – Jayant Chaudhary

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 36:23


On this episode, Jayant Chaudhary and I talk about his current work with technology companies. Jayant is an Innovative CTO who works in the areas of ecommerce, marketing, payments, logistics, and team building. He has 30 years of technology and leadership experience, and enjoys helping businesses make better technology decisions as they bring in new solutions. He's been a tech leader at startups and Fortune 50 companies. Jayant has led teams of over 300 people and managed budgets of over $40 million. Today, he is the CTO of eProxim, which provides technological expertise to solve complex ecommerce and middleware problems. “Most technology projects run into trouble due to a lack of good communication.” – Jayant Chaudhary Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - How to improve communication in tech startups- The importance of developing trust with your team- Tips for building a strong ecommerce platform- How to grow your ecommerce platform as your company grows- How to build a strong communication system in your organization Connect with Jayant Chaudhary: Email: jc@eproxim.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jchaudhary Website: https://eproxim.com/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!
Episode 291: Characteristics of Goal Achievers with Kristin Burke

Oh, My Health...There Is Hope!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 34:12


In this episode of Oh My Heath ... There's HOPE! Jana talks with Kristin Burke.   Kristin Burke's mission is to help others maximize their potential and achieve their definitions of success. As a goal achievement coach, Kristin collaborates with women, entrepreneurs, and leaders to accomplish breakout performances. Her clients excel with goal clarity, grow their confidence, and consistently pursue progress in the direction of their goals. Kristin also hosts the Elite Achievement podcast.   After working over a decade in a male-dominated industry, Kristin is passionate about empowering women to advance professionally. Her curiosity for women having it all blossomed in graduate school, where she authored her thesis on work-life balance. After concluding that the very word "balance" communicated an unrealistic reality, she started her quest to help others understand how to thrive personally and professionally.   Kristin launched her coaching practice after advancing in her corporate career from an intern to a senior-level director. During her tenure with a Fortune 200 financial services firm, Kristin coached hundreds of small business owners as they developed and grew their practices. She established the platform for the organization's top-ranking internship program, supported leaders on their development journeys, and recruited talent to advance the organization's impact in the marketplace. The achievements of the recruits and professionals under her guidance led to setting multiple company records in her organization and throughout the country. She has spoken at numerous annual meetings, regional meetings, leadership clinics, and women's summits.   Kristin is married to her high-school sweetheart, Joe, and they have a vivacious daughter, Scarlett. In her free time, Kristin enjoys finding flow through her yoga practice, riding her Peloton, and reading.   Jana and Kristin talk about: 1) How to navigate your goals and hit them with power 2) Are you competing with yourself? 3) 80% of everything you achieve is a mindset and 20% is a strategy 4) Clarity: get very clear on what you want to achieve 5) Confidence: think in the direction of your goals 6) Courage: start embracing all the unfamiliar 7) Consistency: Start making regular progress     This 30-minute episode is on: In this episode, Jana and Kristin talk about the 4-characteristics of Goal Achievers. How to navigate your goals and achieve them. Are you competing with yourself? Clarity, Confidence, Courage, and Consistency when achieving.   Meet Kristin Burke: https://kristinburke.com/  https://www.instagram.com/meetkristinburke/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/burkekristin/      Free Gift: Listeners can head to my website kristinburke.com to download a copy of my breakout plan. My breakout plan is designed to help people gain goal clarity, outline strategies to achieve their goals, and think through accountability to increase the likelihood of goal achievement. Get in touch with Jana and listen to more Podcasts: https://www.janashort.com/   Show Music ‘Hold On' by Amy Gerhartz https://www.amygerhartz.com/music  Free Gift: 5 Keys To Becoming The Next Influencer Free Video Series Are you ready to see just how powerful your business can be through storytelling? Grab my FREE video series outlining how you can become the next influencer through your powerful story. The upside is right; now, over 90% of businesses are online. On the downside to you is over 90% of businesses are currently online. If you want to stake your place in this crowded space, you need to stand out and be unique. Learn how to do just that for your brand and business. Grab your gift today: https://www.janashort.com/becoming-the-next-influencers-download-offer/  Connect with Jana Short: https://www.janashort.com/contact/ 

Weird Studies
Episode 114: On the Wheel of Fortune, the Tenth Card of the Tarot

Weird Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 94:59


Season five kicks off with a new installment in the ongoing series on the Tarot's twenty-two major arcana. This time, your hosts overcome the trials that fortune has dealt them -- a hangover in the case of Phil, a sleepless night for JF -- to discuss the Wheel of Fortune. Not surprisingly, the conversation is a mess, albeit a beautiful one that comes full circle in the end, tying up all its loose ends in something like a bow (or a coiled serpent). Topics include the challenges of improvised philosophical discussion, the importance of exposing oneself to difficult ideas, the serpentine nature of immanentist discourse, and the doctrine of the Fall. As usual, the anomymously-authored Meditations on the Tarot gets pride of place, although occult luminaries such as Alejandro Jodorowsky, Aleister Crowley, and Pat Sajak make notable appearances. Support us on Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/weirdstudies) Find us on Discord (https://discord.com/invite/Jw22CHfGwp) Get the new T-shirt design from Cotton Bureau (https://cottonbureau.com/products/can-o-content#/13435958/tee-men-standard-tee-vintage-black-tri-blend-s)! Get your Weird Studies merchandise (https://www.redbubble.com/people/Weird-Studies/shop?asc=u) (t-shirts, coffee mugs, etc.) Visit the Weird Studies Bookshop (https://bookshop.org/shop/weirdstudies) Buy the Weird Studies soundtrack (https://pierre-yvesmartel.bandcamp.com/album/weird-studies-music-from-the-podcast-vol-1) REFERENCES Our Known Friend, Meditations on the Tarot (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781585421619) Pints with Aquinas (https://pintswithaquinas.com) Jaroslav Hašek (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaroslav_Ha%C5%A1ek), Czech author Lon Milo Duquette, Understanding Aleister Crowley's Thoth Tarot (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781578636235) True Detective (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2356777/), tv show Thomas Ligotti, Conspiracy Against the Human Race (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780143133148) Henri Bergson, The Two Sources of Morality and Religion (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780343303433) Alexander Jodorowsky, The Way of Tarot (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9781594772634) Jessica Hundley et. al., Tarot. Library of Esoterica (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9783836579872) Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Teilhard_de_Chardin), French priest and scientist Herman Hesse, The Glass Bead Game (https://bookshop.org/a/18799/9780312278496) Bruno Latour (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruno_Latour), French philosopher David Bentley Hart interview (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQBfoneh97E)

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies
How This Agency Got to $40 Million by Setting Clear Financial Goals

Smart Agency Masterclass with Jason Swenk: Podcast for Digital Marketing Agencies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:44


Do you want to get your agency to the eight-figure mark and beyond? What are you doing to get to that level? Erik Huberman had started a few e-commerce companies and was unimpressed by the agencies he had worked with, so he decided to form a small team that could assist his clients. He quickly saw a positive response and created Hawke Media, an outsourced CMO and marketing team that customizes data-driven, performance solutions to help launch, scale, and invigorate businesses. In this interview, Erik talks about how setting financial goals helped him grow his agency to over $40 million. He also shares his marketing methodology and his book, The Hawke Method.  Plus the mistake many agencies make when they start growing, and much more. 3 Golden Nuggets On goal-setting. During the first year of his business, Erik saw things were going well and decided to set financial goals for the next couple of years. He met every one of them, so he believes there's a lot to be said about setting a goal and striving to hit it, and having incremental goals to get there. This will force you to step up when you're falling behind and keep you proactive in the market. In his case, he mainly used it as a scoreboard, as an indicator of growth. It really helped during the agency's first years and he noticed a difference when he stopped doing it around year six. Agency mistakes. According to Erik, some agencies tend to protect themselves a little too much once they get good and do it too soon. “They start throwing out long contracts, high minimums, they go upmarket, they only want to work with fortune 2000,” he says. He believes that this behavior alienates the people that got the business to that point. It is a solid way of doing business and works for many agencies, but Erik decided it wasn't for him and went on to build his business model on challenging himself to consider can you be one of the best marketing companies out there and still work with small and medium businesses too? Understanding the purchase cycle. A lot of marketers and agencies fail to understand the idea of a sales cycle or a purchase cycle. Many times agencies advertise for clients that ask for daily performance reports. “The problem with that,” he explains, “is that what we've seen in e-commerce is that for a $50 average order value will be about a three-week purchase cycle and about five weeks for a hundred dollars,” so understanding the purchase cycle will be critical for the agency-client relationship and a big part of setting realistic expectations about the work. Sponsors and Resources Verblio: Today's episode of the Smart Agency Masterclass is sponsored by Verblio. Check out Verblio.com/smartagency and get 50% off your first month of content creation. Our team loves using Verblio because of the ease in their process and their large pool of crowd-sourced writers. Subscribe Apple | Spotify | iHeart Radio | Stitcher | Radio FM Getting to $40 million by setting financial goals & understanding the purchase cycle {These transcripts have been auto-generated. While largely accurate, they may contain some errors.} Jason: [00:00:00] What's up, agency owners? Jason Swenk and I got another amazing guest. And we're going to talk with Eric of Hawke Media and how they built an almost $40 million agency, or probably by now, they're already over 40 million and cresting the many, many commas, whatever in there. So, excited to get the episode. Let's jump in. Hey, Erik. Welcome to the show. Erik: [00:00:29] Thanks for having me. Jason: [00:00:30] Yeah, man. Excited to have you on. So tell us who you are and what do you do? Erik: [00:00:35] Sure. Uh, Erik Huberman, co-founder and CEO of Hawke Media. We're basically an outsource CMO and marketing team to companies. So we go into brands, identify full-time marketing and spin up different experts. All à la carte month to month. So it could be a Facebook marketer, email marketer, web designer. We've been around about eight years up to 70 full-time people. We run marketing for about 600 brands. And then we also have a venture fund and a financing arm as well, amongst many other things. Jason: [00:01:01] Awesome. And so why did you guys start an agency? What got you into it? Erik: [00:01:06] I built and sold a couple e-comm brands and through my own experience, as well as then I started advising and consulting for a lot of other brands found out that 99% of agencies out there for lack of better word are full of shit. And kept getting frustrated over and over again and went screw it I'm just going to hire my own small team to help these companies. And so built my little SWAT team and immediately saw the benefits. Like my clients started to like what we did. They started to grow and we started to need more and more people and just started to grow from there. Jason: [00:01:35] Awesome. So you guys have been doing it for eight years. You guys are almost 40 million or maybe over it. Talk about some of the progression that you guys went through. Like how long did it take to get over the million mark? Was it fairly quick? Did it take long? Like what clicked? That kind of stuff. Erik: [00:01:53] Yeah. In the first week of business, I shouldn't say first week, I think it was like… a month in, because for the first month, I wasn't sure… I was like I built this team. I started working on clients and I was like, maybe I'll build my next company and then turn this team into my own team. And so I wasn't sure what I was going to do there. And then after a month I was like, wow, this is really working. I should double down on this. And so I set a goal and I would put it on a thermometer. I was like, all right, the first four years we're going to do one, two and a half, five, 10 million. That's, that's the goals. And we came within 1% of all four of those goals. So I think there's a lot to be said about setting a goal and then really driving to hit it and having incremental goals to get there so you know how you're tracking against that goal. Because it forces you when you're falling behind to step up. If it's too easy of a goal, you actually end up, well you will hit that goal is still. Like it's, I don't think when you set a goal, you ended up blowing past it, you manage accordingly. So setting those goals really helped the first four years. And frankly, we didn't set goals for years five and six. And I saw the downside of that. I saw us not grow as fast, not do as well and not really know which direction we're going. But also, at that point we were big enough that it felt weird to just set another financial goal. It's like, yeah, but what are we really trying to do? And it took a couple of years to develop that, but now we're pretty clear. Jason: [00:03:07] And you listed out financial goals. Were there any other goals? And not talking about the incremental goals, I want to get to those in a second. But was it just revenue goals? And then, hey, what are the little ones that we need to do to get there? Erik: [00:03:19] Yeah, frankly, it was because that was the best scoreboard we had it. It wasn't any… It was intrinsic in the sense of like the goal was a goal cause it was the goal. It wasn't because then we could afford this or if you could do that. It was more of just an indicator of growth. And we assume that if we're hitting those numbers, we're also growing in the ways we need to be growing. And so we knew what the levers that we needed to pull were between bringing in new business, retaining our business, retaining our people, all sorts of specific metrics that helped us hit those goals. That became a factor of it. But it was, that was the end scoreboard. That was sort of the result that we were looking for. Jason: [00:03:50] So let's talk about the incremental goals at the stage to get to the million in the first year. And then let's talk about the incremental goals after that for the two and a half to five. I think that'd be interesting. Erik: [00:04:01] Sure. Yeah, we just knew basically, and this is a rough number, we actually got, every year, we got better and better at this in terms of like, where do we need to be this month, next month? How do we need to be tracking? But I also knew where were we six months in needed to be basically the run rate, assuming we went from zero to, you know, like the run rate for a million bucks is what? 80? Jason: [00:04:19] 82, 50. I think. Erik: [00:04:21] A month. Is that right? Yeah. Jason: [00:04:23] Don't make me do math on the podcast. Erik: [00:04:26] There we go. 82,500 a month. So anyways, we, I knew around 80 grand and so I was like, okay, so we need to be there within six months because then we need to make up for not being there the first six months. So we need to balance it out and assume that if we're going growing steadily, that'll be where we can do it. Now, in marketing Q4 is usually a little better, so we ended up going up. But, yeah, I mean, first year we did $1.01 million. Like, literally just beat it. And it was surprising, but we did it and it was all around uh, yeah, just aiming for it. So like when we, and again, I don't remember, it's been seven and a half years, but I, you know, assuming there were months where we were falling behind a little bit, that's where we ramp it up and be like we got to bring in more business, we got to retain, what are we going to do to make sure we hit these numbers? And so we would, it would light a fire under our ass to hit it because also those were ambitious goals to grow that fast. And to grow 150% next year and a hundred percent the next year and a hundred percent the next year we had to do a lot. So anytime we were off track, it just kicked us into gear that we have to hit that. Jason: [00:05:27] And I like that, you know, too many people set out a goal, but then they don't have an action plan in order to hit it or a place where they can measure it. And they just look, oh, January came, oh, we didn't hit it. Well, no shit. Like you, you were reactive to the market. You weren't proactive. You didn't try new things. You just kind of sat back. Erik: [00:05:47] Yeah. The term I hear from the best operators out there is leading indicators. What are the actual controllable leading indicators and get to that result? And in the first year we had no idea because like, I don't know how many people I have to talk to you to how many leads we get to… Like, we didn't have a funnel built. But I did know when we weren't hitting it the levers to pull. So I didn't have it down to a science yet. Now we do. Now my forecaster can give us our revenue within 1% and its forecast to the entire year accurately based on what the inputs are. And then it's just a function of manage, you know, being disciplined about the inputs is how you scale a business at this size. And even earlier, but statistics play out the bigger you get too. Jason: [00:06:23] Yeah. What are some of the, now that you guys have figured it out up till this point what are some of the leading indicators that are really important for getting over the eight-figure mark? Erik: [00:06:34] Yeah. So I would say having a really good handle on your average retention of a client is number one. How much… those clients once you have the retention. But it depends on your agency. We run an agency with that's a different type of scale. We have 600 active clients. So if you're running more of a traditional like creative agency, or if you have bigger clients, but smaller amount, the statistics get a little harder. But for us, because of the scale averages play out. And so we know our average lifetime value of a customer, we consistently try to improve that, but we know where it is and we measure against it constantly so that we can improve it, know that we're doing things that improve it. And then what's your cost to acquire a customer and what your pipeline looks like and what are your conversions on the pipeline? So from lead to qualified lead to, for us proposal, to service agreement, to verbal commitment, to assign the commitment, what is the breakage at each of those stages? And then we know based on the pipeline we have, how much business is going to come in the next month or two. And then we can also then know what does it cost us to get a lead? How much are we investing in marketing? Which ways are we going to drive those leads? So how many leads about can we assume? And then you get that waterfall when you can start to anticipate how many leads do you need, and then you manage against that. Okay. So we're going to need… whatever it is, a thousand leads this month to hit the numbers we want to hit next month. Let's go make sure we get a thousand needs. What are the ways to do that? Well, we have outbound marketing. We also have outbound sales. We have partnerships, we have every type of inbound marketing, advertising, etcetera. These are all things we can… leverages we can pull to make sure we hit the lead count we need to. And then frankly, at this stage all leads are not created equal. So we actually measure different leads at different values. Jason: [00:08:08] I love it. I love that you look at the leading indicators because then you can make the adjustment rather than wait, wait to the very end. Let's kind of switch focus, or maybe not switch focus too much, but let's talk about the Hawke Method. Tell us a little bit more about that. Erik: [00:08:23] Yeah. So it's been, you know, basically our marketing methodology that I've leveraged right now. It's been how I look at marketing for a dozen of years, but pop media has the entire time. I've spoken about this hundreds of times at different conferences and we decided to put a book together called “The Hawke Method” that we just pre-launched that's coming out in Q1 that basically kind of digest… In a really easy-to-digest way everything we think of when we're looking at a company and their marketing. So how do we look at their strategy? How do we assess what they're doing? And how do we know where to invest? Where to pull back? What channels to use? And so it goes from like the very high level, we call it “awareness, nurturing, and trust” the three pillars of marketing. And so we look at, are they covering those three pillars? Where are they not covering? And then we dive into and that awareness breaks down into advertising and PR and word of mouth and a few other things. And then even in advertising, where do you advertise? Is it Google? Is it Facebook? Is it Tik ToK, Snapchat, etcetera. And so we break down into how to look at all these different things in a way that we try to make it replicable as things change, meaning like it's a thesis and a methodology. It's not a tactic that works right now and won't work a year from now. And so, yeah, we basically put that together in a 200-page book and are putting it out there. And working on selling 20,000 copies and making it a New York Times bestseller, and we've already had several universities picked it up, like we're really making traction on getting it out there as a new way of looking at marketing. Jason: [00:09:50] What are, I mean, obviously you've seen a ton of agencies and you guys have acquired a bunch from what I've heard. What do you think a marketing front agencies do wrong for themselves? Erik: [00:10:04] Interesting. I… So this is my, a very controversial statement, but I think that they protect themselves too much when they get good. I think that the, what I see happen with agencies that I don't agree with that has worked for plenty of people, so I'm not saying that never do this, I'm just saying this is my own view. Every agency that gets good and gets a good reputation, starts to be seen well in a, you know, sort of in the ecosystem, they start protecting themselves. They start throwing out long contracts, high minimums, they go up market. They only want to work with fortune 2000. They do all these things that yes, they created, that's a solid way of doing business. I get it. But it alienates all the people that got you there. So I'm always kind of turned sideways to that. Why can't you build a business model and now thankfully we have, but this was our thesis, but why can't you build a business model of still being one of the best marketing companies out there, but still working with small and medium businesses too? I'm not saying don't work with Nike and the big guys, but you can work with small guys too. And so that's really what built it. I think that a lot of times is interesting. I watched a lot of agencies struggle to get up to the eight-figure mark, because they get a little pretentious and they in too early. There's agencies that are doing eight figures that I know that get pretentious and do just fine with it cause they can be. I'd say WPromote, you know, in the market they're constantly trying to go up market and stop working with small and medium businesses. They, you know, got, I think it was Gartner to rate them as one of the best digital agencies, like few years ago. And like, so they started getting a bunch of Fortune 500 interest and leveraged that. I don't know how it's gone for them in the past couple of years because actually those agencies hurt really bad in COVID. But I think that, you know, there's reasons to do it later, but a lot of companies jumped the gun and then they're like, oh, well, you know… One of my favorite things is like, we're staying small and boutique because we can serve our clients better. And I always go, okay, so you're telling me that I should hire you to scale my business and you don't know how to scale your own. Like, explain that one to me. Now, if it's a creative agency, different story, but I'm talking about like the growth and performance agencies that say they're staying boutique, like then you're not good because you don't know what you don't understand growing a business. Jason: [00:12:12] Are you looking for a content creation solution for your agency or clients? Verblio can help you with everything from blog posts, eBooks to video scripts, and a lot more. Verblio is a crowdsource solution to content creation with the pool of more than 3000 highly vetted writer who produce custom SEO-rich content. In fact, my team has been using Verblio and we love the ease of their process. With Verblio, we set the criteria for the style and the tone, and then they match you with the writers that have the expertise in your subject matter. Verblio is a platform specifically designed for agencies, and that's why for a limited time, they're offering my listeners 50% off the first month of content. Just go to verblio.com/smartagency to learn more. That's Verblio V E R B L I O.com/smartagency. Well, I think what happens is they hit, like, I look at it as like six stages of scaling an agency and they get to a point where their business doesn't have the right systems in place. Everything relies on them, they haven't shared the vision with their leadership team. They don't have a leadership team, right? They've gotten to this point by accident. And I think you can get over the couple of million by accident. Getting to the eight-figure mark is not by accident, but to stay there is true skill. Erik: [00:13:41] Yeah, you brought up this point earlier that I actually think relates to that. So I drove, uh, 85% of our business up until we were about a 7 million runway. And then it was the most ridiculous story, so I'm gonna skim over it. But I was hanging out in Monaco during the Grand Prix and saying the most, the richest people in the world, living their lives and went, yeah, I'm never going to be that in the way I'm operating right now. And not that that's actually my goal. It's not really a monetary goal, but it's more like I want the option. And so I immediately objected out of sales completely. It was scary as shit. Like I had a few sales guys. I was like from now on all my leads go to you. At this, I was keeping my better leads because I could close them better, but I'm like, but if I give them the sales, like they're still going to close a lot of them, right? Hopefully. Took that leap of faith. Thankfully had a good small group of guys that, uh, ended up doing really well with those leads. But we did dip. We went, that was June, July and August were down months for us and a little scary. And then we recovered and started scaling again. So, that was what got us into eight figure range, because that was the last piece. I never, on the execution side, I immediately brought on a partner that's my co-founder that did a great job of, as he put it, I'd made promises and he'd deliver on them and… Jason: [00:14:52] You deliver broken promises without him? Erik: [00:14:56] Yeah, exactly. You got to know your strengths, but, uh, he, he definitely did a great job on that side. And so we were able to scale that side from the beginning pretty well. So delivery wasn't as much of an issue. Cause I also, because I was the one driving sales, I did a lot of things that helped us sell. So I productized our offerings. I made things really easy to sell and really easy to put together and then build a team around that. So when I built a sales team, it was teed up for them in a way that was great too, which now we have one of the more higher producing sales teams in the industry period, or, you know, bringing on 80 new clients a month. So that was built because of that, but it took that leap to be like, all right, I'm done. I can't do this. And I continue to do that. And that was three and a half years in. And that became a good lesson, that over and over again, when I find myself, you know, diving into something, that's taking a lot of my time, if I can out eject, eject, whatever that is, and continue to hone in more. Like my focus more today is like a third strategic and working with our executives online, bigger initiatives to grow the business. A third growth, what expansion can we do? Whether it's M&A, whether it's launching a fund, what else can we do to build off this business? And a third promotional being on podcasts, you know, writing a book, that kind of thing. And that becomes more and more my focus. When I find things now pulling me out of that, I look for who else could have that. Jason: [00:16:08] Yeah. I always tell everybody your goal is to transform from the owner to the CEO. And like you said, it's kind of like four or five roles set the vision of the agency… Erik: [00:16:19] I went to a program two weeks ago that actually said the exact opposite. Jason: [00:16:22] Oh, really? Erik: [00:16:23] Yeah. Cause they said your goal is to transform from a CEO to an owner, meaning your business should be working for you, not you running the business. And I think the problem is what do people, you know, the CEO of your own one person company. But when you're an owner and you're just, you're, you know, you treat yourself as a chairman or an investor, the way you operate is different. And we're getting there. Like that's been, that was the goal for this year was to get our executive team in a place where I didn't have to do a lot of what they do. And we're there and we have a great executive team. We brought in COO two months ago. And so he's now stepping up and the goal was for him to run the day-to-day of Hawke Media so my focus can be on doing a better job for our clients, expanding the business. So again, strategic and growth, not managing the data that like, whereas our accounts receivable. Jason: [00:17:09] Yeah. And I remember I was chatting with one of my clients for many, many years. He started out around 300,000 now he's well over, they figure mark. And I remember telling him when you transform from the owner to the CEO, congratulations, you're going to be depressed. And I remember going through this, like I would go into a meeting and they go, Jason, I don't need you. And then I go to the next one, Jason, I don't need you. And I'm like, shit, the business doesn't need me. Like, what the hell do I need to do? And then someone's smart that run another agency was like, no, look, set the vision, communicate it often. Be the face of the organization. Coach your leadership team, you know, assist sales when you need to like add color, right? That's, that's all I'm good at if you want me to do follow up and that shit like, nope, like… Erik: [00:17:53] You were probably really good at it at one point. Jason: [00:17:55] Oh yeah, well, when you had to be, right? But then, then when you start tasting that really fancy champagne, I don't drink champagne, but I guess when some people drink fancy champagne or what is it Don Perignon or I don't know. I drink the Coca-Cola's I guess, right? I drink about a thousand of those a day. Erik: [00:18:15] There's gotta be something unhealthy about that, but I don't know. Jason: [00:18:18] Someone told me it rots your teeth eventually. I'm like, I don't care. The Coke I used to clean my race car engine, so I might as well stop drinking that. Erik: [00:18:15] Yeah, that's probably a good idea. Jason: [00:18:18] Awesome. Well, Erik, this has been great. Is there anything I didn't ask you that you think would benefit the audience? Erik: [00:18:35] Yeah, I would say the one big thing that every, or not every, but most marketers miss that is just a huge one for agencies too is the idea of a sales cycle or a purchase cycle or consideration period where… When you advertise for a client, they're looking for daily reports on the performance. Yet what we've seen in e-commerce specifically is for a $50 average order value it's about a three-week purchase cycle. For a hundred dollars it's about five weeks. For $200 it's about six weeks. And then it goes between two and three months from there. The issue there is like, if, so, if I raised your budgets today, you're not going to see the performance on it for months potentially. And so understanding that purchase cycle so that you report against it is critical in the agency-client relationship, as well as just clients understanding the market. And we see this, we get into this fight a lot where it's like our ROAS this it's like that's a seven-day fucking window. You have a $400 product. What are you talking about? So… Jason: [00:19:26] Well, it's about too knowing the right clients to bring on. Cause, you know, I always say there's no such thing as a bad agency client, there's only a bad prospect or a bad process, and you've got to kind of figure it out and be like, hey, if this is a bad prospect, let's not let them in. And like, I'm like, dude, if you're at zero ROAS, eventually you're going to be so far in the green, who cares? You're getting free advertising. Erik: [00:19:55] A hundred percent. Jason: [00:19:56] So one last question I had, I lied, I guess… I remember maybe sometime back and maybe you've changed this. Do you guys still not have any contracts or long-term contracts? Erik: [00:20:06] Yeah. We prefer month-to-month. Jason: [00:20:08] Why is that…? Obviously, it's working well for you. I've seen some people struggle with it. I've seen some people love it, so… Erik: [00:20:16] Yeah. It's not easy. I was on the other side and everyone was asking me to get married before they ever went on a date with me. Just felt screwed up. I'm not here to protect my vendors is kind of how I felt about it. And I, sorry to use a derogatory term in our space, but if I'm running a brand and I'm hiring you to do my marketing, I don't give a shit if you want a long-term contract, I'm not signing it. And we still stand true to that. When people try to give us longer contracts we just say no, and if you don't want our business, that's fine. We walked away from a few software companies who were like, we have never used your software so like if you want to give us a three month trial we'll do. Because as they said, it's not enough time to ramp up in a month. I'm like, if you want to give us a three-month trial we'll do it, but I'm not signing a three-year contract. You're out of your fucking mind. Like, that's just doesn't make sense to me and so we just stuck to that. And then right now, or like our mission statement is accessibility to great marketing. The idea is we want to be nimble, flexible, accessible, and built that way and be the best at what we do. So by being month to month it forces us to be able to be flexible and nimble. We're just used to it. Our business has to function that way. Jason: [00:21:16] Yeah. And then going back to, you know, your leading indicators and knowing your lifetime value of a client like you can calculate, like, when I look at, you know, our mastermind average member is in their 24 month. And like when you know that that's predictability, because I always tell people, you know, when we go to buy an agency, a lot of times, you know, when you acquire agency, you want to know predictability. The longer-term contracts, a lot of times you'll get a higher valuation because of the predictability is there. But if you can show a track record of having your clients stay this long, that will act the same way. Erik: [00:21:51] And I will say, cause we've dealt with all those conversations. Like if you're looking for an investor to value or a buyer, get a smart one that understands your business. Don't go with someone that's using a cookie-cutter approach to buying the business because you're not going to get a good valuation. And my wife's a senior executive private equity. We have a venture fund. I look at those numbers all the time and it's like, I've had all those stupid conversations. I had… You know where it's like either you're stupid or you think I'm stupid because this, what you're saying is not actually how it works in this world. And that's another good piece of advice I got a long time ago is have your pulse on, if your plan is to sell, which thankfully is not ours, but I get it for a lot of people. Have your pulse on the industry, know what it is to do M&A in your industry. Talk to a banker once a quarter, talk to people, keep your information so you know what the multiples are, you know, what's happening, you know, who the buyers are having a relationship with them. And if again, your goal is to sell, call the people that would buy you and ask them what they would want to buy and just build that. It becomes really easy. Jason: [00:22:45] And I love that. I'm like, yeah, if you know, like make a target list now of the people you have love to buy you and start forming a relationship with them now. Erik: [00:22:54] Yep. It makes it so much easier to get a deal done. And then, you know, you can trust them. They can trust you. Like that part is so important and yeah, I mean, there's no reason for them not to tell you exactly what they want to buy. You just make it easy for them. Jason: [00:23:05] Unless they don't know what they want to buy. And there's a ton of people out there like that. Erik: [00:23:10] Yeah, then don't sell to them cause you don't want that type of buyer. You want someone that's very confident and knows what they're doing so that you can able, depending on what your outcome is too. The only thing I'd say the caveat is if you're really looking at just straight exit debt out and it doesn't matter as much who the buyer is, but that's a hard thing to do with an agency. And you're probably going to do a lot of headaches with an uneducated buyer. Jason: [00:23:29] Well, yeah, and you're not going to get the valuation or the money that you want. If you want straight out buyers like us, we'll be like, all right, what's wrong? Like, what are you not telling us? Erik: [00:23:40] Yep. We've looked at those deals. We actually, funny enough, we just passed on one. We look at those deals, but we offer less. We're like, key, like if you're not there, you're, there's a loss in value. Jason: [00:23:51] Yeah, exactly. And that should make you feel good. Erik: [00:23:53] The fact, especially if you're a sub eight-figure agency, like you can't tell me that you're not driving the boat. Jason: [00:24:00] Yeah, exactly. What's the title of the book and where can people get it? Erik: [00:24:03] You can get it at hawkemethod.com, hawkemethod.com. Jason: [00:24:07] Awesome. Well, everyone go check that out. Erik, thanks so much for coming on the show. And if you guys want to be around amazing agency owners that have been to where you want to go and be able to see the things that you might not be able to see and just have a lot of fun and share the strategies. I want you to all, to go to digitalagencyelite.com.  This is our exclusive mastermind for experienced seven and eight-figure agencies and beyond. So make sure you go there now, go to digitalagencyelite.com and until next time have a Swenk day.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 736 #RiseAndGrind - It's so surreal, Some days I still can't believe it.

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 96:35


Thank you for joining us on the #1 Morning Show in The World!! #RiseAndGrind is BACK! This time with TWO hours full of motivation, inspiration, and education! We hear from Glenn Lundy, and new Co-Hosts Sara McCord, Lolita Walker, Scott Simons, and Marvin Reid! The segment is full of different talks, performances and segments to help start your day, and encourage you to become the best version of yourself!  Glenn Lundy the founder of Breakfast With Champions, #RiseAndGrind and 800% Club. Lundy believes if you can change the way people start their day, it'll make a massive impact in their life, working and motivating to create the best versions of people, 23 year automotive leader!  Sara McCord is a communications and marketing strategist who specializes in helping companies and thought leaders reach ambitious business goals through stronger content thoughtfully built across multiple channels. She's worked with a Fortune-100, billion dollar investment firms, small businesses, and thought leaders and solopreneurs; on multi-faceted communications, branding and rebranding, social media, and content strategies. Most recently, Sara signed on to build Breakfast With Champions, where she's charged with startegically growing, scaling, marketing and monetizing the brand on Clubhouse, as a podcast, and through other audience experiences. Sara got her start in editorial as a Staff Writer/ Editor at the Muse and Mashable Contributor, and her 200+ published articles have been bylined or syndicated across Cosmopolitan, Forbes, Fast Company, Time, CNBC, Good Housekeeping, and more. Lolita Walker is a TEDx Speaker, Keynote Speaker, Certified Life Leadership and Executive Coach, Podcaster, Poet, Author and Change Champion for YOU!  Scott Simons is Moving Lives Forward, Co Host of the Breakfast of Champions Clubhouse Room, President/Managing Partner CMA's Valley Chrysler, Dodge, Honda, Jeep, Nissan, RAM, Subaru, VW Car Dealerships, Deputy Sheriff Reserve, OG Member of the Arete Syndicate, Apex, and Investor in Multiple Businesses across many Industries!  Marvin Reid is the founder of Volume 2, is a Sales and Marketing consultant & business start up adviser. Having worked with enterprise level blue chip companies, he has over 20 years of experience in sales strategy, marketing strategy, brand management and social media strategy. Ultimately, his passion is using strategy to help business owners eclipse their business goals and increase profit. Building roadmaps to success!

True Grit and Grace
Attitude and Determination Win with Mel Abraham

True Grit and Grace

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 68:57


Today's episode of True Grit and Grace is going to be so powerful for you if you have been wanting to start or scale a business and are trying to understand how to go about it. My guest is one of the most respected financial and entrepreneurial experts in the industry and he also has an incredible story of resilience from a cancer diagnosis.  Mel Abraham is a CPA by education but an entrepreneur by exhilaration, and Author of the #1 Bestseller, The Entrepreneur's Solution: The Modern Millionaire's Path to More Profit, Fans & Freedom. He's the founder of Thoughtpreneur TM Academy & Business Breakthrough Academy where he helps entrepreneurs bring their businesses to the world and build the lifestyle that they want. After finding a cancerous tumor in his bladder larger than a baseball in June 2019 and successfully conquering it within 18 months, Mel began to openly teach his The Affluence Blueprint TM because his cancer journey spotlighted the immediate and urgent need for entrepreneurs to find “financial liberation” and peace of mind. This is the very process and system he's used to build his business and more importantly his wealth through business that allowed him to completely shut things down to focus on what's important. Most entrepreneurs are building a financial house of cards and don't even realize it...and traditional financial advice will not work for them. As a frequent guest on some of the top shows and podcasts and through his popular programs, blog and show he shares his thought leadership around financial liberation, affluence, building businesses of impact, and freedom. He's been called an Affluence MentorTM and the “thought leader to thought leaders” and advised some of the top thought leaders of our time in their business, money matters, content creation, positioning and market influence. Mel is a committed advocate for the entrepreneurial way and provides real education to real entrepreneurs for creating a real life! After all, we are placed here to create a legacy beyond acquiring, achieving and accomplishing but by connecting at a meaningful level and impacting lives through our businesses, services and ideals each and every day. Mel has built, bought and sold numerous multimillion-dollar businesses for himself as well as his clients. He's a globally recognized thought leader, business advisor, CPA and financial expert sharing stages with a long list of Fortune 500 Companies as well as beacons in the business and personal development industry, from Arianna Huffington and Chalene Johnson to Brendon Burchard and Tony Robbins. (So yeah! You can understand why I was jumping up and down when I got to share the stage with him for the Transform U Event a few months ago!) Mel is a Certified Public Accountant with over three decades of experience as a financial expert, valuation expert and business and success strategist. Mel is regularly sought after for consulting and valuation engagements around the country such as family limited partnerships, co-tenant interest valuations, operating businesses as well as various entities. These projects have ranged from small family owned businesses to large $1.7 billion companies.   Here's what you will learn: What it was like be diagnosed with cancer and how he beat it (3:02) How to manage the fear that stems from a major illness (9:41) Why attitude and determination is essential in overcoming adversity (15:29) How friends can help you to achieve your goals (21:41) How to understand your needs versus your wants (27:23) Why putting things in order will help with peace of mind (34:38) The importance of friction in shopping (44:28) How emotion ties to shopping and using credit (52:31) What did you learn from this episode? Share on Instagram and tag us at @amberlylagomotivation and @melabraham9 so we can see!   Follow Mel: Facebook Instagram Twitter Website   Links mentioned in this episode: The Entrepreneur's Solution: The Modern Millionaire's Path to More   If you are ready to leave your mark by discovering your message and sharing it with the world, you've come to the right place!! Let's work together to build your influence, your impact, and your income! Join the tribe you have been waiting for to activate your highest potential and live the life you deserve!  Another Your Unstoppable Life Mastermind is starting soon!!! Early bird countdown starts now!  JOIN NOW and let us know you are ready for greatness! Read the "True Grit and Grace" book here and learn how you can turn tragedy into triumph!  Thank you for joining us on the True, Grit, & Grace Podcast! If you find value in today's episode, don't forget to share the show with your friends and tap that subscribe button so you don't miss an episode! You can also head over to amberlylago.com to join my newsletter and access free downloadable resources that can help you elevate your life, business, and relationships! Want to see the behind the scenes and keep the conversation going?  Head over to Instagram @amberlylagomotivation! Audible @True-Grit-and-Grace-Audiobook  Website @amberlylago.com Instagram @amberlylagomotivation Facebook @AmberlyLagoSpeaker

Aww Shift
Jon Levy - Influence and adventure

Aww Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:32


Guesting in for today's podcast is a Behavioral scientist, consultant, and NY Times Best Selling author specializing in Connection, Trust, Community, and Influence. He is no other than Jon Levy. Jon specializes in applying the latest research to transform the ways companies approach marketing, sales, consumer engagement, and culture. His clients range from Fortune 500 brands, like Microsoft, Google, AB-InBev, and Samsung, to startups. Now, Jon talks about his struggles and discoveries on human traits that allowed him to understand better why personal barriers to human communication exist. [03:40] Why should I listen to you? You should listen to me because a random talk will be more entertaining than listening to another crime drama on your podcast. My first book was about the science of adventure and what leads us to live exciting lives, so if you happen to run into me in public, you'll most likely have a great time. [04:42] How did you end up doing this endeavor? I believe an eighth-grade teacher arrived and declared that we were going to redistribute the seating chart in secret, and she let each child submit two people they wanted to sit with and two people they didn't want to sit with. I noticed one child with whom no one wanted to sit, and it was me. Nobody wanted to mingle with me since I was a nerd. In the 1980s, I was fascinated with computer technology. And it was not a cool thing to do. I reasoned that if I could understand human behavior, I could make some friends. And I wish it had a philanthropic bent to it. However, the truth is that as a child, I was pretty lonely. [05:54] What kept you from going down that path? I thought I was one of a kind because I was lonely. Here's what's wild, thrilled, and grown-up watching TV episodes like Saved by the Bell, where there's this core group of friends and the geeky guy in the core group. And I assumed that this was the case for everyone. However, when we examine the research, we notice something else. There's also this intriguing side that comes up now and then. [07:11] People are undoubtedly lonelier than we prefer to admit. And especially now, with the pandemic and people were cowering at home and all that. As a result, I believe there is a genuine misunderstanding about how vital we are to one another. Even simply getting to spend time with you makes my day so much better. [08:11] What can people do to shift this behavior? I believe there are two factors. The first is that we've established a much broader culture of fear. We've done things like attribute television shows like America's Most Wanted throughout the years, making us afraid of our neighbors, especially if they look different from us. As a result, parents grew increasingly protective of their children. [09:03] Then there's the fact that humans are anti-fragile. This means that when you train and increase strain on your body, you strengthen your ligaments, improve your body's strength, and make it more fluidly paired. You also learn how to react more effectively. You can better predict your team's behavior the more time you spend with them. [09:27] The issue is that we now treat children as if they are delicate. That you were to drop them, they would break, and that would be the end of it. However, this implies that we keep them safe. As a result, we plan all of their activities for them. They are never required to improve their social skills. As a result, by the time kids enter college, they are unable to advocate for themselves. Professors have been known to get emails from parents stating that their child requires more time on a test. [10:11] Socialization We have to go through these awkward moments. We have to learn to say, “Hey, do you want to hang out after school?” Maybe we'll get rejected if we allow for this kind of social skill deterioration. However, we will never be able to properly function until we learn to improve those skills. [13:04] Dealing with rejection is a necessary part of selling those cookies. It's anti-fragile, and it makes them stronger. Not only that, but kids also learn civics. Nowadays, they have badges for technology. It's fantastic to have a badge like a cybersecurity badge and all that. Another benefit is that it teaches us how to operate as a group or team toward a single objective, which I believe is critical. [13:44] Without a doubt, these talents are crucial in general and should be acquired as a general thing. Because speaking with others improves every aspect of one's life and work. We've been programmed to believe that people will behave unreasonably. We've been conditioned to think that if I say something to you on an aircraft, you'll throw a tantrum because you're highly politicized or for whatever reason. [15:34] Frequency Illusion The frequency illusion is a cognitive bias in which we believe something is familiar simply because it is conspicuous and it has an emotional component to it. If I ask, “Can you think of three situations when things went wrong on a flight?” It's all over the news all the time. You are not aware of it because it only happens occasionally. However, you may fly nonstop for the rest of your life and never see it. [17:02] You're generally worried when people are waiting for results at doctors' offices. A study looked into it and discovered that they're more inclined to start chatting to you because you want to experience a sense of connection, safety, and stability when you're frightened or afraid of the results. [18:56] According to the seminar leader, the people we surround ourselves with and the discussions we have with them are the primary factors shaping the quality of our lives. Figure out how to surround yourself with the most admirable and exciting people you can find with who you have a great deal of respect. It took me a long time to figure out what causes behavior at various levels of influence and how to interact and connect with those folks. And I ended up going out to suffer as a result of that.  [20:15] What can you do to start moving in that direction? The first thing to understand is that humans do not connect or create trust in how we believe they do. We do almost everything backward around here. [20:31] Have you ever been invited to a business dinner when you don't know the individuals and they take you out to eat? It's an embarrassing scenario, but people do it because they feel trapped. You might have spent some quality time together but it's an inconvenient thing to do.  [21:13] You'll observe that they wanted us to develop trust, but they did it by putting us through these difficult situations. This is because what truly works is the polar opposite. The IKEA effect is what it's called. According to the IKEA effect, we care more about our IKEA furniture since we have to put it together. We put forth the effort, to put it another way. [21:33] If we want to build connections with people, our goal should be to figure out how to encourage them to put effort into us. The ideal technique is to start with a tiny request since once they put in a little effort into you, they'll be eager to put in more effort. Then, once they've done that, they'll be more concerned about us. So, when it comes to human relationships, it's all about how much work they put into them. [24:44] Where can we find out more about you and your books? My book is all over the place—Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and, I believe, even airports. “You're invited” is the title of the book. It also includes audiobooks, eBooks, and other such items, and my website address is jonlevytlb.com. Key Quotes: [09:27 – 09:45] “The problem is that we treat children these days as if they are fragile. That if I drop them, they'll break. Because of that we keep them safe, have their activities planned by us, etc. But as a result, they will never develop their social skills.” [18:58 – 19:05] “The fundamental element that defines the quality of our lives are the people we surround ourselves with, and the conversation we have with them.”   Go to https://www.jonlevytlb.com/ to know about the science of influence and adventure. You can also follow Jon on his socials: Twitter | LinkedIn

Love thy Lawyer
Lauren Blair - Cornell

Love thy Lawyer

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 26:46


lovethylawyer.comA transcript of this podcast is easily available at lovethylawyer.com.Go to https://www.lovethylawyer.com/blog for transcripts.Lauren Blairhttp://www.laurenblairconsulting.com/ Call Lauren Blair at 872-216-5365In 2014, after 20 years of tenaciously representing clients in her diverse litigation practice that included commercial, family, employment and state environmental law, Lauren Blair started Lauren Blair Consulting (LBC), an employment law consulting firm in pursuit of a more collaborative legal practice that focuses on counseling individuals, entrepreneurs and businesses of all sizes and industries on strategies and solutions designed to facilitate employer-employee relations, improve workforce operations, enhance the workplace environment and manage the risk of employment law-related litigation.Executives and corporate clients turn to Ms. Blair for thoughtful and sound advice on general employment law matters, including executive compensation, employment agreements, training and compliance.  Before starting LBC, Ms. Blair practiced employment law and commercial litigation at leading law firms in Chicago, Illinois, Los Angeles, California and Morristown, New Jersey. She has advised and represented businesses, ranging from sole proprietorships to Fortune 500 companies, on a wide variety of employment matters and in all phases of employment disputes and litigation, including appeals. Ms. Blair thrives on working closely with clients to learn their business and legal needs, and develop end-game strategies that deliver desired results.Based in Chicago, Ms. Blair has clients throughout the country. She is currently licensed in Illinois, and held licenses in good standing in California and New Jersey. She received her Bachelor of Arts from Cornell University in 1991 and Juris Doctorate from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1993. She also studied French in elementary school, high school and abroad at L'Universite Paris-Sorbonne in Paris, France, and is fluent in French. Ms. Blair is a staunch advocate of arts and culture and community engagement. She served on Goodman Theatre's Scenemakers Board for over 8 years and on Kohl Children's Museum Board for 2 years, and continues to dedicate her service to other Chicagoland arts, civic and community boards. She has been a featured guest on several media programs including WYCC's In The Loop and Vocalo's The Morning AMp, and has appeared in multiple publications including the Chicago Sun-Times, TCW and Chicago Social. Ms. Blair is passionate about writing and from 2012 through 2014, she was a contributor to her Today's Chicago Woman magazine blog, Working It. In 2013, Ms. Blair recognized as one of five outstanding alumni in Chicago-Kent Magazine's 125th Anniversary issue. Louis Goodman www.louisgoodman.com louisgoodman2010@gmail.com 510.582.9090  Musical theme by Joel Katz, Seaside Recording, Maui Technical support: Bryan Matheson, Skyline Studios, Oakland  We'd love to hear from you.  Send us an email at louisgoodman2010@gmail.com. Please subscribe and listen. Then tell us who you want to hear and what areas of interest you'd like us to cover.  Please rate us and review us on Apple Podcasts.   

The Forbes Factor - Your Secret to health, wealth & happiness!

On today's show, we're giving you the Secrets to Brand U. We are helping entrepreneurs and small business owners learn the secrets that all the Fortune 500 companies already know, the “power of branding”. Learn from Forbes Riley, one of the world's leading brand specialists, and her very special guest, Alessio Tramontozzi “The Underground Entrepreneur.” On Today's Show we give you all the opportunities and secrets to uplevel your branding, so you can grow into more than you could ever imagine.

Luminol | True Crime
Party Murders & A Closet Sex Fortune

Luminol | True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 59:57


The theme this week is "Parties"! First, Sarah tells us about the disappearance of Adrienne Salinas. Then, Caitlin shares the unusual death of Jack Davis Jr. Beer #1: Dream Trip from Pizza Port Brewing Co.Beer #2: Non Alcoholic Beer - The Sober Carpenter Listener discretion is advised.Get a (free!) customized skincare plan and use code LUMINOL for 10% off ANYTHING!! https://emmediane.com/pages/consultation?aff=luminolGet a discount on your SockGuy socks with code LUMINOL21Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/luminolpod)

Happy Bones, Happy Life
128. Taking Action to Achieve Your Goals | Margie Bissinger, MS, PT, CHC

Happy Bones, Happy Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 13:14


Margie Bissinger, MS, PT, CHC is a physical therapist, integrative health coach, and happiness trainer. Margie has over 25 years of experience helping people with osteoporosis and osteopenia improve their bone health through an integrative comprehensive approach. She is the author of Osteoporosis: An Exercise Guide and the host of the Natural Approaches to Osteoporosis and Bone Health Summit that starts on January 17th. Margie has lectured to Fortune 500 companies, government agencies, hospitals, and women's groups throughout the country. She has been featured in the New York Times, Menopause Management, OB GYN News and contributed to numerous health and fitness books In today's talk Margie shares effective strategies to help you achieve your desires and goals. Listen to these easy to implement tips and get started on making this a miraculous year.   Links Natural Approaches to Osteoporosis and Bone Health Summit is LIVE and FREE this week!: https://tinyurl.com/bonehealthsummit   Timestamps: [01:59] Plan ahead [03:43] Have a strong “why” [04:43] Bounce back [05:39] Feeling forward [06:37] Expect your desired outcome  

How Did They Do It? Real Estate
SA350 | The Power of Writing Your Own Story as a Passive Investor with Matt Picheny

How Did They Do It? Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 26:49


Telling one's struggle and pouring your heart out is not an easy task, much more putting it into words and having everyone read it. Listen in to Matt Picheny as he shares his insights on the difficulties of writing a book and the fulfillment it brought to him. Let him take you on his journey as he gives tips and good practices he learned along the way.Key Takeaways To Listen ForLearnings you can acquire from being an author of a bookHow intuition can be a help or a hindranceKey metrics to consider when investing in real estate dealsThe reason behind completing a bookResources Mentioned In This EpisodeBackstage Guide to Real EstateAbout Matt PichenyMatt Picheny is focused on developing passive income streams that enable investors to write their own story, and choose how they want to spend their time.He specializes in revitalizing and elevating communities through real estate investment, community enrichment, climate sensitivity, and the arts.Matt has over 15 years of experience in property analysis, financing, acquisition, construction, operations, and has invested in over 8,000 apartments nationwide. He is a licensed real estate agent, a Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac approved buyer and has earned both Commercial Real Estate & Real Estate Finance certificates from Boston University. Matt is a member of the Forbes Real Estate Council, the Fast Company Executive Board, and is an advisor to a PropTech company.A PMI certified Project Management Professional, Matt is a digital marketing veteran whose 18-year career in the advertising world included working for some of the world's largest advertising agencies, producing award-winning projects for Fortune 500 clients including Verizon, IBM, and Coca-Cola.Matt and his wife have two Tony Awards® as co-Producers of the Broadway shows MoulinRouge! and American Utopia. They have invested in many other theatrical productions including the iconic musicalsHamilton and Wicked.A native of Orlando Florida, and a former actor, Matt still believes in happily ever after. He lives with his wife and their two daughters in Brooklyn, New York and in his downtime enjoys long walks on the beach, Broadway, Rock and Roll, and amazing barbecue.Connect with MattWebsite: Picheny - Your Backstage Guide to Passive InvestingTo Connect With UsPlease visit our website: www.bonavestcapital.com and please click here, to leave a rating and review!SponsorThinking About Creating and Growing Your Own Podcast But Not Sure Where To Start?Visit GrowYourShow.com and Schedule a call with Adam A. Adams

From Rock Bottom to Rockin' It
44: Street Artist to Vice-President of Global Design Coca-Cola // The Story of James Sommerville

From Rock Bottom to Rockin' It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 54:13


James Sommerville is the Founder of KnownUnknown, the world's first decentralized design community working with Fortune 100 brands on brand design assignments and NFTs, leveraging their utility token ($KUDOS). From 2013 to 2018, James was the VP Global Design for The Coca Cola Company, where he led the design innovation and identity programs for many billion-dollar iconic beverage brands. Prior to joining Coca-Cola, James was co-founder of Attik, a UK startup design firm that led the digital art revolution and changed the face of design in the 1990s, inspiring thousands of designers and creatives across the world. They were also responsible for the major redesign of Coke's brand identity in 2006 and its visual identity strategy for 2010's FIFA World Cup. He also worked with other famous brands such as Adidas, Virgin, Heineken, and Sheraton.   *** For Show Notes, Key Points, Contact Info, Resources Mentioned, & More on this episode please visit our website: RockBottom2RockinIt.com. *** Feedback? Questions? Comments? I would love to hear from you! Contact me at us via: Email (eric@ericgilbertwilliams.com), LinkedIn (@ericgilbertwilliams), Twitter (@ericgilbertw), or Instagram (@ericgilbertwilliams). EP Tags: 

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu
Tony Robbins Teaches You How to BREAK Your Negative Thinking and CHANGE Your Life For GOOD

Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:13


Check out our sponsors: ButcherBox: Sign up at ButcherBox.com/impact Athletic Greens: Go to athleticgreens.com/impact and receive a FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase! InsideTracker: Get 25% off their entire store at insidetracker.com/impacttheoryOmbre Lab: To get $30 off -- go to: tryombre.com/Impact“I think anybody that gets wired to grow and give is gonna have a really fulfilling life. It doesn't matter what you choose to do, you're going to be alive, because you're going to make progress.” - Tony RobbinsTo say that Anthony Robbins is a legend is to say nothing at all.Beyond being a #1 New York Times bestselling author, Tony is also a founder, partner, or early investor in 100+ privately held businesses with combined sales exceeding $7 billion annually.He's been honored by Accenture as one of the top fifty business intellectuals in the world, having consulted and coached some of the world's greatest athletes, entertainers, Fortune 500 CEOs, and four US presidents.Finally, through his philanthropy and partnership with Feeding America, he has provided more than 800 million meals and is on track to provide 1 billion meals by 2025.And it isn't only his impressive list of credentials that made me so excited to have him as a guest on Impact Theory. Tony's books, talks, and live events have also had a profound impact on me, both personally and professionally.Our conversation ranged far and wide, covering everything from the secrets to true fulfillment in life to his deep research into the cutting edge of regenerative medicine.If you (like me) feel excited after what Tony shared in this episode, I encourage you to check out Tony's new book, Life Force: How New Breakthroughs in Precision Medicine Can Transform the Quality of Your Life & Those You Love: https://amzn.to/3qrXhDa SHOW NOTES:00:00 | Introduction02:14 | What Drives Tony to Write Deeply About Big Issues10:13 | Where is the Cutting Edge of Medicine in 2022?16:56 | How Tony Made a Huge Impact Despite the Pandemic21:09 | How to Deal With Weak Links in an Organization24:14 | On Destroying Limitations and Learning to Embrace Risk27:48 | The Foundations of a Culture of Weakness (And How to Overcome It)36:11 | The Most Important Pillar of Lasting Change43:37 | How Tony Continually Embraces Change48:15 | Tony's Ultimate Breakthrough 2022 Challenge54:36 | What Drives Tony to Learn DeeplyQUOTES:“Progress equals happiness. If you keep growing, you're going to feel alive. And if you keep growing, you're going to have more to give. And when you're growing and giving is when life is magnificent.” [25:45]“People need a new perspective. And you can't do it by just sitting and thinking - you've got to move your body, you've got to change your energy and your focus, because [with a] low level of energy, I don't give a damn how smart you are - you're not going to use all of your ability.” [34:57]“The one common denominator [of] people that are successful over a lifetime is the sustained hunger. Hunger is the number one factor.” [46:04]“I think anybody that gets wired to grow and give is gonna have a really fulfilling life. It doesn't matter what you choose to do, you're going to be alive, because you're going to make progress.” [47:24]“You've got to understand, anyone can learn anything if you can just break it down to its simple core.” [56:21]Follow Tony Robbins:Website: https://www.tonyrobbins.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/TonyRobbinsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TonyRobbinsInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/TonyRobbinsOrder your copy of Life Force here: https://amzn.to/3qrXhDa Sign up for Tony's Ultimate Breakthrough 2022 Challenge: https://breakthrough2022.com

LeaderTHRIVE with Dr. Jason Brooks
Rick Maurer joins LeaderTHRIVE podcast with Dr. Jason Brooks: Episode 91

LeaderTHRIVE with Dr. Jason Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:00


Today's guest, Rick Maurer, is a speaker, author, consultant, and expert on helping leaders avoid resistance to change. Since the publication of his book Beyond the Wall of Resistance in the 1990s, Rick's opinion has been sought by The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, NBC Nightly News, Fortune, and many other media outlets. Some of the largest companies in the world ask for his advice on ways to avoid resistance to change and ways to build strong support for changes and other big projects. Connect with Rick at www.RickMaurer.com

The One Away Show
Kate O'Neill: One Recruitment Away From Being an Innovator

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:53


Kate O'Neill is the author of “A Future So Bright,” a book that argues that the best way to confront challenges and build a better tomorrow is to allow ourselves to envision the brightest future possible, while at the same time acknowledging the ways the future could go dark and working to prevent them from happening. Widely known as the “Tech Humanist,” Kate is helping humanity prepare for an increasingly tech-driven future with her signature strategic optimism. Kate is also the founder and CEO of KO Insights, a strategic advisory firm committed to improving human experience at scale. As a professional global keynote speaker, Kate regularly speaks with leadership audiences around the world, exploring how data and emerging technologies like AI are shaping the future of human experiences, and advocating with her signature strategic optimism for humanity's future in an increasingly tech-driven and exponentially-changing world. Her clients and audiences include many Fortune 500 and World's Most Admired companies and brands, including tech giants like Google and IBM, household-name brands like Coca Cola and Colgate, future-forward cities like Amsterdam and Austin, top universities like Cambridge and Yale, and even the United Nations. Read the show notes here: https://bwmissions.com/one-away-podcast/

Leave Your Mark
Skill Acquisition and Flow State the Passion of Chris Bertram

Leave Your Mark

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 72:17


EP 248 features the Senior Director of Applied Neuroscience at EXOS, Chris Bertram.  Chris is also an Associate Professor at the University of the Fraser Valley (UFV).  Chris specializes in creating environments that are designed to maximize learning, build resilience, and optimize performance under pressure. His academic and professional focus is in the area of skill acquisition and flow state with an emphasis on the nature of expertise and elite-level performance. Chris has published more than 70 scientific articles across the spectrum of human performance and has been featured in the Globe and Mail, The Vancouver Sun, the New York Times as well on the Golf Channel.  His work has encompassed a wide array of high-performing individuals including PGA Tour winners, collegiate National Champions, Olympic Champions, X-Games Champions, military leaders, special forces operators, as well as corporate leaders of Fortune 500 companies. Above all his accomplishments he is a father to his two girls Kelsey and Maggie, and husband to Kara. We had a great conversation about his life and his passion, enjoy!

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 732 #RiseAndGrind - A man who brought people together unlike any other

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 123:58


Thank you for joining us on the #1 Morning Show in The World!! #RiseAndGrind is BACK! This time with TWO hours full of motivation, inspiration, and education! We hear from Glenn Lundy, and new Co-Hosts Sara McCord, Lolita Walker, Scott Simons, and Marvin Reid! The segment is full of different talks, performances and segments to help start your day, and encourage you to become the best version of yourself!  Glenn Lundy the founder of Breakfast With Champions, #RiseAndGrind and 800% Club. Lundy believes if you can change the way people start their day, it'll make a massive impact in their life, working and motivating to create the best versions of people, 23 year automotive leader!  Sara McCord is a communications and marketing strategist who specializes in helping companies and thought leaders reach ambitious business goals through stronger content thoughtfully built across multiple channels. She's worked with a Fortune-100, billion dollar investment firms, small businesses, and thought leaders and solopreneurs; on multi-faceted communications, branding and rebranding, social media, and content strategies. Most recently, Sara signed on to build Breakfast With Champions, where she's charged with startegically growing, scaling, marketing and monetizing the brand on Clubhouse, as a podcast, and through other audience experiences. Sara got her start in editorial as a Staff Writer/ Editor at the Muse and Mashable Contributor, and her 200+ published articles have been bylined or syndicated across Cosmopolitan, Forbes, Fast Company, Time, CNBC, Good Housekeeping, and more. Lolita Walker is a TEDx Speaker, Keynote Speaker, Certified Life Leadership and Executive Coach, Podcaster, Poet, Author and Change Champion for YOU!  Scott Simons is Moving Lives Forward, Co Host of the Breakfast of Champions Clubhouse Room, President/Managing Partner CMA's Valley Chrysler, Dodge, Honda, Jeep, Nissan, RAM, Subaru, VW Car Dealerships, Deputy Sheriff Reserve, OG Member of the Arete Syndicate, Apex, and Investor in Multiple Businesses across many Industries!  Marvin Reid is the founder of Volume 2, is a Sales and Marketing consultant & business start up adviser. Having worked with enterprise level blue chip companies, he has over 20 years of experience in sales strategy, marketing strategy, brand management and social media strategy. Ultimately, his passion is using strategy to help business owners eclipse their business goals and increase profit. Building roadmaps to success!

The Conscious PIVOT Podcast
Adam Markel's Latest Book: Change Proof

The Conscious PIVOT Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 23:58


Adam Markel starts the new year strong with his latest book, Change Proof. In this episode, he provides a sneak peek at its contents, created as a result of extensive leader assessments of Fortune 50 companies and start-up organizations. Adam breaks down what it takes s to take a leap of faith and live the life you truly want, more energized and inspired than ever. The book dives deep into the importance of regeneration and time off, the myths surrounding resiliency, the dangers of always outrunning everyone, and the best approaches in addressing burnout. Adam also invites everyone to take his free resilience assessment to determine where your mindset currently stands: http://resiliencerank.com/. Show Notes:0:00 – Introduction3:42 – Stories about taking the leap of faith6:41 – Inaccurate concepts of resiliency9:56 – Learning from the future12:24 – Taking time off and bouncing forward16:37 – The Great Restoration20:02 - Free resilience assessment21:11 - Conclusion

Becoming Your Best | The Principles of Highly Successful Leaders
Episode 312 - Stop Selling with Brandon Steiner

Becoming Your Best | The Principles of Highly Successful Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 30:24


Brandon Steiner received his first lesson in entrepreneurship when he was 12; it was free and given by his own mother. He was after a prize of a candy bars box for whoever opened up the most accounts on a paper route. After days of not getting any new clients and seeing him devastated by his repeated failure, his mother gave him a piece of advice he would carry his entire life and make part of his core values as an entrepreneur.  "Stop selling; you can't expect people to just buy a product from you. Differentiate yourself, be a solution-oriented salesperson. You have to solve, you have to serve, stop selling." Brandon Steiner is the Founder and President of The Steiner Agency and CollectibleXchange, Motivational and Inspirational Speaker, and Author. Brandon has spoken to world-class organizations such as the New York Yankees, BMW North America, Nike, and Live Nation, to name a few. He is the author of "Living on Purpose: Stories, About Faith, Fortune, and Fitness that Will Lead You to an Extraordinary Life," "The Business Playbook: Leadership Lessons from the World of Sports," and "You Gotta Have Balls: How a Kid from Brooklyn Started From Scratch, Bought Yankee Stadium, and Created a Sports Empire." Today, in Brandon's second appearance on the show, we decided to divide our episode into two halves. In the first half, we talk about entrepreneurship, and in the second, about parenting. We delve into the three stages of entrepreneurship and why mastering them is crucial, and Brandon kindly shared bits of his past and how he became a successful entrepreneur. We also talk about parenting, what are parents' most common mistakes, and how we can help our kids by "loving them a little less." Tune in to Episode 312  and learn about Brandon's secrets to being a successful entrepreneur and inspiring parent.  Some Questions I Ask: Where would you start with entrepreneurship? What do you think every entrepreneur should have? (6:53) Parenting is one of the most exciting, rewarding, challenging roles a person can have. Could you share some insight on what parents should do and avoid doing? (20:19) In This Episode, You Will Learn: About Brandon's journey in entrepreneurship (2:53)Brandon's first lesson in entrepreneurship: stop selling (11:23)It's when we have our back against the wall that growth happens (15:57)The three stages of entrepreneurship (16:31)"Loving our kids a little less." Brandon's thoughts on parenting (20:42) Resources: CollectibleXchange website Book: Brandon Steiner - Living on PurposeBook: Brandon Steiner - You Gotta Have BallsBook: Brandon Steiner - The Business Playbook Connect with Brandon: LinkedIn Becoming Your Best Resources:Becoming Your Best Website See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Power + Presence + Position
EP484: How to Strategically Build Your Leadership Skills

Power + Presence + Position

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 18:23


There's no doubt that growing a business is one of the most epic personal and professional development journeys you can take in life. Besides the cash, influence, and autonomy that is there to be gained as an owner, having the collection of skills that a seven-figure company demands you acquire will set you up for life. As I look back at my journey as a founder, there are a handful of skills I've worked tirelessly to bring into my repertoire. And as I cast my mind back, there's a very specific order in which I needed to build them in for them to feed off of one another. Keep reading While you're using all of your leadership skills at once, building them all simultaneously is incredibly difficult. So, in this episode, I'm identifying the skills that you need to be an effective and successful CEO, and I'm laying out how to strategically build those leadership skills. Tune in this week to discover the skills that every founder needs to build, and why, especially in the early days, you are your business's most valuable asset. I'm sharing the secrets to making strategic investments in your every area of your development, and the dangers of narrowing your focus instead of elevating your capacity for every skill your business requires of you. Today on the Power + Presence + Position Podcast: Why you are the most important asset your business has. How strategic investments in your personal and professional growth will lay the foundation for even bigger assets. The importance of building your skills in a way that meets the needs of your business at each stage of its development. Why you need a baseline level of skill in operating every single area of your company, at least in the early stages. A cautionary tale of the pitfalls of only focusing on one area of your development. The specific skills every founder needs and the order in which I recommend you build them. Resources Mentioned: To receive weekly written gold in your inbox, make sure you sign up for my email newsletter. Connect with me on LinkedIn. Learn how to nail your niche, clarify your message, and scale your business in the Power + Presence + Position Business Accelerator! Martha Beck Brené Brown  Sign up for the free workshop I'm hosting this month, Scale Your Way to a Fortune with Asset Thinking! Love the show? Let us know! Are you a fan of the Power + Presence + Position? If the tips and interviews we share in each episode have helped you gain the confidence and inspiration to become a better, more powerful leader, head on over to Apple Podcasts, subscribe to the show and leave your honest review to let us know! What are you waiting for? Head on over to Apple Podcasts, subscribe, and leave a review to enter your name into this month's drawing!

WPMRR WordPress Podcast
E181 - Making it as an Influencer (Shane Barker, shanebarker.com)

WPMRR WordPress Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 47:26


In today's episode, we get to listen again to Joe and Shane Barker's conversation. They talk about why real-time engagement matters more than fake following, how influencers shouldn't rely on just one platform, and staying visible online through relevant and relatable content.     Shane is a top digital marketing consultant, keynote speaker, and influencer. He has helped businesses accelerate their growth with customized digital marketing consultation and services. Having won many accolades, he has consulted with Fortune 500 companies, influencers with digital products, and a number of A-List celebrities. Episode Resources: Shane Barker's Website, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram Visit the WPMRR Community What to Listen For: 00:00 Intro 00:50 Welcome to the pod, Shane! 02:11 Teaching a course in UCLA 04:46 How would you define an influencer? 07:20 Fake followers versus real engagement      15:21 Drive social media traffic to your website 20:03 When your social media account gets shut down 22:21 Think where your audience is at 29:14 Presenting yourself on social media without bragging 36:55 The pressure of having a lot of visibility online 43:11 Find Shane online

The Art of Making Things Happen (Bluefishing)  Steve Sims

Michael Counts is a theatrical designer and stage director, visual artist, and media and entertainment entrepreneur who has been focused on creating large-scale immersive installations, theatrical productions and innovative media and entertainment experiences, often in unconventional spaces, for over 25 years. He is one of the early pioneers of immersive art and entertainment and has been called a “mad genius” and “a master of immersive theater” by the New York Times and “one of the most fertile imaginations working in New York City, today” by Time Out New York Magazine.  In 2018, Counts pivoted and founded a company with the mission of offering an optimized and scaleable version of performance and wellness coaching - a resource that Counts had been an early adopter of and to which he credits much of his success as a creative, entrepreneur and innovator. That company, a)plan coaching, has grown to over 50 coaches and now serves a wide range of leading tech start ups and a growing number of Fortune 500 companies. 

Scaling Up Services
Nicole Demeo, Founder, Outfront Solutions

Scaling Up Services

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 35:55


Nicole Demeo, Founder, Outfront Solutions Founder of Outfront Solutions, Nicole DeMeo is an accomplished marketing executive, business launch, growth and turnaround expert. A Silicon Valley veteran, she works closely with executive teams to develop strategies and guide companies through multiple phases of their lifecycles. Her participation in over 50 company launches - including four of her own – has created significantly increased valuations, acquisitions and IPOs. Nicole has served as brand ambassador and marketing strategist for industry leaders such as Steve Jobs, Eric Schmidt and Carly Fiorina and created brand positioning, messaging, and go-to-market strategies for Fortune 500 companies including Apple, HP and Accenture. She has formed and marketed funds and incubators including Andra Capital, How Women Invest and Earlybird Venture Capital. Nicole bridges Silicon Valley to the world bringing fast-growth companies like Trendyol.com EyeEm, Peak Games, NDS Cognitive Labs and Making Sense to market globally. Fueled by her desires to give back, she has worked with some of the largest non-profits, foundations, community organizations and venture funds of our time including: How Women Invest, The September 11th Fund, American Red Cross, UPWARD, How Women Lead, an Advisor to many others. In addition to building businesses, funds, communities and personal brands, Nicole's passion is also in wine as owner of Media Luna Vineyards in Argentina. https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicoledemeo/ https://twitter.com/OutfrontNow @techiecat Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Queerly Recommended
We're Almost Twins (QR027)

Queerly Recommended

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 45:06


It's our first pod of 2022, and Kris and Tara jump straight into the deep end. They talk about Jeopardy! and how Wheel of Fortune is beneath Kris. (Did you know that Kris was almost on Wheel of Fortune? Or the obstacle that blocked her dreams of game show domination forever? Find out!) Also, it should be no surprise that Kris has an Alanis Morissette story. It's a good time. We have fun here. If you enjoy this episode, please consider buying Kris & Tara a Ko-fi! Official Recommendations This week, Kris recommends Vigil, a six-part series from BBC One. It revolves around the mysterious disappearance of a Scottish fishing trawler and a death onboard a Trident nuclear submarine, which bring the police into conflict with the Navy and British security services. For Gentleman Jack fans, Suranne Jones heads up the investigation with Game of Thrones alum Rose Leslie. Tara rounds out the recommendations with Love and other Disasters by Anita Kelly, a romance about the first openly nonbinary contestant on America's favorite cooking show, who falls for their clumsy competitor. It's got angst, and it's that good, good angst. Topics & Works Discussed Amy Schneider Wordle Yellowjackets (Showtime) Jagged (HBO) Tina (HBO) Changing Majors by Anna Harnett Rikeart RuPaul's Drag Race - Season 14 Willow (1988) Fire Emblem: Three Houses (Nintendo Switch) 1 Queen, 5 Queers (Crave) Get the transcript Listen to the episode Check out this clip

Insight Out
How to Get One Million Followers - Brendan Kane (encore episode)

Insight Out

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:32


One million followers in 30 days…sounds crazy, right? Not if you're my guest today. Brendan Kane is a growth hacker for Fortune 500 corporations, brands, and celebrities like Taylor Swift, Rihanna, Katie Couric to name a few.  He got his start in the entertainment world and elevated to Vice President of Digital for Paramount Pictures. He is now the best-selling author of the book One Million Followers and just released his second book Hook Point: How to Stand Out in a 3-Second World Highlights from our conversation: What a "hook point" is and why it is so valuable to understand how to use them How Taylor Swift turns fans into brand advocates Why the testing is so vital (3 part testing equation) Why we need to focus on pattern interruption in this noisy world Misconceptions from his book  Characteristics of shareable content Facebook as a market research tool  Why we shouldn't ignore emerging markets Working with Katie Couric on over 200 celebrity interviews You can find Brenden: Website: https://brendanjkane.com/ Email: bkane@brendanjkane.com Books: One Million Followers and Hook Point Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/BrendanJamesKane https://www.instagram.com/brendankane/ linkedin.com/in/brendanjkane Links and Resources 30:20 Contagious: Why Things Catch On Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=23010497) This episode originally aired on 11/02/2020 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Spawn Chunks - A Minecraft Podcast
The Spawn Chunks 176: Trading Silk Touch For Fortune

The Spawn Chunks - A Minecraft Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 61:59


Joel and Jonny share their latest adventures in Minecraft, and answer listener emails about pickaxe preferences, swamp trolls, and villager trading in the January Chunk Mail Dispenser.

Data Skeptic
Matrix Profiles in Stumpy

Data Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 39:09


Sean Law, Principle Data Scientist, R&D at a Fortune 500 Company, comes on to talk about his creation of the STUMPY Python Library. Sponsored by Hello Fresh and mParticle: Go to Hellofresh.com/dataskeptic16 for up to 16 free meals AND 3 free gifts! Visit mparticle.com to learn how teams at Postmates, NBCUniversal, Spotify, and Airbnb use mParticle's customer data infrastructure to accelerate their customer data strategies.

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 140 - Steve Pockross - Outsourcing Your Law Firm's Content 101

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 25:14


Steve Pockross is the CEO of Verblio and has more than 20 years of startup, nonprofit, and Fortune 500 experience. He was part of the early management team at crowdsourcing pioneer LiveOps and previously led five SaaS and marketing businesses. Verblio is a content creation platform based in Denver, Colorado with a thousand highly curated writers and create 90,000 pieces of unique content per year. Verbilo is based on a marketplace of a similar dynamic to deliver high-quality content and a SaaS platform which holds all of content creation in one place. Read more about Verblio and their work in this Case Study with Rankings.io: https://www.verblio.com/case-studies/rankingsioOn This Episode, We Discuss...- Strategizing the Proper Content Creation Channels for Your Firm- Artificial Intelligence in the Content Creation Marketplace- Possible Trends in Content for 2022

The Social Sunshine Podcast
Ep117 - How to Nurture Your Leads During a Launch

The Social Sunshine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 60:40


Make your launch a MASSIVE success with marketing tips from Lisa Rigoli. Get all her lead-generating tips in this podcast episode. Lisa helps you sell your offer on the ‘Gram while juggling

Small Axe Podcast
#Takeprofits and Invest in Cash-Flowing Assets

Small Axe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:09


Welcome back to the show! Today's guest is my dear friend Travis who has been one of our first guests in the show. I am glad to have him the second time around. Here's some interesting about Travis: Travis is an experienced real estate investor and managing partner of Freeman Equity with over $40M in assets under management. He has 25 years of experience in real estate investing in several markets across the United States in both the residential and commercial spaces. He focuses on cash-flowing properties to create significant passive income for investors. He is a Software engineer by trade and has spent over 25 years in IT management positions for several Fortune 500 firms including Apple. He applies that experience when identifying investment opportunities and markets. Travis comes from blue-collar roots in Saginaw, Michigan. After the General Motors plant that employed his parents were shut down in the mid-seventies the family was forced to migrate to Sacramento, California in pursuit of the American dream. His parents worked diligently to purchase their first single-family home and ultimately a portfolio of over 30 homes in the area. It is during this time that he learned the work ethic for finding the best deals and the power of investing in cash-flowing real estate. He currently resides in Elverta, California with his wife of over twenty years, three children, and one grandchild. Travis has presented at companies like One Finance, ECMC, & Apple where he teaches employees how to generate passive income while minimizing their tax liabilities in order to achieve their financial goals. Let's dive a little deeper and learn more from Travis!   [00:01 – 07:05] Opening Segment  I introduce our guest, Travis Gibson Connect with Travis through the links below Travis shares about his previous and current deals Important lessons [07:06 – 30:49] Mr. Take Profits The rumors of interest rates going up What to do when you look at data Having to see a deal for yourself Travis tells the investors everything he knows about On walking away from deals Take care of the investors! Travis' Houston deals Projecting and closing deals Bad things about generational wealth How to be aggressive with deals Travis talks about his other investments The equity machine Make capital in safer assets Checkout the calculator and ebook Travis made! [30:50 – 36:08] Closing Segment Travis shares his plans for 2022 Connect with Travis through the links below Final words   Tweetable Quotes: “2021 is a very interesting year for me.” - Travis Gibson   "You do not want that bank account to be low when something happens and you need capital.” - Travis Gibson   "Thanksgiving is difficult if you lose your uncle's, your grandparents, or your parent's money.” - Travis Gibson Find out more and connect with Travis through email travis@freemanequity.com   You can also follow his Facebook, LinkedIn, and his website https://freemanequity.com/ Travis isn't also hard to find on Instagram, TikTok, and Twitter, just look for @freemanequity LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode. I believe that you only need a small axe to build a lasting empire. Let's start building yours! To know more about me and all the real estate opportunities you can find, you can connect with me on LinkedIn, Instagram, and Facebook or check out my website https://smallaxecommunities.com/ and book a call with me.

Multiply Your Success with Tom DuFore
84. How to Build Your Personal Brand—Jen Dalton, Founder, BrandMirror

Multiply Your Success with Tom DuFore

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 34:20


Do you know the difference between your company brand and your personal brand? And do you know how to develop and build your personal brand? Or even why your personal brand matters? If you've ever thought about this, or maybe you're just curious to learn more this is the episode for you! Our guest today is Jen Dalton and she is a personal branding expert. She has trained executives and leaders across the world including leaders at Microsoft, IBM, and even the White House! She shares her expertise in our interview about Personal Branding.**Subscribe to our NEWEST Podcast called: Franchise Your Business. CLICK HERE.LINKS FROM THE EPISODE:Learn more about Jen and her company BrandMirror:  https://www.brandmirror.com/If you are ready to franchise your business or take it to the next level: CLICK HERE.ABOUT OUR GUEST:Jen Dalton is the founder of BrandMirror, where she helps CEOs, executives, and entrepreneurs refine their personal brands that break through the noise and actually bring in massive amounts of revenue, and 10x their revenue. Jen has been featured on The Washington Post, Forbes, and Inc. and has spoken at the White House, as well as Microsoft, IBM, and other Fortune 500 companies! Jen is also a Senior Industry Fellow at the Georgetown University Women's Leadership Institute, and spoke to the US Navy Public Relations leaders, receiving a challenge coin on storytelling.ABOUT BIG SKY FRANCHISE TEAM:This episode is powered by Big Sky Franchise Team. If you are ready to talk about franchising your business you can schedule your free, no-obligation, franchise consultation online at: https://bigskyfranchiseteam.com/ or by calling Big Sky Franchise Team at: 855-824-4759. 

Be You Podcast
115 - The Unactivated Activist - Time to Call BS, with Love

Be You Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 41:29


For quite some time now, people including me have been ridiculed and blamed for many of the things going on in the world. But now what? I then realized that I had become obsessed through my anger. Today's conversation isn't about the problems at hand, although those were a catalyst for feeling this way, but rather about being an advocate in a way that is in alignment. How can you be an advocate and activist without it triggering all your wounds and to avoid obsession?   ------------------ The Be You podcast is hosted by certified girl boss Jill Herman, a champion of women's empowerment, personal development, women helping women, and being yourself without apology. Each episode features Jill's experiences with personal development and her journey to being yourself, sometimes featuring guests who are prime examples of women helping women.    Being a girl boss no longer just refers to achievement in the workplace. Personal development and prioritizing being yourself are key ingredients in the women's empowerment movement. Jill has built a community of women helping women so that each one can reach their full potential as the badass girl boss they are.    Whether you're already a champion of women's empowerment, you're a girl boss interested in personal development, you'd like advice on being yourself, you're looking for a community of women helping women, or you're just here for Jill's lessons and entertainment, the Be You podcast is for you.  ------------------   Lisa Bilyeu on women's empowerment:  “Cheer for your girls like you got pom-poms at a pep rally.” - Lisa Bilyeu    Lisa Bilyeu on women helping women:  “Choose your life's board members like you're building a Fortune 500 company.” - Lisa Bilyeu    Lisa Bilyeu on being a girl boss:  “Be brave. Fearless.  Be badass at 15 years old. Be badass at 80 years old.” - Lisa Bilyeu   Lisa Bilyeu on personal development:  “If you're still looking for that one person who will change your life, take a look in the mirror.” - Lisa Bileyu   Glennon Doyle on women's empowerment:  “People who need help sometimes look a lot like people who don't need help.” - Glennon Doyle   Glennon Doyle on being yourself:  “Every girl must decide whether to be true to herself or true to the world.” - Glennon Doyle   Glennon Doyle on personal development:  “What if pain - like love - is just a place brave people visit?” - Glennon Doyle   Glennon Doyle on being yourself:  “I have met myself and I am going to care for her fiercely.” - Glennon Doyle   Mel Robbins on personal development:  “You need to hear this loud and clear: No one is coming. It is up to you.” - Mel Robbins   Mel Robbins on being yourself:  “There will always be someone who can't see your worth. Don't let it be you.” - Mel Robbins   Mel Robbins on being a girl boss:  “You have been assigned this mountain so that you can show others it can be moved.” - Mel Robbins   Rupi Kaur on being yourself:  “Loneliness is a sign you are in desperate need of yourself.” - Rupi Kaur   Rupi Kaur on being a girl boss:  “How you love yourself is how you teach others to love you” - Rupi Kaur   Rupi Kaur on women's empowerment: “If you were born with the weakness to fall you were born with the strength to rise” - Rupi Kaur

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast
147 | What Part of The Problem Is You With Jordan Montgomery

The Military Veteran Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 40:02


Do your dreams match your values?  This is the question that our guest today Jordan Montgomery opens up with as he shares the story of where he went from having everything to having nothing.     Jordan Montgomery, the owner of Montgomery Companies, is a highly regarded performance coach and keynote speaker whose clients include business executives, sales organizations, and entrepreneurs.  Jordan travels to speak and coach executives at Fortune 500 companies, professional athletes, and salespeople from small-town Iowa to a dominant force in the performance coaching industry.  In addition to his work speaking and coaching, Jordan is an accomplished business leader who has managed top-performing sales teams in the financial services industry.  Jordan resides in Tiffin, Iowa, with his wife Ashley, and his three daughters, Audrey, Claire, & Olivia. When he is not writing, coaching, or speaking, Jordan spends time with his family and enjoys the outdoors. He is a lover of sports and all things Iowa Hawkeyes!   And today, he opens up his story for us to learn the hard lessons he has to walk through.    Topics Covered:  When dreams don't align with your values   Rebooting your life from the ground up  Learning to lead oneself while looking in the mirror  Helping your kids understand whom God made them be  Doing the Bible in a year program with your kids  Why learning to process your thinking out loud is important  How physiology affects the psychology  How to connect with guest  https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordanmmontgomery (LinkedIn)  https://www.facebook.com/montgomerycompanies/ (Facebook)  https://www.instagram.com/jordanmmontgomery/ (Instagram)   https://twitter.com/jmmontgomeryco (Twitter)  https://www.montgomerycompanies.com/ (Website ) Thank you for Listening to the Episode!  Be sure to subscribe on https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-military-veteran-dad-podcast/id1448127126 (Apple), https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9taWxpdGFyeXZldGVyYW5kYWQubGlic3luLmNvbS9yc3M (Google), https://open.spotify.com/show/2I1mwoZ0VaR9tLdCwwxsg2 (Spotify), or wherever you get your podcasts. And feel free to drop us a line at ben@militaryveterandad.com.  Follow Ben on Social Media to stay up to date on Military Veteran Dad – https://www.facebook.com/benjamin.killoy (Facebook) | https://twitter.com/BenKilloy (Twitter) | https://www.instagram.com/militaryveterandad/?hl=en (Instagram) | https://www.linkedin.com/in/ben-killoy/ (LinkedIn)  For help, resources, and community support, please join the https://www.facebook.com/groups/militaryveterandad (Military Veteran Dad) Facebook Group.  Be sure to check out all the http://www.freedadcourse.com/ (free courses) available to help come home to a better tomorrow.  Heads Up: My episodes may contain affiliate links! If you buy something through one of those links, you won't pay a penny more, but we'll get a small commission, which helps keep the lights on. Thanks!  Support this podcast

ContenderCast with Justin Honaman
THE POWER OF CLARITY :: UNLEASH THE TRUE POTENTIAL OF WORKPLACE PRODUCTIVITY, CONFIDENCE, AND EMPOWERMENT

ContenderCast with Justin Honaman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 35:45


Yet a new frontier of enormous opportunity to improve results is hidden in plain sight. According to a Fortune 500 study, as much as 80% of working time is lost to tiresome meetings, unclear expectations, difficult decisions and other wasteful delays. Overcoming the lack of clarity behind this waste - on both an individual and organizational basis - would reap huge rewards. In The Power of Clarity, Ann Latham exposes the unrecognized confusion and explains how to eliminate it. This fascinating guide to workplace productivity and effectiveness draws upon extensive research and case studies to demonstrate how you can get better results in far less time while also increasing confidence and commitment. Ann joins Justin to discuss her new book!

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani
The Truth About Self-Love - Shadé Zahrai

The Mindvalley Podcast with Vishen Lakhiani

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 6:56


You'd be surprised how many people believe that self-love is the authority to be selfish. But what if you decided to define it differently instead? In this short episode, self-mastery expert Shadé Zahrai shares a better definition of self-love and her version is the antidote to imposter syndrome, the secret culprit that holds many people back. Get ready to become the Master of your confidence.      Listen out for: - The definition of self-efficacy. - The difference between self-love and self-esteem. - The true definition of imposter syndrome.  - How to overcome imposter syndrome.   ABOUT SHADÉ ZAHRAI Shadé Zahrai is a leadership ‘alchemist' known for her ability to translate the latest in neuroscience and psychology research into practical and actionable strategies that drive mindset shifts and behavioral change in a systematic way. She is a bestselling author, Harvard-trained leadership coach, TEDx speaker, and was recently recognized as Adweek's Careers Creator of the Year. Along with her Ph.D. research in leadership and career performance, Shadé has spent hours with hundreds of teams from startups to Fortune 500s, observing clear behavioral trends behind the happiest and most successful people.      Bonus:                                                                          - Find Vishen's notes on this episode here

The Virtual Summit Podcast
How To Excel At Creating Summits In The Corporate Industry.

The Virtual Summit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 31:00


EP230 How To Excel At Creating Summits In The Corporate Industry. Demishia Samuels walks us through her top strategies on creating incredible summits in the corporate space.  After 4 years of hosting summits she shares how to get Fortune 500 Companies on a summit, what components are most important for your audience, and how to structure your summit for success.  Plus whether you should run a free summit or a premium summit.  All that and more on today's episode of the Virtual Summit Podcast! https://podcast.virtualsummits.com/230  

Going Deep with Aaron Watson
511 Wes Kao Insider Status and the Future of Education (Maven)

Going Deep with Aaron Watson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 46:23


Wes Kao is the cofounder of Maven, the world's first digital platform for cohort-based courses. In just one year, the Maven team launched over 100 cohorts, saw dozens of instructors make $10K, multiple made $250K+, and raised a $20m Series A from Andreesen Horowitz.   Their course creators include Anthony Pompliano, Li Jin, Sahil Lavingia, Shaan Puri, and Sahil Bloom.   Prior to starting Maven she was the co-founder of the altMBA, which launched the modern cohort-based education movement with Seth Godin. She's led over 150 launches for Fortune 500 brands and startups, and is recognized as a leading expert in B2C marketing.    In this episode, Wes and Aaron discuss how to go from being and outside to an insider, why MOOCs fail, and how Wes got a job with Seth Godin.   Sign up for a Weekly Email that will Expand Your Mind.   Wes Kao's Challenge; Figure out how you can turn bugs into features.   Connect with Wes Kao Linkedin Wes on Twitter Maven on Twitter Maven.com WesKao.com If you liked this interview, check out episode 422 with Pomp. Underwritten by Piper Creative Piper Creative makes creating podcasts, vlogs, and videos easy.    How? Click here and Learn more.   We work with Fortune 500s, medium-sized companies, and entrepreneurs.   Follow Piper as we grow YouTube Instagram Subscribe on iTunes | Stitcher | Overcast | Spotify

Milestones Motivation & Money
Curating The Ultimate Pitch Deck

Milestones Motivation & Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 22:57


Have you ever wanted to know what to include in a pitch deck? In this episode, Donna Griffit joins us to share tips on how to craft the ultimate pitch deck. A pitch deck is key for seeking investments or sometimes grant opportunities. Donna Griffit, a Corporate Storyteller, has worked globally for over 16 years with Fortune 500 companies, Start-Ups, and investors in a wide variety of industries. She has consulted and trained clients in over 30 countries. Through her guidance, clients have raised over a billion dollars. In addition, Donna has the ability to magically spin raw data into compelling stories that captivate audiences and drive results. Donnas Template for the Pitch deck - https://www.donnagriffit.com/guides/ultimate-investor-deck/ You can also use www.Canva.com  for free templates to start your pitch deck https://www.linkedin.com/in/donnaabraham/ https://www.donnagriffit.com/ https://twitter.com/Donna_Grif   Book Angel to speak here Order I AM In Control of My Finances Order the Ballin On A Budget Workbook Order Upfront: An Entrepreneur's Quick Start Guide Follow the Podcast on Instagram  Join Milestones, Motivation & Money on Clubhouse  Join the Milestones, Motivation & Money Facebook Group Watch Guest Interviews on YouTube Follow us on Patreon https://www.patreon.com/milestonespodcast Visit our podcast site   Have a podcast? Need to Create Promo Graphics?  Get 2 Weeks FREE of Headliner Looking for Podcast Guests? Or Wanting to be a guest on other podcasts?  Check out this podcast matching service

How to Succeed Podcast
How to Succeed at Improving Your Personal Presence

How to Succeed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:39


Mike Montague interviews Paul Glynn on How to Succeed at Improving Your Personal Presence.   In this episode: The best attitude, behavior, and technique on how to succeed at improving your personal presence Where personal presence fits in the Sandler System You can improve your personal presence if you want to The most important part of your communication is feedback Be aware of your personal presence Techniques to improve your personal presence Ask questions Take control of your health Paul's definition of success Podcast: https://howtosucceed.libsyn.com/ iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/how-to-succeed-podcast-by/id1097591566 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/00JoVzRtMzmQB5Ae5RWWQZ   The How to Succeed Podcast is a public and free podcast from Sandler Training, the worldwide leader in sales, management, and customer service training for individuals all the way up to Fortune 500 companies with over 250 locations around the globe.   Find white papers, webinars, and more in our free Sandler E-Learning Library: https://www.sandler.com/sell   Don't forget to subscribe and leave us a comment!

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 725 #RiseAndGrind - 5 ways to increase value!

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 121:48


Thank you for joining us on the #1 Morning Show in The World!! #RiseAndGrind is BACK! This time with TWO hours full of motivation, inspiration, and education! We hear from Glenn Lundy, and new Co-Hosts Sara McCord, Lolita Walker, Scott Simons, and Marvin Reid! The segment is full of different talks, performances and segments to help start your day, and encourage you to become the best version of yourself!  Glenn Lundy the founder of Breakfast With Champions, #RiseAndGrind and 800% Club. Lundy believes if you can change the way people start their day, it'll make a massive impact in their life, working and motivating to create the best versions of people, 23 year automotive leader!  Sara McCord is a communications and marketing strategist who specializes in helping companies and thought leaders reach ambitious business goals through stronger content thoughtfully built across multiple channels. She's worked with a Fortune-100, billion dollar investment firms, small businesses, and thought leaders and solopreneurs; on multi-faceted communications, branding and rebranding, social media, and content strategies. Most recently, Sara signed on to build Breakfast With Champions, where she's charged with startegically growing, scaling, marketing and monetizing the brand on Clubhouse, as a podcast, and through other audience experiences. Sara got her start in editorial as a Staff Writer/ Editor at the Muse and Mashable Contributor, and her 200+ published articles have been bylined or syndicated across Cosmopolitan, Forbes, Fast Company, Time, CNBC, Good Housekeeping, and more. Lolita Walker is a TEDx Speaker, Keynote Speaker, Certified Life Leadership and Executive Coach, Podcaster, Poet, Author and Change Champion for YOU!  Scott Simons is Moving Lives Forward, Co Host of the Breakfast of Champions Clubhouse Room, President/Managing Partner CMA's Valley Chrysler, Dodge, Honda, Jeep, Nissan, RAM, Subaru, VW Car Dealerships, Deputy Sheriff Reserve, OG Member of the Arete Syndicate, Apex, and Investor in Multiple Businesses across many Industries!  Marvin Reid is the founder of Volume 2, is a Sales and Marketing consultant & business start up adviser. Having worked with enterprise level blue chip companies, he has over 20 years of experience in sales strategy, marketing strategy, brand management and social media strategy. Ultimately, his passion is using strategy to help business owners eclipse their business goals and increase profit. Building roadmaps to success!

Nobody Told Me!
Dr. Delatorro McNeal: ...drastically improve productivity and boost morale.

Nobody Told Me!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 37:37


If you have goals you want to achieve and could use some advice on how to reach them, this episode is for you. Our guest is internationally known peak performance expert Delatorro McNeal, who works with Fortune 500 corporations and entrepreneurs to drastically improve productivity and boost morale. Delatorro is the founder of The Full Throttle Experience and is a sought-after motivational speaker who's delivered thousands of presentations over the past fifteen years. He's the author of eight books, the latest of which is called, "Shift into a Higher Gear: Better Your Best and Live Life to the Fullest". Thanks to our sponsors of this episode! --> Betabrand: has the comfortable pants women need, without sacrificing style, polish, or personality. Their Dress Pant Yoga Pants are designed with the fit and flexibility of yoga pants, but they look like polished dress pants. They're soft, comfy, perfectly stretchy, and stay wrinkle-free. Choose from dozens of colors, patterns, cuts, and styles - like boot-cut, joggers, cropped, skinny, and more. And they have fun, limited-time prints - but they sell out fast, so don't wait! Right now, get 30% off your Betabrand order when you go to Betabrand.com/NOBODYTOLDME. -->Ritual: the obsessively researched vitamin for women. Even if you try hard to eat the right things, most likely, you're still not getting all of the essential nutrients you need on a daily basis. For example, over 97% of women between the ages of 19 and 50 aren't getting enough Vitamin D from their diet. And 95% aren't getting their recommended daily intake of key Omega-3s. Chances are, you fall into one, or both, of those groups. Ritual's Essential for Women 18+ Multivitamin was formulated by exhaustive research to help fill nutrient gaps in the diets of women over the age of 18. Its nutrients help support brain, bone and blood health, in addition to providing antioxidant support. Read how Ritual challenged some of the top scientists to reimagine the daily multivitamin for women. The result is everything they think a multivitamin should be. Visit ritual.com/NTM to start your ritual today with 10% off your first three months. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jessie Lee is The People’s Mentor
0465 Being Courageous When You're Fearful #bosslee

Jessie Lee is The People’s Mentor

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 37:12


Fortune favors the bold and certainly that includes the courageous. I hope you enjoy this training I know how important it is for your business that you listen to this. If you find out you please consider leaving a five star review and make sure you subscribe to the show. Connect with me http://messenger.com/t/imbossleeimbosslee Check out my #1 MLM podcast www.jessieleepodcast.com Subscribe for free content www.jessieleeward.com Follow me on Instagram www.instagram.com/imbosslee Follow me on TikTok https://www.tiktok.com/@imbosslee Subscribe to me on Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/JessieLeeOSullivan www.jessieleetelegram.com

Wealth Formula by Buck Joffrey
299: Chris Leonard

Wealth Formula by Buck Joffrey

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 24:25


Christopher Leonard is a business reporter whose work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, and Bloomberg Businessweek. He is the author of The Lords of Easy Money, The Meat Racket and Kochland, which won the J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award. The post 299: Chris Leonard appeared first on Wealth Formula.