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Ocean between Europe, Africa and the Americas

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  • Jan 19, 2022LATEST
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Latest podcast episodes about atlantic

Vox's The Weeds
What BBB means for climate policy

Vox's The Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 70:35


Weeds co-hosts Jerusalem Demsas and Dara Lind talk with Robinson Meyer (@yayitsrob), staff writer at the Atlantic, about the climate provisions in President Joe Biden's Build Back Better bill. They discuss specific climate-focused policy proposals and the political stalemate Congress is in, thanks to the filibuster in the Senate. Plus, a white paper about building codes and wildfires in California. References:  Robinson Meyer on the climate gamble going on in Congress Weeds alum Matt Yglesias on the Build Back Better Bill Vox's Rebecca Leber on why Joe Manchin may have doomed climate policy A 2016 piece from Vox's Dylan Matthews about money in politics “Progressive leader calls on Biden to unilaterally act on agenda,” The Hill “Manchin's $1.8 trillion spending offer appears no longer to be on the table,” The Washington Post  “Noisy and Unsafe: Stop Fetishizing Old Homes,” The Atlantic Hosts: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind) immigration reporter and Weeds host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Wine for Normal People
Ep 410: Cahors, France -- the Malbec Capital of the Old World

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 42:17


Cahors is the best-known appellation in Southwest France, likely because the wine of the region is based off a grape everyone knows: Malbec.  Source: https://vindecahors.fr/ Made around the town of Cahors, 160km/100 mi east of Bordeaux, this region hugs the river Lot, and stretches over slopes with such varied soil, each wine is a story of terroir in a bottle. The unique land, combined with an ideal climate, and a history of winemaking that goes back to the Romans contributes to the special combination that creates this earthy, dark fruited, herbal, and powerful red. If you haven't tried this Old World style of Malbec, after this show, you will be excited to see what you may be missing! Here are the show notes: Here Malbec is AKA -- Auxerrois, Côt (COE). It must be 70% of the blend – the balance is made up with Merlot, or less commonly Tannat. Any white or rosé made in the region is categorized IGP Côtes du Lot   The planted vineyard area is 3,323 ha/8,211 acres but it stretches across 21,700 hectares/53,622 acres over 45 communes along a section of the River Lot around the town of Cahors   Most of the winemakers here are independent, private wineries (75%) with just 25% members of the co-op, an impressive breakdown in a smaller region! 75% of the winemakers are working sustainably, with 31% converting to organic or already certified organic. The climate of Cahors represents a combination of influences, as the region is about the same distance from Atlantic, Mediterranean, and Pyrenees Mountains. The summers are hot, the fall is dry, and the lack of rain means the roots dig deep to look for nutrients, giving more character to the wine. The Massif Central to the east occasionally blows cold air in the winter, which can cause deep freezes (we go into the endo and eco dormancy, very dorky!). Source: Getty Images via Canva The terroir of Cahors is, to me, the most interesting thing about the area. Most vineyards lie in terraces that are carved out by the river Lot. We discuss the two main areas – the Lot Valley alluvial terraces and the limestone plateau known as the Causses. The Lot Valley, representing 60% of the wine made, has several terraces with gravelly, sandy deposits that range in age from 20,000 years old to 1 million years old. These wines tend to be fruitier, more floral, and lighter in style.  The Causses is at elevation and represents slopes covered in clay, limestone, and marl with red, iron-rich soils in some spots. They represent ~ 40% of the vineyard and these wines are more tannic, complex, and age worthy. Styles of Cahors: Given the varied terroir, some styles are fruitier and some are earthier. Many have flavors and aromas of fruits and flowers, spice, herbs, and cedar, with underbrush and licorice. They can be dark in color and higher in alcohol. Some are quite tannic, especially those with Tannat as a component. Softer versions have a bigger component of Merlot.   We end the podcast with a comparison of Argentinean Malbec, noting that Argentina's Malbec is fruitier, more plummy with soft tannins, higher alcohol, and fine to drink on its own because of its easy to drink profile. Cahors, on the other hand is more tannic, earthier, with more acidity, and may pair better with food because the tannins are firmer, acidity higher. Source: Getty Images via Canva   If you've never tried Cahors, hopefully this will convince you to get a bottle and see what the Malbec of the Old World has to offer!   Much of the information for this podcast is from: https://vindecahors.fr/   ________________________________________________________________ Thanks to our sponsors this week: Our new sponsor: Wine Spies! Wine Spies uncovers incredible wines at unreal prices - on Zinfandel, Barolo, Champagne...you name it - up to 75% off! It's not a club and there's no obligation to buy. They have a build-a-case option, so you can mix and match wines while enjoying free shipping on every purchase. Visit www.winespies.com/normal you'll get $10 credit to use on your first order! Check them out today!   If you think our podcast is worth the price of a bottle or two of wine a year, please become a member of Patreon... you'll get even more great content, live interactions and classes!  www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes

You Start Today with Dr. Lee Warren | Weekly Prescriptions to Become Healthier, Feel Better, and Be Happier.

Dr. Karen Swallow Prior, PhD is a reader, writer, and professor. But she does all those things in the context of great faith in God, and a love for Jesus. She is a thought leader and sought-after speaker, and she shows people how to put culture in its proper context in relation to our faith.  I invited Dr. Prior onto the show because her social media presence constantly challenges my thinking on important issues, and I've been impressed with how she weathers attacks from left and right for never wavering from what she believes.   We had a great conversation about good books, reading, faith, and the cost of telling the truth.  She puts her faith on the line in an inspiring way- she's been arrested for protesting in front of abortion clinics, and she's written and spoken out extensively about the sanctity of life at all stages.  Dr. Prior's website. Read her recent New York Times pro-life op/ed here. Dr. Prior on Twitter (her account is great to follow!) Dr. Prior on Instagram!   Official Biography: Karen Swallow Prior, Ph. D., is Research Professor of English and Christianity and Culture at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. She is the author of Booked: Literature in the Soul of Me (T. S. Poetry Press, 2012), Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist (Thomas Nelson, 2014), and On Reading Well: Finding the Good Life through Great Books (Brazos, 2018). She is co-editor of Cultural Engagement: A Crash Course in Contemporary Issues (Zondervan 2019) and has contributed to numerous other books. Her writing has appeared at Christianity Today, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, First Things, Vox, Relevant, Think Christian, The Gospel Coalition, Religion News Service, Books and Culture and other places.

Indy Ball Report
Episode 149: Automatic Out

Indy Ball Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 45:15


Battling Illness our dynamic duo returns this week to talk on the biggest news to come out of the ALPB in nearly half a year. Then a discussion on the newest member of the Staten Island Ferryhawks and if there may be someone following soon.Recorded- January 14, 2022Uploaded- January 15, 2022Intro- 00;00-01;35ALPB Mound & Robo Ump- 01;35-30;25Staten Island Ferryhawks- 30;25-43;00Outro- 43;00-END

Mobile Suit Breakdown: the Gundam Anime Podcast

Show Notes We finally get started on Gundam 0080: War in the Pocket, and it makes quite the impression! Was it the good or bad kind of impression? There's only one way to find out! This week, we review and analyze episode 1, "How many miles to the battlefield?" (戦場までは何マイル?), and research and discuss the history of Playboy Magazine in Japan, how the creative team's nostalgia and childhood memories connect to 0080's story and themes, and how the unexpected appearance of mobile suits in a neutral colony connects to the history of US military bases and the presence of nuclear weapons in Japan. Playboy Magazine in Japan Wikipedia pages for Playboy, Monthly Playboy (月刊プレイボーイ / Gekkan Pureibōi), the Playboy Clubs, and Playboy Bunnies. _Britannica page for Playboy. _ _History of Playboy, from the company's website. _ Twitter thread (with photos) about Playboy clubs (and similar) in Japan, by @mulboyne. Photo of Taga Rie, a Bunny at one of Japan's Playboy clubs, from Getty Images (they had to lean like that to place drinks/light cigarettes because if they bent over they'd fall out of the one-piece). _Vintage store based in Las Vegas, with photographs of Monthly Playboy covers from the 70s and 80s. _ Wikipedia pages for China Lee and Jennifer Jackson. Papers and articles: Batura, Amber B. “From the Bachelor Pad to the Jungle: Bunnies, Playboy Magazine, and Vietnam Soldiers.” Texas Tech University, 2018. Accessed at https://ttu-ir.tdl.org/bitstream/handle/2346/73903/Batura_Amber_Thesis.pdf Chrisman-Campbell, Kimberly. “The Surprising Tale of the Playboy Bunny Suit.” The Atlantic, Atlantic Media Company, 4 Oct. 2017, https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/10/history-of-the-playboy-bunny-suit/541929/ “Tokyo's Foreign Flavors.” Edagawa, Koichi, Japan Quarterly; Oct 1, 1985; 32, 4; ProQuest pg. 356 Nostalgia and the Creative Team Team credits and biographical information was sourced variously from animenewsnetwork.com's encyclopedia and ja.wikipedia.org pages for the specific people. _Timelines of the major events of the Vietnam war are available in various places including History.com, Britannica, and Wikipedia. _ Japan & Nuclear Weapons Article 9 of the Japanese Constitution is described on Wikipedia here, and the full text of the constitution is available in English at the website of the National Diet of Japan. _The 1951 Security Treaty Between the United States and Japan is described here. _ The 1960 Treaty of Mutual Cooperation and Security Between the United States and Japan is described here. _More information about the U.S. military use of Japanese ports, specifically during the Korean War. _ Two articles by U.S. researchers around the year 2000, going into what was then publicly known and acknowledged about nuclear weapons deployed in and near Japan. Several articles from 2010 when the new Japanese government confirmed the existence of the secret agreements permitting U.S. nuclear weapons to pass through Japanese ports without prior consultation. _A 1981 article from the Christian Science Monitor about the Japanese reaction to former Ambassador Reischauer's admission about the secret agreements: "Japan reels under Reischauer's nuclear 'bombshell'." _ Steve Rabson, Six Decades of US-Japanese Government Collusion in Bringing Nuclear Weapons to Japan. Asia-Pacific Journal, Vol 19, Issue 14, No. 3. Available at https://apjjf.org/2021/14/Rabson.html Mobile Suit Breakdown is written, recorded, and produced within Lenapehoking, the ancestral and unceded homeland of the Lenape, or Delaware, people. Before European settlers forced them to move west, the Lenape lived in New York City, New Jersey, and portions of New York State, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Connecticut. Lenapehoking is still the homeland of the Lenape diaspora, which includes communities living in Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Ontario. You can learn more about Lenapehoking, the Lenape people, and ongoing efforts to honor the relationship between the land and indigenous peoples by visiting the websites of the Delaware Tribe and the Manhattan-based Lenape Center. Listeners in the Americas and Oceania can learn more about the indigenous people of your area at https://native-land.ca/. We would like to thank The Lenape Center for guiding us in creating this living land acknowledgment. You can subscribe to Mobile Suit Breakdown for free! on fine Podcast services everywhere and on YouTube, visit our website GundamPodcast.com, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, or email your questions, comments, and complaints to gundampodcast@gmail.com. Mobile Suit Breakdown wouldn't exist without the support of our fans and Patrons! You can join our Patreon to support the podcast and enjoy bonus episodes, extra out-takes, behind-the-scenes photos and video, MSB gear, and much more! The intro music is WASP by Misha Dioxin, and the outro is Long Way Home by Spinning Ratio, both licensed under Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 licenses. The recap music is "pieces of life" by Analog by Nature, licensed under a CC BY attribution license. All music used in the podcast has been edited to fit the text. Mobile Suit Breakdown provides critical commentary and is protected by the Fair Use clause of the United States Copyright law. Gundam content is copyright and/or trademark of Sunrise Inc., Bandai, Sotsu Agency, or its original creator. Mobile Suit Breakdown is in no way affiliated with or endorsed by Sunrise, Bandai, Sotsu, or any of their subsidiaries, employees, or associates and makes no claim to own Gundam or any of the copyrights or trademarks related to it. Copyrighted content used in Mobile Suit Breakdown is used in accordance with the Fair Use clause of the United States Copyright law. Any queries should be directed to gundampodcast@gmail.com

Bloggingheads.tv
Biden's Exit Strategy (Robert Wright & Mickey Kaus)

Bloggingheads.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 60:00


Mickey's plan to install Nancy Pelosi in the Oval Office ... Who can convince Biden not to run for reelection? ... Mickey's comeback strategy for Biden ... Bob takes the Parrot Room into untested waters ... Is Boris Johnson in trouble over Covid protocols or policy failures? ... Are seditious conspiracy charges warranted for the Oath Keepers? What about Trump? ... Mickey: The Supreme Court got the vaccine mandate ruling wrong ... Bob: It will be bad if Russia invades Ukraine, but it won't threaten U.S. interests ... Bob: China doesn't have a monopoly on repressive software exports ... Parrot Room preview: Bob takes a Covid test, Mickey catches Bob in an almost-devastating contradiction, Bob tries to catch Robert Malone in a contradiction, Sidney Poitier, Bob Saget, Terry Teachout, Bob v. Andrew Sullivan, Don't Look Up, Ruth Barrett sues the Atlantic, Bari Weiss on Hollywood, David Remnick claims we're suspended between democracy and authoritarianism, Mickey has second thoughts about donating to the Salvation Army, Matt Ridley on the origin of Covid, a Jeffrey Epstein update, Maya Angelou gets a quarter, and what's up with Leon Wieseltier's journal? ...

The Wright Show
Biden's Exit Strategy (Robert Wright & Mickey Kaus)

The Wright Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 60:00


Mickey's plan to install Nancy Pelosi in the Oval Office ... Who can convince Biden not to run for reelection? ... Mickey's comeback strategy for Biden ... Bob takes the Parrot Room into untested waters ... Is Boris Johnson in trouble over Covid protocols or policy failures? ... Are seditious conspiracy charges warranted for the Oath Keepers? What about Trump? ... Mickey: The Supreme Court got the vaccine mandate ruling wrong ... Bob: It will be bad if Russia invades Ukraine, but it won't threaten U.S. interests ... Bob: China doesn't have a monopoly on repressive software exports ... Parrot Room preview: Bob takes a Covid test, Mickey catches Bob in an almost-devastating contradiction, Bob tries to catch Robert Malone in a contradiction, Sidney Poitier, Bob Saget, Terry Teachout, Bob v. Andrew Sullivan, Don't Look Up, Ruth Barrett sues the Atlantic, Bari Weiss on Hollywood, David Remnick claims we're suspended between democracy and authoritarianism, Mickey has second thoughts about donating to the Salvation Army, Matt Ridley on the origin of Covid, a Jeffrey Epstein update, Maya Angelou gets a quarter, and what's up with Leon Wieseltier's journal? ...

Due For A Win: Atlantic City and Casino Biz Podcast
DFAW #165: Glorified Burlesque

Due For A Win: Atlantic City and Casino Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 36:53


On episode 165 of the Atlantic City and Casino Biz Podcast, Kyle and Craig look back at some shocking 1865 criminal activity, the completion of the Atlantic City Expressway, and... Read more »

The Dom Giordano Program
Readin', Writin', and Reason with Dom Giordano | Funding Issues

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 42:40


Dom Giordano, WPHT host and former teacher, has dedicated much of his daily show toward parents who are taking it into their own hands to push back against school boards that have a negative impact on their children. This has culminated in a weekly podcast on education, Readin', Writin', and Reason, which has allowed wonderful relationships to develop between Giordano, educators, and parents throughout the country who are speaking out against overbearing school boards. First, Dom welcomes back friend of the show Ron Tomalis, former Pennsylvania Secretary of Education, to discuss the dire situation in Philadelphia public schools. Giordano and Tomalis discuss how the city could find itself in such a funding struggle, allowing children to fail at an incredible rate. Tomalis reveals what is being done elsewhere to address budgetary concerns, offers what he believes to be the issue within the school system, and tells of the implications on taxes within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.  Then, Asra Nomani, Vice President of Strategy and Investigations for Parents Defending Education, rejoins the podcast to discuss a bombshell report by her organization that alleges that Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona solicited a very controversial letter from the National School Boards Association that compared protesting parents to domestic terrorists. In an October 5th email exchange, NSBA Secretary Treasurer Kristi Swett wrote that NSBA leader Chip Slaven “told officers he was writing a letter to provide information to the White House, from a request by Secretary Cardona.” Nomani tells how the organization uncovered the emails, and Giordano lays forth what this means in the grand scope of the school board narrative. Finally, Angie Schmitt, author of Right of Way: Race, Class, and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America, joins the podcast to discuss a piece she penned for the Atlantic, telling why Coronavirus policies have caused her to sour on Democrats. First, Schmitt takes Giordano through her past year, raising and schooling two children while being the primary source of income. Schmitt tells that during her 6 months off from work, her entire family got Coronavirus, and she recognized that there may be ulterior motives at play here. In addition, Schmitt tells that she feels both parties, Democrat and Republican, have spent too much time fighting one another rather than finding a solution out of the pandemic.

On the Media
A Question of War

On the Media

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 50:20


Since the insurrection on January 6, warnings of a second American Civil War have been sounded. This week, On the Media explores whether the civil war talk is an alarmist cry, or actually a sober assessment. Plus, hear how the myth of “the Dark Ages” paints an unfair portrait of medieval times.  1. David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker and host of the New Yorker Radio Hour, on the risk of second civil war. Listen. 2. Barbara Walter [@bfwalter], professor of International Relations at the University of California, San Diego, on the tell-tale signs that a country is headed for insurgence. Listen. 3. Charlie Warzel [@cwarzel], journalist and contributing writer at The Atlantic, on when journalists should sound the alarm (and how loud we should ring it). Listen. 4. David M. Perry [@Lollardfish] and Matthew Gabriele [@prof_gabriele], authors of The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe, on how the Dark Ages might have not been so dark. Listen. Music: Wade in the Water by Hank Jones and Charlie HadenThe Glass House - Marjane's Inspiration by David BergeaudSeinfeld Theme - Jonathan WolffLowland's Away by Gregory Blavenz - The Us Army Fife And Drum CorpsHarpsichord - Four TetAd summan missam: Santus II by Ensemble Aeolus

The Gospel of Fire
Ep 215: Lodro Rinzler - The Buddhist Way to Deal with Anxiety

The Gospel of Fire

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 46:33


Lodro Rinzler is a meditation teacher and the author of seven books, as well as the co-founder of MNDFL meditation studios in New York City. His books Walk Like a Buddha and The Buddha Walks into the Office both have received Independent Publisher Book Awards. Lodro has taught meditation for twenty years in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and travels frequently for his books, having spoken across the world at conferences, universities, and businesses as diverse as Google, Harvard University and the White House. Named one of 50 Innovators Shaping the Future of Wellness by SONIMA, Rinzler's work has been featured in The New York Times,The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, Good Morning America, CBS, and NBC.

Very Serious with Josh Barro
YOU are the economy

Very Serious with Josh Barro

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:23


It's a question you hear a lot during COVID: How do you balance the economy with people's well-being? But the economy is part of people's well-being. On this week's show, Josh talks with Elizabeth Bruenig of the Atlantic and Megan McArdle from the Washington Post about what COVID has taught us about what makes a good economy for the people. They discuss where the public and private sectors have stumbled, and how the most acute economic need has shifted from income support to sufficient provision of goods and services. Plus they talk about Customers Behaving Badly, and how the pandemic has impaired individuals' good sense about how to behave economically.For more Very Serious conversation and opinions, join us at joshbarro.com. Send your Very Serious comments to mayo@joshbarro.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gap Year For Grown-Ups
Tom Peters on [B]OLDLY Turning 80: His Childhood, His Passion, His Anger, His Mission

Gap Year For Grown-Ups

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 48:09


Debbie talks to legendary business author and speaker Tom Peters.  And if you're wondering why she's interviewing a business management guru, it's because Tom exemplifies the new name of the podcast: [B]OLDER. I.e. getting bolder as you grow older. Tom is the co-author of In Search of Excellence, which was published 40 years ago and is considered one of the most influential business books ever written. The book makes the argument that excellent companies treat their employees with respect. They put people first. That was a more unusual perspective four decades ago than it is now.Tom is known for his brash delivery and has been happily haranguing audiences and readers for decades with his philosophy of people first.  In 2017 he received the Thinkers50 Lifetime Achievement Award. He also coined the term Personal Branding.And he's not stopping, even as he turns 80.In this conversation, he reflects on excellence and teamwork; passion, outrage and why they are the most important quality in a good speaker; his love for research and data and the concept of compassionomics. He also gets personal, opening up about his childhood and his mother's influence and reiterating why he is not done yet.He's as fanatical as ever and you'll hear Debbie occasionally interrupting or trying to interrupt him in this conversation. Not something Debbie normally does but Tom's Director of Programs, Shelley Dolley, encouraged her to do so. His most recent book, Excellence Now: Extreme Humanism,  is more relevant now than ever with its emphasis on creating a humane workplace. It's his eighteenth book and it may be his last, he tells Debbie. Much of his written and speech material is available—free to download—at tompeters.com and excellencenow.com.Enjoy a spirited and wide-ranging conversation with a legendary thinker.  Mentioned in this episode or useful:TomPeters.comTom Peters on TwitterIn Search of Excellence: Lessons from America's Best-Run Companies by Tom Peters and Bob Waterman (​​Harper Business; Reprint edition 2006)Excellence Now: Extreme Humanism by Tom Peters (Networlding Publishing, March 2021)Complete listing of Tom's booksThe Brand Called You by Tom Peters (Fast Company, August 31 1997)Tom Peters remembers Bob Waterman (who died Jan. 2, 2022)Debbie's Cool Friends interview with Tom Peters (2008)Susan Sargent (married to Tom Peters)Rebecca Eaton - Masterpiece TheaterMcKinsey & CoThe Firm: The Story of McKinsey and Its Secret Influence on American Business by Duff McDonald (​​Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition 2014)The Golden Passport: Harvard Business School, the Limits of Capitalism, and the Moral Failure of the MBA Elite by Duff McDonald (Harper Business; Reprint edition 2017)Tickled: A Commonsense Guide to the Present Moment by Duff McDonald (Harper; 2021)Dopesick (TV Mini Series 2021)Empire of Pain: The Secret History of the Sackler Dynasty by Patrick Radden Keefe (Doubleday; 2021)Should Women Rule? (The Atlantic, November 2008)Compassionomics - The WebsiteCompassionomics: The Revolutionary Scientific Evidence that Caring Makes a Difference by Stephen Trzeciack and Anthony Mazzarelli (Studer Group; 2019)Amazon.com: The Social Psychology of Organizing by Karl E. Weick (McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages; 1979)Thomas Keneally, the Australian writer Tom has been enjoying recently Note from DebbieIf you've been enjoying the podcast, please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than two minutes and it really makes a difference. It makes me feel loved and it also attracts new listeners.Subscribe to my newsletter and get my free writing guide: https://bitly.com/debbie-free-guide.Connect with me:Twitter: @debbieweilInstagram: @debbieweilFacebook: @debbieweilLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/debbieweilBlog: Gap Year After SixtyEmail: thegapyearpodcast@gmail.com- DebbieWe Are Looking For a SponsorIf you are interested in reaching a smart and thoughtful audience of midlife, and older, listeners, contact Debbie Weil.Media PartnersNext For MeEncore.orgMEASupport this podcast:Leave a review on Apple Podcasts: it will help us find a sponsor! If you are interested, contact Debbie WeilSubscribe via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher or SpotifyCredits:Host: Debbie WeilProducer: Far Out MediaPodcast websiteMusic: Lakeside Path by Duck Lake

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Professor Eric Segall And Christian Finnegan with Ophira Eisenberg

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 59:02


Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Today's sponsor is Indeed.com/Standup Today's Sponsor is TrueBill.com/Standup  Eric J. Segall graduated from Emory University, Phi Beta Kappa 27  and summa cum laude, and from Vanderbilt Law School, where he was the research editor for the Law Review and member of Order of the Coif. He clerked for the Chief Judge Charles Moye Jr. for the Northern District of Georgia, and Albert J. Henderson of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. After his clerkships, Segall worked for Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and the U.S. Department of Justice, before joining the Georgia State faculty in 1991. Segall teaches federal courts and constitutional law I and II. He is the author of the books Originalism as Faith and Supreme Myths: Why the Supreme Court is not a Court and its Justices are not Judges. His articles on constitutional law have appeared in, among others, the Harvard Law Review Forum, the Stanford Law Review On Line, the UCLA Law Review, the George Washington Law Review, the Washington University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, the Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy, and Constitutional Commentary among many others. Segall's op-eds and essays have appeared in the New York Times, the LA Times, The Atlantic, SLATE, Vox, Salon, and the Daily Beast, among others. He has appeared on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and France 24 and all four of Atlanta's local television stations. He has also appeared on numerous local and national radio shows. Listen and Subscribe to Eric's Podcast Supreme Myths and follow him on Tik Tok!   Ophira Eisenberg is a Canadian-born standup comedian and writer. She hosted NPR's nationally syndicated comedy trivia show Ask Me Another (airing on 400+ stations) where she interviewed, joked, and played silly games with some of the biggest and funniest folks in the world.  Lauded as “hilarious, high risk, and an inspiration,” Ophira filmed her comedy special Inside Joke, when she was 8½ months pregnant. The show's material revolves around how she told everyone that she was never going to have kids, and then unexpectedly found herself expecting at “an advanced maternal age.” Inside Joke can be found on Amazon and iTunes, along with her two other comedy albums, Bangs!and As Is. She has appeared on Comedy Central, This Week at The Comedy Cellar, Kevin Hart's LOL Network, HBO's Girls, Gotham Live, The Late Late Show, The Today Show, and VH-1. The New York Times called her a skilled comedian and storyteller with “bleakly stylish” humor. She was also selected as one of New York Magazine's “Top 10 Comics that Funny People Find Funny,” and hailed by Forbes.com as one of the most engaging comics working today. Ophira is a regular host and teller with The Moth and her stories have been featured on The Moth Radio Hour and in two of The Moth's best-selling books, including the most recent New York Times Bestseller Occasional Magic: True Stories About Defying the Impossible. Ophira's first book, Screw Everyone: Sleeping My Way to Monogamyi s a comedic memoir about her experiments in the field as a single woman, traveling from futon to futon and flask-to-flask, gathering data, hoping to put it all together and build her own perfect mate. She is also sought after as a brilliant interviewer and moderator, and has interviewed dozens of celebrities, writers, and actors. Originally from Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Ophira graduated with a Cultural Anthropology and Theater degree from McGill University. She now lives in Brooklyn, NY where she is a fixture at New York City's comedy clubs Christian Finnegan  is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor based in New York City. BUY HIS NEW ALBUM--- "Show Your Work: Live at QED"   Finnegan is perhaps best known as one of the original panelists on VH1's Best Week Ever and as Chad, the only white roommate in the “Mad Real World” sketch on Comedy Central's Chappelle's Show. Additional television appearances as himself or performing stand up have included “Conan”, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson”, "Would You Rather...with Graham Norton", “Good Afternoon America” and multiple times on The Today Show and Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and on History's I Love the 1880s. He hosted TV Land's game show "Game Time". As an actor, Finnegan portrayed the supporting role of "Carl" in the film Eden Court, a ticket agent in "Knight and Day" and several guest roles including a talk show host on "The Good Wife". In October 2006, Finnegan's debut stand up comedy CD titled Two For Flinching was released by Comedy Central Records, with a follow-up national tour of college campuses from January to April 2007. “Au Contraire!” was released by Warner Bros. Records in 2009. His third special "The Fun Part" was filmed at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston on April 4, 2013 and debuted on Netflix on April 15, 2014. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Also check out Gareth Sever  Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page  

Know Your Enemy
Joan Didion, Conservative (w/ Sam Tanenhaus)

Know Your Enemy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 99:58


When Joan Didion died at the age of 87 in December, her early conservatism figured into a number of obituaries and commentaries, but was rarely discussed in detail. Matt and Sam turned to Sam Tanenhaus, William F. Buckley, Jr.'s biographer and knower of all things National Review, to discuss Didion's early writing for the magazine, her roots in California conservatism,  and how her politics changed—and didn't—over the course of her long career.  Along the way, they discuss why she loved Barry Goldwater and hated Ronald Reagan, why she finally stopped writing for National Review, and how she compares to other writers from that era—from Norman Mailer and Tom Wolfe to Gore Vidal and Garry Wills. Sources:Joan Didion: "On Self-Respect,"  Vogue,  1961‘I want to go ahead and do it,' (Review of Mailer), NYTimes, Oct 7, 1979"The Lion King," (Review of Dinesh D'Souza), NYRB, Dec 18, 1997"New York: Sentimental Journeys,"  NYRB, Jan 17, 1991. "John Wayne: A Love Song," Saturday Evening Post, 1965Slouching Toward Bethlehem (1968)The White Album  (1979)Salvador (1983)Political Fictions (2001)Where I Was From  (2003)A collection of Didion's National Review Writing Commentary on Joan Didion:Ross Douthat, "Try Canceling Joan Didion," NYTimes, Jan 5, 2022Parul Sehgal, "The Case Against the Trauma Plot," NYTimes, Dec 27,  2021Louis Menand, “Out of Bethlehem,” New Yorker, Aug 17, 2015Stephen Schryer, "Writers for Goldwater,"  Post45, Jan 20, 2020Haley Mlotek, "It's All in the Angles," The Nation, June 15, 2021Caitlin Flanagan, "The Autumn of Joan Didion," The Atlantic, Feb 15, 2021Jacob Bacharach, "Joan Didion Cast Off the Fictions of American Politics," The New Republic, Dec 27, 2021...and don't forget to subscribe to Know Your Enemy on Patreon for access to all of our bonus episodes!

The Brian Lehrer Show
Why NOT to Catch Omicron for the Immunity

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 29:22


Katherine Wu, staff writer at The Atlantic who covers science, talks about the latest omicron news, including why the CDC's new guidance about how long to isolate after infection is so confusing. →"Should I Just Get Omicron Over With?" (The Atlantic, Jan. 5, 2022)→"America's COVID Rules Are a Dumpster Fire" (The Atlantic, Jan. 6, 2022)

Outlook
I sailed the oceans in a Scientology jazz band

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:15


In 1968 Neil Sarfati was 23 and feeling "lost", when a conversation with a neighbour introduced him to Scientology. What began as self-help movement born out of the teachings of the founder, science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, had become an organisation with a large and devoted following. Fearing the world would be destroyed unless the teachings of Scientology took hold, Neil left his job and wife and made his way to Los Angeles to sign up to the Sea Org, an elite group of its most dedicated members. He boarded their ship, the Apollo, and began playing saxophone in the crew's new jazz band, The Apollo Stars, in ports dotted around the Atlantic coast of Africa and Europe. But as Hubbard became increasingly creatively involved, Neil started to doubt his commitment to Scientology. Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com Presenter: Emily Webb (Photo: Neil Sarfati in 2012. Credit: Neil Sarfati)

Remotely Renee
Episode 1: From the Ground Up

Remotely Renee

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 74:54


Welcome to Montgomery & Co. Today, Renee Montgomery and her co-hosts, Sirena, Nicole, and Snook talk to Jemele Hill of The Atlantic, and Bo Han, the founder, and CEO of Buzzer about social media's influence and how to bet on yourself in business. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
MOCO - Episode 1: From the Ground Up

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 74:54


Welcome to Montgomery & Co. Today, Renee Montgomery and her co-hosts, Sirena, Nicole, and Snook talk to Jemele Hill of The Atlantic, and Bo Han, the founder, and CEO of Buzzer about social media's influence and how to bet on yourself in business. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz
Montgomery & Co - Episode 1: From the Ground Up

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 74:54


Welcome to Montgomery & Co. Today, Renee Montgomery and her co-hosts, Sirena, Nicole, and Snook talk to Jemele Hill of The Atlantic, and Bo Han, the founder, and CEO of Buzzer about social media's influence and how to bet on yourself in business. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Authors Stephen Marche and Etan Thomas Episode 519

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 110:55


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Today's sponsor is Indeed.com/Standup 26 mins Stephen Marche is a novelist, essayist and cultural commentator. He is the author of half a dozen books, including The Unmade Bed: The Messy Truth About Men and Women in the Twenty-First Century (2016) and The Hunger of the Wolf (2015). He has written opinion pieces and essays for The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic, Esquire, The Walrus and many others. He is the host of the hit audio series How Not to F*ck Up Your Kids Too Bad, and its sequel How Not to F*ck Up Your Marriage Too Bad on Audible, and is currently at work on a book about the possibility of a civil war in the United States for Simon and Schuster. 1:03 Etan Thomas has amassed an amazing collection of interviews intertwined with the heartfelt commentary of his own to create a masterpiece. You'll read the voices of athletes, activists, media personalities, scholars, and the family of victims of police brutality. These voices include Kareem Abdul Jabbar, Bill Russell, D Wade, Russell Westbrook, Steve Kerr, Oscar Robertson, Mark Cuban, Michael Bennett, Carmelo Anthony, Derrick Rose, Swin Cash, Alonzo Mourning, Chris Webber, Michael Bennett, Jamal Crawfor, The Fab Five's Chris Webber, Juwan Howard, Ray Jackson, and Jimmy King, John Carlos, Laila Ali, Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf, Bradley Beal, Tamika Catchings, Curtis Conway, Laila Ali, Harry Edwards, Chris Hayes, Craig Hodges, Chamique Holdsclaw, ESPN's Scoop Jackson, Bomani Jones, Michael Smith, Michael Wilbon and Jemele Hill, Shaun King, Ted Leonsis, Thabo Sefolosha, James Blake Torrey Smith, Eric Reid, Shannon Sharpe, Anquan Boldin, Ilyasah Shabazz, Kenny Smith, David West, Jahvaris Fulton (brother of Trayvon Martin) Emerald Snipes (daughter of Eric Garner) Alysza Castille (sister of Philando Castille) Valerie Castille (mother of Philando Castille) and Tiffany Crutcher (sister of Terence Crutcher) Today's athletes have delves into politics, current events, presidential elections, Black Lives Matter, women's rights, murders at the hands of the police, mass incarceration, and the list goes on and on. We Matter highlights and discusses this new wave of athlete activism; dispels the myth that current athletes are not connected and affected by what goes on not only within the confines of their own communities, but across society as a whole; gives credit and pays homage to the athletes of yesteryear who have paved the way for the Colin Kaepernicks and Lebron James's of the world to be as vocal as they are today; and encourages athletes of the future to continue to use their voice to bring about change Over the past decade, we have witnessed an unprecedented number of athletes across all sports using their positions, their platforms, their celebrity and the power of their voices for change. Athletes have an unprecedented ability to influence fashion, pop culture, and politics with their actions. It is refreshing to see many acting on their convictions. Muhammad Ali once said,”I don't have to be who you want me to be. I'm free to be who I want.” we talk about Etan's newest book Police Brutality and White Supremacy: The Fight Against American Traditions Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page

Business Casual
The Truth About the Wellness Industry

Business Casual

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 38:22


Pour yourself a tall glass of celery juice and join Scott and Nora as they break down the wellness industry with Amanda Mull, a staff writer for The Atlantic. She details its history, meteoric rise, clever marketing strategies, and lack of regulation. Check out some of Amanda's reporting on Goop and Instagram wellness fads.

Curiosity Daily
Linguistic Laws in Nature and Fatherless Condor Chicks from Parthenogenesis

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 10:48


Learn about linguistic “laws” that also show up in nature; and how two California condors were born without fathers. Linguistic "laws" like Zipf's law of abbreviation and Menzerath's law also show up in biology, geography, and more by Grant Currin Jonny Thomson. (2021, October 22). The unknown linguistic laws that apply to all life. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/life/linguistic-laws-biology/  Semple, S., Ferrer-i-Cancho, R., & Gustison, M. L. (2021). Linguistic laws in biology. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2021.08.012  Two condor chicks were born from parthenogenesis, something we've never seen before by Cameron Duke Harrison, S. (2021, October 28). California Condors Are Capable of Asexual Reproduction. Wired; WIRED. https://www.wired.com/story/california-condors-are-capable-of-asexual-reproduction/ Ryder, O. A., Thomas, S., Judson, J. M., Romanov, M. N., Dandekar, S., Papp, J. C., Sidak-Loftis, L. C., Walker, K., Stalis, I. H., Mace, M., Steiner, C. C., & Chemnick, L. G. (2021). Facultative Parthenogenesis in California Condors. Journal of Heredity. https://doi.org/10.1093/jhered/esab052 San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance Conservation Scientists Report First Confirmed Hatchings of Two California Condor Chicks from Unfertilized Eggs. (2021). San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance. https://sandiegozoowildlifealliance.org/pr/CondorParthenogenesis The Economist. (2021, October 30). No sex please, we're condors. The Economist; The Economist. https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2021/10/30/no-sex-please-were-condors Zhang, S. (2021, October 28). The Atlantic. The Atlantic; theatlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/10/california-condors-are-capable-virgin-birth/620517/ Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to get smarter withCody Gough andAshley Hamer — for free! Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wake Up Warchant
(1/13/22): Prep and portal ratio for eliteness, LB play, ACC title back in play?

Wake Up Warchant

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 77:42


(3:30) Can you build a championship level team by relying on the portal? (12:00) They're gonna get a QB in the portal...right? (17:00) Tie NIL funds to students staying put? (23:00) Can improved LB play make this defense special? (27:00) Is winning the Atlantic on the table? (34:00) Did Norvell have a master plan at WR? (47:00) What happens first: Saban retires, FSU makes (four team) playoff? (52:00) Will players get paid....to leave? (55:00) Arrange the 2022 schedule (59:00) Has the portal brought parity? (1:07:00) Mt Rushmore of FSU assistant coaches Music: Milky Chance - Love Again Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Species Unite
Steven Wise: The Most Important Animal-Rights Case of the 21st Century

Species Unite

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 27:55


“The reason that you should accept our client as having rights is because we're showing what an extraordinary being she is. These beings have mirror self-recognition, they know that they are elephants. In fact, we listed 42 different, highly complex cognitive abilities that elephants have. If you didn't know it was an elephant, you'd think [I was] talking about what a human being does.” - Steven Wise     There is an elephant who lives all by herself in a small enclosure at the Bronx Zoo. Her name is Happy. She arrived at the zoo in 1977, a few years after she'd been kidnapped from the wild in Thailand. The Bronx Zoo claims that Happy is Happy. The best elephant cognition scientist in the world have argued that she's anything but. And most of us regular human beings can see that an isolated elephant in a tiny enclosure is not living a good life. Steven Wise is the founder and president of the Nonhuman Rights Project. In 2018, the Nonhuman Rights Project brought a petition for writ of habeas corpus on Happy's behalf. Habeas corpus is a common law right that protects against unlawful and indefinite imprisonment. In Happy's case, the NhRP are seeking recognition of her fundamental right to bodily liberty and transfer to an elephant sanctuary. Last spring, the New York court of appeals, the highest court in the state of New York, agreed to hear Happy's case. This is the first time in history that the highest court of any English-speaking jurisdiction will hear a habeas corpus case brought on behalf of someone other than a human being. In a story for the Atlantic, Jill Lepore called Happy's case, “the most important animal-rights case of the 21st Century.” Steven Wise has been working toward this since 1980. LINKS: The Nonhuman Rights Project  https://www.nonhumanrights.org/ Instagram  https://www.instagram.com/nonhuman.rights.project/ Twitter  https://twitter.com/nonhumanrights FB  https://www.facebook.com/NonhumanRights Steven's TED Talk   https://www.ted.com/speakers/steven_wise

The Common Good Podcast
Dr. Amanda Porter discusses her book, “Dear Anxiety, Let's Break Up,” Brian and guest co-host Steve Coble unpack The Atlantic article, “Why More Americans Are Saying They're ‘Vaxxed and Done,'” and they reflect on Francis Chan's message on u

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 56:45


(00:00-8:38): Brian was joined by guest co-host Steve Coble. Steve is the Pastor of Teaching, Discipleship, and Spiritual Formation at Renewal Church of Chicago. Learn more about Steve at renewalchicago.com Brian and Steve discussed the following articles: ”Chicago schools: Public school students will return to classroom Wednesday after teachers union suspends work action, mayor says” “Chicago Teachers Union clears way for in-person classes to resume Wednesday in Chicago Public Schools after four days of cancellations over COVID-19 clashes” (8:38-18:07): Brian and Steve shared their thoughts on a tweet from Tim Keller, “#1 Pure capitalism says all your money belongs to you; #2 pure Marxism says all your money belongs to the State; #3 Christianity says all your money belongs to God (1 Chron 29), and we should be radically generous with it as Jesus was with his riches. (2 Cor 8-9)” (18:07-28:52): Brian and Steve unpacked Derek Thompson's article for The Atlantic, “Why More Americans Are Saying They're ‘Vaxxed and Done.'” (28:52-38:39): Dr. Amanda Porter, Author and Nurse Practitioner, joined Brian and Steve to talk about her new book, “Dear Anxiety, Let's Break Up.” Learn more about Amanda at amandaporternp.com and connect with her on Instagram at @AmandaPorterNP (38:39-46:51): Brian and Steve shared their thoughts on Jana Riess' Flunking Sainthood column at Religion News Service, “The I Hate Winter Spirituality Club.” (46:51-56:44): Brian and Steve reflected on an encouraging message from Francis Chan, “Francis Chan on Until Unity.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
ID The Future: Casey Luskin: Biogeography Is No Friend of Common Descent (#1550)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022


Geologist Casey Luskin discusses biogeography and the problems it poses for the idea of universal common descent. To make it work, evolutionists have to propose, for instance, that old world monkeys rafted across the Atlantic from Africa to South America on a natural raft. Really? That's some raft. And how did the monkeys not starve […]

Intelligent Design the Future
Casey Luskin: Biogeography Is No Friend of Common Descent

Intelligent Design the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 26:28


On this ID the Future, geologist Casey Luskin discusses biogeography and the problems it poses for the idea of universal common descent. To make it work, evolutionists have to propose, for instance, that old world monkeys rafted across the Atlantic from Africa to South America on a natural raft. Really? That's some raft. And how did the monkeys not starve to death? Or die of thirst? They couldn't drink salty ocean water, after all. And talk about a genetic bottleneck! That's just one of several problems Luskin raises with the idea that all species gradually evolved from a universal common ancestor. In his conversation with host Emily Reeves, he also touches on the problem of convergence, as when two creatures Read More › Source

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls on Biden to cancel student debt

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 164:13


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they think the lies of the 2020 election will repeat themselves in the 2022 midterms and 2024 presidential race. Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls for President Joe Biden to cancel student loan debt, criticizes Governor Charlie Baker's pandemic response and pushes for urgent action on voting rights. Pressley is the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts 7th District. Rep. Mike Connolly weighs in on state debates over rent control, and whether he thinks there is enough momentum to get Mayor Michelle Wu's housing plan passed. Connolly is a Massachusetts State Representative and co-sponsor of the Tenant Protection Act. Shirley Leung talks about today's tent demolitions at Mass. and Cass, and luxury apartment buildings providing access to rapid tests. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Corby Kummer updates listeners on changes to SNAP benefits that would allow people to purchase hot meals and from restaurants, and Taco Bell's new subscription service. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Art Caplan discusses the first heart transplant using a genetically modified pig heart, and debates over the severity of Omicron. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. We end the show by talking with listeners about whether they have attended large events or made other risky pandemic decisions they regret.

Unsafe Space
[Episode 0700] [Dangerous Thoughts] Crying About Hobbies and Lying About Science

Unsafe Space

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 90:35


Carter discusses the origin of rights and debunks the myth of the "right to vote" before reviewing a piece of NPC propaganda from The Atlantic titled, "How Hobbies Infiltrated American Life." He rounds out the discussion by presenting and dismantling a commonly repeated metanarrative about science perpetuated, ironically enough, by those quintessential opponents of all metanarratives: postmodernists. The video version of this episode is available here: https://unsafespace.com/ep0700 Links Referenced in the Show: Atlantic article lamenting productive hobbies: https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2022/01/history-hobbies-america-productivity-leisure/621150/ A curious lists of alleged rights: https://twitter.com/PAcat15/status/1481070695278911494 Statistics on American and video consumption: https://techcrunch.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/time-spent-video.png?resize=680,588 Statistics on social media consumption: https://www.broadbandsearch.net/blog/average-daily-time-on-social-media About Dangerous Thoughts Hosted by Carter, "Dangerous Thoughts" is a series dedicated to practical and applied philosophy, as well as deeper dives into other crucial but complex topics. Its goal is to help rational individuals become more dangerous to the intellectual and psychological enemies of the principles upon which Western Civilization was built and has thrived. Thanks for Watching! The best way to follow Unsafe Space, no matter which platforms ban us, is to visit: https://unsafespace.com While we're still allowed on YouTube, please don't forget to verify that you're subscribed, and to like and share this episode. You can find us there at: https://unsafespace.com/channel For episode clips, visit: https://unsafespace.com/clips Other video platforms on which our content can be found include: LBRY: https://lbry.tv/@unsafe BitChute: https://www.bitchute.com/channel/unsafespace/ Also, come join our community of dangerous thinkers at the following social media sites...at least until we get banned: Censorship-averse platforms: Gab: @unsafe Minds: @unsafe Locals: unsafespace.locals.com Parler: @unsafespace Telegram Chat: https://t.me/joinchat/H4OUclXTz4xwF9EapZekPg Censorship-happy platforms: Twitter: @_unsafespace Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/unsafepage Instagram: @_unsafespace MeWe: https://mewe.com/p/unsafespace Support the content that you consume by visiting: https://unsafespace.com/donate Finally, don't forget to announce your status as a wrong-thinker with some Unsafe Space merch, available at: https://unsafespace.com/shop

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Food stamp benefits could soon be used to purchase restaurant meals, prepared foods

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 20:25


Numerous states are looking into extending food stamp use to restaurants and prepared meals to keep up with what academics are calling the lack of time, skills, resources, and physical abilities of some SNAP users. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share why more states are looking into joining the SNAP Restaurant Meals Program, and where food policy needs to change. “When it comes down to it, realistically, the people who need and rely on nutrition assistance often work two jobs, they're supporting families, and they have no time at all to cook and prepare the wholesome food that SNAP was originally designed to restrict them to buying,” Kummer said. When Restaurant Meals started in 2003, 19 states participated in the program. That number shrank to just four states by 2018. Now, six states — Arizona, California, Maryland, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Virginia — let some people who receive SNAP benefits use food stamps at restaurants. Illinois and New York are both in the process of applying to the Restaurant Meals Program. Kummer told Boston Public Radio that states have to prove that there are enough high need residents — such as “adults over 60, people with disabilities, and those who are homeless and their spouses” — to get exemptions in the Restaurant Meals Program and SNAP. While the Restaurant Meals Program has been applauded by food equity advocates and anti-hunger organizations, small restaurants have been slow to participate in the program due to lengthy bureaucratic processes. Instead, large chains like McDonald's and Subway are often state-certified for the program. “It's a lot of paperwork on the part of the restaurant, and so this in the beginning seemed like it was going to be a boon for for smaller restaurants, especially with [something like a] high volume, local sandwich shop that opens,” Kummer noted. “But [the paperwork] turned out to be so cumbersome that it discouraged all but the largest chains.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

The Bulwark Podcast
Tim Alberta: The Fringe Has Merged with the Mainstream

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 40:51


With all the manic, hyperbolic nonsense about the election and vaccines, the fringe is no longer visible. The Atlantic's Tim Alberta joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Special Guest: Tim Alberta.

Everything Everywhere Daily History Podcast

Subscribe to the podcast!  https://podfollow.com/everythingeverywhere/ Beginning in the 16th century, French settlers crossed the Atlantic to settle in a new French colony in the new world. That colony wasn't modern-day Quebec, however. The colony was known as Acadia.  When the British took control of Acadia in 1713, the Acadians were allowed to stay, but eventually, that privilege was revoked by the British, and those people were scattered to the winds.  Today, the descendants of the Acadians can still be found all over the world.  Learn more about Acadia and the Acadian Expulsion on this episode of Everything Everywhere Daily. -------------------------------- Associate Producers: Peter Bennett & Thor Thomsen   Become a supporter on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/everythingeverywhere Discord Server: https://discord.gg/UkRUJFh   Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/everythingeverywhere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/everywheretrip Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/EEDailyPodcast/ Website: https://everything-everywhere.com/everything-everywhere-daily-podcast/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Atlantic Files
The Atlantic Files #210: What's up with Julius Randle

The Atlantic Files

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 41:50


The Retrospectors
The Cryogenic Rush Job

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 10:38


Dr James Bedford became the first dead body to be cryogenically frozen on 12th January, 1967 - a day still commemorated in the ‘suspended animation' community as Bedford Day.But in this burgeoning (pseudo)science, there were plenty of preparations yet to be made. Which meant that the freezing team - lead not by scientists but enthusiasts - ran out of ice, and forgot to drain his blood. In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly dive into the legal cases that sprang from this early period of cryogenic freezing; consider the psychological implications of being awoken from death, generations after your grandchildren have died; and propose a controversial solution for minimising future errors in the process…Further Reading:• ‘Cryonics: Will These Bodies Come Back From Death?' (The Atlantic, 2019): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YjrQVVSSbI• ‘Cool dude James Bedford has been cryonically frozen for 50 years' (CNET, 2017): https://www.cnet.com/news/cool-dude-james-bedford-has-been-cryonically-frozen-for-50-years/Photo credit: AlcorFor bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021.• ‘Evaluation of the Condition of Dr. James H. Bedford After 24 Years of Cryonic Suspension' (Alcor, 1991): https://www.alcor.org/library/bedford-condition/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

KERA's Think
The real people accused of voter fraud

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 35:42


Election audits have shown again and again: voter fraud is not a problem on a massive scale. Vann R. Newkirk II, senior editor at The Atlantic and host of the podcast Floodlines, joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the people targeted for voter irregularities – mostly people of color – and why they serve as a cautionary tale for the future of American voting rights. His recent article is headlined “When the Myth of Voter Fraud Comes For You.”

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson
What You Need To Know About Omicron in 2022

Detroit Today with Stephen Henderson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 52:02


Stephen Henderson speaks with The Atlantic's Katherine Wu and Wayne State University Medical Researcher Dr. Paul Kilgore about this stage of the pandemic and what everyone needs to know to stay safe.

Midnight Train Podcast
Pro Wrestling Deaths

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 151:57


Today we're entering the world of sports. That's right, we're talking about everyone's favorite sport… Curling! Curling is a sport in which players slide stones on a sheet of ice toward a target area segmented into four concentric circles. It is related to bowls, boules, and shuffleboard. Two teams, each with four players, take turns sliding heavy, polished granite rocks, also called stones, across the ice curling sheet toward the house, a circular target marked on the ice. Each team has eight stones, with each player throwing two. The purpose is to accumulate the highest score for a game; points are scored for the stones resting closest to the center of the house after each end, which is completed when both teams have thrown all of their stones. A game usually consists of eight or ten ends…  Um...What the fuck.. Fucking Moody… This is why we can't trust him to do research while hunting Sasquatch in Canada… Hold on, let me find the right notes… Son of a bitch, where are they… Ah, here we go. Today we are actually going into the wonderful world of… WRESTLING!!! But you know us… we're actually not looking at the wonderful part… No sirs and madams, we take it to the not-so-wonderful side. We'll be discussing some crazy and tragic wrestler Deaths. Many of our beloved childhood wrestling favorites have passed on over the past decade or so. Many were related to the job's rigors, leading to drug use and overdose, heart attacks, suicides, and a host of other causes. Today, we're going to look at some more… "interesting," if you will... wrestler deaths. Some of these guys you'll know, some only hardcore wrestling fans will know, and some, none of you may know, at all. Also, we're going to skip some of the biggest ones because they've been covered more times than podcasts covering Ted Bundy and in much more detail within the time we have, so you won't be hearing about some of the more popular ones. So without any more curling bullshit (fucking Moody). Let's get to it!    First up is an old-timer that primarily wrestled in Australia… We love you beautiful sumbitches in Australia, so we wanted to throw this one in. Also, maybe you guys have some stories about this guy if you're old enough to remember him. His name is Brute Bernard! He initially made his name as tag team partner of Skull Murphy in the WWF. Brute toured the world with Skull until he died in 1969. Brute won the IWA World Tag titles in Australia with Murphy 6 times. They defeated Mark Lewin & Dominic de Nucci, Lewin & Bearcat Wright, Mario Milano & Billy White Wolf, Mario Milano & Antonio Pugliese, and Lars Anderson & Dick Murdoch. They lost to Lewin & Wright twice, Milano & Pugliese twice, Don Leo Jonathan & Antonio Pugliese, and Mario Milano & Spiros Arion. Brute continued as a solo wrestler in Australia, where he had his most tremendous success, winning the Austro-Asian title from Spiros Arion before dropping it back to him. He also wrestled extensively in the Carolinas, teaming up with the Missouri Mauler in Texas. Brute was also married to pro wrestler Betty Joe Hawkins.   He was famous for his 'camel walk.' I tried to look it up but couldn't find anything about it, but I think it was probably something like the iron Shiek's "Camel Clutch."    So when you look up the cause of death of this guy, you get a common reason of "shot while cleaning gun," which is still fucked up. The thing is, if you do a little more digging, it doesn't seem so simple. While there isn't an incredible amount of information on his death, if you look, you can find enough people that are suspicious of the "accidental" death ruling. Some think it was an intentional self-inflicted gunshot. There is a small amount that believes it was murder. And then some say that he was drunk and decided to play a game of Russian roulette. So what is the real story? Who knows? But there are enough people asking questions and spewing theories to make this an exciting appetizer for the show! Suicide? Russian roulette? Courtney Love? Who knows! And if that's "too soon", fuck off... she had SOMETHING to do with it.   Ok, so who's next? Oh, how about Neil Allen Caricofe. His ring name "Neil Superior" was better known, and he was born on April 6, 1963, in Hagerstown, Maryland. He was at one point a corrections officer, and he also served in the army reserve. He was trained by one of the Wild Samoans, who you definitely remember if you're Chainsaw's age. Superior made his pro debut in 1989. He and his father, Dick Caricofe, founded the All-Star Wrestling League (later known as the National Wrestling League) in Hagerstown, Maryland, that same year. Caricofe formed a tag team with fellow Wild Samoan graduate Doug Stahl called The Superior Brothers, "Nasty" Neil, and "Desirable" Doug Superior. At some point, the two also wrestled under the team name...The Satanic Warriors… yea… Anyway. After splitting with Stahl, Superior embarked on a singles career. One of his first significant opponents was "The Honky Tonk Man" (who I loved as a kid) and who he faced in Hagerstown on August 10, 1991. Superior also feuded with Rasta the Voodoo Mon. Later that year, Superior defeated Helmut Hesler to win the NWL Heavyweight Championship. After that, he worked for many other independent companies throughout the 90s. Finally, he became the south Atlantic pro wrestling heavyweight champion in 1992 and held the belt for 4 months until the promotion folded. He would then go back and finish his career in the NWL until his death… Which is why we're here.    Early on the morning of August 23, 1996, Caricofe, who had left his hotel room around 4:00 A.M., was observed acting erratically and running naked on the seventh floor of the Fenwick Inn in Ocean City, Maryland. Which, of course, we've all done at some point in our lives. It was believed that Caricofe had left his room accidentally and was unable to find his way back. Caricofe may have suffered from a medical condition caused by seizures, which made him sleepwalk. According to the Caricofe family, it wasn't unusual for him to sleep either in his underwear or nude. The night desk clerk, Lisa Mulvihill, became aware of the situation when a concerned guest called the front desk. When Mulvihill investigated, she saw Caricofe "jumping around and banging himself against the wall ."She briefly attempted to communicate with Caricofe but returned to the front desk and called the police, finding him unresponsive. Mulvihill received a second call that Caricofe was banging on the doors of several rooms. Mulvihill then made a second call to the police, informing them that she was returning to the seventh floor and requesting that officers meet her there. Officers would arrive and find Superior roaming the hallway, and when they approached him, they said he appeared to be in a boxer's stance, dancing around on his tiptoes and doing some kind of shadowboxing. They say he was not responding to their commands, and they called for backup when they assumed he was under the influence and dangerous. An attempt by two officers to handcuff Superior failed. They continued shouting commands to lay down on the ground and, when Caricofe failed to respond, all four officers used pepper spray, which they later claimed had no effect. Caricofe then moved toward the officers, pinning Officer Freddie Howard up against the wall, and held the officer by his shirt. Sergeant Braeuninger and Officer Alban radioed for backup, the latter calling in a "Signal 13," indicating an officer needed emergency assistance. Alban, Braeuninger, and Jones began hitting Caricofe on his lower back and legs with nightsticks to free Howard. Caricofe would run away and mash his way down 7 flights of stairs; along the way, police say he ran into a vending area and began beating his head and shoulders into the vending machines. Once he made it down the stairs, he headed into the parking lot, where more police were waiting. They sprayed him with pepper foam and beat him with nightsticks in another attempt to subdue him. Finally, the over officer grabbed him and held him long enough for the others to restrain him. The group held Caricofe down while attempting to handcuff him and place the "violent prisoner restraining device" on his legs. While police were waiting for paramedics to arrive, the officers observed that Caricofe was no longer breathing. They assisted paramedics in performing CPR on Caricofe but could not revive him. He was pronounced dead at the hospital a short time later. The story does not end there, though.    The circumstances surrounding Caricofe's death were questioned during the next few weeks. It was not learned until afterward that Caricofe had been diagnosed with a medical condition two years earlier, a neurological problem possibly resulting from a wrestling-related injury that caused seizures and made him appear to be sleepwalking. Ya know, CTE... for those that don't know, Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive brain condition that's thought to be caused by repeated blows to the head and repeated episodes of concussion. It's mainly associated with contact sports, such as boxing or American football. The Caricofe family was given little information from authorities regarding the death of their son. They learned from Gerald Minnich, director of Minnich Funeral Home in Hagerstown, who described their son's injuries, that Neil Caricofe had sustained "a possible broken nose, swelling around his eyes and a bruise on the back of his head ." Caricofe's father did not initially hold Ocean City police liable for the death of his son. He was told by a Maryland State Police investigator and a friend who was a state trooper at the Berlin police barracks that his son had hit his head on a vending machine as he was running from police. The family believed that the responding police officers, three of whom were temporary, seasonal patrolmen, were inexperienced and had overreacted due to Neil Caricofe's size. In an article from the Washington Post, shortly after the incident, a woman who said she was staying at the hotel and witnessed the incident said Caricofe "didn't yell back or attack but refused to lay down and kept running around."   The woman, who spoke on the condition that her name not be used, said she believes that officers put something resembling a dog collar around Caricofe's neck just before he became unconscious. "There were at least 10 of them on top of him," she said. "When they were finished, he was unconscious."    City spokesman Jay Hancock said he had "not heard about anything being placed around {Caricofe's} neck at all." He said officers are trained to use a baton to strike someone in "the extremities."   The witness also said police officers did not attempt to revive Caricofe by giving him CPR, contradicting police statements that officers had done so.   The autopsy ruled the cause of death was heart disease combined with the ingestion of drugs and alcohol. A toxicology report found the presence of ephedrine, gamma hydroxybutyrate, anabolic steroids, and ethanol in his system. The family would challenge this ruling, though, as they believed he was perfectly healthy and that the police used excessive force, which caused his death. A year after Caricofe's death, his parents were still unable to find out the details of what occurred that night. The family's Baltimore attorney, Gerald Ruter, believed his clients were being stonewalled by law enforcement. So the family began their own investigation. On June 2, 1998, Caricofe's parents filed a $350 million federal lawsuit against the Ocean City Police Department, claiming that their son had died due to police brutality. The case was heard in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Gerald Ruter, an attorney for the Caricofe family, claimed that the officers "jumped on him and knocked him down and emptied several cans of pepper spray into his face," causing him to suffocate to death. It was further claimed their use of nightsticks and pepper spray to subdue Neil Caricofe was unnecessary and constituted excessive force. Among those named in the lawsuit included former mayor Roland F. Powell, Police Chief David Massey, and 13 Ocean City police officers charged with wrongful death, excessive force, inadequate training and supervision of police, and false arrest.    The case was dismissed by Judge Frederic Smalkin, who believed the officers had appropriately responded. The ruling was upheld by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on April 1, 2002, concluding that the officers had never resorted to deadly force.   Sounds pretty fucked up. More police bullshit? Justified force? Who knows, but that's a crazy tale!   Next is one of the more prominent wrestlers we're gonna talk about. He started out as the Blue Angel, which transformed him into the Blue Blazer, the character that first brought him success. He is none other than the legendary Owen Hart. This is another one that's been covered a ton, but we wanted to talk about it because some of us here at the train remember watching this happen live. A member of the Hart wrestling family, he was born in Calgary, Alberta, the youngest of twelve children of Stampede Wrestling promoters Stu and Helen Hart. Among other accolades, Owen was a one-time USWA Unified World Heavyweight Champion, a two-time WWF Intercontinental Champion, a one-time WWF European Champion, and a four-time WWF World Tag Team Champion, as well as the 1994 WWF King of the Ring. He headlined multiple pay-per-view events for the WWF and was widely regarded as one of the company's best in-ring performers. And if you've never seen him in action, the guy was an absolute specimen in the ring. On May 23, 1999, Hart fell to his death in Kansas City, Missouri, during the Over the Edge pay-per-view event. Hart was in the process of being lowered via harness and grapple line into the ring from the rafters of Kemper Arena for a booked Intercontinental Championship match against The Godfather. In keeping with the Blazer's new "buffoonish superhero" character, he began a dramatic entrance, being lowered to just above ring level. At that time, he would act "entangled," then release himself from the safety harness and fall flat on his face for comedic effect—this necessitated the use of a quick-release mechanism. It was an elaboration on a Blue Blazer stunt done previously on Sunday Night Heat before Survivor Series in 1998. While being lowered into the ring, Hart fell 78 feet (24 m), landing chest-first on the top rope (approximately a foot from the nearest turnbuckle), throwing him into the ring. Hart had performed the stunt only a few times before. Hart's widow Martha has suggested that Hart unintentionally triggered an early release by moving around to get comfortable with both the harness and his cape. Television viewers did not see the incident. Instead, a pre-taped vignette was being shown on the pay-per-view broadcast and on the monitors in the darkened arena during the fall. A vignette is any piece of video footage featuring characters or events shown to the audience for entertainment or edification. It is usually meant to introduce a debuting character, get a wrestler over before their TV wrestling debut, or signify an impending return. Afterward, while medical personnel worked on Hart inside the ring, the live event's broadcast showed only the audience. Meanwhile, WWF television announcer Jim Ross repeatedly told those watching live on pay-per-view that what had just transpired was not a wrestling angle or storyline and that Hart was hurt badly, emphasizing the seriousness of the situation. Jim Ross would later say in an interview.                     "Being at ringside the night he fell [and announcing live on air that he had died] was the toughest thing I ever did. To this day, I've still never seen the tape. I was pretty numb. Everyone was in shock that night. I still have nightmares about it. Owen was as warm-hearted as any human being I have ever known. He loved to laugh, and he loved to make other people laugh. He had a great spirit, a good soul, and a good heart."   Five months before his tragic death, Owen Hart opened up to Slam Wrestling about his desire to soon leave wrestling:   "When my contract is up, I'm out of wrestling. I've made plans. I've been smart with my fiscal affairs. Financially, I'll be set. I really want to devote a lot of time to my family. I've bought some property on a lake. I plan on doing a lot of boating and fishing. I want to continue to stay in shape. And who knows, I might do ten weeks a year in Japan. Something just to motivate me to keep in shape, keep involved a little bit but not have to deal with the politics, the pressures that are so intense right now. I've paid my dues for twelve years now. If I continue for five more, that's seventeen years working at a pretty hard clip. I think that at that point, my family, my wife, and my kids, have been compromised enough. I would like to kind of just disappear from wrestling fans and stuff. I don't want to forget the fans and what they've done. They've supported me and stuff, but at the same time, I'd like to just — I don't want to be hanging on like one of these wrestlers who's sixty years old, saying, 'Hey, I'm a wrestler.' Let it go. Make your money out of it and get on. Going out and performing- it's an art. I'd like fans to remember me as a guy who would go out and entertain them, give them quality matches. Not just the same old garbage every week."   There was a lot of controversy over the incident. One of the main things that people talked about was how they went on with the show that night after the fall. So many people were upset that they would do this.    Vince McMahon would say of the decision:              "Knowing Owen as the performer he was, it is my belief that he would have wanted the show to go on. I didn't know if it was the right decision. I just guessed that it was what Owen would want." This is bullshit and just shows the kind of person McMahon was, in my personal opinion.   Referee Jimmy Korderas, who Hart almost landed on when he fell, would say:   "It's easy for us to say afterward, 'Well, the show should have stopped…' I was kind of on the fence with that. I kind of liken it a little bit to a Nascar race, where the race continues even after a tragic accident. Again, it's a tough call. I'm just glad I'm not the one who had to make that call."   There were lawsuits filed by Hart's wife against the WWE and the harness company. A settlement was reached with the WWE for 18 million dollars which his wife used much to set up the Owen Hart Foundation. The lawsuit against the harness company was dropped after the settlement.    A traffic end to the life of a great wrestler.   Next up Adolfo Bresciano! You may know him better as Dino Bravo! After training under Gino Brito, he started his career in Montreal in the 1970s, working for Lutte Internationale. He became one of Canada's top professional wrestling stars, winning several major titles, including the Canadian International Heavyweight Championship six times, the NWA Canadian Heavyweight Championship (Toronto version), and the NWA Mid-Atlantic Tag Team Championship. He later signed with the World Wrestling Federation, where, as a partner to Dominic DeNucci, he won the WWF World Tag Team Championship. He was also the sole holder of the WWF Canadian Championship before the title was abandoned in 1986.  Bravo returned to the WWF in late 1986 with a new look. He was now noticeably more muscular and almost immediately began bleaching his brown hair blonde. Again, he was a heel and began working as part of Luscious Johnny Valiant's stable with Greg "The Hammer" Valentine and Brutus "The Barber" Beefcake. Bravo was known as more of a technical wrestler in his days of wrestling in Canada. Still, with his strongman gimmick, his technical side was pushed into the background and his style changed to using power (brawling) moves such as bodyslams, clotheslines, punches, kicks, and other power holds such as the bearhug. In contrast, his finishing move changed from an airplane spin to a sidewalk slam. Bravo left the WWF and retired from wrestling following a European tour in April 1992. After retiring, he helped train wrestlers in Montreal.    After retiring from the WWF, Dino reportedly struggled to make ends meet. Related by marriage to Montreal mobster Vic Cotroni, Dino became involved with crime. Using his status as a wrestling celebrity, he smuggled and sold illegal cigarettes in Canada, mainly to Aboriginals. The story goes that while his wife was taking his daughter to ballet class, he sat down to watch a hockey game on television and ended up shot 17 times with seven hits to the head and 10 to his torso. The crime remains an unsolved murder; however, it is widely accepted that Dino's involvement in smuggling was the reason for his death. As there were no signs of a break-in and no footprints outside the home's windows, there is speculation that Dino knew his killer, that the person was watching hockey with him when the assassination happened. While this can't be confirmed, what is certain is that Dino's wife found him later that evening when she returned home with their daughter. Dino Bravo was killed on Wednesday, March 10, 1993.    In an interview, his former opponent Bret "The Hitman" Hart revealed that Bravo confided to friends shortly before his death that he knew his days were numbered.   Canadian Mafia… Not gonna lie… Didn't know that was a thing!    Speaking of murdered wrestlers, it's time for everyone's favorite…. The midnight train's quick hits!   John Meek wrestled under the name "Iron" Mike Steele, and in his career, he shared the ring with the likes of Marc Mero and Dean Malenko. Unfortunately, his wrestling career and life came to an end on August 29, 2007.   Harry Brian Taylor intentionally ran over Steele from behind with his van while he was riding his motorcycle. Steele passed away two hours later next to his damaged motorcycle.   On July 10, 2008, Taylor was found guilty of second-degree murder for killing Mike Steele. He was sentenced to life imprisonment without parole.   Frank' Bruiser Brody' Goodish found success as a main eventer and became one of the most talented big men in wrestling. Brody was scheduled to face Dan Spivey in Puerto Rico, but he was called into the shower area by wrestler José Huertas González to talk about some business.   Brody was stabbed in the gut by González and died in the hospital from his stab wounds. He was only 42. González was charged with murder but pleaded self-defense and was acquitted.    Tank Morgan was born in 1933, and his name died down following his tenure in WWF (now WWE) from 1966-1967.   On December 12, 1966, he lost to former WWE Champion Bruno Sammartino in a two out of three falls match inside Madison Square Garden's, the world's most famous arena.   This was the most notable moment in Morgan's entire career, but sadly, he was gunned down in a drive-by shooting on August 15, 1991, while walking his dog. Unfortunately, the details concerning his death are pretty scarce.   Many people believed that Morgan was caught up in the crossfire and was a victim of mistaken identity. What we do know, however, is that he was murdered.   "Gentleman" Chris Adams had a successful wrestling career. He's also the man who trained a guy named Steven James Anderson, aka Steve Williams "The Ringmaster," aka "Stunning" Steve Austin, aka... you guessed it! Stone Cold Steve Austin. Adams worked for World Class Championship Wrestling as a mid-carder in the late 1990s.   After Adams' short-term girlfriend Linda was found dead in 2000 following a drug or alcohol overdose, Adams was charged for manslaughter. However, he was passed out too, but he survived the overdose.   He waited to find out whether or not the court found him guilty, but he never lived to hear the verdict. Adams was shot in the chest after a heated argument with his friend on October 7, 2001.   The charges were acquitted after the friend claimed that he shot Adams in self-defense.   Ricky Lawless was considered an excellent technician during his career in the '80s. He trained a lot of independent wrestlers such as Joey Maggs, Bobby Starr, and Axl Rotten.   Lawless was discovered dead at the age of 28 after he, too, was shot. It was determined by the police that Raymond Swartz, the husband of the woman Lawless had reportedly had an affair with, was the man responsible for the shooting.   There you have it… murdered wrestler quick hits.   No wrestling family has been through more tragedy than the Von Erichs. The family's actual last name is Adkisson. However, every member of the family who joined the wrestling business used the Von Erich name. This was in dedication to the patriarch of the family, Jack (Fritz Von Erich) Adkisson.   Fritz lived to the age of 68, though unpleasantly, five of his six sons preceded him in death, three by suicide.   The firstborn son, Jack Jr., was electrocuted at the age of six in 1959 in a household accident.   In 1984, David Von Erich died in Japan from an unconfirmed cause, although it is widely believed he died from a drug overdose.   On April 12, 1987, Mike Von Erich left a suicide note for his family, then went to Lewisville Lake, where he drank alcohol and overdosed on the sleeping aid Placidyl. A few days before his death, Mike was arrested after a DUI. His body was found four days later and buried at Grove Hill Memorial Park in Dallas.   On September 12, 1991, at about 9 P.M., Chris Von Erick was found by his brother Kevin and mother outside of their family farm in Edom, suffering from a self-inflicted 9mm gunshot wound to the head. According to Kevin, he discovered Chris sitting alone on top of a hill. Chris reassured him, and after Kevin left, he shot himself in the head. Although Chris was hospitalized at the East Texas Medical Center shortly after 10 P.M., he died 20 minutes after arriving, eighteen days before his 22nd birthday. Toxicology reports also revealed cocaine and valium were in his system at his death. Kevin had talked to Chris earlier that day about 100–150 yards north of their home where an apparent suicide note had been left. After the 1987 suicide of brother Mike, Chris began to experience depression and drug issues. He was also frustrated by his inability to make headway as a wrestler due to his physical build. His interment was located at Grove Hill Memorial Park in Dallas.   On June 4, 1986, Kerry von Erich was in a motorcycle accident that nearly ended his life. He suffered a dislocated hip and a badly injured right leg. Doctors were unable to save his right foot, eventually amputating it. According to his brother Kevin, Kerry injured the foot following surgery by attempting to walk on it prematurely, thus forcing the doctors to amputate it. He continued wrestling after the accident with a prosthesis. He kept the amputation secret to most fans and fellow wrestlers, even going to the extreme of showering with his boots on. His amputation was kept secret from the public until after his death. However, Roddy Piper stated in his autobiography: "We were the best of friends. In fact, he felt comfortable enough to sit with me in a hotel and shoot the breeze with his prosthetic off".   After the amputation of his foot, Kerry became addicted to pain killers, followed by several drug problems. Among the many of them were two arrests, the first of which resulted in probation. Kerry died by suicide with a single gunshot to the heart with a .44 caliber pistol on February 18, 1993, on his father's ranch in Denton County, Texas, just 15 days after his 33rd birthday. His death came just one day after being indicted for the second drug charge, which would have more than likely resulted in extensive jail time (being a violation of his probation),   In his autobiography, "My Real Life in the Cartoon World of Wrestling", Brett "the Hitman" Hart stated that Kerry had told him that he had decided to join his late brothers in heaven and was waiting for God to tell him when. Bret told Kerry that his living daughters would need him more than his late brothers. Kerry mostly convinced Bret that he had changed his mind, but Bret feared that it was only words. Kerry told Bret again in the summer of 1992 that he wanted to follow his three late brothers David, Mike, and Chris and that they were calling him. Kerry's marriage had fallen apart earlier in 1992, and according to Hart, Kerry believed that his death was inevitable.   Fritz lived to the age of 68 and had to bury 5 of his sons.    Kevin Von Erich talks about being the last Von Erich brother left alive in an interview from 1994. He says:   "My brothers and I lived real dangerously.   "We were a really reckless group always showing off for each other – like walking on bridges in Japan and taking every chance we could. We were just young kids. I'm really surprised that I survived…   "We used to have this thing called the 'chance of the day,' where every day we'd take a chance on our lives. Dave was always too smart for that, so he'd just watch. We'd jump on wild bulls' backs, jump on trains going fast. "We'd get on the roof of a car at highway speed. You start thinking nothing can get you, and you're indestructible. That's part of being in sports. We were blessed with good bodies and good balance. We felt like we could do anything, and nothing would hurt us."   He goes on about the pain killers and drugs:            "Mike was into painkillers. All the brothers had painkillers prescribed by doctors. Kerry was the only one who got into illegal drugs [that weren't prescribed].   "Kerry figured he didn't have anything to live for. He was rootless. He had no home. Seeing me with my family made his pain greater. It reminded him of what he was missing. It was such a sad, tragic thing.   "He had his two beautiful daughters and a wife he loved, but then he'd come home, and all his stuff would be moved out. She'd move all his stuff out. Kerry was no saint [but] they both treated each other kind of rough.   "He had pretty much come to an understanding the day he killed himself. He just left having lunch with Kathy, his wife. Kerry was going to jail*, and he was afraid of never seeing his girls again.   "He said, 'Kevin, I'm about to kill myself…'   "We had talked for about an hour. We told some good dirty jokes, we laughed, and he told me, 'I'm going to kill myself.' I thought I had him talked out of it.   "He said, 'I didn't want to be like Mike and not say goodbye.'   "That's when I begged him. I said, 'Don't do this. Don't leave me alone. You're my only brother. Don't leave me.'   "I thought I had talked him out of it.   "Thirty minutes later, they found his body. He must have gone right out and done it.   If you want to talk about tragic wrestler deaths, there you go. We can't even imagine going through something like that. And remember, if you or someone you know are having thoughts of harming yourself or someone else, please reach out to your local mental health professionals. It takes a stronger person to get help than to do something you can't take back.   Those are some of the crazier deaths we found. This list is but a small fraction of the tragic deaths from the world of wrestling. Tons of guys we grew up watching have died recently due to health complications and drug issues. There have been some younger guys that have passed on recently as well. There have been tons of suicides in wrestlers under the age of 50. Also, as we've seen, a pretty good amount of murders. As we stated earlier, we stayed away from many more prominent names, mainly because they were health-related and covered extensively in recent years. Also, we don't want to talk about a guy who decided it was best to end his wife's and son's lives, as well as his own. CTE is a raging bitch. We'd like to hear what you guys think and maybe some crazy ones we've missed since we're not perfect! But before we talk about anything else, I am going to show you wonderful listeners some of my favorite moves in the ring on my boy Logan and check this out on our youtube page! Top wrestling movies   https://www.ranker.com/list/wrestling-movies-list-of-all-wrestling-films/ranker-film

Apple News Today
What happens when everyone calls out sick at the same time

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 9:39


The Atlantic explains how the Omicron surge is hitting hospitals, which are already struggling to deal with cases from previous COVID waves. A big problem is there aren’t enough doctors and nurses. Bloomberg looks at how millions of American workers calling out sick during is hurting the U.S. economy. President Biden is making a voting-rights speech in Georgia today. NBC News explores what activists want to hear. He was held at Guantanamo Bay and never charged with a crime. He’s now finding life after detention is its own kind of prison. The Washington Post tells his story. Coach Kirby Smart steered Georgia to the college-football national championship by finally beating long-time rival Alabama, led by his own mentor. Sports Illustrated looks at how it happened.

Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over the Moon, vol. 1 (ep. 178)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 29:42


From a rogue radio operator, to Bugs Bunny, to the lady who recorded all the time and temperature message for the phone company, we look at some history and notable names in voicework (which is what I do for a living, hire me!)  Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website.   If you logged onto the internet between say ‘95-2005, you'd inevitably hear two things, the shriek of a modem, like a robot orgy in a combine harvester, and a cheery man's voice saying, “Welcome” and “You've got mail.”  Elward Edwards recorded those phrases for $200 in 1989, when his wife worked for Quantum Computer Services, the company that later became AOL. At its peak, AOL had 23 million users, all hearing Edwards' voice.  He briefly returned to public attention when a video of him saying the iconic line was posted on social media, by one of his Uber passengers.  My name's …   Every topic I cover on YBOF is interesting to me, anywhere from a little ‘huh' to an all-consuming passion that dictates everything from my daily schedule to my podcast listening.  This is one of those, because I do voiceovers for a living.  Hire me today, no job too small.  With a chronic idiopathic pulmonary condition, covid provided a real kick in the pants to finally get out of retail.  What I discovered, apart from how it's not as easy as you think, or at least as easy as I thought with two years of podcasting already under my belt, is that VO is everywhere!  It's not just cartoons and dubbing movies.  Phone menus, kids toys, GPS, pre-roll ads on YT, website explainer videos, e-learning/training, continuing education, audiobooks, podcasts of course, guided meditations, seriously we could be here all day.  Even computerized voices usually start with a real person, more on that later.   Kids these days may not hear a voice that was unbelievably common in the lives of many of us.  [sfx “At the tone, the time will be 7:22 and 40 seconds,” “I'm sorry, the number you have dialed is no longer in service”]  That's the authoritative voice of Jane Barbe, one of the most widely-heard voices ever.  Barbe was the queen of telephone recordings, estimated to have been heard 40 million times a day in the 1980s and early 1990s, everything from automated time and weather messages to hotel wake-up calls.  She wasn't the only person who recorded automated phone messages, but she practically had the market cornered.    Barbe did most of her recordings for Atlanta-based Electronic Telecommunications Inc., which at one time produced as many as 2,000 voice messaging systems for businesses and government agencies, and for Octel Communications, which is now a part of Bell Labs/Lucent.  She was heard on 90% of “intercept messages” -- the recording played when something is wrong with a phone number -- and 60% of automated time and temperature calling programs.  You see, children, before you had the exact time and the collective knowledge of humanity to take to the toilet with you, you might go to the nearest telephone and dial a number you had committed to memory, probably the wildest part of this story, so a recording could tell you the time and temperature.   While I still haven't encountered my own voice in the wild, which was especially disappointing after I voiced a local political ad, Jane Barbe misdialed her calls as much as the rest of us, an experience she described as “really weird.”  One time she overheard her mother dialing a number and getting her on a recorded message.  ‘Oh, shut up, Jane!' her mom groused before slamming down the receiver in exasperation.   The story of how our go-go tech-driven lives became infused with voiceovers well predates YT and phone menus.  We have to go back over a century, to the night of Christmas eve 1906.  Up to that moment, the ship wireless operators for the United Fruit Company, along with the US Navy, had only heard Morse codes coming through their headphones.  But suddenly, they heard a human voice singing “O Holy Night” with violin accompaniment and afterwards a reading from the Bible.  This was heard by ships along the Atlantic northeast coast and from shore stations as far south as Norfolk, Virginia.  A repeat broadcast was heard on New Year's Eve as far south as the West Indies.  The voice was that of Canadian inventor and mathematician Reginald Fessenden, who was responsible for establishing the first transatlantic wireless telegraphic communication and what is considered to be the first voice work.  Fessneden was excited by Alexander Graham Bell's new device, the telephone, and set out to create a way to remotely communicate without wires.  In 1900, working for the United States Weather Bureau, Fessenden recorded the very first voice over: a test he made reporting the weather.  The following year, Guglielmo Marconi, who is often credited as the father and inventor of the radio became the first person to transmit signals across the Atlantic Ocean.   Though wireless communication was invaluable in WWI, broadcasts to the public were largely regional, amateur affairs.  The first radio news program was broadcast August 31, 1920 by station 8MK in Detroit, Michigan, which survives today as all-news CBS station.  The first college radio station began broadcasting two months later from Union College, Schenectady, New York.  Around the same time, station 2ADD (call letters were weird in the beginning), aired what is believed to be the first public entertainment broadcast in the United States, a series of Thursday night concerts that could initially only be heard within a 100-mile (160 km) radius and later for a 1,000-mile (1,600 km) radius. It wasn't much, but it was the start of broadcast voice work.   The average person knows off-hand that the first movie with diegetic, or native, sound was The Jazz Singer in 1927, but the biggest event in voice work came the following year -- the first talkie cartoon.  It was Steamboat Willie, with the prototype for Mickey Mouse voiced by none other than creator Walt Disney.  Hot on its heels came next year's Looney Tunes the following year.  And that's t-u-n-e-s like music, not t-o-o-n-s like cartoon.   In the early days of animation, Disney produced short animated films called “Silly Symphonies,” to promote and sell music, in the form of records and sheet music.  As Silly Symphonies gained popularity, Warner Brothers created its own equivalents, “Merrie Melodies”“Looney Tunes.” As for the “looney” part of the title, Warner Brothers wanted to indicate that “[their] cartoons were a little wackier than the sweeter characters of Disney.”  Cartoons quickly solidified their place as entertainment for children and adults alike.   One man in particular made Looney Tunes a powerhouse, “the man of a thousand voices” - Mel Blanc.  He is considered to be the first outstanding voice actor in the industry and voiced Bugs Bunny, Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, Yosemite Sam, the Tasmanian Devil, Marvin the Martian, Pepé Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, and many others.  Raised in Portland, Oregon, he worked at KGW as an announcer and as one of the Hoot Owls in the mid-1930s, where he specialized in comic voices. It took him a year and a half to land an audition with Leon Schlesinger's company, where he began in 1937. He also worked for Walter Lantz, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Columbia, and even Walt Disney until Schlesinger signed him to an exclusive contract.   One of Mel Blanc's most important contributions to the voice over industry is the recognition that voice artists now get to enjoy. Originally, voice artists were not given screen credit on animated cartoons. After he was turned down for a raise by tight-fisted producer Leon Schlesinger, Blanc suggested they add his name as Vocal Characterizationist to the credits as a compromise. Not only did it give a greater recognition to voice artists but also from then on, it helped to bring Blanc to the public eye and quickly brought him more work in radio.   We almost didn't have as much Mel Blanc voice-work as we did.  On January 24th, 1961, Blanc was in a near-fatal car accident on Sunset Boulevard.  He suffered multiple fracture to both legs and his pelvis, as well as triple skull bone displacements.  He lay in a coma, unresponsive, for two weeks.  After many doctors' attempts to bring him out of the deep unconsciousness, one of his neurologists tried a different approach and asked Blanc, “How are you feeling today, Bugs Bunny?”  After a moment, in a low voice, he replied, “Eh… just fine, Doc. What's up?”  The doctor then asked if Tweety was in there too, to which Blanc replied: “I tot I taw a puddy tat.”  Mel Blanc recovered shortly after and continued to do what he did best, until his death at age 81.  His tombstone in Hollywood Forever Cemetery reads “That's all, folks.”   Bonus fact: Bugs Bunny's habit of eating carrots while delivering one-liners was based on a scene in the film It Happened One Night, in which Clark Gable's character leans against a fence, eating carrots rapidly and talking with his mouth full to Claudette Colbert's character.  The trouble was, Mel Blanc didn't like carrots.  He would bite and chew the carrots to get the sound needed and immediately spit it out.   MIDROLL   Hopping back to Disney, the house of mouse also pioneered the full-length animated feature, to much soon-to-be-disproven skepticism and derision, with Snow White in 1937.  Adriana Caselotti was the daughter of Italian immigrants living in Connecticut.  Both her mother and older sister sang opera and her father gave voice lessons, so making best use of one's voice was sort of their thing.  After a brief stint as a chorus girl, when she was only 18, Caselotti was hired to provide the voice of Snow White.  She was paid $970, equivalent to $17K today, typical for the non-union times.  In most Hollywood stories, this would be step one of a meteoric rise.  The movie was certainly a success, even briefly hold the title of highest grossing sound film, so why isn't Adriana Caselotti a household name?  All my research indicates that Disney did it on purpose.  Caselotti was under contract with Disney, so she couldn't work for other studios, but Disney never provided her with any other roles.  Even radio and TV legend Jack Benny was turned away, with the explanation, “That voice can't be used anywhere.  I don't want to spoil the illusion of Snow White.”  It's the same reason Disney didn't credit voice actors for the first six years of feature films; he didn't want anything to remind the buying public that the characters are just make-believe.  Caselotti's only other cinematic contribution, for which she was paid $100, was to sing the falsetto line "Wherefore Art Thou, Romeo", in the Tin Man's song in The Wizard of Oz.  She was a lovely girl; you can see pictures of her if you're listening to the show on the Vodacast app.   I've actually got a few bullet points on the dark secrets behind the happiest place on earth.  There's enough to fill a movie.  I can see the trailer now.  “In a world…”  I can't do the voice.  Only one man could, the epic movie trailer guy, Don LaFontaine.  Donald LaFontaine was called, “The King,” "Thunder Throat" and "The Voice of God."  His CV includes 5,000 movie trailers and over 350,000 television commercials, network promotions, and video game trailers.  His signature phrase, "in a world...", is so well known and parodied, LaFontaine parodied it himself in a Geico ad. [sfx]   LaFontaine was born in 1940 in Duluth, Minnesota. to Alfred and Ruby LaFontaine.  At age 13, his voice changed, all at once, mid-sentence, and never went back.  He began his career as a recording engineer at the National Recording Studios producing commercial spots for Dr. Strangelove: Or how I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb.  LaFontaine worked behind the mic until 1964, when he had to fill in for a missing voice actor to finish a promo spot for 1964's Gunfighters of Casa Grande for a client's presentation.  The client bought the spots, and LaFontaine's career as a voice actor began.  LaFontaine developed his signature style of a strong narrative approach, and heavy melodramatic coloration of his voice work.  In 1976 LaFontaine started his own company producing movie trailers.  He moved to Los Angeles in 1981 and was contacted by an agent, launching a career that spanned three decades.  LaFontaine's signature voice came with a busy schedule.  He could have voiced about 60 promotions a week, sometimes more than 3 in a single day.  Most studios were willing to pay a premium for his service.  It has been said that his voice-over added prestige and excitement, a certain gravitas, to what might otherwise have been a box office failure.    In a 2007 interview, LaFontaine explained the strategy behind his signature catch phrase, "in a world where...": "We have to very rapidly establish the world we are transporting them to. That's very easily done by saying, `In a world where ... violence rules.' `In a world where ... men are slaves and women are the conquerors.' You very rapidly set the scene."  Wait, what movie wa that second one?  LaFontaine became so successful that he arrived at his voice-over jobs in a personalized limo with a full time driver, until he began recording from his palatial estate in the Hollywood Hills, thanks to the internet and ISDN.  It's hardly worth talking about ISDN as a voiceover today, as it's rapidly on its way out, but as a podcaster, I'm happy to.  ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) is a system of digital telephone connections, which enables recording studios anywhere in the United States, Canada and abroad to connect digitally with voice over talent working remotely in their home recording studio.  It's as clear as being in the same room.  It makes a Zoom call look like two Solo cups and an old shoelace.  But nobody's having a dedicated ISDN line installed these days.  It costs at least $1500 for the unit, plus anywhere from $75 to a few hundred dollars per month for the service, so [sfx raspberry] onto the rubbish heap of rapidly-outdated technology it goes!   LaFontaine died suddenly in 2008 and  now all we're left with is the Inception noise. [sfx]  I mean, it was cool at first, but now … meh.  You can also hear shades of LaFontaine in the work of a Barbadian-British VO known professionally as Redd Pepper.  His legal name is on wikipedia, but I don't like when mine comes up, so I won't use his.  (Also, if you find out someone goes by a name other than the one on their passport, just leave it, will you?  Be they trans, an actor, an exotic dancer, or a check-out girl, don't matter.  You don't need to know what my “real name” is unless you're writing me a check.)  Anyway, Pepper has voiced over 100 trailers, including blockbusters like Jurassic Park, Men in Black and Space Jam, so you've probably heard him, even if you thought he was the old “in a world” guy.  Here's LaFontaine [sfx] and here's Pepper [sfx].   Speaking of signature sounds, if you've ever heard old movies or newsreels from the thirties or forties, then you've probably heard that weird old-timey voice.  It sounds a little like a blend between American English and a form of British English.  Did everyone talk that way between the world wars?  Not everyone, no, only the people being recorded and they did it on purpose.   This type of pronunciation is called the Transatlantic, or Mid-Atlantic, accent.  Not mid-Atlantic like Virginia and Maryland, but like in the middle of the Atlantic.  Unlike most accents, instead of naturally evolving, the Transatlantic accent was acquired.  People in the United States were taught to speak in this voice.  Historically, Transatlantic speech was the hallmark of American aristocracy and by extension the theatre.  In upper-class boarding schools across New England, students learned the Transatlantic accent as an international norm for communication, similar to the way posh British society used Received Pronunciation, which we'll get to in a minute.  Mid-Atlantic English was the dominant dialect among the Northeastern American upper class through the first half of the 20th century. As such, it was popular in the theatre and other forms of elite culture in that region….   Transatlantic has several quasi-British elements, such a lack of rhoticity.  This means that Mid-Atlantic speakers dropped their “r's” at the end of words like “winner” or “clear”.  They'll also use softer, British vowels – dahnce, fahst.  While those sounds were reduce, emphasis was put on t's.  In American English we often pronounce the “t” in words like “writer” and “water” as d's. Transatlantic speakers pounce on their T's, writer, water.     This speech pattern isn't completely British, nor completely American.  Instead, it's a form of English that's hard to place and that's part of why Hollywood loved it.  With the evolution of talkies in the late 1920s, voice was first heard in motion pictures.  It was then that the majority of audiences first heard Hollywood actors speaking predominantly in Mid-Atlantic English.  But why do so many speakers have such a high, nasal quality?  There's a theory that technological constraints, combined with the schooled accent, created this iconic speech.  According to Duke university professor Jay O'Berski, this sound is an artifact from the early days of radio.  Radio receivers had very little bass technology at the time, and it was very difficult, if not impossible, to hear bass tones on your home device.  Speakers with pleasing full baritones were no good on early radio.    The Transatlantic accent made Americans sound vaguely British, but how can you make British people sound more British, like, the maximum amount of Britishness, like a cup of earl grey tea served with a dry scone smeared with marmalade and imperialism.  You teach them Received Pronunciation.  Received Pronunciation, or RP, is the instantly recognisable super-British accent often described as The Queen's English', ‘Oxford English' or ‘BBC English.'  RP is described as “the standard form of British English pronunciation,” though only 2% or so of Brits speak it.   So where did Transatlantic pronunciation go?  Linguist William Labov noted that Mid-Atlantic speech fell out of favor after World War II, as fewer teachers taught it to their students and radio and movie sound technology evolved to handle bass.  It's not gone entirely, though.  British expats like Anthony Hopkins still use it and it pops up in place of actors' natural British accents in movies.  The example that leaps to my mind is Warwick Davis.  You also know him as The Leprechaun, Professor Fliwick in Harry Potter, among 80 other roles.  For his first major film role as the titular Willow in 1988, he was taught the Transatlantic accent because the studio heads thought that Americans wouldn't be able to understand his British accent.  *sigh*  I could probably do a whole episode on executives thinking the average person was sub-moronic.  Did you ever once have a problem with Warwick Davis' accent, or anything less clear than Brad Pitt in Snatch?  Pop on to our social media…

Past Present
Episode 308: The History of Rest and Relaxation

Past Present

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:38


In this episode, Niki, Natalia, and Neil discuss the history of rest and relaxation. Support Past Present on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/pastpresentpodcast Here are some links and references mentioned during this week's show:  As boundaries between work and home have become blurred during the pandemic, Americans have been thinking more deliberately about rest and relaxation. Neil drew on Judith Shulevitz' New York Times piece about “bringing back the Sabbath” and this Atlantic review about her book on this topic. Natalia referred to historian Sarah Milov's history of the cigarette and her discussion of the office “smoke break.”   In our regular closing feature, What's Making History: Natalia shared the C-SPAN lesson plan based on the lecture she gave on “The Making of American Fitness Culture.” Neil discussed Brittany Gibson's POLITICO piece, “They Stormed the Capitol. Now They're Running for Office.” Niki recommended Brad Plumer's Vox article, “How America Got Addicted to Road Salt—And Why That's A Problem.”

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
It's still Trump's GOP

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 28:00


Former President Donald Trump is still one of the most influential members of the Republican party even after leaving office nearly a year ago. Sam chats with Vann R. Newkirk II, senior editor for The Atlantic, and McKay Coppins, staff writer for The Atlantic, to make sense of what Trump's GOP has been up to this past year — and its strategies going into the next elections.You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

Incident Report
Vax n' Chill?

Incident Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 13:47


Lately there's been an awakening on the part of hardcore Covidians: Omicron done changed the game, so is it finally time to chill? Here's my take. Link to the Atlantic article, video podcast, and transcript: https://zdoggmd.com/vax-n-chill Your support keeps us independent and mild-to-moderately awesome: https://zdoggmd.com/supporters Show, podcast, music, support, shop, social media, and email: https://lnk.bio/zdoggmd

The Dom Giordano Program
Cleveland Mother Angie Schmitt Sours On Democratic Party Over COVID Policies

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 10:41


Angie Schmitt, author of Right of Way: Race, Class, and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America, joins the Dom Giordano Program to discuss a piece she penned for the Atlantic, telling why Coronavirus policies have caused her to sour on Democrats. First, Schmitt takes Giordano through her past year, raising and schooling two children while being the primary source of income. Schmitt tells that during her 6 months off from work, her entire family got Coronavirus, and she recognized that there may be ulterior motives at play here. In addition, Schmitt tells that she feels both parties, Democrat and Republican, have spent too much time fighting one another rather than finding a solution out of the pandemic. (Photo by Getty Images)

The Dom Giordano Program
FULL HOUR | Why Do Teachers Unions Have So Much Power?

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 42:45


Today, Dom led off the Dom Giordano Program by discussing the push to return to in-person schooling in the face of the Omicron variant, telling of the efforts by teachers unions to force children into remote schooling again. Then, Giordano and producer Dan debate the situation that unfolded last night during the Sunday Night Football game, in which controversy arose in the last two minutes of overtime when the Raiders decided to seal their fate with a win instead of a tie against the Chargers. Had both teams tied, both would have made the playoffs, but the Raiders decided to kick a game winning field goal after a Chargers timeout. Then, after bumping back from break, Dom and Dan spend time remembering the great career of Bob Saget, then switch back into a conversation surrounding coronavirus policies, particularly in schools. Then, Angie Schmitt, author of Right of Way: Race, Class, and the Silent Epidemic of Pedestrian Deaths in America, joins the Dom Giordano Program to discuss a piece she penned for the Atlantic, telling why Coronavirus policies have caused her to sour on Democrats. First, Schmitt takes Giordano through her past year, raising and schooling two children while being the primary source of income. Schmitt tells that during her 6 months off from work, her entire family got Coronavirus, and she recognized that there may be ulterior motives at play here. In addition, Schmitt tells that she feels both parties, Democrat and Republican, have spent too much time fighting one another rather than finding a solution out of the pandemic. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

10% Happier with Dan Harris
410: Ways to End Bias That Will Also Make You Happier | Jessica Nordell

10% Happier with Dan Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 60:58


Jessica Nordell is a science and culture journalist who has written for the Atlantic and the New York Times. She earned a B.A. in physics from Harvard and an M.F.A. in poetry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her new book is called The End of Bias, A Beginning: The Science and Practice of Overcoming Unconscious Bias. This episode explores: why humans evolved to have biases; what happens physiologically when biases are challenged; why some of the most popular personal and institutional strategies for confronting biases do not work; the role mindfulness and loving kindness meditation can play in reducing bias; and the power of studying history.This episode is part one of a weeklong series the TPH podcast is doing about bias. Part two features Bob Wright, author of Why Buddhism is True, who has done some interesting work to challenge his own tribal instincts.Full Shownotes: https://www.tenpercent.com/podcast-episode/jessica-nordell-410See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

History Storytime - For Kids
Captain Cook and the European Discovery of Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii

History Storytime - For Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 9:45


Sophie (age 8) and Ellie (age 6) tell the story of the great explorer Captain Cook who was the first European to discover Australia, New Zealand and Hawaii.----more---- Before we even start our episode Sophie and Ellie point out that there were already people living there who did not need to be discovered as they had their own cultures, languages and homes. However, we decide to tell the story anyway as Captain Cook was still a great explorer . James Cook was born 300 years ago in Britain. Britain was a powerful country who got rich through trading and from her colonies. James Cook was born into a poor family. When he was 16 he went to become a grocer. The grocer's was by the sea and James used to look out the sea and wonder what it would be like to be a sailor. After a year and a half he went to sea himself. He became a sailor on a ship which carried coal from Newcastle to London. It was a boring sailing job. However, James Cook spent his time learning all the mathematics that you needed to be a good sailor. Then war broke out between Britain and France. James decided he wanted a life of adventure so he joined the navy. He had to start at the bottom. However, the navy soon realized that he knew a lot about sailing and was good at maths. He was put in charge of the sailing on a warship. Britain and France were fighting to see who would rule Canada. The British decided to sail their navy up a river in Canada to attack the French. The French thought this was impossible. However, they had not reckoned with James Cook. He mapped the river and found out where it was safe for the British fleet to sail without hitting the rocks. The British found the French, defeated them and conquered Canada. The British admirals now realized that James Cook was a very clever man. After peace came they made him captain of his own ship and sent him to the Pacific. They told him that his job was to look at Venus from there. However, when he arrived he opened secret orders. Actually he job was to explore the islands and in particular to find the mythical land called Terra Australis – which we now call Australia. Captain Cook got very lucky because he met a local person called Tapaia. He knew the area very well and was a good sailor. Together they went exploring. The first place that Captain Cook found was what we now called New Zealand. There were people already there called the Maori. Then he carried on sailing and found what we now call Australia. There were other people living there who we sometimes called Aboriginal people. When he got back to Britain everyone was amazed. He was treated like a hero. He was sent out again to find more of Australia. This time he found lots of islands that he claimed for Britain. Then he was sent out a third time. This time he sailed to Hawaii and from there he went to the top of North America to what we now call Alaska. Up in the Arctic he tried to find a way to the Atlantic through the ice. He was not successful and sailed back to Hawaii. There he had an argument with the local King and was killed on the beach.   Still today though he is remembered as one of the greatest ever explorers. PATRONS' CLUB Next week we are going to tell the story of the First Fleet. This is the fleet which first took Europeans to colonise and settle in Australia.  This episode will be exclusively available on our Patrons' Club. Then the week after we will have another free episode available. You can join at www.patreon.com/historystorytime.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Weekend Special with Profressor Eric Segall on the Supreme Court hearing on COVID Mandates and more!

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 46:32


Weekend Extra!!! Hear all about it. Sorry. This is not a full show or really a show. Its just a very important conversation with one of the most pre eminent Constitutional Legal Scholars of our Time. I hope you listen to it and inflate my monthly download numbers and .... Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more  Eric J. Segall graduated from Emory University, Phi Beta Kappa 27  and summa cum laude, and from Vanderbilt Law School, where he was the research editor for the Law Review and member of Order of the Coif. He clerked for the Chief Judge Charles Moye Jr. for the Northern District of Georgia, and Albert J. Henderson of the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. After his clerkships, Segall worked for Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher and the U.S. Department of Justice, before joining the Georgia State faculty in 1991. Segall teaches federal courts and constitutional law I and II. He is the author of the books Originalism as Faith and Supreme Myths: Why the Supreme Court is not a Court and its Justices are not Judges. His articles on constitutional law have appeared in, among others, the Harvard Law Review Forum, the Stanford Law Review On Line, the UCLA Law Review, the George Washington Law Review, the Washington University Law Review, the University of Pennsylvania Journal of Constitutional Law, the Northwestern University Law Review Colloquy, and Constitutional Commentary among many others. Segall's op-eds and essays have appeared in the New York Times, the LA Times, The Atlantic, SLATE, Vox, Salon, and the Daily Beast, among others. He has appeared on CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, and France 24 and all four of Atlanta's local television stations. He has also appeared on numerous local and national radio shows. Listen and Subscribe to Eric's Podcast Supreme Myths and follow him on Tik Tok! Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Nerdette
New year, new apocalypse!

Nerdette

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 28:31


We ring in the new year with a panel discussion on the huge snowstorm in the mid Atlantic and the death of the BlackBerry. Author Catherine Price explains why fun is an essential part of life. And what does the sun actually sound like? One of the scientists behind the first spacecraft to touch the sun's atmosphere tells us all about it.

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr
Episode 350-Operation Primrose

The History of WWII Podcast - by Ray Harris Jr

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 36:16


As the Battle for the Atlantic is not going well for the Allies, Churchill's War Cabinet puts into motion a plan to steal a Nazi Enigma machine. Bletchley Park has been trying to break the German Naval codes for years, but more is needed. Meanwhile Malta is about to get a reprieve from the Germans who are preparing for Operation Barbarossa. But one last air raid is needed. Pic-U-110 and the HMS Bulldog. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices