Podcasts about War on terror

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International military campaign that started after the 11 September 2001 attacks

  • 1,689PODCASTS
  • 3,210EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 26, 2022LATEST
War on terror

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Best podcasts about War on terror

Show all podcasts related to war on terror

Latest podcast episodes about War on terror

By Any Means Necessary
US Propaganda Campaign Against Russia Key Part of Ukraine Tensions

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 111:39


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Greg Palast, author of several New York Times bestsellers including The Best Democracy Money Can Buy and investigative reporter, whose work you can find at gregpalast.com to discuss record rejections of mail-in ballot applications in Texas and the disproportionate impact on Black and Latino urban voters, the false idea of the fraudulent voter that is behind this voter suppression efforts and the economic elite behind the idea, the long-standing trend around voter ID laws and how they punish poor voters, and the lack of action from the Biden administration in protection of voting rights.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Paul Pumphrey, Founding Board Member of Friends of The Congo to discuss the recent coup in Burkina Faso and the resource and economic interests that neocolonial actors have that could be aided by the coup, why nations like France would be interested in the political disruption in west Africa, coup leader Lt Col. Paul-Henri Sandaogo Damiba's ties to France, and the mainstream media's distortion of the situation in west Africa as a problem of Islamist terrorism rather than exploitation from Western powers.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Kevin Kamps, Radioactive Waste Watchdog at Beyond Nuclear to discuss the anniversary of the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons becoming international law, the growing movement against nuclear proliferation, how geopolitics affects the campaign for denuclearization as major nuclear powers continue to refuse to ratify the prohibition, and the growing movement pushing the United States to disarm and end the threat of nuclear war. Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Danny Haiphong, Contributing Editor of Black Agenda Report, Co-Host of The Left Lens, and co-author of “American Exceptionalism and American Innocence: A People's History of Fake News―From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror” to discuss escalating tensions with Russia over Ukraine and how it fits into the broader cold war narratives against China and Russia, how Russiagate set up the propaganda war that is playing out in the tensions over Ukraine, the accusation of alternative media that dares to challenge the Russiagate narrative as propaganda, and how the conflict over Ukraine and the broader cold war drive against Russia conveniently attempt to distract from the failures of the United States.

Red Star Radio
Ukraine & The Fall of NATO *Preview*

Red Star Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 3:08


The full version of this episode is available for subscribers In this episode we reflect on the latest developments in the Ukraine crisis. To understand things further we look back over the period since the collapse of the USSR taking in the Kosovo war, the fall of Milosevic, the war on terror, the role of Yeltsin, the rise of Putin and why the US trying to make this into Cold War Part 2 is doomed to failure.

SMac Attack
Ep 142 The War on Domestic Terrorism and the Coming Economic Destruction

SMac Attack

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 59:03


I've been asked by dozens of people recently for my latest analysis of the Real Estate market and the economy moreover. You asked, I listened. You may not like what I have to say but you need to hear it... Plus an update on the War on Terror which has now come home WILD times Become a supporting member of Liberty Lockdown here!: https://libertylockdown.locals.com/ This is where I do monthly AMA's for supporting members only Super valuable stuff! Support our sponsors! Looking to change career paths, start a business, free yourself from the paycheck to paycheck lifestyle? Start here by signing up for The Daily Job Hunt, it's free!: http://crash.co/daily https://privacypost.io/ is a privacy by default virtual mail and business center designed for the location independent, expat, and international entrepreneur seeking financial freedom. If you fit the bill you should absolutely check them out today! Wanna have ripped abs like an MMA Superstar? Need to prepare for the apocalypse? Boy do I have the device for you. Go to https://sideshaper.com/ and pick up the best ab machine I've ever used. Use code "LIBERTY" at check out for $50 off! This offer is exclusive to my listeners. Make sure to sign up over at Odysee so you can watch the video version of this show and not worry about censorship! It's free too! https://odysee.com/$/invite/@LibertyLockdown:8 Please follow me on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/libertylockdown/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/LibertyLockPod Pickup LL shirts over at https://www.toplobsta.com/pages/liberty-lockdown Podcast subscriptions are the best way to never miss an episode: Apple https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/liberty-lockdown/id1138657182 Spotify https://open.spotify.com/show/47zBxoqrvRr8Fxn87DlIUh VIDEO VERSION, sub the YT bruh! t.co/s4MO6TtOzu?amp=1 All links: https://www.libertylockdownpodcast.com/ As always, if you leave a five star review on Apple Podcasts with your social media handle I'll read it on next week's show (audio version only)! Love you long time

Real Dictators
Turkmenbashy Part 2: Putin, Taliban, Internet Shutdown

Real Dictators

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 57:58


Installed as leader of independent Turkmenistan, Saparmurat Niyazov constructs one of the most surreal regimes in all of history. Rebuilding the capital city in white marble, he puts his own mother at the forefront of public life. An absurd series of policies begins – nothing is exempt from Turkmenbashy's whims. Even as the War on Terror lands on his doorstep, the tyrant seems unstoppable. But, somehow, opposition will emerge, culminating in a dramatic attempt on his life. A Noiser production, written & produced by Dan Smith. Research by Derek Henry Flood. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Opperman Report
Trevor Aaronson : The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Maufactured War on Terrorism

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 135:47


Trevor Aaronson : The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Maufactured War on Terrorism A groundbreaking work of investigative journalism, The Terror Factory: Inside the FBI's Manufactured War on Terrorism exposes how the FBI has, under the guise of engaging in counterterrorism since 9/11, built a network of more than fifteen thousand informants whose primary purpose is to infiltrate Muslim communities to create and facilitate phony terrorist plots so that the Bureau can then claim it is winning the war on terror. The paperback edition of The Terror Factory includes all new information on the FBI's counterterrorism efforts related to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, as well as how the government has used (potentially illegally) FISA information in sting cases. Trevor Aaronson is an investigative reporter for Al Jazeera America. He has won more than two dozen national and regional awards, including the Molly Prize, the international Data Journalism Award, and the John Jay College/Harry Frank Guggenheim Excellence in Criminal Justice Reporting Award.

The Red Nation Podcast
The War on Terror & the “crusading society” w/ Adnan Husain (Pt.2)

The Red Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 43:18


Historian and co-host of Guerrilla History Podcast (@guerrilla_pod) Adnan Husain (@adnanahusain) sees the war on terror as part of a long history going back to the medieval crusades. This deep-dive historical discussion traces the early forms of racial capitalism and settler colonialism as they arose in Europe and the Americas. Make sure to check out the first half of the conversation! Support https://www.patreon.com/redmediapr  

The Panjwai Podcast
Bonus Episode 7 -The Seinfeld Episode w/ The Boardwalk Podcast

The Panjwai Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 108:00


Join us for a special episode of The Panjwai Podcast as we sit down with our friends at The Boardwalk Podcast and talk about…..nothing. Much like the sitcom Seinfeld, we spend about two hours jumping from topic to topic despite the valiant efforts of Zach Popp to keep us on track. We do eventually talk about Panjwai, the war on terror and Afghanistan.   Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkuGAa5_U7BNTmfZtsNjecA Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheBoardwalkPodcast Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/ie/podcast/the-boardwalk/id1566678503 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3eAAxXR2Zk6NbXXRIhwld2   ---------------------------------   The views expressed by the guests and hosts of this podcast do not represent the views of the Department of Defense or United States Government.   ——————————————— Also Available on:   Apple: https://buff.ly/3gTXet9 Spotify: https://buff.ly/2Kx6cjR Google: https://buff.ly/3b29R4z Podbean: https://buff.ly/2WoN0aF iHeartRadio: https://buff.ly/3nc5Wo1   Check out the video version of the podcast at : https://www.youtube.com/thepanjwaipodcast   For maps, photos and more information about Panjwai go to : https://www.thepanjwaipodcast.com/about-panjwai   You can donate and support the podcast on Patreon for as little as $3.00 a month. visit www.patreon.com/thepanjwaipodcast to learn more.   Direct donations can also be sent via venmo @thepanjwaipodcast Be sure to like, follow, and/or subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, iHeartRadio, Youtube, TuneIn, Amazon Music and many more. visit www.thepanjwaipodcast.com/listen for more information.    Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thepanjwaipodcast Instagram: @thepanjwaipodcast Twitter: @panjwaipodcast --------------------------------

PBS NewsHour - Segments
As Guantanamo enters its third decade, what does the future look like for detainees?

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 6:26


Tuesday marked 20 years since the military detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba opened. Since Jan. 11, 2002, it's been one of the most enduring symbols of the United States' war on terror. But it's also a symbol of government waste and mismanagement, and a legacy of torture. Amna Nawaz looks back at the facility's two decades, and what's to come, with Carol Rosenberg of The New York Time. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Head of the Snake Part 1: The Road to Afghanistan

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 50:34


In May of 2011, Mark Owen crossed the Afghanistan-Pakistan border on a mission to capture/kill Osama bin Laden, the leader of al-Qaeda - to decapitate “The Head of the Snake.”    But that night in Abbottabad, Pakistan is just a part of Mark's story. In this special four-part series of Danger Close, Jack sits down for an extended interview with Mark to discuss the story you haven't heard. Starting with Mark's childhood in a remote Alaskan community to his early days in the SEAL Teams to 9/11 and the sustained combat that followed to his selection and training for a team at the highest echelons of special operations, this is Mark Owen unfiltered, candid, and uncensored.  Mark would go on to take part in high-profile operations like the mission to rescue Captain Richard Phillips from Somali pirates and the search for Bowe Bergdahl.  He would later work his way up a stairwell in a compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan and into a hallway where the most wanted terrorist in the world waited…   But, as Jack and Mark discuss, the aftermath of the raid would not only change the public profile of Naval Special Warfare, it would also alter the course of Mark's life in ways he could have never anticipated.  IRONCLAD and SIG Sauer proudly present, The Head of the Snake: The Killing of UBL, a special Danger Close event.   Part 1: The Road to Afghanistan  Long before he was a part of one of the U.S. military's most high-profile missions, Mark Owen was the child of Christian missionaries living in a remote village in Alaska. It was there that he would begin to learn the survival and shooting skills that would become major assets in some of the most dangerous operations conducted in the War on Terror.  In part 1 of the Head of the Snake series, Jack hears about Mark's childhood, his early days as a Navy SEAL, and how the 9/11 attacks would revolutionize special operations.   Mark Owen's book: No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama Bin Laden Sponsors: Today's episode is presented by SIG Sauer. Today's show is also brought to you by Black Rifle Coffee. 

The Red Nation Podcast
The War on Terror & the “crusading society” w/ Adnan Husain (Pt.1)

The Red Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 65:59


Historian and co-host of Guerrilla History Podcast (@guerrilla_pod) Adnan Husain (@adnanahusain) sees the war on terror as part of a long history going back to the medieval crusades. This deep-dive historical discussion traces the early forms of racial capitalism and settler colonialism as they arose in Europe and the Americas. Support https://www.patreon.com/redmediapr  

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
U.S. Foreign Policy and the Military-Industrial Complex w/ Ret. Col. Lawrence Wilkerson

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 47:28


On this edition of Parallax Views, Ret. Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, former Chief of Staff to Colin Powell, returns to Parallax Views to discuss the state of U.S. foreign policy, international relations, and the military-industrial congressional complex. The conversation begins with a discussion of AIPAC's recently announced foray into direct spending on U.S. election, the U.S.-Israel relationship, and the potential of a cataclysm in the relationship. We also discuss the far-right, Trumpism, and antisemitism in regard to all of this the changing nature of the U.S.-Israel relationship going forward into the next few decades. Col. Wilkerson expresses his belief that the relationship between U.S. and Israel will not atrophy over time, but rather come to a juncture that will lead to a catastrophic rupture. From there we pivot to discussing the newly passed Pentagon/defense budget that over $770 billion dollars in total. In this regard we talk about the deepening chasm between the public's increasingly weary feelings towards war and military adventurism and Congress' support of thing like the recent $650 million arms deal to Saudi Arabia. Col. Lawrence Wilkerson also elaborates on his belief that the National Security State is "eating up" American Democracy. We go through some history from the Cold War to post-9/11 War on Terror. The National Security State, Wilkerson says, is always seeking to find a new threat to justify its continued existence and growth. Ret. Col. Wilkerson and I also get into the current Ukraine crisis, U.S.-Russia relations, the situation with Taiwan, U.S.-China relations, the war games simulations over Taiwan and their significance (Wilkerson has been involved in some of these simulations), China's Belt and Road Initiative, Vladimir Putin, intelligence agencies and the problems CIA vs. NKVD/GRU intelligence, the threat of nuclear weapons being used if a war is started conventionally, the New Cold War, the threat of climate change and the environmental impacts of the Department of Defense, hubris within elements of the foreign policy establishment, and finally Wilkerson's thoughts on the recently passed Colin Powell and the conflcits between figures like Powell and Dick Cheney in the years of the Bush administration's stay in the White House. "From unknown successes to personal disillusionment: What the public doesn't know about Colin Powell" by Hilary McQuilkin and Meghna Chakrabarti - On Point Radio on WBUR - October 22, 2021 "Full-length version: What the public doesn't know about Colin Powell" - On Point Radio on WBUR - October 22, 2021

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates on the State of American Foreign Policy

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 56:35


Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates joins us for a candid examination of America's successes and failures abroad from the Cold War to the War on Terror to China's threat to the global order. Robert Gates was the 22nd Secretary of Defense, serving under both Presidents George W. Bush and Barak Obama. He had previously served as Director of the CIA, from 1991 to 1993, Deputy National Security Advisor from 1989 to 1991, and Deputy Director of the CIA from 1986-1989. He is the author of From the Shadows, Duty, A Passion for Leadership, and Exercise of Power: American Failures, Successes, and a New Path Forward in the Post-Cold War World.

The Thought Leader Revolution Podcast | 10X Your Impact, Your Income & Your Influence

“You're the only obstacle, and it's an obstacle that you can clearly move out of the way.” Two time Emmy award winning writer and producer, Robyn Symon joins us today. Specializing in documentary and tv series, Robyn is a filmmaker that tells transformational stories that highlight people who make a difference in the world. Robyn is passionate about giving people the courage to take action on their ideas, dreams and goals. A short list of her film achievements include; Behind The Blue Vail, One Week Job, Young Entrepreneurs Society, YesMovie.com, and Transformation: The Life And Legacy Of Werner Erhard. Her latest film is Do No Harm, which discusses the issue of suicide in the medical industry. Check out the IMDB link below for her full discography.   Expert Action steps Get in action! Whatever your goal or idea, are baby steps everyday toward making it happen. Talk about your dream as though it's real. Be in connection with other people. Share your ideas with people. Help people and share how they could help you.   To learn more about Robyn Symon or to connect with her directly: https://www.symonproductions.com/ donoharmfilm.com info@donoharmfilm.com robyn@symonproductions.com Facebook IMDB   Also mentioned in this episode: David Deida book The Way Of The Superior Man Nick Koumalatsos Wayne Allyn Root and The Great Patriot Protest and Boycott Book Sovereign Man Movement Sovereign Man Podcast   Visit eCircleAcademy.com and book a success with call Nicky to take your practice to the next level.

SBS World News Radio
Cabinet papers reveal what went on in 2001

SBS World News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 6:44


How did the Howard government cope with the 9/11 attacks, the war on terror and the Tampa controversy?

The Rewind
Episode 215: Nightmare Alley - The Card Counter

The Rewind

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 117:13


Josh is joined once again by recurring guest Ben Luben for a double feature. First (Beginning-52:47) they discuss Nightmare Alley and how Guillermo del Toro in straying from the fantasy genre, how the movie wades into politics without being too explicit about it, Bradley Cooper's leading performance and much more! Then (52:48-end) they talk about Paul Schrader's The Card Counter and how Schrader used a poker player to tell a story about dealing with guilt in a unique way, Oscar Isacc's haunted performance, the movie's message about America's lingering effects on veterans of the War on Terror and much more! Spoilers for Nightmare Alley start at 30:22. Spoilers for The Card Counter start at 1:24:07.

YNG NEWS
No Compliance = No Virus: The Choice is Yours

YNG NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 56:18


John and Sean share their thoughts on the new War on Terror.

New Books in History
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Law
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in World Affairs
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Military History
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in Political Science
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Genocide Studies
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books in Genocide Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/genocide-studies

New Books Network
Noah Weisbord, "The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats" (Princeton UP, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 62:34


On July 17, 2018, starting an unjust war became a prosecutable international crime alongside genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. Instead of collective state responsibility, our leaders are now personally subject to indictment for crimes of aggression, from invasions and preemptions to drone strikes and cyberattacks. Noah Weisbord, The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats (Princeton UP, 2019) is Noah Weisbord's riveting insider's account of the high-stakes legal fight to enact this historic legislation and hold politicians accountable for the wars they start. Weisbord, a key drafter of the law for the International Criminal Court, takes readers behind the scenes of one of the most consequential legal dramas in modern international diplomacy. Drawing on in-depth interviews and his own invaluable insights, he sheds critical light on the motivations of the prosecutors, diplomats, and military strategists who championed the fledgling prohibition on unjust war—and those who tried to sink it. He untangles the complex history behind the measure, tracing how the crime of aggression was born at the Nuremberg trials only to fall dormant during the Cold War, and he draws lessons from such pivotal events as the collapse of the League of Nations, the rise of the United Nations, September 11, and the war on terror. The power to try leaders for unjust war holds untold promise for the international order, but also great risk. In this incisive and vitally important book, Weisbord explains how judges in such cases can balance the imperatives of justice and peace, and how the fair prosecution of aggression can humanize modern statecraft. Jeff Bachman is Senior Lecturer in Human Rights at American University's School of International Service in Washington, DC. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

No Politics at the Dinner Table - Podcast
The American War (w/Spencer Ackerman) - Ep101 -12.6.21

No Politics at the Dinner Table - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 72:04


Brothers-in-law Amit and Tony have on one of the most accomplished national security reporters, Spencer Ackerman, to discuss his new book Reign of Terror. This is a must-read, must-listen if you want to get a full account of the war on terror since 9/11 and its main features (hint: they predate 9/11).

The Academic Minute
Nolan Fahrenkopf, University at Albany – The Security of Arms Transfers During the War on Terror

The Academic Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 2:30


Transferring weapons can have deleterious effects. Nolan Fahrenkopf, research fellow at the Center for Policy Research at the University at Albany, determines how some may get into the wrong hands. Nolan Fahrenkopf is a research fellow at the Center for Policy Research (CPR), at the University at Albany. He has extensive policy and research experience […]

The Bledsoe Show
How to Be Your Own Scientist

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 74:19


00:00.00 Max Shank Ladies and gentlemen welcome back to Monday morning with max and mike today I'm very excited because we are going to talk about how to be your own scientist. This is a subject very near and dear to my heart because unfortunately there are. No shortcuts. It would be so nice if we could just all be told what exercises to do and what foods to eat at what time but we are unique individuals and there's no way that you're going to put a broad. General piece of advice that works for everybody. You cannot apply the same solution to everyone so that is why you must take responsibility to be your own scientist and today we're going to talk about that mike nice to see you again. 00:53.66 mikebledsoe Good to see you max. And yeah, I'm excited about this topic because um, I'm somebody who's very comfortable experimenting on myself I know you are as well and so. A lot of times when I look around at the world and people are confused about something. It's it's hard for me to understand why they're confused I go well why don't you just try it out and then find out if it works for you or not in the way you want it to work and yet people are still waiting for there to be. A mountain of evidence or their favorite journalist to make an article about a single study that's going to convince them that this is the way to move forward and 1 thing I want to mention is you know we we're doing this because we. Well I'm doing this because I want to warn people of the dangers of going with the flow of the rest of society and if we're going to take a really broad view of ah science I mean science is really about discovery. Um, people are looking for things that are true. Ah and truth hides in plain sight as results and so ah, most scientific inquiry isolates and really goes deep into a single thing. But if you want to zoom out and you want to use the scientific lens to just say what are the results that exist in the world today then you would get that you may not find out everything that contributed to creating those results but you could at least be present with the results and that's 1 of the things that i. I see is missing in our society is just this this lack of acknowledgement of what is so ah I won't say science is failing because science is just a tool It's what we use but I I think as a society we're failing. Because even though we supposedly have the most advanced advanced science on the planet. At this point we have the most widespread obesity diabetes mental health challenges everything that science claims to have answers for and ah. Science doesn't claim anything because it's not a person but people like to claim that they represent science and then and then make bold claims for everybody. It's a really sad state because what we see is the the general result is mainstream understanding. 03:38.60 mikebledsoe Ah, and you don't want to go with that if you want to be average look at the average they're they're sick and almost dead. Ah then go for it. But if you don't want to be average. You have to be your own scientist. 03:51.90 Max Shank Well I generally agree with what you're saying I think it's important to define our terminology a little bit and there are 2 things that really stuck out to me there number 1 is you either mean science as a field. Like there are the sciences. There are physical sciences, social sciences and actually that's the main problem that we're in. So if you remember anything about this first bit. It's that our physical sciences have advanced astronomically literally astronomically. But our social sciences are retarded in in the most literal sense of the word, our social science progress is in the basement that progress has been slowed down or retarded when. You think of science what you probably are referring to is the scientific method which involves number 1 observing what's going on around you to a hypothesis which is basically a guess so all science starts with paying attention. And then guessing and then you run an experiment and you record the results and that's the scientific Method. It's supposed to inform you based on a repeatable experiment when unfortunately right now right. The word science is used more like a political tool or a persuasive tool just the same way if some guy is in a long white lab coat. You are maybe more likely to believe what he's going to say so it's important that we don't conflate or. As mike says the collapse distinction between the science and the scientific method. And yeah. 05:43.87 mikebledsoe Well I think yeah Science I think using the word scientific field is good because that refers to a group of people who may identify as scientists and then they they collaborate in some way but because it's a organization or or ah, a. There's a large large organization. There's subsets of organizations and some are recognized more widely than others but the scientific field is wrought with ah policy so inside there there is um. Policy is driving so much of what what research is being conducted. What research is published. There's There's all these things ah science that there is not a there is a governor that is being put on science by policy and So. Ah, the the it's fueled by dollars. But but the reason we have an I R B We have a ah ah review board is to make sure that we're not inhumanely experimenting on people or or something like that. But that same review board. 06:40.72 Max Shank Well, it's fueled by dollars right? I mean just like anything else. There's an incentive. 06:55.26 Max Shank Right. 07:00.27 mikebledsoe On The flip side may also limit ah research that a lot of times limits new research because if you want to if you want to jump into something that's too far of a gap between what's already being studied. Then a lot of times that won't get moved forward. 07:18.81 Max Shank Yeah, and you don't have to only think of what are traditionally scientific fields like physics and chemistry and computer technology. In fact, 1 of the. Best books I've ever read is called scientific advertising and he approaches advertising in a very methodical and scientific way using the scientific method hence the name. So I think 1 of the things that we're talking about today is applying that scientific method. To as many parts of your own life as possible and it doesn't need to be such a heavy word either. It really comes down to paying attention and reviewing what the results actually were for you right. 08:06.79 mikebledsoe Yeah I I was at a talk this past weekend I went to and a conference and first conference I've been to in a couple years it was it was a lot of fun. Ah, but what we got talking about was the well. What. 1 woman. She gave a presentation about how to how women need to be experimenting on themselves because the majority of research that's been conducted has been on men and then not only that ah the fda up until ninety ninety 3 made it they they. Made it where there was going to be no clinical studies on women who ah were pregnant or had who had gotten pregnant during any of the research trials and so it's basically illegal to conduct clinical research on pregnant women and then. Because women could get pregnant. No 1 wanted to do research on women because they could just lose all their subjects and I've been a part of of studies before research studies and just getting the subjects for your study are is difficult enough. So the majority of that's been done for men and so. 09:21.12 Max Shank 1 with women. The hormone fluctuations can be so dramatic throughout a month due to the natural cycle that they have to throw that data out anyway. 09:23.20 mikebledsoe Um. 09:32.15 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's a 28 day cycle whereas men have a 24 hour cycle. Um, and there there is variation over I think a seventy 2 hour day period for men but it's so small by comparison. Um, so man, why was I getting into that. 09:46.59 Max Shank Um, for me. 09:52.30 mikebledsoe Um. 09:52.31 Max Shank How how they make the measurements how they do the scientific studies difference between men and women. 09:58.41 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, there was somewhere I was going with that and I I lost it. It'll come back. 10:06.70 Max Shank I think we can kind of segue though into the ability to decipher. What's going on in these scientific studies I think the number 1 thing with any new piece of information. Absolutely number 1 thing doesn't matter if it's an article, a new story scientific study. You got to look at the incentive is who is to gain the most from this bit of information and unfortunately. You can prove almost anything with statistics. In fact, 1 of my favorite quotes is a mark twain quote you have lies damn lies and statistics and oftentimes you can set up the study itself. To prove exactly what you want to prove like I could easily prove that leg presses are better than squats or vice versa depending on what I decided to measure so it's very interesting to look at the way that people use. Scientific studies to back up their argument and it makes sense because as far as persuasion is concerned. It is 1 of the best things 1 of the best ways to persuade is to say this is proven to work and that's actually the main reason why most people aren't willing. To take a scientific approach to their life. They want to outsource that science to somebody else because if I say hey mike you know I got this? Ah great exercise plan. there's ah there's a good chance. It's not going to work for you. But by the end of it. We might have an idea what will work for you versus. If I say mike I have this scientifically proven plan if you just follow it. You are guaranteed results because you know sixty percent of other people got results. But. 12:02.87 mikebledsoe Yeah I think I think a lot of people don't don't are not friendly. Experimenting on themselves because of their association. Well, there's no guarantee but there's no so there's an association with not getting the desired result. 12:12.43 Max Shank There's no guarantee. 12:21.90 mikebledsoe With failure instead of really being able to view it as a test I don't think that yeah that people are people our our culture has been raised and educated in a fashion that makes ah not getting the desired result. 12:25.33 Max Shank It's the fomo. 12:38.14 mikebledsoe And it makes you a bad person like there's there's this, there's this association with that and they don't know what we do is We have a whole culture of people who don't know how to test what works for them because they don't It's It's so much safer to go with the mainstream I mean. Ah. 12:39.52 Max Shank He failed. 12:57.40 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean who yeah, it's safer just to be the average kid in the classroom. Yeah, you'll fit in. 13:01.39 Max Shank What you'll fit in right? It's fascinating because most of the study and I'm just going to use like exercise and nutrition as examples most of the time you can easily prove that 1 thing is better than another thing. But it's so so difficult to prove with any kind of randomized control study that something is better than many other things so you end up with these studies that are very um, we'll just call it like tunnel vision. For lack of a better word right? So it's like we have proven that squats are better than leg presses and I'm I'm sure we could pull several of our friends. On this podcast and they would conclusively be like yeah dude squats are way better than Leg presses I mean this has been put to bed and I'm like for who though and over what period of time because it's so difficult to get participants to do something for a long period of time. Usually these studies are like. 12 weeks at the longest. It's really difficult to figure out what's going to be overall best for strength and longevity and plus as you and I both know a lot of the strength gains come after years and years not after just a few weeks so there are so many considerations here that it should inform your experiment but you should not believe that it is going to provide you with the same result because in fact, no matter what the odds are. It's still pretty much going to be a coin flip about whether squats or leg presses are going to be better for you as an individual because there are 2 outcomes that it could be either. Squats will be better for you or leg presses or a combination of each right? but we can't test that because it makes the research too complicated. So you might have a person who would be way better off doing leg presses but the study showed that only like ten percent of people do better with leg presses. You follow what I'm saying here and then. 15:18.89 mikebledsoe Me. 15:22.95 Max Shank Of course this doesn't take into consideration at all that sled pushes and lunges might have been better than both squats and leg presses. So you end up getting tunnel vision because now you have put your belief. You've put your faith into this study. So now you may plug away because. I I believe this the scientists are correct. They obviously have no incentive other than informing me of what is true. So now you are going to be because you're going to stop looking now, you're going to stop doing your due diligence and the same thing is true with nutrition. Because peanuts are either a protein packed health food or instant death depending on the severity of your peanut allergy so you have to do your own experiment because the same thing is true with with any substance and we haven't even gotten into the less. Tangible things that are more qualitative like what exercise do you enjoy doing like the reality is if even if Backsquats are better than tennis I'm I'm just not going to do years and years of back squats like I don't care I find it boring i. 16:39.63 mikebledsoe Yeah, go ahead? yeah. 16:39.86 Max Shank Don't want to do it and I'm a pretty motivated guy so you gotta look at you gotta look at what will work practically for you rather than trying to be more absolutist about which is better than what because it's gonna be different for you. As an individual so there's no way to get around it unless you're willing to accept a worse result for yourself. 17:05.14 mikebledsoe Yeah, the something you said that really stuck out to me is talking about Tunnel vision. Um, that happens another other thing that contributes to tunnel vision in regard to research 3 things I want to cover is ah. And meanalysis outliers in isolation and so ah, when research is being conducted when a single study is being conducted. Ah if there's an outlier someone who falls. Ah so far enough outside of the bell curve. They just cut them out of study altogether like it just aren't even there and so ah and it will not make it into the published study. It's not even acknowledged how many people may have been cut due to being an outlier. Um. 17:43.82 Max Shank Her. 17:59.89 mikebledsoe And it's really up to the scientist who's conducting the study which as we know humans you know tend to be biased and by by many different things and so 1 is we must be aware of the outliers and you you got to understand that you may be the outlier. 18:17.70 Max Shank Um, yeah, peanut might kill you. 18:19.51 mikebledsoe So peanut might kill you might make a hundred other people stronger it'll you'll die. Um, the other 1 is the other thing I want to talk about was well isolation science is really good at isolating something but as you were talking about. 18:23.26 Max Shank Ah. 18:37.66 mikebledsoe You're going to be able to find a study that compares back squats to leg press. But you're not going to find a study that compares back squats to leg press which the when the back squat was combined with the lunges and the leg press was combined with the sled push and. 18:53.24 Max Shank Can't control that many variables possible. 18:54.77 mikebledsoe Too many variables. So like the whole point of this like the scientific method by its design because it was designed by human beings by its design is really good at isolating incredibly good isolating and this is something I I really want people to understand. Is if you want to isolate. It's it's the best. But if you want to integrate it you you have to start making a lot of guesses and this is where the the N equals 1 comes in the the self experimentation because ah, you. You're the only 1 that's going to log that much care and time and into the research of yourself I mean what max was saying too the majority of studies are only 12 weeks long because it it gets really expensive for 1 to to be able to pay people and. You know that just whatever it just gets expensive energy wise time wise and then yeah who's you know? and so now if you want a longer term Study. You're gonna have to have a lot more money. Um. 19:52.83 Max Shank And that's where the incentives come into play too where who's funding that study. 20:02.89 Max Shank How many people how many people out there just have free cash and are like let's honestly just see what happens with it I don't I don't care if it disproves my strong incentive. It's so rare for that to happen. It's almost never going to happen. 20:16.58 mikebledsoe So yeah, no, No so ah, it's yeah, incredibly good at ah yeah, the the the isolation I mean Also yeah is. Is. It's a small window in time twelve weeks if we talk about just fitness because that's all the research that I was involved with was all fitness based and I it became obvious to me that it was such a short period of time. How are we really getting the results. We're looking for. Um, and. 20:51.48 Max Shank It should only inform your guess it should only inform your hypothesis for what you do yourself and there's a huge difference between the scientific method in terms of ah, proving that. Electricity and magnetism are the same Force. You know the the stuff that we the science that is done to build a telephone that can wirelessly transmit video in real time is very different than the. I I don't even like to call it science that we do for ah random control trials because these trials end up having to be interpreted in statistics and that's where you can very easily. Fabricate a different reality than what is going on So There's a really big difference between doing the experimental science where it is repeatable to the point where you get the same result every single time you know like buoyancy is so clearly Measurable. Electric Force Magnetic Force electromagnet. That's so measurable and so repeatable and so consistent. But this whole idea of getting a big group and then being able to very easily manipulate statistics to your advantage I mean that's. That's like pseudoscience to me and I'm sure a lot of people would really hate to hear me say that but it's so easy to manipulate statistics under the guise that you have done good science. 22:35.86 mikebledsoe Yeah, so I want to differentiate something here. Um, and that is a single study versus a metaanalysis and so ah the when I when I was in school I went through ah a scientific methods class. 22:45.58 Max Shank This. 22:55.36 mikebledsoe Um, and between that class and another class I had in grad school I I created 2 lit reviews and which was which is basically ah a metaanalysis and that is I looked at over 1 ah hundred studies on a specific subject and then. I basically told a story about what it means. That's what ah, that's what that is and so something very interesting happened is well once I got into the studies themselves I realized it really became apparent that. 23:16.64 Max Shank 1 and then i. 23:31.90 mikebledsoe Finding consistency between studies was not as easy as I would have liked to have been um and then ah I conducted I conducted the analysis. I wrote the lit review and in 1 of my classes someone did a lit review on the same exact thing ah on the same exact topic and I'm telling you what I put some time into this some effort I was I was. Honest about it I wanted to impress my classmates I wanted to impress my professor I wanted to do it right? and I bet you the other guy did too the results incredibly different, incredibly different on what we've. Our suggestions on how this research should be applied between the 2 of us there's over 200 and fifty different studies that were cited and we came up with different meaning because that's what we that's it's it's sense making of. 24:29.88 Max Shank Ah. 24:36.50 Max Shank Um, did you meta did you me analyze the same studies. Ah, that's the 1 interesting thing about meta-analysis because you can say we we evaluated. 24:40.47 mikebledsoe Ah, no, no, but it was the same. 24:51.90 Max Shank 3 hundred studies and they all proved the same thing meanwhile there are 7 hundred other studies that they just didn't evaluate that proved the exact opposite thing. 24:56.91 mikebledsoe Well well that was that was the thing is I I was under time constraints. You know we're doing this in a single semester I found over 1000 studies I could have referenced but I just couldn't I just don't have the time to do that and that also happens in science. It. 25:04.50 Max Shank Murder. 25:14.38 Max Shank What are you a slow reader or something you can't read a thousand studies like you don't care about the results man. 25:16.54 mikebledsoe And what. Ah, well and here's the thing is it's cherry pick and it's always cherry picked and whether it's an intentional cherry picking based on Bias or it's cherry picking based on just saying I think this is the best ones to choose from because we have a. 25:26.67 Max Shank Of course. 25:37.59 mikebledsoe Have a specific limitation which life is limitation and so that's not going away maybe with quantum computing that could that could change. Ah so I I really like that that really highlighted to me is when I when I started looking at the studies and then. Not only that the studies that I chose something that I learned during that process were studies and of course I believe my shit was more accurate but the studies that I end up choosing had methods used that I felt were applicable to. Athletes and so I wasn't just randomly selecting studies I was like look if I'm gonna be looking at weight lifters I'm not going to be looking at a leg press I'm gonna be looking at a squat instead. So um, so that's that's another thing that really got highlighted to me was. 26:26.96 Max Shank Right? um. 26:36.75 mikebledsoe Ah, the methods matter and most people only read the summary they may read the abstract which is the explanation of the the big picture paragraph about you know how we're conducting this study and all that and then there's the summary. Most people read The. The abstracting summary and they probably don't even read all of that and then they come up with some type of conclusion and so huh it is hard. It's hard I mean it's it's not is it. 26:59.63 Max Shank To be fair, it is really hard. It's really hard like I've I've gone down I've gone down that rabbit hole man reading those studies is so difficult like I I want to poke my eyeballs out. 27:13.68 mikebledsoe So yeah I probably read yeah I've read over yeah I read over 1000 I I know I've read at least a thousand and and yeah, it's I have no interest in. 27:18.88 Max Shank With a fork by the time I've read like 10 of them. It's like ridiculous. 27:30.81 mikebledsoe I don't I don't enjoy it but I still have to look at research at times because I go I gotta know I gotta know but what I what I realized is ah in inside of that I started I started paying attention to when Journalists would write an article about. 27:35.35 Max Shank It's horrible. It's horrible. Yeah. 27:50.48 mikebledsoe Ah study and that it it was it was after that class and I remember reading. Ah you know the eggs were bad for you in the New York times. Yeah, and but I read it and I go I go. 27:50.17 Max Shank Oh god. 27:59.29 Max Shank Oh no, not this again. 28:07.60 mikebledsoe I'm probably the only person on the planet's going to click the citation and look at the actual study and I remember clicking the study and reading it and going. Wow these people really we got I got back down to the isolation thing which is. Ah, you know?? Ah, they weren't even talking about nutrition in the study they were just talking about they were testing something else and it is ah it was a huge extrapolation ah in order There was this huge gap in logic that needed to be crossed. 28:37.80 Max Shank Oh it's crazy. 28:45.25 mikebledsoe In order to come up with a summary because the scientists do this. The fucking scientists will they'll have a solid everything and then they get it a summary and I read the summary and I and I go I don't even know I'm not I'm reading it I'm going I can tell this scientist is Biased. So so we got this. So we we look at this is how how's it like to your point how is it funded. What are the other biases that might be with the scientists we've seen this a lot with like plant-based diet advocate science scientists. Ah. 29:04.48 Max Shank I think. 29:22.28 mikebledsoe How many what other biases might they have then they which may influence what data they include in the study and what they don't then not only that all they gotta do no matter what the study actually shows what they put in their summary is probably gonna get. The the most amount of attention and then you go from a scientist with biases that then makes it to a journalist who knows squat about they don't know shit about science or the scientific method and then they write an article based on their bias and so there's this. 29:57.74 Max Shank It's all cuts the C word I think we know no ah it's the now causation and correlation I think that is the big leap. 30:00.14 mikebledsoe What's the C word. 30:04.76 mikebledsoe I. You know. 30:13.64 Max Shank That's the biggest leap I see in these ah these I'll tell you these guys are real jerks ah who confuse correlation with causation because that is such an unreal difference. Between correlation and causation because even something like cigarettes and I I don't smoke cigarettes I smoked 1 menthilated one half of 1 menthilated cigarette in my whole life and it was okay and I wasn't like dying to do more of it. But this whole idea. Like when you really like dig into it. Cigarette smoking is just correlated with death from like cancer heart disease and things like that they haven't actually proven that it causes it and the difference between causation and correlation is so freaking. Huge. Because you look at something like cigarette smoking people who smoke cigarettes are less likely to exercise cardiovascularly they're more likely to make poor food choices. They're more likely to overeat they're more likely to be stressed out. There are all these I don't know if that last 1 is actually true. 31:16.90 mikebledsoe A. 31:28.43 mikebledsoe It take any more sugar I imagine I mean just you said poor diet but I mean sugar is a huge inflammatory. 31:29.28 Max Shank I take that 1 back. 31:35.67 Max Shank Right? So what I'm saying is it's that leap from correlation to causation is like 1 of the most evil things that is done because you like you said you might have a perfectly legitimate study beforehand and then they're like. Coming out with this article that says Salt kills ten percent of americans I'm like or ten percent are you that was an actual article by the way Salt kills ten percent of americans meanwhile you go to Korea they have like triple the salt consumption and way less death. So how do you harmonize. Those 2 inequalities right? So that I think that's a big ah key point correlation versus causation. 32:21.60 mikebledsoe Yeah I mean I'm I'm gonna go ahead and put it out there because I know you know we we will dance around it but like the died with Covid versus died from Covid it. It's the the correlation. 32:32.66 Max Shank I Know it's horrifying. 32:37.61 mikebledsoe The correlation is spelled out in the like title of the report and is ah people are people are believing that it's causing it and so someone's yes, right. 32:44.54 Max Shank Whoa. 32:49.79 Max Shank But that doesn't help with the death counter that doesn't help with the huge death counter in the side corner. 32:56.66 mikebledsoe Yeah, the depth that yeah, it's It's not as sensational I know but ah well and here's the thing is lot anytime I I bring this up with certain people and they have just tried to fire hos me with all sorts of shit after that I'm like look look I'm just saying it's it's I'm not lying like I'm not making this up I'm just saying. This is the actual report and this is what they've been saying on even on the news like like but then they go Yeah, but it's caused I'm like no no, no, no, no with not from and it's um, and then the politicians picked it up now if you're a scientist who's studying this shit. 33:19.67 Max Shank Ah, it's insane. 33:32.63 Max Shank Oh god. 33:35.83 mikebledsoe If you're a scientist that's studying this and you're getting paid to study. It would do you think maybe you would have a bias. What do you think? what do you think? what do you? which scientists think do you think are getting paid the best right now. 33:44.41 Max Shank We all do man. 33:52.40 Max Shank But probably the ones reminding people to drink enough water and get sunshine. It's highly highly Monetizable Strategy hey you know all that stuff that's free that you don't do start doing it again by the way that'll be zero dollars. 34:00.20 mikebledsoe I. 34:10.65 mikebledsoe Ah, here. 34:10.21 Max Shank Like what it's ah no, it's It's totally insane. Um that that has been allowed to happen and like I I could talk about this I I mean we all are right? um. 34:19.46 mikebledsoe Well who's allowing it to happen. Yeah, it's this is this is the general population it. It is because because they're not trying to hide it. They're saying died with and and yet the average the average person is just not educated well enough. 34:28.87 Max Shank The the now. Well if if science if the science that you're doing or the scientific method that you're doing is ah dependent. 34:38.96 mikebledsoe Think that's part of it. 34:46.13 Max Shank On Inflammatory rhetoric and like a constant bombardment of propaganda you should probably go back to your fucking research phase and do a different experiment because it's not ah, it's not really working and actually I think that. Ah. 34:50.10 mikebledsoe Um. 35:04.10 Max Shank I heard 1 of the most ridiculous phrases I've ever heard in my life in the last little bit of history which is ah trust science or even trust the science now that is ridiculous because that only means ah well 2 things is funny about that. Number 1 that means trust the scientists who are talking right? It doesn't have anything to do with trust the science because you would have to be trusting the result of the experiment and you would have to understand that experiment to be able to do that and the second funny thing is um. The whole reason we do science is because we don't trust the whole purpose of science is to verify like it's the most meaningless ridiculous rhetorical phrase I've ever heard in my life has no bearing in reality whatsoever and you hear um, stupid people parroting it back. 35:46.30 mikebledsoe You know. 36:01.55 Max Shank Like they know what the fuck is going on. It's because no 1 wants to just say you know what? Ah gosh I don't really know and it it makes sense because we want to stay part of the tribe and we don't want to seem stupid right? So it's like. 36:16.27 mikebledsoe You know so. 36:20.42 Max Shank No, no, no, not yeah I trust that what what are you anti-science anti-vaccine and of course those are broad generalizations that it has to do a little bit with attention inflation like we talked about a little bit before how. If I say there's an imminent hurricane. That's a more exciting weather story then it's going to be sunny today and you'll probably click on the like imminent hurricane. So it's this race for the most outrageous deadly stuff but the same thing is true in America we're talking about right. The same thing is true in America that was true before is the biggest threat to your health is yourself like if you look at all the ways that people die um suicide beats murder like 4 to 1 maybe even 5 or 8 to 1 now. It's ridiculous like we kill ourselves way more than each other directly. With like ah, a bath with the toaster or whatever and not only that all of the ways that people die. It's like so ridiculous to like to fight heart disease like how are you going to fucking fight heart disease like who are you going to punch like it's ridiculous The whole thing is like fighting sickness isn't the same as promoting health and all of these things like we're gonna battle Diabetes. We're gonna battle heart disease and it's like no dude that person has been killing themselves for 20 years by eating shitty food not exercising. Not expressing themselves authentically not having a close group of friends that promotes that sort of healthy active behavior like it's not fucking rocket surgery here. It's no ah, it's no surprise that people are dying a little prematurely but we get so. Honed in on these ways that people die kind of like where you're taught we like to isolate. We're like we got to fight hard to so then you know suddenly the egg with cholesterol is like going to kill you the egg that's be afraid of eggs of all the things to be afraid of you should be. Terrified of the damage that you are doing to yourself not of a fucking egg. 38:38.10 mikebledsoe Yeah, well you know fighting a war on something is super super popular and was that okay we got out so far all right? so that what there used to be a war. Well well we used to have a war. We used to. 38:43.79 Max Shank Even profitable Also Profitable war on drugs I think that's ah we lost. 38:54.90 mikebledsoe Have Wars with other countries. It was like Kings we're having Wars with other kings and then it was it was countries were having Wars with each other and then ah yeah, and then and then we had to get really creative and start having Wars on ideas like the concept of drugs the concept of. Terrorism The constant is like like you can just ah fucking you can attack anybody at that point if you convince people that that we're fighting a war on terrorism all got do is say that there are terrorists. We're gonna fight the war on Covid we're going to that makes you might be an enemy if you get put into the Anti-vaxer ah category. Ah you. 39:36.59 Max Shank Um, isn't the war on terror hilarious. What's scarier than that the war on terror is fucking terrifying. There's there's no greater terrorist organization than the media. No 1 has terrorized more people than the media. 39:43.49 mikebledsoe Um, well the problem a problem with no greater. 39:54.15 Max Shank They scare people into promoting a war. We should not be in they scare people into being like oh yeah, you better frisk my asshole before I get on the airplane like Jesus there's nothing scarier than like the constant but like the war on terror is such an epic failure. The war on drugs. 40:04.79 mikebledsoe A. 40:12.45 Max Shank Such an epic failure I mean there are real actual problems in the world and we're like hey are you are you smoking grass. Well let's put you in prison for that like the war on. Are you kidding me? Meanwhile we're going to sell trillions of dollars in opiates. 40:25.60 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 40:32.39 Max Shank Because you know the way that we practice medicine here isn't that we talk to you about a more active lifestyle or um, you know, physical therapy type exercise maybe putting your feet in the dirt. We're just going to drug you like of course like there's no There's no money in it. That's why you got to fall on the incentive like you know all of this gets erased by a simple phrase which is buyer beware and the truth is there are people who are going to swindle you. There are people who call up an old lady at home and they're like ah you're. Daughter needs a thousand dollars to get bailed out of Mexico you better wire it right away and you know what the lady does it. There are people out there to swindle you on the low level and there's a great big swindle at the upper levels too. So it's your responsibility as a consumer. To decide what you believe like it's no, it's no surprise that buy and believe are synonyms like if someone tells you a story that you don't believe you say I don't buy it so that's that's the whole thing is like it's up to you to decide what story you're going to put faith into. And quite frankly, you're better off believing basically nothing you hear and just being a little bit more of a scientist yourself to see what the results actually are and I know that's harder it is harder. You get a better result, but it is harder. 42:04.57 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, there's ah, there's also I mean this this brings me back I'm I'm going to rewind a little bit here but the we've talked about the victim villain Hero the Drama Triangle and people. 42:06.92 Max Shank Also watch out for eggs. 42:19.90 Max Shank Ah. 42:24.27 mikebledsoe People want there to be something to demonize something to villainize something to vilify so that yeah and so I mean ah you know Covid's the enemy. So now the scientists are the heroes. 42:29.50 Max Shank So they can be the hero. 42:39.29 Max Shank Um, I'm the Hero eggs are the enemy also Salt but my breakfast is just out to get me. 42:42.25 mikebledsoe And ah, eggs are the enemy. Yeah yeah, so whoever figured that out. Um, yeah, eggs and bacon I'm fucked man and ah constant barrage. Ah yeah, but it's it's interesting that these Wars went from ah these countries fighting each other which is really just governments in disagreement. 42:53.76 Max Shank Um, ah. 43:10.48 mikebledsoe Convincing the population to go fight for them. Ah, and I was 1 of the suckers. So I'll be the first raised my hand and ah and then we go from like ah yeah, the war on drugs the war on poverty. Ah that that fucking I think this. 43:16.60 Max Shank Yeah. 43:25.23 Max Shank Um. 43:29.98 mikebledsoe People in San francisco been fighting the war on poverty harder than anybody they've got more money doing and yes, they they got the worst homeless population. Ah we haven't won a war in a while. It's been a. 43:33.00 Max Shank Um, when was the last war we won I don't think we've ever like won ah won 1 of those wars with the like a nebulous enemy like poverty is kind of a nebulous enemy. 43:48.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, it's not. It's not really the the last the last thing the last time we had a war with anything was what and they didn't we didn't say it was a war on this person because it would be against geneva convention rules. 43:51.85 Max Shank Like how would we even know that we won how would we even know that we won. 44:07.10 mikebledsoe But the United states waged war against osama bin laden and it was the first time in history that a country waged war on 1 person and they called it terrorism because they wanted to make it look a lot bigger than it was because they had a hard time getting him. So. The are. 44:25.52 Max Shank that's um That's amazing that's like I'm not a I'm not pro-terrorism from anyone but but if you have like a whole country you wage war on you. That's like remember grand theft auto. When you would get like five five stars five cop level at at you you know I'm talking about you know that game having it was it was just like an increasing amount like if you just like. 44:46.25 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, Matt not actually I didn't play that much I know what the game is though. 44:56.75 Max Shank I don't know punch a hooker or something and get like a half a star and the police are kind of looking out for you and then if you like Rocket launcher a helicopter or something you get like a lot of so you get like 5 star. So that's when you got like the whole swat team coming after you I played this game like 5 times but this is all I remembered I just wanted to get as much havoc as possible. 44:59.90 mikebledsoe Ah. 45:16.30 Max Shank If you're 1 guy and you have a whole country declare war on you. You know you've done something to get their attention. 45:22.47 mikebledsoe Yeah, and it's and it's curious I won't go into it. But if you if you look into someone Bin. Laden's history it's ah there it's it's a ah, if you want to go down and wrap a hole go look that shit up. That's all I'll say um, but it's interesting. 45:38.82 Max Shank Well revisionist history is like a good ah like talking point for this because um, the biggest consistency in history is that it's been very carefully selected lies to get people to Believe. A very carefully selected story I mean the losers don't get to write a history book really and look I only I'm a huge ah fan of. 46:06.57 mikebledsoe They're dead. 46:16.20 Max Shank North korea and history not North korea exactly but the history of North korea is very interesting just to clarify I'm not like ah but anyway the guy kim ilsung who started. 46:25.00 mikebledsoe Um, dude I heard it's popular to be a communist right now I think we get more listeners just just claim it. 46:30.90 Max Shank Finally I can be popular. It's what I've always been looking for oh god no but what I found out is okay so there are 2 great stories. There are many more but my 2 favorite are the ones where Kim il-sung goes to war with like. Ah, usa and south korea and gets like 85 percent of the buildings are destroyed like some crazy percentage of the population is killed and he has the testicles to come back address his people. And say everybody we won that was what he said he he just he got held a catastrophic loss. He just went back and told everybody that we won and we're gonna we're gonna get revenge on the american terrorists. Basically. 47:24.12 mikebledsoe A. 47:26.59 Max Shank Then I found out he had a huge like mass I think it was like a benign tumor on the back of his neck but you never see it because every single picture of him is from a certain angle so you can't see it so it's so easy to hide something if you are the 1 who's. 47:29.82 mikebledsoe And. 47:37.65 mikebledsoe E. 47:45.26 Max Shank Selecting how history gets portrayed and look believe whatever you want I guess but like look at the war on people's minds over the last 2 years I mean it's crazy I've never seen anything like it I think more people. Have been snapped into reality which is probably why people feel very jaded about the media because like how many times does someone need to lie to you before you're just like you know what? I don't I don't trust that guy anymore like if you were in a relationship. And your girlfriend lied to you every day for years and years would you keep believing what she said I don't think so. 48:27.74 mikebledsoe No I think it's interesting that we we started off talking about being your own scientist Now we're often to politics but it makes very it makes a lot of sense and it it. It's all it's all correlated. Ah because because you can't. 48:41.78 Max Shank Ah. 48:46.32 mikebledsoe The the problem with the way that people are interpreting science now is through the lens of policy and politics and so it has to be addressed now I want to bring it back to how do we be our own scientist. How do we? How do we. Do these experiments for ourselves. How do we make choices. Maybe somebody's only done things that have been that they've outsourced to their doctor or they've outsourced ah took you know whoever about their life and what how they should live it and they want to start experimenting. What are some of the ways that you have you experiment for yourself. Max. 49:26.78 Max Shank Fast fasting is a really good place to start because then you are bringing a little bit of honesty into the equation and then reintroducing foods after a fast can be very illuminating because you can be aware of how they affect you personally. I think that's 1 of the best ways to do it I think having um, an exercise plan that you follow through with is another really good way to do that and there are a couple sayings like what is measured is improved I've heard. 50:02.74 mikebledsoe What what gets measured gets managed. Where's ah fuck singing. Ah yeah, sometimes what you can measure is not the most important thing so you got to keep keep that in you got to keep that. 50:03.49 Max Shank Saying before I can't remember who said it there you go maybe that's the 1 I'm thinking of. 50:17.46 Max Shank Well definitely not well that that reminds me of Goodhart's law which is as soon as a measure becomes a target. It's no longer a good measure. 50:22.64 mikebledsoe And mind. 50:30.53 mikebledsoe And that's that's happened a lot in regard to heart health. It's like it's like ah cholesterol is bad all right? What foods can you eat the lower cholesterol and then you know 20 years goes is by and they go. 50:33.65 Max Shank And then what right right? what. 50:49.70 mikebledsoe Well, it's not really the cholesterol. It's the inflammation but there's all this momentum running with cholesterol and it's like you pick up the box of cheerios and it says it lowers cholesterol and it's got a ah heart drawn on the box and ah. 51:03.65 Max Shank That serial money can pay for a lot of scientists I'll tell you what. 51:08.70 mikebledsoe Well yeah I mean the the ingredients are subsidized with tax Pi payers money. So why? not? That's why it's subsidized. Um. 51:15.51 Max Shank It's also 1 of the cheapest foods you can possibly make I think the packaging is more expensive. Yeah yeah, it's absurd and here's the thing like you don't have to believe that these scientists are evil because no 1 thinks that they're evil. Everyone thinks they're the good guy in their story but just because their intentions may be good. Doesn't mean that the result can't really fuck you up, you know, like the. 51:40.39 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, I Well here's the thing is scientists I know a lot of Ph Ds I know a decent amount of scientists and they they are very well versed in a very narrow field and some of them know it and some of them don't but. The the job going back to the job of the scientist is to isolate and to be a human being to live a fully optimized life. You need to Isolate. You need to integrate and then from there you can improvise. And no scientists are Improvising. It's not their.. It's not their strong suit. Their strong suit is to Isolate. It's up to you to integrate ah to to test and isolate variables. 52:17.94 Max Shank Um, so. 52:25.20 Max Shank You know. 52:33.20 mikebledsoe And then see what you spec works in combination with your lifestyle integrate it into your lifestyle. This is why fasting is such a good idea is because it's It's a way to reduce variables. Um, and then you integrate it and you keep paying attention and then after you've integrated something far enough into your life then. You become like you start to improvise I see this with Ido partol talks about this when he's teaching movement. He says isolate integrate improvise and ah the idea is a lot of times people see a master improvising. And they try to copy the improvisation as and this happens with you know this happens in in everything that that's going on in our lives people try to improvise ah copy someone's Improvisation. It's in business or something and then it doesn't work for them and so. 53:14.20 Max Shank Ah. 53:31.40 mikebledsoe It's ah it's something to remember is on on 1 side. You have people who are only look at integrate at ah isolation just acknowledge science and scientists for what they're doing. It's isolating practice integrating and then. Recognize the masters who are already improvising and recognize it as improvisation and then and then talk to them about how they did it and I think that's that's a ah key to maximizing your own potential. 53:53.84 Max Shank The. I Think honest record keeping is probably the most important thing for for being your own scientist is honest record keeping. 54:03.50 mikebledsoe Okay. Yeah, writing shit down is great because our memories tend to get very selective. There's a lot of research to support that I don't know where it's at right now but you know I think you should believe me. 54:29.30 Max Shank It's very true I mean it's hard to determine causality or correlation as well and I'll give you a good example that I like which is have you ever heard of oil pulling. 54:42.92 mikebledsoe Oh yeah I do it? Yeah man I sometimes I'll do it every day for like a month or 2 and then it'll be like once a week on and off. 54:45.99 Max Shank Gotta have heard of that you do oil pulling every day sometimes. 54:54.23 Max Shank Okay, so you're a bad scientist that's fine. No big deal just I'm just kidding you. You seem a little triggered there. Ah no so here's the funny thing about oil pulling. 55:00.33 mikebledsoe I've done it long enough frequent enough. Okay, okay, max come on not I don't get triggered I don't get triggered. 55:13.39 Max Shank So you do it for like five minutes right throw some coconut oil in your mouth. Wish it around at least that's what I've heard 10 to 20 You're an animal that means you're twice as good as those five minute oil pullers at least twice as good. Oh it's compounding benefit. No kidding. 55:18.10 mikebledsoe Do 10 to twenty minutes but okay at least at least? well it's compounding. So it's it's an exponential. Yeah. 55:33.15 Max Shank Yeah wow little statistic right from out of the ass. Ah, here's what's funny about oil pulling because there are 2 things going on with oil pulling that could be potentially very good number 1 you are nose breathing only. And for the average person just breathing through your nose is like is like magic because breathing is the bridge between your conscious and subconscious. You go Boom sympath ah parasympathetic state unless you have a stuffy nose then you'll go sympathetic and you'll feel like you are drowning. But the cool thing about oil pulling is it's really impossible to figure out which of those is benefiting you the most. But here's the deal if your record keeping is good then it doesn't matter which is the benefit for you if it's the fact that you have oil in your mouth. Or the fact that your nose breathing for five minutes if that ritual helps you observe observably so you're in the right ballpark now if you're a hyper Nerd. You can take a step further and you can do ah a more controlled experiment. You could do ah 2 weeks with oil. And you could do 2 weeks just with your mouth closed for that long or you could do water and so that would be a way that you could get a little bit more clarity on which of those things is beneficial to you but the point is if you find a habit. That actually improves your life then it's really good to repeat it and give it a chance to give you those long-term results same thing with exercise like there's no best eight week exercise plan because the results that you get in eight weeks will be dwarfed. By the results that you get in 2 years like it's way better if you do something that is super half asked for 2 years consistently than if you do the most optimized balls to the wall Eight week ultra gains program right. 57:42.23 mikebledsoe Yeah I ah but made me think about the knowing why something works can be very beneficial. Ah but it can also be very limiting and that a lot of times people. Want to know why the oil pulling is working and and and what you're talking about is oh I'm just getting the these I do this action and then I get these benefits but I don't know why I'm getting those benefits. Ah I want to get people permission and to know that it's okay. You don't understand how it's working or why it's working all you gotta know is that it's working and and you're paying attention now. That's good enough. However, if you understand the mechanisms for by which it's working and you understand the principles now, you're gonna be able to bank. Better guesses at maybe you can be able to extrapolate that to another guest or you're able to um, ah know its limitations and and it's gonna help you conduct other experiments. But again, don't get hung up on why it's working the. I guess what I'm saying is don't stop doing something that's working just because you can't understand why it's working I think a lot of people. They don't even a lot of people won't even try something out because they they want to understand it first and my buddy had this really great saying which is don't let you? Yeah, he said? ah. 59:04.22 Max Shank Um, I think that's good. 59:12.21 Max Shank Right? It's like they want permission. 59:18.91 mikebledsoe Don't let your understanding get in the way of your knowing and so you're gonna throughout your life. You're gonna know a lot more shit than you understand So like that. No. 59:20.55 Max Shank Oh. 59:29.68 Max Shank And nobody really knows it all either. That's the thing you know like you ever do ohms I Love doing ohms. Ah um, and there's like ah. 59:37.10 mikebledsoe Oh yeah. 59:43.48 Max Shank Four separate cycles the ah the ooh the umm and then the pause and then you go through that cycle Now What's interesting is it depends who you ask why? those are good. Are you liberating your throat Chakra are you ah activating your vagus nerve. 01:00:00.45 mikebledsoe Yes, all of it. 01:00:02.34 Max Shank Are you simply warming up your vocal cords and and what's what's interesting is I have a diverse set of people that I've met in my life and I'm I'm really easy to get along with. And what's funny I think I am maybe maybe I shouldn't be the authority on that I have no idea Actually I think I'm fun to be around. Ah. 01:00:25.88 mikebledsoe I haven't seen you hang around very many people. So if I'm just going to look at the results. However, I find you easy to hang out with yeah. 01:00:30.93 Max Shank Ah, ah yeah I mean the data would the the data would suggest that I'm hard to get along with actually um I know people who would hear me say the word chakra and they would just go. Ah. Really really you think there are chakras and I'll be like I guess not I guess I'm stupid. Ah, ah. Meanwhile I could give the vagus nerve explanation to someone and they'd be like ah no, that is just restoring the flow through your kundalini and opening your heart sha or you know whatever. So yeah, just to add to your point of maybe it's beneficial to understand the principles. Behind certain things like it I think it's valuable to understand how different tissues grow and regrow at different rates. You know the lining of your intestines regenerates replaces itself every couple days whereas Bones can be like on a 2 wo-year cycle. It's big difference. Um, but you don't you don't have to know exactly what's going on in order to harvest the benefits from it and I think that maybe is a good way to segue into the placebo and nocebo effect. 01:01:44.66 mikebledsoe What's. 01:01:54.76 mikebledsoe Well I want to I want to mention 1 thing before we go there is ah there's a lot of like people people only value value the latest science it seems it's like if the study is more than like a few years old it's people don't even really want to pay attention to it and I see ah a lot of these Yeah yeah. 01:02:16.94 Max Shank Did you say a few years mean like 24 hours it's got to be brand spanking new. 01:02:24.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, there's this, there's something about people valuing things that are newer over what's older and when I say well for instance thing about Kundalini yoga that shit is old as fuck. Ah. I don't care what words they're using to describe what's happening there. There is something happening there that is ah that enhances my experience as a human being in a way that nothing else can and so whether they call it chakras or whether we're we're. You know, tickling the vagus nerve or whatever the fuck it is it is ah it's doing something that I like and that's okay, that's totally okay, but I think a lot of these ancient traditions are using language that people. I mean this happens a lot with chinese medicine. You know they're talking about this or that and then next thing you know there's some type of scientific research study that that says something and people go did you hear about this new study and like well that really sounds like the meridian system from chinese medicine. You're like no no, it's this new scientific like okay, cool. You know what. 01:03:36.67 Max Shank Number. 01:03:38.92 mikebledsoe I'm gonna go with an old Chinese dude over here cause I think he knows more about this than someone who just made a discovery and has come up with a clever way of explaining it. So I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of I'm a big fan of honoring tradition and really also looking at the science and. 01:03:46.47 Max Shank Well I call it go ahead. 01:03:57.68 mikebledsoe I enjoy when I see science and tradition. You know there's a melding and there's ah, there's ah ah, a modern explanation that that more people are willing to accept when a lot of that like more ah the older traditional explanations for things seem like that's kind of silly. I mean happens to like old russian women too talk to these old russian women and they talk about their mothers and grandmothers and what they did how they treated their food and their medicine all this stuff and 30 years ago I would have thought man that's crazy like what but now I go oh this all makes sense like oh yeah, like this old russian woman I know. Yeah, my my mother would always we drink a ah a shot of vodka every day for health I go what are you talking about? how is alcohol going to be good for your health. Well it doesn't get mentioned that they're they're soaking these ah these really magical herbs like Rodeola or ginseng. In the vodka for years and then they break it out. It's it's high quality tinctures so things like that are happening anyways. So it's it's worth paying attention to your elders. 01:04:59.84 Max Shank Oh. 01:05:09.94 Max Shank It's good to honor tradition and then also to challenge it honestly and I think that there's there's a whole I call it n y m It's not yet measurable like there are so many things that are true that are just not yet measurable by us. 01:05:12.65 mikebledsoe E. 01:05:27.39 Max Shank Right now with the equipment that we have available and I think the the arrogance of people getting so pigeonholed into what is currently measurable using the equipment we have is such a limiter into that person's well-being or their ability to help somebody. Because there's a lot of stuff in isolation that may be true and then in integration may be false like for example, um, people can do research on how different frequency electromagnetic waves affect. Ah, cell right? and then can say okay this electromagnetic wave did not affect the cell negatively therefore it is safe but that has nothing to do with whether or not. That frequency of an electromagnetic wave would be safe for a whole person to experience. So when you have it so isolated like that you're missing the whole integration and the wholeness of the organism in how. It responds with that interaction. 01:06:44.68 mikebledsoe Yeah there's there's a quote that my girlfriend posted I think I think I'll quote her put it on Twitter and to be healthy is to be whole health is english. Health in English is based on anglo-saxon word hail which means whole wholeness is necessary to live a fulfilled life. Ask you? What are you missing that prevents you from living a whole and healthy life. Yeah, and just makes me think about that is is looking at the whole person because integration is only gonna take you so far and I want to. Um, want to point out it. It may sound like we we did like there's a science bashing here I imagine some people could listen to this and be like oh they spent more time talking about how science does not apply than or where the limitations of it are than where it is and um I imagine that's. 01:07:39.29 Max Shank Well we know what the advantages are there are obvious event we're we're having this conversation on computers in different states like of course it's it like works. But that's not see here's the thing because I'm gonna hijack what you said Mike and I Mike and I. 01:07:43.39 mikebledsoe Yeah, well I. 01:07:58.31 Max Shank Are looking out for your health mentally physically financially and we're going to point out the things that are most likely to fuck you up and the reality is most of the benefits of science need no rhetorical argument. They need no explanation. Phone. It just works like if it's really scientific like it just works so getting the rhetoric out of the scientific method getting appeal to Authority and ad hominent attacks out of the scientific method. That's what's going to help you actually live the best. Because if you don't identify those for what they are which is huge traps you're going to get messed up. 01:08:41.60 mikebledsoe Yeah, well said thanks for hijacking me I love it. Let's let's shut this bad boy down last last words for the the listeners. 01:08:54.22 Max Shank Eat lots of eggs and Salt I don't I don't know it takes more time it takes more effort to figure out what's going to work best for you. I personally followed. The worst exercise plans for my individual body for a really long time and I did it because of how I would measure up to other people and that's once again getting into that like I like saying that. 01:09:16.71 mikebledsoe But they did. 01:09:30.75 Max Shank Whatever measuring stick you use is also the 1 that's going to administer your beating so whatever you are measuring. It should be for an important reason and the more I think mature you get like you were talking about child adult the less you're going to care. About impressing other people with how many pounds you can lift and whatever else the more you get in tuneed with what makes your body feel the best and the strongest and the most elastic and that's actually been the biggest. Shift in my training philosophy is I used to really focus on super high level athletics and I still do. But my approach is much more about elasticity and I think that that is the ultimate. Athletic attribute is if can you bounce around without breaking because ultimately no 1 cares. How much you can squat. You don't care how much you can squat um, the amount of pounds on the bar is going to matter less and less and less the older you get and most people eventually come around. To the realization that they just want to be able to move quickly smoothly. Ah with accuracy dexterity agility without hurting and I guess that's that's basically it is it takes more effort to figure out what's. Good for you individually, but it is very well worth it. 01:11:08.85 mikebledsoe Yeah, you know I think about this whole conversation I think about being your own scientist is really you know we can talk about being your scientist for a lot of things but for your own physical body. Um, your and your. Your internal state too. Not just your physical body. But your your mental emotional spiritual state is really just a practice of and a methodical practice of self-awareness by applying the the scientific method to yourself is to me a a spiritual practice and so ah. 01:11:34.74 Max Shank Um. 01:11:45.25 mikebledsoe Really pay attention to the results because in the results are the truth and so if you look at any area of your life if you look at your internal state your your physical body. Your cultural environment. The people that you talk to and hang out with and. Ah, your your physical environ

The Opperman Report'
Pt1 John Kiriakou :Reluctant Spy/ Pt2 Michael Bowe -Marines Turn Blind Eye to Child Sex Abuse

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 126:16


Part 1 John Kiriakou :Reluctant Spy: My Secret Life in the CIA's War on TerrorJohn Kiriakou is a former CIA officer, former senior investigator for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and former counterterrorism consultant for ABC News.In 2002, Kiriakou became the chief of counterterrorism operations in Pakistan, where he led a CIA team in the March 2002 raid and capture of Abu Zubaydah, then thought to be al-Qaeda's third-ranking official.Following Abu Zubaydah's capture, Kiriakou became Executive Assistant to the CIA's Deputy Director for Operations, where he served as the Director of Central Intelligence's principal Iraq briefer.Kiriakou left the CIA in March 2004. He later served as a senior investigator on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and as senior intelligence advisor to Committee Chairman Senator John Kerry. Kiriakou also authored a bestselling book, "The Reluctant Spy: My Secret Life in the CIA's War on Terror," and worked as an intelligence consultant for ABC News.Throughout his career, Kiriakou received 12 CIA Exceptional Performance Awards, the CIA's Sustained Superior Performance Award, the Counterterrorism Service Medal, and the State Department's Meritorious Honor Award.In 2007, Kiriakou appeared on ABC News, during which he became the first CIA officer to confirm that the CIA waterboarded detainees, and he labeled waterboarding as “torture.” Kiriakou's interview revealed that this practice was official U.S. policy approved at the highest levels of the government.The government began investigating Kiriakou immediately after his media appearance. Five years later, he was charged with multiple felonies resulting from his whistleblowing. He became the sixth whistleblower indicted by the Obama administration under the Espionage Act - a law designed to punish spies.Eventually, in order to avoid a trial that could have resulted in separation from his wife and five children for up to 45 years, he opted to plead guilty to one count of a reduced charge in exchange for a 30-month sentence.In 2012 Kiriakou was honored with the Joe A. Callaway Award for Civic Courage, an award given to individuals who “advance truth and justice despite the personal risk it creates.” Two days prior to sentencing, he was honored by inclusion of his portrait in artist Robert Shetterly's series "Americans Who Tell the Truth," which features notable truth-tellers throughout American history.Kiriakou reported to federal prison in Loretto, Pennsylvania on February 28, 2013 to begin serving his sentence, where he continued to speak out in a series of "Letters from Loretto," including his first, which provided a stunning portrait of prison life. In November 2013, the Peace and Justice Center of Sonoma County, California honored Kiriakou as its "Peacemaker of the Year." He was awarded the prestigious PEN First Amendment Award from the PEN Center USA in August 2015.He was released from prison in February 2015.Part 2 Attorney Michael J. Bowe - American Marines Turn Blind Eye to Child Sex AbusePro BonoMichael engages in substantial pro bono work for institutions and individuals, including representing victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the family of United States Marine Lance Corporal Gregory Buckley, Jr., and Marine Corp Major Jason Brezler. These high-profile matters of national import have received substantial Congressional, press, and public attention.6 years ago #-marines, #:reluctant, #abuse, #afghan sex slaves, #blind, #bowe, #child, #ed, #eye, #john, #john kiriakou, #kiriakou, #marines child sex abuse, #michael, #michael bowe, #opperman, #reluctant spy, #sex, #spy/, #turn

The Opperman Report
Pt1 John Kiriakou :Reluctant Spy/ Pt2 Michael Bowe -Marines Turn Blind Eye to Child Sex Abuse

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 126:16


Part 1 John Kiriakou :Reluctant Spy: My Secret Life in the CIA's War on Terror John Kiriakou is a former CIA officer, former senior investigator for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, and former counterterrorism consultant for ABC News. In 2002, Kiriakou became the chief of counterterrorism operations in Pakistan, where he led a CIA team in the March 2002 raid and capture of Abu Zubaydah, then thought to be al-Qaeda's third-ranking official. Following Abu Zubaydah's capture, Kiriakou became Executive Assistant to the CIA's Deputy Director for Operations, where he served as the Director of Central Intelligence's principal Iraq briefer. Kiriakou left the CIA in March 2004. He later served as a senior investigator on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and as senior intelligence advisor to Committee Chairman Senator John Kerry. Kiriakou also authored a bestselling book, "The Reluctant Spy: My Secret Life in the CIA's War on Terror," and worked as an intelligence consultant for ABC News. Throughout his career, Kiriakou received 12 CIA Exceptional Performance Awards, the CIA's Sustained Superior Performance Award, the Counterterrorism Service Medal, and the State Department's Meritorious Honor Award. In 2007, Kiriakou appeared on ABC News, during which he became the first CIA officer to confirm that the CIA waterboarded detainees, and he labeled waterboarding as “torture.” Kiriakou's interview revealed that this practice was official U.S. policy approved at the highest levels of the government. The government began investigating Kiriakou immediately after his media appearance. Five years later, he was charged with multiple felonies resulting from his whistleblowing. He became the sixth whistleblower indicted by the Obama administration under the Espionage Act - a law designed to punish spies. Eventually, in order to avoid a trial that could have resulted in separation from his wife and five children for up to 45 years, he opted to plead guilty to one count of a reduced charge in exchange for a 30-month sentence. In 2012 Kiriakou was honored with the Joe A. Callaway Award for Civic Courage, an award given to individuals who “advance truth and justice despite the personal risk it creates.” Two days prior to sentencing, he was honored by inclusion of his portrait in artist Robert Shetterly's series "Americans Who Tell the Truth," which features notable truth-tellers throughout American history. Kiriakou reported to federal prison in Loretto, Pennsylvania on February 28, 2013 to begin serving his sentence, where he continued to speak out in a series of "Letters from Loretto," including his first, which provided a stunning portrait of prison life. In November 2013, the Peace and Justice Center of Sonoma County, California honored Kiriakou as its "Peacemaker of the Year." He was awarded the prestigious PEN First Amendment Award from the PEN Center USA in August 2015. He was released from prison in February 2015. Part 2 Attorney Michael J. Bowe - American Marines Turn Blind Eye to Child Sex Abuse Pro Bono Michael engages in substantial pro bono work for institutions and individuals, including representing victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the family of United States Marine Lance Corporal Gregory Buckley, Jr., and Marine Corp Major Jason Brezler. These high-profile matters of national import have received substantial Congressional, press, and public attention. 6 years ago #-marines, #:reluctant, #abuse, #afghan sex slaves, #blind, #bowe, #child, #ed, #eye, #john, #john kiriakou, #kiriakou, #marines child sex abuse, #michael, #michael bowe, #opperman, #reluctant spy, #sex, #spy/, #turn

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
To Govern the Globe: World Orders and Catastrophic Change w/ Alfred W. McCoy

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 70:57


On this edition of Parallax Views, the distinguished historian Prof. Alfred W. McCoy of the University of Wisconsin-Madison joins us to discuss his latest book To Govern the Globe: World Orders and Catastrophic Change. McCoy's previous works include the classic The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade as well as A Question of Torture: CIA Interrogation, from the Cold War to the War on Terror, Policing America's Empire: The United States, the Philippines, and the Rise of the Surveillance State, Colonial Crucible: Empire in the Making of the Modern American State, Endless Empire: Spain's Retreat, Europe's Eclipse, America's Decline, and In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of US Global Power. In To Govern the Globe, delves into the history of empires and world orders from the Iberian Age to now as well as tackling the seeming decline of U.S. hegemonic power, the rise of China, and what climate change means for world order going forward. In this conversation Alfred and I begin by discussing the meaning of empire and world order and what those terms mean. We then delve into the issue of what Alfred calls the "delicate duality" in which Empires express ideals on one hand but seeks maintenance of power, often through breaking from those ideals, on the other. From there we dive into a number of other topics including the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, how the contradictions of the "delicate duality" can eventually undermine and subvert an empire, the degradation of U.S. moral authority vis-a-vis the torture at Abu Gharib and Guantanamo Bay, China and an alternative international order, climate change and its projected impact on Shanghai by 1950, the late geopolitical chess player Zbigniew Brzezinski, principle vs. power in China and the U.S., what the decline of U.S. power means for the American public, projecting 2030 as the year of America's loss of hegemonic power globally, Chinese military power and technology in the near future, the Pentagon war games in which the U.S. end up in a conflict with China over Taiwan, the succession of hegemonic powers historically and their struggles to dominate the Eurasian land mass, how the U.S. dominated the Eurasian landmass through the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), China and the Shanghai Cooperative Organization, China and the tri-continental world island, potential waning of relations between U.S. with countries like Japan and the Philippines, the advantage that the U.S. has had as the global hegemon, the establishment of the U.S. dollar as the global reserve currency and the construction of a "Grand Imperial Bargain", the weak social safety net and low wages in the U.S. and workers relying on cheap good that could become expensive in the future (causing social tensions to arise and exacerbate), not wanting to make policy recommendation in To Govern the Globe as it could degrade an objective analysis of the historical trajectory, Barack Obama's strategy for containing China and the Asia Pivot, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), Sir Halford McKinder and the World Island, Zbigniew Brzezinski's conditions for the perpetuation of U.S. hegemonic power and how all those conditions have been violated), climate change as the next catastrophe for world order and the choice between world order and barbarism that may face us as climate change worsen, climate change and the potential refugee crisis it could cause, the emergence of the First World Order through the Black Death and the destruction of the Mongolian Empire, the death of one world order and the emergence of another throughout history, China and coal power, projections indicating China will be hit by extreme heatwaves in the coming decades, international cooperation without the total loss of national sovereignty, the potential for a new kind of empowered world order to face climate change, climate change and the potential for brutal conflict over resources like water, the prosperous Global North vs. the impoverished Global South, John Mearsheimer and looking past the anarchic world system, the European Union, ceding limited and narrow areas of sovereignty as a small reform that could combat climate change, and more!

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
Global War on Terror, Pt 3: A Return to the New

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 54:07


Since the explicit withdrawal of the U.S. from Afghanistan, the broader media and political discourse is that the so-called War on Terror is over. But the war lives on through drone warfare and mass surveillance of Muslim citizens. In this era of increasing anti-Muslim violence, how are Muslims imagining and creating a better world for themselves and others? Is it possible to shift the narrative and take back what was lost in the war?

Haymarket Books Live
The US Empire After Afghanistan w/ Anand Gopal & Rozina Ali

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 77:51


Join renowned journalists Rozina Ali and Anand Gopal for a discussion of the aftermath of the Afghanistan withdrawal and the US empire. Following the official U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan in August, questions remain about the fate of the country following the twenty-year US occupation. What will happen to the 3.6 million Afghans that have fled their homes since the withdrawal? Or the twenty-three million in the country now threatened with starvation and famine because of US Sanctions? Is the war still being fought in more insidious ways that are harder to see and harder to resist? Join renowned journalists Rozina Ali and Anand Gopal as they discussion all this and more on Friday Dec 3rd at 5PM on the Haymarket Youtube channel. --------------------------------------------------------------------- Speakers: Rozina Ali is a contributing writer at New York Times Magazine and a fellow at Type Media Center. Her writing covers the War on Terror, Islamophobia, and the Middle East and South Asia. She was previously on the staff of The New Yorker and The Cairo Review of Global Affairs. She is currently working on a book about the history of Islamophobia in the United States. Anand Gopal is a freelance journalist covering Afghanistan, Egypt, Syria, and other international hotspots. He is the author of the Pulitzer Prize nominated No Good Men Among the Living, and is currently working on a book about the Arab revolutions. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/u1Hd4jTAauc Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

New Books Network
Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., "Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:11


The United States is the world's largest donor of foreign aid, and in this profound analysis, Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. demonstrates the links between human rights protections and the provision of US strategic aid in recipient countries. In Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), Professor Regilme puts forward a "theory of interest convergence" which draws out the way that shared strategic interests between donor and recipient countries have the power to strengthen the legitimacy of domestic recipient governments, but not necessarily in ways that protect physical integrity rights of citizens. Presenting two case studies from The Phillipines and Thailand during the post-cold-war period and also during the global war on terror periods, the book provides a richly researched, intricate understanding of the way that authoritarian governments have continued to benefit from the provision of US aid, while not necessarily improving their human rights records. Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. is a Tenured University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Find him on twitter @santinoregilme, check out his latest book @AidImperium Jane Richards is a doctoral student at the University of Hong Kong. You can find her on twitter where she follows all things related to human rights and Hong Kong politics @JaneRichardsHK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Political Science
Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., "Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:11


The United States is the world's largest donor of foreign aid, and in this profound analysis, Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. demonstrates the links between human rights protections and the provision of US strategic aid in recipient countries. In Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), Professor Regilme puts forward a "theory of interest convergence" which draws out the way that shared strategic interests between donor and recipient countries have the power to strengthen the legitimacy of domestic recipient governments, but not necessarily in ways that protect physical integrity rights of citizens. Presenting two case studies from The Phillipines and Thailand during the post-cold-war period and also during the global war on terror periods, the book provides a richly researched, intricate understanding of the way that authoritarian governments have continued to benefit from the provision of US aid, while not necessarily improving their human rights records. Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. is a Tenured University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Find him on twitter @santinoregilme, check out his latest book @AidImperium Jane Richards is a doctoral student at the University of Hong Kong. You can find her on twitter where she follows all things related to human rights and Hong Kong politics @JaneRichardsHK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in American Studies
Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., "Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:11


The United States is the world's largest donor of foreign aid, and in this profound analysis, Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. demonstrates the links between human rights protections and the provision of US strategic aid in recipient countries. In Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), Professor Regilme puts forward a "theory of interest convergence" which draws out the way that shared strategic interests between donor and recipient countries have the power to strengthen the legitimacy of domestic recipient governments, but not necessarily in ways that protect physical integrity rights of citizens. Presenting two case studies from The Phillipines and Thailand during the post-cold-war period and also during the global war on terror periods, the book provides a richly researched, intricate understanding of the way that authoritarian governments have continued to benefit from the provision of US aid, while not necessarily improving their human rights records. Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. is a Tenured University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Find him on twitter @santinoregilme, check out his latest book @AidImperium Jane Richards is a doctoral student at the University of Hong Kong. You can find her on twitter where she follows all things related to human rights and Hong Kong politics @JaneRichardsHK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies
Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., "Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in Southeast Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:11


The United States is the world's largest donor of foreign aid, and in this profound analysis, Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. demonstrates the links between human rights protections and the provision of US strategic aid in recipient countries. In Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), Professor Regilme puts forward a "theory of interest convergence" which draws out the way that shared strategic interests between donor and recipient countries have the power to strengthen the legitimacy of domestic recipient governments, but not necessarily in ways that protect physical integrity rights of citizens. Presenting two case studies from The Phillipines and Thailand during the post-cold-war period and also during the global war on terror periods, the book provides a richly researched, intricate understanding of the way that authoritarian governments have continued to benefit from the provision of US aid, while not necessarily improving their human rights records. Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. is a Tenured University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Find him on twitter @santinoregilme, check out his latest book @AidImperium Jane Richards is a doctoral student at the University of Hong Kong. You can find her on twitter where she follows all things related to human rights and Hong Kong politics @JaneRichardsHK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/southeast-asian-studies

New Books in World Affairs
Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., "Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:11


The United States is the world's largest donor of foreign aid, and in this profound analysis, Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. demonstrates the links between human rights protections and the provision of US strategic aid in recipient countries. In Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), Professor Regilme puts forward a "theory of interest convergence" which draws out the way that shared strategic interests between donor and recipient countries have the power to strengthen the legitimacy of domestic recipient governments, but not necessarily in ways that protect physical integrity rights of citizens. Presenting two case studies from The Phillipines and Thailand during the post-cold-war period and also during the global war on terror periods, the book provides a richly researched, intricate understanding of the way that authoritarian governments have continued to benefit from the provision of US aid, while not necessarily improving their human rights records. Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. is a Tenured University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Find him on twitter @santinoregilme, check out his latest book @AidImperium Jane Richards is a doctoral student at the University of Hong Kong. You can find her on twitter where she follows all things related to human rights and Hong Kong politics @JaneRichardsHK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Law
Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr., "Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia" (U Michigan Press, 2021)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:11


The United States is the world's largest donor of foreign aid, and in this profound analysis, Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. demonstrates the links between human rights protections and the provision of US strategic aid in recipient countries. In Aid Imperium: United States Foreign Policy and Human Rights in Post-Cold War Southeast Asia (University of Michigan Press, 2021), Professor Regilme puts forward a "theory of interest convergence" which draws out the way that shared strategic interests between donor and recipient countries have the power to strengthen the legitimacy of domestic recipient governments, but not necessarily in ways that protect physical integrity rights of citizens. Presenting two case studies from The Phillipines and Thailand during the post-cold-war period and also during the global war on terror periods, the book provides a richly researched, intricate understanding of the way that authoritarian governments have continued to benefit from the provision of US aid, while not necessarily improving their human rights records. Salvador Santino F. Regilme Jr. is a Tenured University Lecturer of International Relations at Leiden University, The Netherlands. Find him on twitter @santinoregilme, check out his latest book @AidImperium Jane Richards is a doctoral student at the University of Hong Kong. You can find her on twitter where she follows all things related to human rights and Hong Kong politics @JaneRichardsHK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

Things Police See: First Hand Accounts
TPS E88: U.S. Customs Agent Bob Starkman

Things Police See: First Hand Accounts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 68:05


In this interview Steve chats with former U.S. Customs Agent Bob Starkman.  Bob worked as a street agent for customs and was also part of the FBI JTTF.  At the same time Bob was fighting crime he was honing his skills as a college basketball coach eventually making his way to the JUCO hall of fame!  Check out his book that details his journey! https://www.amazon.com/Inside-Both-Courts-Bob-Starkman/dp/B08VWY9YLJ Inside Both Courts is a gritty, forty-year, no-holds-barred look from inside my world of college basketball, the people I have met along the way, the War on Drugs, its successor, the War on Terror, and how basketball and law enforcement guided me in my successful careers, and more importantly as a family man. Support/Donate! https://thingspolicesee.com/donate/ Shop Merch / Subscribe / be a guest / Contact  www.thingspolicesee.com Join the FB community!  https://www.facebook.com/thingspolicesee/ Background consultation - Ken@policebackground.net

History Film Club
Are there good films about the War On Terror?

History Film Club

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 37:40


Proessor Kim Wagner joins Alex and Hannah to discuss war films, colonialism, and exactly how terrible Mel Gibson is.Producer: Natt TapleyAssistant Producer: Abi Robinson See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Haymarket Books Live
Stories of Survival Recording: Stories of Survival: Surviving the Post-9/11 Human Rights Crisis

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 73:13


Join us for the third event in a 4-part series by the Center for Constitutional Rights and Haymarket Books marking the 20th anniversary of 9/11. In “Stories of Survival: Surviving the post-9/11 human rights crisis and reclaiming rights for all,” we are honored to hear from survivors of the U.S. government's so-called “War on Terror,” who have resisted the U.S.' campaign of human rights abuses, from endless wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, to the global export of the nebulous and discriminatory “terrorism framework”, and the proliferation of domestic policies of surveillance and detention that reinforced existing systems of oppression. From Kabul and Mombasa to Omaha--panelists will share the impact of the harms and together demand accountability and imagine a world repaired. Panelists: Marie Ramtu holds a master's degree in Peace Studies and International Relations from Hekima University College. She's a lobbyist with grassroots, regional, and international niches. Her experience in humanitarian, the human rights and social justice sectors spans at least 14 years. Marie has operated to safeguard the rights of the marginalized refugees and asylum seekers. She has also had a specific focus in influencing a shift in attitude, policies, and practices in the specific protection on the rights of sexual and gender minorities. Before joining Muslims for Human Rights (MUHURI) as the Executive Director, Marie worked with regional and international non-governmental organizations that include the Coalition for the Independence of the African Commission (CIAC), the Network of African National Human Rights Institutions (NANHRI), and Church World Service. Born in Kabul, Afghanistan and raised in rural Washington state, Gazelle Samizay's work often reflects the complexities and contradictions of culture, nationality and gender through the lens of her bicultural identity. Her work in photography, video and mixed media has been exhibited across the US and internationally, including at Whitechapel Gallery, London; Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery; the California Museum of Photography, Riverside; the de Young Museum, San Francisco; and the Slamdance Film Festival, Park City, UT. In addition to her studio practice, her writing has been published in One Story, Thirty Stories: An Anthology of Contemporary Afghan American Literature and she is a founding member of the Afghan American Artists and Writers Association. Samizay has received numerous awards and residencies, including from the Princess Grace Foundation, NY; Craft Contemporary, Los Angeles; the Arizona Community Foundation, Phoenix; Level Ground, Los Angeles, the Torrance Art Museum, and Side Street Projects, Los Angeles. She received her MFA in photography at the University of Arizona and currently lives in San Francisco. www.gazellesamizay.com. @gsamizay. Naveed Shinwari is a plaintiff in Tanvir v. Tanzin, a case brought in 2013 on behalf of American Muslims who were placed or kept on the No-Fly List by the FBI for refusing to spy on their Muslim communities. He was repeatedly questioned and harassed by the FBI as they attempted to recruit him to spy on others. As retaliation for his refusal to do so, Naveed was placed on the No-Fly List and unable to travel to Afghanistan to visit his wife and daughters for two years. His fight to hold government officials accountable for their abuse of power continues. Moderator: Samah Mcgona Sisay is a Bertha Justice Fellow at the Center for Constitutional Rights, where she specializes in international human rights and challenging inhumane immigration policies and abusive police practices. Prior to coming to the Center for Constitutional Rights, Samah worked as an Equal Justice Works Fellow at African Services Committee. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/1bClT5GmLJk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: A birdhouse full of nips, and other yankee swap horror stories

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 164:13


Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne talks about Governor Charlie Baker's latest plan to distribute over two million rapid tests to Massachusetts towns in need, and the state of democracy in the U.S. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: How Progressives And Moderates Can Unite To Save Our Country." Then, we ask listeners their outlook on climate change, after tornados sweeping through Arkansas, Illinois, Mississippi, Missouri and Tennessee left dozens dead and scores of buildings demolished. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III weigh in on Gen Z's relationship with religion and a Black medical illustration going viral. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the inaugural dean of Africana studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Shaleen Title shares takeaways from her recent academic paper on solutions to equity issues in cannabis laws, and the state of legalization and decriminalization of drug use across the country. Shaleen Title is a former Cannabis Control Commissioner who is now the Distinguished Cannabis Policy Practitioner in Residence at the Drug Enforcement and Policy Center at Ohio State University. She is also the CEO and co-founder of the Parabola Center. Charlie Sennott discusses civilian casualties from the War on Terror that the U.S. military hid from the public, and how U.S. democracy compares to other countries. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Brian O'Donovan previews this year's return to an in-person Christmas Celtic Sojurn, and his inspiration behind the event. Brian O'Donovan is host of Celtic Sojourn on GBH. A Christmas Celtic Sojourn begins its holiday run tomorrow, with a sold out show in Rockport. Tickets are still available for shows at the Cutler Majestic Theatre in Boston – www.christmasceltic.com.  We end the show by talking with listeners their experiences with holiday yankee-swap events.

So To Speak w/ Jared Howe
S o T o S p e a k | Ep. 807 | A Few Bad Apples

So To Speak w/ Jared Howe

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 30:03


January 6th, like Unite The Right in 2017, is a cautionary tale about how it only takes a handful of provocateurs and bad decisions to create a pretext for lawfare against everyone involved. Leftists are now using J6 to substantiate their calls for a domestic war on terror that targets rural, white Americans, but the fact that it even happened is proof that the domestic war on terror had already started. This is EPISODE 807 of So to Speak w/ Jared Howe!

Uncle Rod’s Story Corner

AYO!! Back in the bar with Double-R & David Hagans!! A$$hole customers,the War on Terror,& 50yr-old women that act like the drunkest girl you dated in college,we've got it all!! Shots up!!

McConnell Center Podcast
War, Propaganda, and the Domestic Fate of US Militarism with Dr. Abigail R. Hall

McConnell Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 37:21


Dr. Abigail R. Hall, associate professor of economics at Bellarmine University, joins McConnell Center Director Dr. Gary Gregg to discuss her two most recent books, Manufacturing Militarism and Tyranny Comes Home. The two explore how overseas wars and foreign policy affect the domestic policy of the United States and create a culture of militarism. Important Links Abigail Hall, Manufacturing Militarism: US Government Propaganda in the War on Terror Abigail Hall, Tyranny Comes Home: The Domestic Fate of US Militarism Follow Dr. Hall's work at her website, https://www.abigailrhall.com/. Stay Connected Visit us at McConnellcenter.org Subscribe to our newsletter  Facebook: @mcconnellcenter Instagram: @ulmcenter  Twitter: @ULmCenter This podcast is a production of the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville. Views expressed in this show are those of the participants and not necessarily those of the McConnell Center.

The John Batchelor Show
David Grantham #Unbound. (Intell.) The complete, forty-minute interview, April 5, 2021.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 39:50


Photo:   Bar Harbor, Maine. Civil Air Patrol base headquarters of coastal patrol no. 20. Lieutenant Day, intelligence officer. @Batchelorshow David Grantham #Unbound. The complete, forty-minute interview, April 5, 2021. Consequences: An Intelligence Officer's War, by David Grantham  Paperback – November 11, 2020. https://www.amazon.com/Consequences-Intelligence-Officers-David-Grantham/dp/098440631X/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= “Very little has been written on the U.S. Air Force Office of Special Investigations efforts in the global war on terror. Consequences by David Grantham provides a unique and fascinating window into the nuts and bolts of OSI counterintelligence operations. You won't be disappointed.”– Fred Burton, author of Beirut Rules: The Murder of a CIA Station Chief and Hezbollah's War Against America    In 2020, ISIS followers are being encouraged to use COVID-19 to sicken Westerners. An ISIS supporter attacked a Naval base in Corpus Christi, Texas. Iran and the United States exchanged blows in Iraq. We are still living in the long shadow of the Iraq War. In 2006, David Grantham was fresh out of college and serving as a counterintelligence officer with the elite and secretive Air Force Office of Special Investigations. Iraq was veering toward civil war. The U.S. military desperately needed better on-the-ground intelligence to turn the tide. Grantham found himself in Kuwait and Afghanistan, then at Iraq's infamous American prison, Camp Bucca. Not only was Bucca the breeding ground for the Islamic State, it was in southern Iraq, where America's deadly fight with Iran was an open secret. Consequences is both a riveting, behind-the-scenes look at intelligence operations at the height of the Iraq war, and a charming and sobering story of one man's journey through the pleasures and consequences that come with wartime intelligence.

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)
Global War on Terror, Pt 1: Guantanamo and the Afterlives of Torture

Ideas from CBC Radio (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 54:07


The prison at Guantanamo Bay remains open. And while advocates including former detainees fight to close it down, the legacy of detention and torture live on. This is the first of a three-part series in which IDEAS producer, Naheed Mustafa, peers into the house the War on Terror built.

By Any Means Necessary
Supreme Court Threatens To Roll Back Reproductive Justice

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 111:38


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Hannah Dickinson, professor and organizer with Geneva Women's Assembly in Geneva, NY to discuss the Supreme Court's hearing of a case that has the potential to weaken or fully overturn abortion rights in the US, the ongoing efforts to weaken Roe v. Wade and how the fight for reproductive health is an especially important issue for working class women, how reproductive justice impacts everyone, and the need for a movement to demand that the right to abortion be guaranteed in law.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Mikaela Nhondo Erskog, an educator and researcher for the Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, also a part of the secretariat of Pan Africanism Today and a coordinating committee member for No Cold War to discuss the recently completed Forum on China-Africa Cooperation held in Dekar, Senegal, China's good faith proposals and the problems potentially posed by African leaders' inaction, debunking the West's manufactured concern about China's loan to Uganda for its Entebbe airport, and how the era of multilateralism with China challenges US hegemony.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Amir Khafagy, an award-winning journalist based out of New York City who you can follow on Twitter @AmirKhafagy91 to discuss the yellow taxi medallion debt crisis that left many taxi cab drivers in insurmountable debt as rideshare services remained unregulated, the role that the city and Mike Bloomberg have played in exploiting cab drivers, the resistance waged by the New York Taxi Workers Association and its victory in securing a solution for drivers.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Danny Haiphong, Contributing Editor of Black Agenda Report, Co-Host of The Left Lens, and co-author of “American Exceptionalism and American Innocence: A People's History of Fake News―From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror” to discuss the so-called summit for democracy being organized by the Biden administration and its purpose in legitimating US hegemony, the material conditions that give shape to how democracy unfolds, and the anti-Black aspects of Enes Kanter Freedom's sinophobic crusade.

The Opperman Report
The Watchdogs Didn't Bark: The CIA, NSA, and the Crimes of the War on Terror

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 60:01


The shocking reexamination of the failures of US government officials to use available intelligence to stop the attack on American on September 11, 2001. “The authors lay bare…an intelligence failure of historic proportions.”—John Kiriakou, former CIA officer, author, The Convenient Terrorist In 2009, documentarians John Duffy and Ray Nowosielski arrived at the offices of Richard Clarke, the former counterterror adviser to Presidents Clinton and Bush. In the meeting, Clarke boldly accused one-time Central Intelligence Agency director George Tenet of “malfeasance and misfeasance” in the pre-war on terror. Thus began an incredible—never-before-told—investigative journey of intrigue about America's intelligence community and two 9/11 hijackers. The Watchdogs Didn't Bark details that story, unearthed over a ten-year investigation. Following the careers of a dozen counterterror employees working in different agencies of the US government from the late 1980s to the present, the book puts the government's systems of oversight and accountability under a microscope. At the heart of this book is a mystery: Why did key 9/11 plotters Khalid Al Mihdhar and Nawaf Al Hazmi, operating inside the United States, fall onto the radars of so many US agencies without any of those agencies succeeding in stopping the attacks? The answers go beyond mere “conspiracy theory” and “deep state” actors, but instead find a complicated set of potential culprits and an easily manipulated system. Taking readers on a character-driven account of the causes of 9/11 and how the lessons of the attacks were cynically inverted to empower surveillance of citizens, kidnapping, illegal imprisonment, torture, government-sanctioned murder, and a war on whistleblowers and journalists, an alarm is raised which is more pertinent today than ever before. Read less

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2718 - Cold War Defense Spending and How It Transformed Politics w/ Michael Brenes

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 66:28


Sam and Emma host Michael Brenes, history lecturer at Yale University, to discuss his recent book For Might and Right: Cold War Defense Spending and the Remaking of American Democracy, on how the Cold War helped to ingrain the military-industrial complex within the American political, economic, and labor sectors. Michael takes Emma and Sam back to the forties, in the wake of WWII, as the US shifted its focus to the USSR's threat to US imperial interests, with the unification of liberals in the government around the idea that the US military must be broadened, even while conservatives were wary of a garrison state. They also dive into how the Cold War saw the defense budget cemented as a new form of welfare state, far from the New Deal, serving to generate unionized, stable jobs, with legislation from the GI bill to full racial integration in the military presenting the sector as the leader of social progress. Next, they look at Eisenhower's presidency, as, despite being a key figure in identifying the military-industrial complex, he allowed defense funding to flourish in a time of austerity, with the holes in the military-welfare state becoming more and more glaring as the actual welfare state is rolled back under the second red scare. Over the next two decades, the US sees a declining faith in the military-industrial complex as it becomes clear that the fight for jobs in the sector is both a zero-sum game, and becoming increasingly concentrated in specific, higher-educated fields. Then, they dive into the 80s and 90s, as the sudden disappearance of the USSR left a gaping hole for excuses for the Pentagon budget, until a conversation around reassessing the connection between defense and the economy is interrupted with a presidential impeachment trial, putting US politics into a drama-driven state, with 9/11 then putting US defense back into the money seat, even on the domestic scale, with the militarization of police increasing rapidly into the aughts with the wars on drugs and crime. They wrap up the interview by touching on the last couple of decades, and how the war on terror has both seen the biggest uptick in total defense spending, and a return of the discussion around an international, completely autonomous US military and its failures. They also look at how the defense industry exacerbates income inequality, and what we can do to begin to shift jobs during a period of peace to civilian, peacetime purposes. Emma and Sam also discuss Sen. Barrasso extending empathy and understanding to Jan 6 insurrectionists' “hang Mike Pence” chants. And in the Fun Half: Emma and Sam cover the general failings of COP26, looking at AOC's recent comments about the US “[recovering] our moral authority,” before John from SA calls in to debate the importance of negative partisanship, and the MR crew covers the Republicans that voted for BIF almost immediately announcing their retirement. Tulsi visits Fox as Sean Hannity flirts with her imperialist and fiscally conservative tendencies, Dave from Jamaica discusses vaccine hesitancy versus anti-vaccination propaganda, and Cole James Cash shares good news, bad news, and great news. Jared from Portland discusses avoiding painting our children a nihilist picture of the future, plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on January 16th HERE! https://thewilbur.com/artist/majority-report/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here. Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ (Merch issues and concerns can be addressed here: majorityreportstore@mirrorimage.com) You can now watch the livestream on Twitch Check out today's sponsors: Podium makes doing business as easy as sending a text. All your employees can text from a single inbox, offering a smoother experience for your customers. Whether you're answering questions, collecting reviews, scheduling appointments and deliveries or dealing with payment collection – all you have to do is just send a text. Stay ahead of the competition with Podium – they have free plans for growing businesses, plus all the power growing businesses need to scale. Get started free today at Podium.com/MAJORITY. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today as they continue to strike for a fair contract! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere, at https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel! Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! Check out The Nomiki Show live at 3 pm ET on YouTube at patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada, at patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Purchase tickets for Cole James Cash's DJ set in Brooklyn here!

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Daily Review with Clay and Buck - Nov 1 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 59:04


Ned Ryun, Founder and CEO of American Majority and Voter Gravity, weighs in on the VA race. Colin Kaepernick making political comments in uniform vs. an airline pilot. Fox's Tucker Carlson on his new three-part documentary, Patriot Purge (dropping tonight on Fox Nation) about what really happened on 1/6 and how it's been used to start a domestic war on terror. Breaking down the VA race and the betting odds -- plus McAuliffe's last ditch dirty tricks. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com