Podcasts about Hearing

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Sensory perception of sound by living organisms

  • 8,849PODCASTS
  • 13,996EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 7DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 21, 2021LATEST
Hearing

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Hearing

Show all podcasts related to hearing

Latest podcast episodes about Hearing

Andy Woods Ministries
Hearing and Doing The Word

Andy Woods Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:00


Christ Crucified Fellowship
Hearing and Doing The Word

Christ Crucified Fellowship

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:00


Kratom Science
62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom

Kratom Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:52


Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz is a senior toxicologist from Germany and an outspoken advocate for harm reduction and science-based, rational drug policy. On October 11, 2021, representing the European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies, Dr. Steinmetz testified against kratom prohibition for the World Health Organization’s 44th Expert Committee on Drug Dependence . Dr. … 62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom Read More » The post 62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom first appeared on Kratom Science.

Direction for Life
Hearing Gods Voice Part 4B

Direction for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:43


Saint of the Day
St Hilarion the Great of Palestine (371)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 1:22


He was born in Palestine to pagan parents who sent him to Alexandria to be educated. There he learned of the Christian faith and was baptized. Hearing of the fame of St Anthony the Great, he met the great "Father of monks," and determined to devote himself to the ascetical life. For the rest of his life he traveled from place to place, engaging in the most austere life of solitude, prayer and fasting. But wherever he went, his holiness shone like a beacon, and he became known to the people, who flocked to him for counsel, nurture and healing. He would then flee to another place and begin again. His travels took him to Egypt, Libya, Sicily, and finally Cyprus, where he reposed at a great age. As he lay on his deathbed, he cried out 'Go forth, O my soul. What do you fear? Go forth! Why are you disquieted within me? You have served Jesus Christ for almost seventy years and do you fear death?' Speaking these words, he died.   The Synaxarion gives an excruciatingly thorough description of his ascetical labors, which may be instructive:   "From his sixteenth to his twentieth year, Hilarion's shelter was a simple cabin made of bulrushes and marsh grasses. Afterwards, he built a little, low cell that looked more like a tomb than a house. He lay on the hard ground, and washed and cut his hair only once a year, on Easter day. He never washed the coat of skin that Saint Anthony gave him, and wore the same tunic until it fell to pieces. He knew all of Holy Scripture by heart and recited it aloud, standing with fear, as though God were visibly present. From his twenty-first to his twenty-seventh year, a few lentils soaked in cold water was, for three years, his daily food, and for the next three he took nothing but bread, sprinkled with salt. From his twenty-seventh to his thirtieth year, he lived on wild plants; from the age of thirty to thirty-five, on six ounces of barley bread and a few vegetables, cooked without oil. Then, falling ill and with failing eyesight, he added a little oil to his food but did not increase his allowance of bread, even though he saw his body grow weaker, and believed his death was near. At an age when others tend to decrease their austerities, he kept to this diet with redoubled fervor, like a young novice, until his death. He never ate until after sunset and relinquished his fast neither for the greatest feasts nor the gravest illnesses."

Midnight Train Podcast
The Bedlam Asylum... um...Bethlem Royal Hospital. OLD AF.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 152:38


Today we are taking the train to a wonderful little building… Actually scratch that… This place was once so crazy( no pun intended) that its nickname became a common word.  The definition of the word is "A place or situation of chaotic uproar, and where confusion prevails. " The word is Bedlam. The place is Bethlehem Royal Hospital. The hospital is considered the first lunatic asylum. The word "bedlam" is derived from the hospital's nickname. Bedlam is a bastardization of the word bethlem, which in turn was a corruption of the name Bethlehem. Although the hospital became a modern psychiatric facility, historically it was representative of the worst excesses of asylums in the era of lunacy reform. We're gonna get into all that craziness tonight and see what kind of "Bedlam" actually went on there.    Bethlem Royal Hospital's origins are unlike any other psychiatric hospital in the western world. As a formal organization, it can be traced to its foundation in 1247, during the reign of King Henry III, as a Roman Catholic Monastery for the Priory of the 'New Order of St Mary of Bethlem' in the city of London proper. It was established by the Italian Bishop of Bethlehem, Goffredo de Prefetti, following a donation of personal property by the London Alderman and former City-Sheriff, the Norman, Simon FitzMary. It bears its name after its primary patron and original overseer. The initial location of the priory was in the parish of Saint Botolph, in Bishopsgate's ward, just beyond London's wall and where the south-east corner of Liverpool Street station now stands. Bethlem was not initially intended as a hospital, much less as a specialist institution for the mentally ill. Rather, its purpose was tied to the function of the English Church; the ostensible purpose of the priory was to function as a centre for the collection of alms to support the Crusaders, and to link England to the Holy Land. Bishop De Prefetti's need to generate income for the Crusaders, and restore the financial fortunes of his apostolic see was occasioned by two misfortunes: his bishopric had suffered significant losses following the destructive conquest of the town of Bethlehem by the Khwarazmian Turks in 1244; and the immediate predecessor to his post had further impoverished his cathedral chapter through the alienation of a considerable amount of its property. The new London priory, obedient to the Church of Bethlehem, would also house the poor, disabled and abandoned; and, if visited, provide hospitality to the Bishop, canons and brothers of Bethlehem. The subordination of the priory's religious order to the bishops of Bethlehem was further underlined in the foundational charter which stipulated that Bethlems's prior, canons and male and female inmates were to wear a star upon their cloaks and capes to symbolize their obedience to the church of Bethlehem.   During the 13th and 14th centuries, with its activities underwritten by episcopal and papal indulgences, Bethlem's role as a center for the collection of alms for the poor continued. However, over time, its link to the mendicant Order of Bethlehem increasingly devolved, putting its purpose and patronage in severe doubt. In 1346 the Prior of Bethlem, a position at that time granted to the most senior of London's monastic brethren, applied to the city authorities seeking protection; thereafter metropolitan office-holders claimed power to oversee the appointment of prios, and demanded in return an annual payment of 40 shillings from the coffers of the order. It is doubtful whether the City of London ever provided substantial protection, and much less that the priorship fell within their patronage, but dating from the 1346 petition, it played a role in the management of Bethlem's organization and finances.   By this time the crusader bishops of Bethlehem had relocated to Clamecy, France under the surety of the Avignon papacy. This was significant as, throughout the reign of King Edward III (1327–77), the English monarchy had extended its patronage over ecclesiastical positions through the seizure of alien priories, mainly French. These were religious institutions that were under the control of non-English religious houses. As a dependent house of the Order of Saint Bethlehem in Clamecy, Bethlem was vulnerable to seizure by the English crown, and this occurred in the 1370s when Edward III took control of all English hospitals. The purpose of this appropriation was to prevent funds raised by the hospital from enriching the French monarchy, via the papal court, and thus supporting the French war effort. After this event, the Head Masters of the hospital, semi-autonomous figures in charge of its day-to-day management, were crown appointees, and Bethlem became an increasingly secularized institution. The memory of Bethlem's foundation became muddled. In 1381 the royal candidate for the post of master claimed that from its beginnings the hospital had been superintended by an order of knights, and he confused the identity of its founder, Goffredo de Prefetti, with that of the Frankish crusader, Godfrey de Bouillon, the King of Jerusalem. The removal of the last symbolic link to the mendicant order was confirmed in 1403 when it was reported that master and inmates no longer wore the symbol of their order, the star of Bethlehem. This was exclusively a political move on the part of the hospital administrators, as the insane were perceived as unclean or possessed by daemons, and not permitted to reside on consecrated soil.   From 1330 Bethlehm was routinely referred to as a "hospital" does not necessarily indicate a change in its primary role from alms collection – the word hospital could as likely have been used to denote a lodging for travellers, equivalent to a hostel, and would have been a perfectly apt term to describe an institution acting as a centre and providing accommodation for Bethlem's peregrinating alms-seekers or questores. It is unknown from what exact date it began to specialise in the care and control of the insane. Despite this fact it has been frequently asserted that Bethlem was first used for the insane from 1377. This rather precise date is derived from the unsubstantiated conjecture of the Reverend Edward Geoffrey O'Donoghue, chaplain to the hospital, who published a monograph on its history in 1914. While it is possible that Bethlem was receiving the insane during the late fourteenth-century, the first definitive record of their presence in the hospital is provided from the details of a visitation of the Charity Commissioners in 1403. This recorded that amongst other patients then in the hospital there were six male inmates who were "mente capti", a Latin term indicating insanity. The report of the 1403 visitation also noted the presence of four pairs of manacles, eleven chains, six locks and two pairs of stocks although it is not clear if any or all of these items were for the restraint of the inmates. Thus, while mechanical restraint and solitary confinement are likely to have been used for those regarded as dangerous, little else is known of the actual treatment of the insane in Bethlem for much of the medieval period. The presence of a small number of insane patients in 1403 marks Bethlem's gradual transition from a diminutive general hospital into a specialist institution for the confinement of the insane; this process was largely completed by 1460. In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.    In 1546, the Lord-Mayor of London, Sir John Gresham, petitioned the crown to grant Bethlem to the city properly. This petition was partially successful, and King Henry VIII reluctantly ceded to the City of London "the custody, order and governance" of the hospital and of its "occupants and revenues". This charter came into effect in 1547. Under this formulation, the crown retained possession of the hospital, while its administration fell to the city authorities. Following a brief interval when Bethlem was placed under the management of the Governors of Christ's Hospital, from 1557 it was administered by the Governors of the city Bridewell, a prototype House of Correction at Blackfriars. Having been thus one of the few metropolitan hospitals to have survived the dissolution of the monasteries physically intact, this joint administration continued, not without interference by both the crown and city, until Bethlem's incorporation into the National Health Service (NHS) took place in 1948.   The position of master was a sinecure largely regarded by its occupants as means of profiting at the expense of the poor in their charge. The appointment of the early masters of the hospital, later known as keepers, had lain within the patronage of the crown until 1547. Thereafter, the city, through the Court of Aldermen, took control of these appointments where, as with the King's appointees, the office was used to reward loyal servants and friends. However, compared to the masters placed by the monarch, those who gained the position through the city were of much more modest status. Thus in 1561, the Lord Mayor succeeded in having his former porter, Richard Munnes, a draper by trade, appointed to the position. The sole qualifications of his successor in 1565 appears to have been his occupation as a grocer. The Bridewell Governors largely interpreted the role of keeper as that of a house-manager and this is clearly reflected in the occupations of most appointees during this period as they tended to be inn-keepers, victualers or brewers and the like. When patients were sent to Bethlem by the Governors of the Bridewell the keeper was paid from hospital funds. For the remainder, keepers were paid either by the families and friends of inmates or by the parish authorities. It is possible that keepers negotiated their fees for these latter categories of patients.   In 1598 the long-term keeper, Roland Sleford, a London cloth-maker, left his post, apparently of his own volition, after a nineteen-year tenure. Two months later, the Bridewell Governors, who had until then shown little interest in the management of Bethlem beyond the appointment of keepers, conducted an inspection of the hospital and a census of its inhabitants for the first time in over forty years. Their express purpose was to "to view and p[er]use the defaultes and want of rep[ar]ac[i]ons". They found that during the period of Sleford's keepership the hospital buildings had fallen into a deplorable condition with the roof caving in, the kitchen sink blocked up and reported that: "...it is not fitt for anye man to dwell in wch was left by the Keeper for that it is so loathsomly filthely kept not fitt for anye man to come into the sayd howse".   The 1598 committee of inspection found twenty-one inmates then resident with only two of these having been admitted during the previous twelve months. Of the remainder, six, at least, had been resident for a minimum of eight years and one inmate had been there for around twenty-five years. Three were from outside London, six were charitable cases paid for out of the hospital's resources, one was supported by a parochial authority, while the rest were provided for by family, friends, benefactors or, in one instance, out of their funds. The precise reason for the Governors' new-found interest in Bethlem is unknown but it may have been connected to the increased scrutiny the hospital was coming under with the passing of poor law legislation in 1598 and to the decision by the Governors to increase hospital revenues by opening it up to general visitors as a spectacle. After this inspection, the Bridewell Governors initiated some repairs and visited the hospital at more frequent intervals. During one such visit in 1607 they ordered the purchase of clothing and eating vessels for the inmates, presumably indicating the lack of such basic items.    The year 1634 is typically interpreted as denoting the divide between the mediaeval and early modern administration of Bethlem.    Although Bethlem had been enlarged by 1667 to accommodate 59 patients, the Court of Governors of Bethlem and Bridewell observed at the start of 1674 that "the Hospital House of Bethlem is very olde, weake & ruinous and to[o] small and straight for keeping the greater numb[e]r of lunaticks therein att p[re]sent". With the increasing demand for admission and the inadequate and dilapidated state of the building it was decided to rebuild the hospital in Moorfields, just north of the city proper and one of the largest open spaces in London. The architect chosen for the new hospital, which was built rapidly and at great expense between 1675 and 1676, was the natural philosopher and City Surveyor Robert Hooke. He constructed an edifice that was monumental in scale at over 500 feet (150 m) wide and some 40 feet (12 m) deep. The surrounding walls were some 680 feet (210 m) long and 70 feet (21 m) deep while the south face at the rear was effectively screened by a 714-foot (218 m) stretch of London's ancient wall projecting westward from nearby Moorgate. At the rear and containing the courtyards where patients exercised and took the air, the walls rose to 14 feet (4.3 m) high. The front walls were only 8 feet (2.4 m) high but this was deemed sufficient as it was determined that "Lunatikes... are not to [be] permitted to walk in the yard to be situate[d] betweene the said intended new Building and the Wall aforesaid." It was also hoped that by keeping these walls relatively low the splendour of the new building would not be overly obscured. This concern to maximise the building's visibility led to the addition of six gated openings 10 feet (3.0 m) wide which punctuated the front wall at regular intervals, enabling views of the facade. Functioning as both advertisement and warning of what lay within, the stone pillars enclosing the entrance gates were capped by the figures of "Melancholy" and "Raving Madness" carved in Portland stone by the Danish-born sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber.   At the instigation of the Bridewell Governors and to make a grander architectural statement of "charitable munificence", the hospital was designed as a single- rather than double-pile building,  accommodating initially 120 patients. Having cells and chambers on only one side of the building facilitated the dimensions of the great galleries, essentially long and capacious corridors, 13 feet (4.0 m) high and 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, which ran the length of both floors to a total span of 1,179 feet (359 m). Such was their scale that Roger L'Estrange remarked in a 1676 text eulogising the new Bethlem that their "Vast Length ... wearies the travelling eyes' of Strangers". The galleries were constructed more for public display than for the care of patients as, at least initially, inmates were prohibited from them lest "such persons that come to see the said Lunatickes may goe in Danger of their Lives"   The architectural design of the new Bethlem was primarily intended to project an image of the hospital and its governors consonant with contemporary notions of charity and benevolence.    By the end of the 18th century the hospital was in severe disrepair. At this point it was rebuilt again on another site.  As the new facility was being built attempts were made to rehouse patients at local hospitals and admissions to Bethlem, sections of which were deemed uninhabitable, were significantly curtailed such that the patient population fell from 266 in 1800 to 119 in 1814. The Governors engaged in protracted negotiations with the City  for another municipally owned location at St. George's Fields in Southwark, south of the Thames.   The deal was concluded in 1810 and provided the Governors with a 12 acres site in a swamp-like, impoverished, highly populated, and industrialised area where the Dog and Duck tavern and St George's Spa had been.   A competition was held to design the new hospital at Southwark in which the noted Bethlem patient James Tilly Matthews was an unsuccessful entrant. Completed after three years in 1815, it was constructed during the first wave of county asylum building in England under the County Asylum Act ("Wynn's Act") of 1808. Female patients occupied the west wing and males the east, the cells were located off galleries that traversed each wing. Each gallery contained only one toilet, a sink and cold baths. Incontinent patients were kept on beds of straw in cells in the basement gallery; this space also contained rooms with fireplaces for attendants. A wing for the criminally insane – a legal category newly minted in the wake of the trial of a delusional James Hadfield for attempted regicide – was completed in 1816. Problems with the building were soon noted as the steam heating did not function properly, the basement galleries were damp and the windows of the upper storeys were unglazed "so that the sleeping cells were either exposed to the full blast of cold air or were completely darkened". Faced with increased admissions and overcrowding, new buildings, designed by the architect Sydney Smirke, were added from the 1830s. The wing for criminal lunatics was increased to accommodate a further 30 men while additions to the east and west wings, extending the building's facade, provided space for an additional 166 inmates and a dome was added to the hospital chapel. At the end of this period of expansion Bethlem had a capacity for 364 patients. In 1930, the hospital moved to the suburbs of Croydon,[211] on the site of Monks Orchard House between Eden Park, Beckenham, West Wickham and Shirley. The old hospital and its grounds were bought by Lord Rothermere and presented to the London County Council for use as a park; the central part of the building was retained and became home to the Imperial War Museum in 1936. The hospital was absorbed into the National Health Service in 1948. 1997 the hospital started planning celebrations of its 750th anniversary. The service user's perspective was not to be included, however, and members of the psychiatric survivors movement saw nothing to celebrate in either the original Bedlam or in the current practices of mental health professionals towards those in Mneed of care. A campaign called "Reclaim Bedlam" was launched by Pete Shaughnessy, supported by hundreds of patients and ex-patients and widely reported in the media. A sit-in was held outside the earlier Bedlam site at the Imperial War Museum. The historian Roy Porter called the Bethlem Hospital "a symbol for man's inhumanity to man, for callousness and cruelty."  The hospital continues to operate to this day in this location.    Ok so with that history out of the way let's drive into what really transpired to give this hospital it reputation and that drove Bedlam to strain it's current meaning in our lexicon.    Early on Sanitation was poor and the patients were malnourished. Most of the patients were able to move about freely, but those who were considered dangerous were kept chained to the walls. Patients' families often dumped unwell family members in the asylum and disowned them. We've discussed other asylums and things dealing with them so we won't get into the fact that most of the patients were horribly misdiagnosed due to little to no understanding of mental health until relatively recently. Some of the treatments used ranged from barbaric and esoteric to just plain crazy.    One of those crazy ass ones was called rotational therapy. Charles Darwin's grandfather, Erasmus Darwin, began using “rotational therapy”, which involved spinning a patient around and around on a chair or swing for up to an hour. They would sometimes be spun over 100 times per minute. Obviously this would create issues for the patient. Many would get sick and vomit. Most would become very upset and distraught while becoming severely disoriented. The vomiting was seen as a good thing and progress in the treatment. Doctor Joseph Mason Cox was a doctor who actually picked up this type of treatment later on. The time spent spinning, and the speed of the spin, were to be determined by the good doctor. Considering the fact that the common side effect was fear, extreme pallor, vomiting, and voiding the bowels and bladder, the doctor evidently commonly overdid it. Of course he didn't think so at the time. He wrote happily that, “after a few circumvolutions, I have witnessed the soothing lulling effects, when the mind has become tranquillized and the body quiescent.” It's true that after being spun until fluid leaves the body via every available orifice, most people have had the fight taken out of them and are ready for a nap. There is one positive side effect of this kind of rampant torture of the insane. Scientists started noticing that vertigo has visual effects, and used the chairs to study them. These rotating chairs mark the beginning of a lot of visual and mental experiments done on perception. The early 1800s were a particularly grim time, and many patients were chained to the walls naked or almost naked, as the medical director felt that it was necessary to break each person's will.    Some of the more barbaric and esoteric treatments included bloodletting, leeches and good old fashioned starvation and beatings.  Ice baths would often be used to try and calm down hysterical patients.    At the time, bloodletting was believed to be a completely acceptable and normal way to cure a patient of a variety of mental and physical ailments. Doctors thought that they could literally bleed a sickness out of a patient, which not only doesn't work, it extra-double doesn't work on mental illnesses. Many of the patients were forced to undergo treatment with leeches and the induction of blisters, which mostly just sounds unpleasant, but it often proved fatal. Reportedly, the physicians at the time at least understood that everyone needs blood, so only patients who were deemed strong enough to undergo treatment were allowed to have this "cure."    Here's another fun one. A doctor named William Black wrote that patients were placed in straitjackets and given laxatives, which was seen at Bethlem as one of the "principal remedies." Hearing voices? Some explosive diarrhea oughta clear that up. Seizures? One diarrhea for you. Diarrhea for everyone!   We all know the best thing for someone who may not be in their right mind is to be left alone… in the dark… for long periods of time… Like really long periods of time. Well we may know that's probably NOT the best, but Bedlam never got the message. Some patients were left alone in solitary for days, weeks, even months at a time. Seems very counterproductive.    One of the worst ones was the example of the inhumane conditions was that of James Norris. Norris, an American Marine, had been sent to Bethlem on the 1st of February 1800. Her was kept in Bethlem's “incurable wing,” Norris' arms were pinned to his sides by iron bars. He was also kept chained to the wall by his neck. This fifty-five-year-old man had been continuously kept in this position for “more than twelve years.”   The apathy of families abandoning their relatives to a hellish existence in Bethlem led to a new form of exploitation. From the 1700s to the 1800s, there was a marked increase in the dissection of bodies to learn more about human anatomy. In the 1790s, Bethlem's chief surgeon was Bryan Crowther, a man who saw opportunity in the search for corpses to study. Crowther would dissect Bethlem's dead patients in the name of medical science, believing that he would be able to find a difference in the brains of his mentally ill patients, compared to “normal” people. Of course, he did these operations without any kind of consent or legal right.   One of the best ways to sum up the reasoning behind this torture is to let you know from the man who was behind the worst of it. John Haslam was one of the most sinister figures in the history of Bethlem, and it was while he was the head of management that the institution sunk to a new low in depravity. While Bryan Crowther was conducting illegal dissections as chief surgeon, Haslam used various tortures against the patients. He was adamant that the first step to curing the patients was breaking their wills first. So ya… They figured fuck em… Break their will and they'll be fine… Wow. Oftentimes patients would lack even basic amenities for living. That includes proper clothing and food.    To make things even worse for the patients, from approximately the early 1600s until 1770, the public was able to go for a wander through Bedlam. Money was collected as entrance fees, and it was hoped that seeing the crazy people would make people feel sufficiently compassionate that they would donate funds to the hospital. Another reason for this is that they hoped it would attract the families of these patients and that they would bring those patients food and clothing and other things they needed so the hospital would not have to provide them.    Oh if that's not bad enough, how about the mass graves. Modern-day construction of the London Underground unearthed mass graves on the grounds of Bethlem, created specifically to get rid of the corpses of those who didn't survive the hospital's care. Discovered in 2013, the mass graves dating back to 1569, and there are somewhere close to 20,000 people buried in them. Amazingly, authorities have managed to identify some of the deceased, but many others will likely never get a face and name.   Anything about any of these areas being haunted? Yup we got that too. Although the first few sites have long been transformed into other things, the girls that happened there could have left tons of negative juju. We found this cool story.            "The Liverpool Street Underground Station was opened in February of 1874 on the site of the original Bedlem Hospital. Former patients haunt this busy section of the London Underground.    One compelling sighting happened in the summer of 2000. A Line Controller spotted something strange on the CCTV camera that he was monitoring that showed the Liverpool Station. It was 2:00 am in the morning and the station was closed for the night. This witness saw a figure wearing white overalls in an eastbound tunnel. He became concerned since he knew no contractors worked the station this late at night. He called his Station Supervisor to report what he was seeing on the screen.   The Supervisor went to investigate. The Line Controller watched as his Supervisor stood nearby the mysterious figure. So he was confused when his Supervisor called to say he had not seen any figure. The Line Controller told his boss that the figure had stood so close to him that he could have reached out and touched it. Hearing this the Supervisor continued to search for the figure.   Again the Line Controller saw the figure walk right passed his boss on his screen, but again his boss did not see the figure. The Supervisor finally giving up went to leave the station but as he did so he spotted white overalls placed on a bench that he had passed before. He stated that they could not have been placed there without him seeing who did it.   Even before the Liverpool Station was built the area where the hospital stood was considered haunted. Between 1750 and 1812 many witnesses reported hearing a female voice crying and screaming. It is believed that this is a former patient from Bedlam.    Rebecca Griffins was buried in the area. While alive she always frantically clutched a coin in her hand. Witnesses state they hear her asking where her ha' penny is."   Fun stuff!   The following comes from the old building that was turned into the imperial war museum.    It is said that  to this day  the spectres of those who suffered in Bedlam still roam the hallways and rattle their chains in remembered anguish.   During the Second World War, a detachment of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force was stationed inside the Imperial War Museum with barrage balloons. Much of the museum has parts that date back to Bedlam and it isn't hard to imagine them as cells full of the damned inmates. Many of the young girls who were garrisoned inside had never heard of the buildings sordid past, so had no reason to fear it. Yet soon complaints began to flood in as during the night many found they couldn't sleep, kept up by strange moaning and the rattling of chains. The long passed inmates of Bedlam made their displeasure well known. Eventually the complaints became so bad the entire detachment had to be rehoused nearby.   Possibly the most famous ghost of Bedlam is the sad spectre of poor Rebecca. At a merchant's house by London Bridge lived a lovely young girl by the name of Rebecca. She fell head over heels in love with a handsome young Indian man who had come to lodge with the family. So besotted was she that when he packed up his bags to return to India she was shocked that he hadn't loved her quite nearly as much as she'd loved him. She helped him to pack his things, hoping all the while that he would change his mind and agree to stay. But all she received was a gold sovereign that he slipped into her hand before leaving forever.   The grief of her spurning was too much for her mind to handle and she snapped, soon being admitted to Bedlam Hospital. The golden sovereign he had given her was gripped firmly in her fist for the remainder of her short life, the final token from her lost love, never to be given up. When she finally wasted away into death it didn't go unnoticed by one of the guards who prised the coin from her hand and then buried her without her most prized possession. It was after that the guards, inmates and visitors all began to report a strange sight indeed. A wan and ghostly figure began to roam the halls of Bedlam, searching for her lost love token, her spirit refusing to be put to rest until she had it back in her hand. It is said that she still wanders the halls to this day, looking for that stolen coin to make her whole once more.   Well… There you have it, the history and craziness of Bedlam Asylum!    British horror movies https://screenrant.com/best-british-horror-movies/   BECOME A P.O.O.P.R.!! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   The Charley Project www.charleyproject.org

Good Morning Liberty
White-Pill Wednesday - Good News Only! (FDA Regulations, SpaceX, Southwest, & More) || EP 569

Good Morning Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:43


Hearing aids without a prescription or an exam? The FDA takes big step toward making that happen. https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2021/10/19/fda-over-the-counter-hearing-aids/ In-N-Out Burger tells San Francisco 'we refuse to become the vaccination police' after city temporarily closes restaurant https://www.theblaze.com/news/in-n-out-burger-san-francisco-vaccination-police?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter Southwest Airlines will keep workers on the jobs who apply for vaccination exemptions https://www.npr.org/2021/10/19/1047492766/southwest-airlines-vaccination-exemption Morgan Stanley says SpaceX's Starship may ‘transform investor expectations' about space https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/19/morgan-stanley-spacex-starship-may-transform-investor-expectations.html Michigan House And Senate Pass School Choice Bills https://swiftheadline.com/michigan-house-and-senate-pass-school-choice-bills/ The Nomad Network is the #1 community for liberty minded people just like you, who want to create freedom in their lifetime by focusing on entrepreneurship, investment and income mobility. http://www.nomadnetwork.app/gml Subscribe on Youtubehttp://www.youtube.com/goodmorninglibertyNeed someone to talk to?Betterhelp.com/gml Interested in learning how to Day Trade?Mastermytrades.com Chat LIVE during the show!https://goodmorningliberty.locals.com/ Like our intro song?https://www.3pillmorning.com Advertise on our podcast! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Hangout Talks
EP 62: How You Should Be In Check With Your Mental Health. Guest, Dr. Muffaqam Shah, MBBS.

Hangout Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 45:15


How does food, exercise, and talking to someone help with mental health? He's baaaccck! This great hangout with Dr. Shah MBBS will give you all the answers. Hearing from a lifestyle medicine professional will offer you a different perspective on this very important topic. IG: @drmoofee ** If you enjoy the podcast, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds, and it really makes a difference in helping us share our stories! Join Us! Instagram: Hangout Talks: instagram.com/hangouttalks Peter: instagram.com/peter_thesuitedmarketer Triet:  instagram.com/triethoang www.trietcommunication.com Contact Us: hangouttalks@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Direction for Life
Hearing Gods Voice Part 4

Direction for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 28:11


As It Happens from CBC Radio
October 20: Hunted for sport

As It Happens from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:43


Afghan Assassinations, Conservative MPs Vaxxed, Miss France Lawsuit, Reno Bans Whips, Iranian-Canadian Sentenced, Jan 6 Hearing and more.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 78:37


Making sense of sound is one of the hardest jobs our brains must do. Our hearing is always on. We can't close our ears the way we close our eyes. And yet we are quite adept at ignoring sounds that are unimportant. Nina Kraus explores what is going on in our brains when we hear a word, a chord, a meow, or a screech, and examines the partnership of sound and brain, showing how the processing of sound drives many of the brain's core functions. Our hearing brain interacts with what we know, with our emotions, with how we think, with our movements, and with all our other senses. Auditory neurons make calculations at one-thousandth of a second. Hearing is the fastest of our senses. Sound also plays an unrecognized role in both healthy and hurting brains. Kraus explores the power of music for healing as well as the destructive power of noise on the nervous system. She traces what happens in the brain when we speak another language, have a language disorder, experience rhythm, listen to birdsong, or suffer a concussion. Join us as Kraus explores how our deep engagement with sound leaves a fundamental imprint on who we are. NOTES MLF: Humanities SPEAKERS Nina Kraus Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Communication Sciences, and Otolaryngology, Northwestern University; Author, Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World In Conversation with George Hammond Author, Conversations With Socrates In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 7th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Scottish Football
Sportsound Podcast : 19 Oct 21. Reaction to Celtic's 2-0 Europa League win over Ferencvaros.

Scottish Football

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 47:10


Post-match reaction as Celtic get off the mark in Europa League Group G with a 2-0 win over Hungarian champions Ferencvaros. Hearing from Celtic manager Ange Postecoglou.

Double Your Sales Now!
Creating 8 Figure Growth as a 4th Generation CEO | QRE193

Double Your Sales Now!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:48


The Melanie White you will meet on today's interview is a 4th generation CEO of her family's business, Hellwig Products, but her journey definitely didn't start out at the top. While simultaneously working on her degree in psychology and working at a bakery,  Melanie's desire to be in outside sales was born. After seeing and listening to the sales reps that came through the family business, Melanie decided she wanted to have a go at impacting people through sales also. Her timing was perfect; Hellwig Products needed an outside salesperson to do their cold calling, Melanie saw the opportunity and raised her hand. Cold-calling was a gruelling experience and very quickly she learned she had to know more than the people she was selling to and figure out how she needed to talk to them if she wanted to make the sale. Hearing “no” was commonplace Melanie quickly developed a thick skin. Through tears, perseverance and the knowledge that she was made for more, Melanie forged ahead and fought against everything that worked to keep her small. From sales rep to CEO Melanie's story is one of inspiration to never give up, find new ways to improve the old and no matter how difficult it is keep going until you reach the top. So grab a pen and your favourite notebook and get ready to lay out the plans for your own quantum revenue expansion! Ursula's Takeaways: Intro (00:00) Be Knowledgeable (8:55) 4th Generation CEO (12:28) Definite Benefit To Being Woman Owned (16:28) Sale Went To A Trickle (22:25) My Biggest Goal For A Month (30:45) We Have Core Values As A Company (37:05) About Melanie White Melanie White is CEO and 4th Generation of Hellwig Products. The automotive suspension manufacturing company was started by her great grandfather and grandfather in 1946. Melanie joined the team 15 years ago, and as she has risen in the company she has been able to influence more growth. The company will triple in revenue this year from 12 years ago. Connect with Melanie White Website: http://www.hellwigproducts.com (www.hellwigproducts.com) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hellwigproducts (https://www.facebook.com/hellwigproducts) LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melaniehellwigwhite/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/melaniehellwigwhite/) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hellwig_products/ (https://www.instagram.com/hellwig_products/) About Ursula Mentjes  Ursula Mentjes is an award-winning Entrepreneur and Sales Expert. She will transform the way you think about selling so you can reach your revenue goals with less anxiety and less effort! Ursula specializes in Neuro-Linguistic Programming and other performance modalities to help clients double and triple their sales fast.   Honing her skills at an international technical training company, where she began her career in her early twenties, Ursula increased sales by 90% in just one year. Just 5 years later, when the company's annual revenue was in the tens of millions, Ursula advanced to the position of President at just 27.  Sales guru Brian Tracy endorsed her first book, Selling with Intention, saying, “This powerful, practical book shows you how to connect with customers by fully understanding the sales process from the inside out. It really works!” Ursula is also the author of One Great Goal, Selling with Synchronicity and The Belief Zone, which received the Beverly Hills President's Choice award.  Her Podcast, Double Your Sales NOW, is available on iTunes, iHeartRadio and other outlets.  Ursula also serves as Past Statewide Chairperson of the NAWBO-CA Education Fund and Past President of NAWBO-CA. She is the recipient of the SBA's Women in Business Champion and a recipient of the Willow Tree's Extraordinary Example and Extraordinary Entrepreneur Awards, the NAWBO-IE ANITA Award, chosen as PDP's Extraordinary Speaker, PDP's Business Woman of the Year, the Spirit of the Entrepreneur Awards Finalist and the...

ParentingAces - The Junior Tennis and College Tennis Podcast
How Does a Junior Player Go from Good to OMG! ft. Todd Widom

ParentingAces - The Junior Tennis and College Tennis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:35


Welcome to Season 10, Episode 43, of the ParentingAces Podcast, a proud member of the Tennis Channel Podcast Network. In this week's episode, we follow up on our recent podcast with Orlando and Zander Bravo (click here to watch/listen) and talk with Zander's coach, Todd Widom, about how Zander made such huge strides in such a short period of time. If you're a regular of our podcast, by now you have a pretty clear understanding of Coach Todd Widom's philosophy on coaching and developing junior tennis players. When he gets a player who is already in high school, wants to play high-level college tennis, but is missing some significant pieces of his/her game, that's where Todd really shines. In the case of Zander Bravo, not only did Todd have to commit to helping Zander reach his goal of playing at an Ivy, but Zander and his family also had to commit to putting in the work and support needed for Zander to reach his goal. When all is said and done, all parties involved honored their commitment, and Zander will be playing at Brown University starting Fall 2022. The Junior Tennis Journey is a long one, often met with many ups and downs along the way. Hearing from the coach's side how to manage that journey should prove valuable to the parents and players out there. For more information on Todd, visit his website here and be sure to follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. You can also email him at todd@twtennis.com. As always, a big thank you to Morgan Stone, aka STØNE, for our intro and outro music this season. You can find more of his music at SoundCloud.com/stonemuzic. If you're interested in House Music, please be sure to check out his social media channels on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. If you're so inclined, please share this – and all our episodes! – with your tennis community. You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or via your favorite podcast app. If you haven't already, be sure to become a Member of ParentingAces by clicking here. And check out our logo'd merch in our online shop (Premium Members received FREE SHIPPING every day!). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Direction for Life
Hearing Gods Voice Part 3

Direction for Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:33


Tough Girl Podcast
Jessie Stevens - Youth Climate Activist, outdoors enthusiast and founder of the movement People Pedal Power. Cycling 570 miles from Devon to Glasgow #ride2COP26

Tough Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:48


Jessie in her own words:   “It would be a lie to say that I have always been aware of the climate crisis, because I haven't. Frankly, that is the problem.   Whilst always enjoying spending time in nature whether that be up at our allotment or walking on the wilds of Dartmoor right on my doorstep, it was only a few years ago that I became aware of the dire straights our climate is in.   It was at this moment that like many youth activists, I began to realise that I really had no choice but to fight for it. This didn't mean that it necessarily was something I wanted to do, because most young people just want a care free experience as they grow and develop, and activism is certainly not these things. However, I felt a duty to do this, because the vast majority of adults around me and in society were choosing not to.   It was then that I decided to create People Pedal Power and cycle to COP26 both as a personal challenge and as a way to bring the many individuals concerned about the Climate Crisis together. As a way to highlight the power and joy that is created when people come together to create change.   I am a youth activist who cares deeply about the power of people to create change and this is exactly what I want People Pedal Power to do. The idea to start the movement came from my fears that more inaction would come from this upcoming COP. I knew that we didn't have time for this to occur, as this summit has to be the one where real change is created, if not by our leaders but by the power of individuals creating collective action. As can be seen from the youth climate movement across the world, individuals really do have the power to create change, and so I decided to harness this!   I also believe in the immense power that words and storytelling have in helping us as individual to learn, understand and ultimately engage in the climate crisis. I have been trying to do this for the past 2 years with my monthly newspaper columns and other writing projects which discuss the climate crisis from the youth perspective.”   New episodes of the Tough Girl Podcast go live every Tuesday at 7am UK time - Hit the subscribe button so you don't miss out.    The Tough Girl Podcast is sponsorship and ad free thanks to the monthly financial support of patrons.    Support the mission to increase the amount of female role models in the media. Visit www.patreon.com/toughgirlpodcast and subscribe - super quick and easy to do and it makes a massive difference. Thank you.   Show notes Who is Jessie Being interested in the environment  Being aware of the climate emergency  Wanting to make a difference  Being on a learning journey  Delaying with climate anxiety and climate grief Is the climate a concern for young people Why it's a split issue Wanting to find your tribe Growing up and being supported by her family Studying for A'Levels at 6th fort What does being a Youth Climate Activist mean How Jessie is driving change Being passionate about writing Hearing from the youth Growing up in the 2000s What is - People Pedal Power What is COP (Conference of the Parties) COP26 in Glasgow, Scotland  Adults putting profits before people. Wanting to get the youth voice into the political sphere.  Partnering with the Adventure Syndicate How the partnership is going to work Creating a cargo bike relay  Why it's not just shouting about what's wrong Why the moment is going to be joyful and highlighting the issues and the way forward How the movement has evolved Getting into cycling and loving the journey  The route and the logistics of cycling from Devon to Glasgow Making sure to factor in mental rest  Riding 570 miles and hoping the training has paid off Concerns about the journey and thinking about the impact of the weather Dealing with all of the unknowns about the challenge  How it's going to work once she's arrived in Glasgow  Working with Eco-Schools  Wanting to bring more of a youth perspective to the summit Tough Girl Podcast Extra episode coming on the 13th November to follow up with Jessie and her journey. What does Jessie want to happen over the next few weeks. Good luck to Jessie!   Social Media   People Pedal Power - Demanding Climate action and greener more accessible transport.   Website: httpspeoplepeddlepower.wordpress.com/   Instagram: @people_pedal_power     The Adventure Syndicate is a collective of extraordinary cyclists who happen to be women and who aim to challenge what others think they are capable of.   Website - theadventuresyndicate.com    Instagram: @adventuresynd  

YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show
EP 1066B - Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World

YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


Making sense of sound is one of the hardest jobs we ask our brains to do. Making sense of sound is one of the hardest jobs we ask our brains to do. In her book Of Sound Mind, Nina Kraus examines the partnership of sound and brain, showing for the first time that the processing of sound drives many of the brain's core functions. Our hearing is always on—we can't close our ears the way we close our eyes—and yet we can ignore sounds that are unimportant. We don't just hear; we engage with sounds. Kraus explores what goes on in our brains when we hear a word—or a chord, or a meow, or a screech.Sound plays an unrecognized role in both healthy and hurting brains. Kraus explores the power of music for healing as well as the destructive power of noise on the nervous system. She traces what happens in the brain when we speak another language, have a language disorder, experience rhythm, listen to birdsong, or suffer a concussion. Nina Kraus, Ph.D., is a scientist, inventor, and amateur musician who studies the biology of auditory learning. She began her career measuring responses from single auditory neurons and was one of the first to show that the adult nervous system has the potential for reorganization following learning; these insights in basic biology galvanized her to investigate auditory learning in humans.

Derek Prince Legacy Radio 15 Minute Format

Cultivating a sensitive heart means having our hearts in tune with God's voice—hearing and paying attention to Him. Derek explains that's the real key to true blessing. Solomon prayed, “Give me a hearing heart.” Make that prayer your own.

Mint Arrow Messages
5 Year Chip: What We've Learned in 5 Years of Addiction Recovery

Mint Arrow Messages

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 60:36


Last week in our 12-step meeting, Neil picked up his 5 year chip for 5 years of abstinence (or sobriety) from his addiction to pornography. Our experience with addiction recovery is something we've shared openly for the past several years, and on this milestone birthday (that's what we call each year of sobriety in recovery) we felt like it would be a good time to revisit this topic and share some of the ways Neil got stopped, stayed stopped, and how he has found a new way of living instead of being weighed down by addiction. If you or someone you love is struggling with addiction, we hope today's episode will provide some answers and resources and hope. This week's episode is sponsored by Ana Luisa Jewelry. Treat yourself and your loved ones to beautiful sustainable jewelry. Go to shop.analuisa.com/mintarrow and use code MINTARROW for 10% off.   Time Stamps: [00:00:42] - Neil celebrates 5 years of abstinence (or sobriety) from his addiction to pornography, and explains why the 24hr milestone is most important. [00:03:04] - Neil talks about the mindset behind maintaining a new lifestyle and spiritual fitness to not lose to the illusion of an endpoint. [00:05:46] - Corinne explains that seeing others gain new chips gave her hope. [00:07:04] - Neil gives his addiction background, starting with his exposure during adolescence. [00:09:01] - Neil talks about how ARP became a turning point in his story. [00:10:46] - Corinne and Neil candidly talk about the times where they were less hopeful of any change happening. [00:13:21] - The pain of the problem vs. The pain of the solution. [00:15:54] - What is a sponsor in a recovery program? [00:18:33] - Addiction is like pain management to become numb from the world. [00:20:36] - Listen to Neil explain how “contrary actions” help stop from being desensitized.  [00:22:39] - Neil explains why he calls another program member to reground himself. [00:25:20] - Here are the most basic methods of addressing a crisis or addiction. [00:27:51] - There are different meetings you can attend. Find one for you. [00:29:51] - What surprised Corinne about going to meetings? [00:32:18] - Corinne talks about how amazed she is during the 12-step meetings when people share their raw experiences. [00:34:53] - Hearing people speak from different points of their journey is humbling, and gives insight to each other. [00:36:53] - Neil talks about the mutual respect of understanding a shared experience, like an addiction. [00:38:38] - Corinne and Neil share their sides and thoughts of the last relapse Neil experienced. [00:40:43] - Neil talks through his thoughts on committing to abstinence, and how he helps himself maintain consistency. [00:43:29] - Corinne talks about managing her experience of being the spouse of someone dealing with addiction. [00:46:01] - How did Corinne let go of the pressure she was placing on herself during Neil's journey? [00:48:53] - By being accountable individually, Corinne and Neil were able to empower each other. [00:50:43] - Neil says that things quiet down overtime, like neural pathways being stopped or redirected. [00:52:06] - Listen to Neil's share from a 12-step meeting. [00:57:32] - What is the one message Neil gives to those dealing with addiction? What is the one message Corinne gives those with spouses managing drug addiction? [00:59:02] - Hold On. Pain Ends.   Supporting Resources: Find an Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) meeting in your area The ARP manual

Faith Bible Church Sermons
The Bible Impacts Every Believer (James 1:19-21)

Faith Bible Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 55:50


JAMES transitions to a new topic, challenging his readers in a whole new way, and tests believers over their response to God's Word. Today, in doctrinally sound churches, we find the same responses to the preaching and teaching of the Bible. There is the response of HEARING ONLY and the response of HEARING and DOING.

She Knows
Is he keeping our marriage a secret ? ( H.E.RS notes )

She Knows

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 19:08


Tonight we have a juicy h.e.rs notes ( Hearing everyday real shit ) one of our sisies needs our help. How would you react to your husband not telling his family and friends that you are his wife ? How would you react to your husband not posting you on social media? These are some major red flags that we really need to discuss . IG : @ms.brownstone_ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sheknowsmsbrownstone/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sheknowsmsbrownstone/support

CTSI Discovery Radio
Episode #90 - Hearing Loss & Devices to Restore Hearing

CTSI Discovery Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 30:00


Hearing loss affects millions of people, ranging from something that can create inconvenience to causing isolation. But, there are devices that can successfully restore hearing and improve quality of life. Plus, discover how we may already have a tool for better hearing right in our hands. Listen, and learn all about hearing loss…inside this edition of CTSI Discovery Radio!

BMitch & Finlay
10.15.21 Hour 3- Fan Reactions, Remembering Sean Taylor, Voicing Displeasure

BMitch & Finlay

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 39:13


1:00- Keeping the phone lines open to talk about Sean Taylor. 17:45- Hearing from fans about their favorite memories of Sean Taylor.  20:10- Letting people call in to talk about how upset they are with the WFT. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Arroe Collins
Affirm Above Our Tears

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 1:07


Hearing your heart is only a step. It is required to activate it...

Highly Favored Podcast
COMFORTABLE

Highly Favored Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 51:13


This week, Clarke and Kendra discuss how comfort leads to stagnation in your walk with Christ. Avoid the distraction of comfort and be obedient to what God is calling you to do, so you can mature spiritually.IG | @highlyfavoredpodcastTwitter | @highlyfavpodFacebook | Highly Favored Podcast

Horse Hippie’s Morning Mantras

Morning Mantra: "Joy does not simply happen to us.  We must choose joy, and keep choosing it everyday."Life doesn't have to be over-the-top to be fulfilling. It doesn't have to be full of the spectacular. There is joy in the simple things. The ordinary.Sharing a cup of coffee with a friend.Watching your horse graze.Hearing a bird sing good morning.Listening to a cat purr.Seeing your dog's tail wag.Joy can be found everywhere.Joy is not a destination, joy IS the journey.If you are feeling less than joyful, know that it is always there inside you.  Just keep knocking and eventually the joy inside will open a window to see who is there.#BeCommittedToJoy #BeHappy #BeHorsey #BeHippie #HorseHippie #MorningMantra #inspirationalQuotes #MorningMotivation #Equestrian #HorseLover #QuotesToInspire #HorseHippieBrand #HorseHippieBoutiqueQuote: Henri Nouwen

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e21PiVlzhcs Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )This week we are featuring our first News Roundup of the season. We originally had a guest lined up, but he has had to reschedule due to illness, so we get to spend the hour talking news, news, and more news! Regular Guests: Dr. Moiya McTier ( https://www.moiyamctier.com/ & @GoAstroMo ) Allen Versfeld ( http://www.urban-astronomer.com & @uastronomer ) Ashley Walker ( https://www.blackinastro.com/ @That_Astro_Chic ) This week's stories: - The DART mission. - Hearing the northern lights! - Women of Color Project. - JWST arrived in French Guiana. - 42 of the largest asteroids. - Climate action from NASA   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Are You Serious Sports
Can #LSU Pull Off The Unthinkable, Nah.... What Are We Hearing About Coaches, UF vs LSU

Are You Serious Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:01


Episode 337: Live In 30 Minutes. Positives to have going into Florida game for #LSU. #AYS See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts
THE ALL MARINE RADIO HOUR: Mensas talk LtCol Scheller’s Article 32 hearing + Greatest US Navy moments in history + USS Somerset thoughts a day later

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 108:34


Three retired Marine Infantry Officers — Colonel Will Costantini, Colonel Jeff Kenney & Major Tim Lynch join host Mike McNamara for an hour of current events discussion every Thursday here on ALL MARINE RADIO. TODAY'S TOPICS: Is the court martial of LtCol Scheller appropriate and what do you expect from the carnival that will surround […]

The Trombone Retreat
"Now Hearing Candidate 1' an audition podcast with guest, John Romero - Free Preview

The Trombone Retreat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 5:38


Listen to a free preview of "Now Hearing Candidate 1" an exclusive video podcast breaking down the processes and strategies of audition winners from announcement through audition day! Join host Sebastian Vera as he talks to John Romero, principal trombonist of the Metropolitan Opera and formerly Fort Worth Symphony as he shares his audition story and personal discoveries to success.To hear the entire episode and have access to exclusive perks and features, consider becoming a patron at http://www.patreon.com/tromboneretreat

ABA Banking Journal Podcast
How the IRS Reporting Proposal Would Affect Banks and Customers

ABA Banking Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 19:42


On the latest episode of the ABA Banking Journal Podcast — sponsored by NICE Actimize Xceed — Citizens Bank of Edmond CEO Jill Castilla talks about the effects the Biden administration's controversial proposal for a financial account reporting regime would have on a bank like hers, with $310 million in assets and 55 employees. She talks about the challenge of implementing a system like this alongside current anti-money laundering reporting and 1099 filing at a community bank. Castilla also discusses why she started speaking out about the proposal, which would entail bank reporting to the IRS of gross annual inflows and outflows in financial accounts over a de minimis threshold of $600. Hearing directly from Citizens Bank customers worried about their financial privacy and about the elevated risk of audits over normal transactions motivated Castilla to press the issue. With House Speaker Nancy Pelosi indicating that congressional leaders still plan to include some version of this reporting regime in the social spending bill — which continues to be negotiated on Capitol Hill — ABA continues urging bankers to take action and educate their customers about the proposal. Take action and find customer resources at SecureAmericanOpportunity.com.

Derek Prince Legacy Radio 15 Minute Format

Many people struggle to find faith—they run to and fro trying to find it. They haven't yet discovered the secret of faith. Faith comes by hearing God's voice. If you don't have faith, you can get it. Faith can be cultivated. Listen to find out how faith comes.

Legacy Church GA
9-12-21 Are You Hearing It (Canton) - Pastor Nate

Legacy Church GA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 36:41


Legacy Church GA
9-12-21 Are You Hearing It (Marietta) - Pastor Tammy Nielson

Legacy Church GA

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 38:11


Absolute Trust Talk
074: Art Therapy and Dementia

Absolute Trust Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:12


Do you have a spouse or loved one who has dementia? Hearing them say “I love you” or share a memory is something that every caregiver hopes for. And in those rare instances, it truly gives a renewed sense of purpose in life. Unfortunately, often, after being diagnosed with dementia, patients are prescribed drugs that, in some cases, cause depression or suppress who they are. But what if there was a way to reduce the medications and boost the mental well-being of the person with dementia and the spouse or caregiver? Interestingly enough, evidence shows that art plays a role in improving neural health. Art therapy is being taught as an alternative approach to dementia cases, providing an opportunity for patients to boost their mood and change their behavior without diminishing their quality of life. In this episode, Kirsten sits down with the incredible Angel Duncan. Angel is a mental health, art therapist, and research clinician specializing in therapeutic program developments for people with mental health, developmental, intellectual, cognitive, and memory disorders. Angel has an extensive background in counseling psychology, life development, and Alzheimer's disease phase 1b, 2, and 3 clinical research trials. She works globally with leading organizations on brain health initiatives and is a widely published author and speaker. During their discussion, Kirsten and Angel dive into the science behind art therapy, explaining how and why it works. Duncan also shares countless examples of patients who practice art therapy demonstrating the behavioral changes and how they reconnect with their spouses again or learn to engage with their caregivers. If dementia or mental health issues have impacted your life or the life of someone you know, this episode is for you. Tune in now for more on the benefits of art therapy and why Angel Duncan has spent her career advocating for this life-changing form of treatment. Big Three from Episode #074: Research shows that by engaging in art, which taps into certain regions of the brain, those with dementia are also getting neural activation and productivity. Ultimately, this leads to a shift in mood and behavior. Art Therapy is found to be helpful for all forms of dementia and, really, all types of mental health issues. Just because someone has dementia or another cognitive issue, doesn't mean their creativity goes away. Case studies and research demonstrate exactly how art therapy brings those with dementia out of their box, helping them reconnect with the outside world. Time-stamped Show Notes: 3:08 Long-term memory is returning for dementia patients through the process of Art Therapy. Listen now to hear Angel Duncan share the benefits of staying artistically creative for those suffering from neurological diseases.  5:43 Studies prove that art truly does work for people who have dementia. Start listening now for more on how art is helping neurological disease.  8:05 Relationships between caregivers, whether family or professional, and dementia-infected patients are becoming nurtured with empathy because of art therapy.  10:13 More often than not, psychotropic drugs are the go-to fix for dementia patients, causing diminished behavior. Angel answers how art could be used as an alternative to psychotropic drugs.  14:21 Angel Duncan has advocated for art therapy for almost 20 years. Listen to her journey and the life-changing work that has come from working with like-minded physicians.  17:43 Press play here to learn what different creative mediums are included in art therapy treatments. 21:11 Ask Kirsten Segment: Kirsten answers an email from Maria in Danville looking for advice on how to encourage her mother, who has dementia, to do an estate plan. If you have a question that you'd like to have answered by Kirsten, send an email to info@absolutetrustcounsel.com. 23:56 Listen to how Angel helped co-create Art in Mind for dementia patients at the Yale Art Gallery.  28:08 Angel Duncan's Art Therapy Workshop is not just for dementia patients but also for spouses and caregivers. Listen in as Angel shares stories and feedback from those who have participated in the workshop. 30:06 Interested in learning more about art therapy? You don't want to miss out on this special event -The 12th annual Expressive Therapy Summit is hosting Neurosciences and Aging Symposium and Track Series for aging populations. Listen here for more details on the event.  32:18 Live Q&A: Do you find art therapy to be helpful in all forms of dementia? Resources/Links in this Episode: Cognitive Dynamics Lorenzo's House About Angel Duncan – How to get in touch about programs Expressive Therapy Summit [Ad] Do you need help planning for things like incapacity? The Absolute Trust Counsel team is here to help. If you become incapacitated without a plan, you don't have time to wait for court rulings, nor do you want to waste your money on that. You need support right away. At Absolute Trust Counsel, we can help put a plan in place, so you and your family are covered – no matter what the situation.  Visit our calendar to pick a date and time that works best for you, and let's get started!

Bikes or Death Podcast
Ep. 91 - Kyle Gilbert & Nick Ybarra on their ETS Experience

Bikes or Death Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 115:03


The inaugural East Texas Showdown is over and now comes the podcasts! Hearing everyones stories after their rides as we shared food and beverages was a true pleasure, enjoyed by all. It was really probably the magic sauce that made this event special. I went to Austin shortly after the race and recorded 3 episodes with five guests and I look forward to sharing some of that post race fodder with you over the next couple of weeks. First up are Nick Ybarra (Showdown, 4th) and Kyle Gilbert (Showdown,. 6th). We meet the Wednesday after the race at Kyles workshop in Austin, which made for a cool backdrop to our conversation. On this episode Nick and Kyle share their experience on this years ETS. It was both of their first bikepacking race and they had different approaches. For example, Nick wore sandals for, had rim brakes, carried very minimal gear, and no aero bars. Whereas, Kyle was clipless, with disc brakes, ran aerobars, and lived on crackers. It created some good conversation about different approaches to the same course. It was a lot of fun for me to get to hear about my event from their perspectives. I had all kinds of concerns as a first time racer director with a brand new route, but as I heard more and more stories like these all of my concerns have been squashed. The feedback I got from participants was overwhelmingly positive. In fact, a Spring date was highly requested and we are happy to make that happen. Dates coming soon! These episodes aren't possible without support. Thanks to this weeks supporting partners: Kuat - They just released the Piston Pro X, and it's badass. How do you tell your bike you love it without saying I love you? Answer, you get it a Piston Pro X. NM Bikepacking Summit - Part Summit, Part Bikepacking Party, 100% good times, good rides, and good tacos. Schedule Oct. 21st at 6:00pm - 12-15 mile mellow gravel ride Oct. 22nd 8:20-11:00am & 2-5pm - Bikepacking Summit - @7:30pm I'll be interview Cjell Mone' with a live audience Oct. 23rd at 9:00am - Dangerbird Group Start Contact Matt Mason for more info! Huge thanks to our newest Patrons:

Dermot & Dave
You Will Have The Air Guitar Out After Hearing Some Of These Tunes

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:50


You've definitely rocked along to some of these tunes at a concert or inside in the car!  [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/10/13122519/DavesWorldRiffs_1310.mp3"][/audio] For Dave's World, Dave brought us some of the best Guitar Riffs in the world (in his humble opinion) and they have torn Dermot and Maria! You can listen to the full chat by clicking the Play button above.

You Were Made for This
126: Sometimes God Uses Strangers to Care for Us

You Were Made for This

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 14:20


I didn't see this coming, but episode 121 that aired five weeks ago, “The Relational Energy of Fall,” had the most listener response of any podcast episode this year, and I think for any of the past episodes since the podcast began in late November of 2018. Keep listening to hear what listeners responded to because I think you'll be encouraged as you hear how sometimes God uses strangers to care for us. The excerpt from episode 121 that started it all I'll have a link to the entire episode 121 in the show notes, but for now, here's a brief excerpt from “Experience the Relational Energy of Fall.” [ I'm sorry, there is no transcript for this part of the podcast. Please listen to the podcast.] Listener feedback As you heard in the clip that just played, I felt helpless when I talked to Stacey. I wanted to do something besides listen. Yet, there was nothing I could do to make things better. But then, weeks later, when the episode aired, I started getting responses from several listeners, which gave me an idea. Before I tell you the idea, here's the feedback I received that prompted me to do something “John, I  enjoyed today's podcast. I will be praying for "Stacy" I was touched by her story.”  - Patty “Good morning John. I appreciated this week's You Were Made for This podcast. . . And for your daughter's high school friend, how difficult of a time she is going through. I'm sure you mentioning that story rallied many to be praying for her. It did me.” - Randy Another local podcast listener I ran into asked about Stacey, “How sad," he said about her situation. And finally, there was this response from a listener “Having been walking around the past few weeks, sometimes on the verge of tears, I have felt very alone in my sadness. “But the few times when a brave person has been bold enough to ask me how I am doing, and then taken the time to truly listen, has been a healing balm. And a rare gift. ”There are no words I need or even want to hear. I just sometimes need a safe place to let a few tears seep out every now and then to cleanse my emotional paLette. “Thanks for the reminder that it is OK to feel awkward if it allows another human being the chance to be real.” ~ Imelda NOTE: Imelda prayed for her, too! I was surprised and encouraged by people's reaction, at the compassion, and how they volunteered to pray for Stacey. Nobody asked them to do this! Their empathy for her and her difficult situation was palpable. They put themselves emotionally into her shoes. An abusive spouse. The prospect of not seeing her children. How will I pay the bills? All three of these examples show me that somes God uses strangers to bless us and care for us. What to do with this listener feedback After hearing these responses to Stacey's story, the idea that came to me was to go back to the office supply store where she worked to let her know people were praying for her. I thought that would encourage her, and hopefully lighten her load a bit. It would be putting 2 Corinthians 13:11 into practice, where we are told, “encourage each other.” So I stopped into the office supply store one day, but she wasn't there. Before going the next time, I wrote a note and put it in an envelope with her name on it, thinking if she wasn't in again, I'd ask one of her co-workers to give it to her when she came into work. In the note, I said that I had a podcast and that I was so touched by the conversation we had several weeks ago that I used it as the subject of a podcast episode, changing her name, of course, to protect her privacy. I told her about the podcast and how she could listen to it, and then I concluded with the following: Much to my surprise, 4 different listeners have taken the time to tell me that they are praying for you. I have been doing the same most days since we last met. I hope this encourages you. Stacey responds Sure enough, she was gone again the next time I stopped into the store. So I dropped off the note with a co-worker before I checked out with my office supplies. The same day I dropped the note off for Stacey, she sent me an email later that night. It read: “Hi John, When I got to work tonight, a co-worker told me, "A man came in with an envelope for you.  He said you went to school with his daughter, and asked me to hand-deliver it to you.  I put it in the office.  I'm  not sure what it is." "I was intrigued. What the heck?  Who is this man?  Who is the person I went to school with?  So I went to the office and found the envelope with my name on it, and your return address label.  I opened it up, and couldn't make it to the 2nd paragraph without crying.  I was a mess.  Finally, though I got through the whole thing and I was bawling!  Then I showed it to my co-worker (who is not a Christian, by the way), and she thought it was really nice.  She said, ‘You never know when people are thinking about you and that they care.' "Now that I'm living with my parents again, I showed them the letter as soon as I got home.  Again, I couldn't make it through the letter without crying.  I was anxious to listen to the podcast!  I just finished listening and I can't tell you how much I appreciate all the prayer that's going into my marriage . . . Most people would say I should've left him a long time ago.  I had one friend end our friendship because she couldn't take listening to all the stories of abuse and how I still kept going back to him.  Hearing your podcast was inspirational, so for that, I thank you. "Thanks again for your letter, and for using me in your podcast.  Just knowing strangers are praying for me is humbling.” So what does all this mean for the rest of us? Knowing that sometimes God uses strangers to care for people, we can do what Imelda talked about, namely Be a brave person, bold enough to ask someone how they are doing, and then take the time to truly listen. Don't worry about the words to say. Be a safe place for someone to cleanse their emotional palette, as she puts it. And then feel awkward doing this. Here's the main point I hope you remember from today's episode There are times when God uses strangers to care for us, to let us know we are not alone during our darkest of days. Conversely, there is real joy in being one of those strangers God uses to bless someone with our prayers. It brings out the best in us. I'd love to hear any thoughts you have about today's episode. Just send them to me in an email to john [at] caringforothers [dot] org. Or you can share your thoughts in the “Leave a Comment” box at the bottom of the show notes. Closing In closing, if you found this podcast helpful, please forward it to someone else. I hope your thinking was stimulated by today's show, to both reflect and to act. Maybe to pray for a stranger going through a tough time. When you do so, you will find the joy God intends for you through your relationships. Even a relationship with a stranger. Because after all, You Were Made for This. Well, that's all for today. I look forward to connecting with you again next week. Goodbye for now. Related episodes you may want to listen to 121: Experience the Relational Energy of Fall You Were Made for This is sponsored by Caring for Others, a missionary care ministry. We depend upon the generosity of donors to pay our bills.  If you'd like to support what we do with a secure tax-deductible donation, please click here. We'd be so grateful if you did.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
What a professional project manager can do for your project

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:08


Antonia Botero is a project manager, licensed architect, and urban designer. As the owner of MaddProject, a boutique project management consulting firm, she specializes in advising real estate owners and related-industry businesses with their development projects, keeping them on task, on schedule, and on budget.  In this episode, Antonia shares the scope of work of a project manager - what they do, what they don't do, what they cost, and when you would want to bring one in on your developments. --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor Podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: Hey, everyone, welcome to another episode of the remote real estate investor. I'm Michael Albaum, and today I'm joined by a very special guest, Antonia, she is a project manager, extraordinare licensed architect in numerous states, and then the owner of MaddProject, and she's going to be talking to us today about when you should think about hiring a project manager, what are some of the do's and don'ts, do's and also what it's like to be a woman running her own business in the construction space. So without further ado, let's get into it.   Antonia, the Conqueror project manager, extraordinaire, licensed architect in multiple states and owner of MaddProject, how are you today?   Antonia: I am wonderful. Thanks for having me.   Michael: Now, absolutely. Thanks for taking the time to hang out with us. So you are a jack of all trades, you do a lot of different stuff. Tell us a little bit about what it's like to be a project manager. But before we get into that, can you share with everybody what the best way to get ahold of you is or a hold of your company bad project, if after listening to this episode, they're like Antonia is a beast. She's a rockstar, I want to use her as my project manager.   Antonia: Sure, absolutely. So my website is great is a great way to get ahold of me, there's a little contact me form in there that I watched very closely. So Mad project.com. And you can scroll down, contact me. Also, there's a great newsletter that I write about once a month. So if you want to get it, you can hear from me that way. And additionally, I'm very active on Twitter. And I will give you my handle and you can share it in the notes as well. But that's a really easy way to contact me. And worst case, if you really just want to get to me, it's Antonia at Madd Project calm with a double D. So that's her always I'm very easy to get a hold of.   Michael: Awesome, awesome. Well, again, thank you for coming on and sharing with everybody. What I want to talk about today is what it's like to be a project manager. What are some of the things that a project manager does? And then what are some of the hurdles that you've seen people really stumble over when doing rehab or renovation projects where maybe they should have gotten a project manager?   Antonia: Sure, absolutely. So typically, on development projects, there's one person who serves as a point of contact for the owner, who helps coordinate the design team helps to oversee the permitting process and ultimately oversees or helps to oversee the construction manager during construction process. So generally, when you have larger projects, you should expect to have a project manager somebody either in house with the developer or a third party, like my company, that their job is just to make sure that the project is going in the right direction that you're accomplishing through design, all the different, you know, goals that are set forth in the pro forma. So that's generally what a project manager does.   Michael: Okay, I guess what would be the scale or the scope of a project that you would feel a project manager would be justified in coming on because a lot of our listeners will do cosmetic rehab, update flooring, kitchen, bathroom, that kind of thing. And they might be thinking to themselves, oh, shoot, do I need a project manager for that? What do you what would you say is kind of the defining scope or cost.   Antonia: So you know, it really depends on what you want the project manager to do, if it's something where you just need a little bit of help on strategy. That's one way if you need comprehensive project management because you've got no idea what you're doing. By way either of you know it's a new type of project that you've never done before or you've never done any kind of design or construction before you don't know how to hire an architect. It's really more about the resources that you have available and less about the size of the project itself. I think that's more the thing that I would say pushes you to have a project manager   Michael: Okay, now I love that. What about let me give you a scenario because I think this has been a lot of our listeners fall into this category and curious your take on on project management versus their project management. So I'd say 95, maybe 98% of our investors or listeners are remote investors. And oftentimes they are newer investors. And so if they want to take on a project that involves some significant rehab of a house, maybe changing some bedrooms, around changing the footprint of the property, and then some cosmetic stuff, and they don't have any experience and they're remote, is that something you think they'd be justified in hiring a property manager to help facilitate and coordinate?   Antonia: I mean, I definitely think that there could be a lot of value. If they're thinking of doing it again, at some point, because there's a lot of things that you can standardize, for example, like, let's say, you know, that you like a certain tile in the kitchen, you know, that you want your bedrooms to be a certain size. And in order, instead of having to go through the process, you know, learning the lessons, the hard way, you could have a more strategic sort of session with, you know, we do hourly consults, or 30-minute consults, where we could talk about some of those strategies, we could talk about some of the things you could standardize.   So I think, perhaps not hiring someone full on, but at minimum, having some sort of conversations with somebody either be at the architect that you end up hiring for the project, because you're going to need one, if you're doing something like that, or the contractor that you hire for it. I think having some general strategy of Hey, like, what are the things that we're going to have to do? What are what is the permit like? How long do those things take, and then ultimately, going back and saying, Hey, we want to do this, again, let's make a list of all the things that we learn in terms of, you know, how long permits actually took, what finishes, we do end up liking that were very easy to get during construction, they were easily available at the local store, and in sort of really find a way to, like, take the lessons and actually use them, right?   Because a lot of the problem that people have is that, you know, let's say you do it once, and you're gonna make mistakes, and that's okay. But if this is the first time you're doing it, and you still don't know, like, how to pick tile, I mean, are you doing?   Michael: What are you doing?   Antonia: I'd really say, sort of sit down for a minute and think a little bit about strategy and about like, and then as you go through the process, write down some of the lessons so that you can refer back to them, and really have a better go around the second, third, fifth time.   Michael: I love that. And I think it makes so much sense. And I mean, I love to that mad project does these half hour hourly console's because so many people don't know what they don't know. And so don't even know what questions to ask if they're a property manager or contractor who they're working with. So I think a strategy session could be so valuable. I know you and I have talked about my development project. And I wish we had sat down for numerous strategy sessions before taking on that project, but too little too late that this is how this is the learning lesson on the job.   So what about in terms of driving? timing? Is that something that a project manager should be expected to do or could be expected to do? If I'm a remote investor and contractor says, Hey, it'll take a month, I hire a project manager and said, okay, make sure they're out there getting this stuff done, because I'm remote? Is that something that you're able to help help out with?   Antonia: Absolutely. So there's a couple of different ways that a project manager should be doing that. And again, it also depends on the size of the project. If you're, for example, in your example, where you're saying, okay, it's for remote investors, you know, the project manager should have a couple of different points of contact with the team that is actually on the ground, whether the project manager is also remote or not, you know, there should be at least a weekly meeting during construction, and that in that weekly meeting, you should be discussing things like, hey, like, did the inspector come this week? Are we gonna run out of the tile that I really like that I know, has like a two week lead time? And so we really need to anticipate it. Hey, are you actually on schedule? And if you're not on schedule, why aren't you on schedule? Oh, because the plumber didn't show up? Why didn't he show up? Did we? Did you not pay him? Or is it because you know his guy last minute had a family thing and couldn't come on Tuesday.    So it's really having those touch points and having them constantly like you can say, oh, we're gonna have weekly meetings and then by the third one, people lose steam or, or kind of feel like, Oh, well, you know, we've had them the last two weeks, we don't really need to continue having them. That's absolutely the wrong thing to do. You want to have constant touch points, you want to make sure that you're, you know, all the time paying attention to what's going on, particularly on those remote projects where if you're doing like a single family rehab, they go really quick.   So you want to make sure that you're Hearing the problems every week, you know, the contractor a lot of times a lot of these contractors can have a question. And they can forget to ask you for four weeks, and then, you know, they stopped work because they didn't have an answer to a question that they forgot to ask you. So, you know, a project manager can absolutely help to do one, make sure that you're having the meetings. And number two, you can in your agreement with your project manager, you can ensure that they are walking the site, at least, you know, every two weeks.   So, there's really a lot of things that you can do you know, the project management, you can also have these periodic meetings with the different parties. So you don't necessarily have to have a meeting with everybody you can have I mean, I highly encourage having like an all hands meeting once a week for for like a single family rehab. But you can also make sure that like Tuesday mornings, you call the architect, and you're just gonna, you know, you're just kind of chit chat, you're like, Hey, how's it going, like, Hey, what are you up to, you know, cuz those are the times when you get like, the dirt, right? Like, Hey, I went out there, and like that green that you chose for that wall is, you know, the contractor is not going to tell you, they're like, Oh, yeah, I painted the wall,   Michael: And I got paid for it!   Antonia: He's not gonna say, Hey, I didn't write the I paid for it, I painted the wall, and you you come visit from out of town, and you look at it, you're like, Oh, my God. Good idea. Right. So those are the things you want to avoid. And the way that you avoid them is by keeping that contact. And and again, you know, once you're a remote investor, and you've done this a few times, honestly, these are things that once you kind of get the hang of them, you don't need to hire someone else to do them, you can do them yourself, if you have a good strategy and a good framework to begin to do them. And then you got to have the discipline, right?   So having a project manager a lot of times in a project is like having like a coach, you know, it's the person who's saying, like, Hey, you need to pay this invoice, hey, you need to sign this contract, hey, you need to make this decision. You know, hey, like, I need to, I need you to go to down to the city and sign this document like normally, having that extra discipline helps a lot in the project and they helped to drive the schedule. So all of these things and having that constant coaching and sort of follow up, follow up follow up was absolutely the role of Project Manager. And it is the thing that really keeps the schedule, which as we know and development schedule scheme, and that doesn't matter what project you have.   Michael: Anyone who's watching the YouTube version of this will have noticed that I was smiling, grinning ear to ear when Antonio was talking about the plumber, because like literally, that's what happened, like flipped by GCS and all the Providence show up and I got family stuff like Are you serious? Are you kidding right now. So it that kind of stuff happens.   Antonia: But it's also important to know that the guy didn't show up because he had a kids soccer game that he forgot about, versus Hey, you didn't show up? Because the contractor didn't pay him? And then you're like, wait, I paid you. So why didn't you pay the guy. So and the more you know, the quicker you figured that out, the better because you don't want to be having that conversation when you're like two weeks away from supposedly being done. And then it turns out that, you know, your contractor or your your CM has not been paying your subs for the last, you know, four weeks, and you come to find out that you have a lien on your house, right?   So, you know, in that sense, like, that's also why it's important because you can avoid these major sort of problems. If you're able to catch them as they're happening.   Michael: Love it. Love it. So that's, I think, a really great summation of what project managers do do. Can you talk to us a little bit about maybe what the clients have expected of you in the past, but you said, you know, like, this really is outside the role and scope of a project manager, when what should people expect to have done by other people or to do themselves?   Antonia: Oh, boy,   Michael: Feel free to go crazy with this one.   Antonia: You know, we've run into some funny situations that I mean, I've I've installed bread, I've built furniture on site, I've I've brought people coffee. I've been on site overnight on installs of big jobs. You know, within the bounds of professional reasonableness, we basically do everything. And I that's a big, you know, caveat that I put at the beginning of that reasonable professionalness.   Michael: Right, right, which is so shades of gray. Right, in that statement?   Antonia: Oh, yeah. Yeah. And then every now and then, I mean, you know, for for me on the bigger super complex projects where you know, you have sort of a syndicate or group of, or different group of investors coming in to code up a project. This is like the really big stuff. I will sit in a lot of investor meetings, just because Very often investors will ask, you know, the sponsor, Hey, how are you going to build this? You know, what are these things cost? What's your schedule? Like? What are you? What's your team? Like? Like, who's actually giving you insight? How are you going to review applications? All these things? And, you know, I'm the one answering those questions on behalf of the sponsor, the person who hires me. So there's a little bit, you know, that goes into that, you know, we also do a lot of feasibility at the beginning of a project.   Many times people will come to us to say, Hey, you know, we went down the road of designing this entire project, and it doesn't pencil. And it turns out that it's a terrible idea to build a high rise building in this neighborhood. What do we do, and so I'll actually, you know, I'll put my architect urban designer hat on, and I will redesign the entire building.   So I, you know, it's been crazy. And I think the last year pandemic, you know, kind of gave people a little bit of reason to pause. And to rethink a lot of these things. And so I actually ended up with almost every single project that has come through in the last 18 months, I have redesigned at the request of the owner, that they said, hey, look like we whatever we have isn't really working. What do you think we should do? Like, how do we start project management on this? And I'm like, Hey, guys, let's take a step back, read a feasibility and make it work. So we'll do a lot of that.   So we go from, you know, we are a little bit involved in those investor conversations, because they often have questions that we aren't equipped to answer. And we're also involved in feasibility, you know, I'd rather be involved in projects that don't need to have the ship turned around, I'd rather just be involved from the beginning, but it is what it is. And then…   Michael: It is what it is.   Antonia: Yeah. And then finally, you know, we are obviously the on site day to day stuff, you know, design decisions, technical, mechanical, electrical plumbing decisions regarding ownership preference, and what's really going to be the best way to go with systems. You know, all of that stuff, obviously, that that's the more traditional stuff that you'd expect to see. And where we are a little bit less traditional is on the design, and is on that sort of investor facing stuff.   Every now and then I'm asked to be a part of potential investor conversations. And if for whatever reason, the situation is a little murky, or there's a lot of kind of unanswered things like, you know, it's a dance, right, you want to make sure that you're helpful and that you're, that you're there. But at the end of the day, I am not the owner of the project. And so I have to be very careful, not only from like a deal perspective, like I don't, I don't want to say anything that's gonna tank your deal. That's, you know, that doesn't help anybody. But at the same time, like, I am a registered architect, I do carry professional liability. And I am very aware of it. And so, you know, I my agreements with all my clients, like explicitly says that, on the project involved, I have no professional standing, I am not the architect of the project. And sometimes there's conversations or moments with building departments or things like that, where I have to really be disciplined about my role on the project and the fact that I'm not I'm not a professional with professional standing on this project.   So that's kind of the general where we draw the boundaries, you know, and then there's the, you know, the stuff that is not professional. We deal with some of that, too, but that's how they, you know,   Michael: It sounds like we could probably do a whole episode on that.   Antonia: Oh, yeah. Yeah, for sure.   Michael: So I'm curious, Antonio, why in the last 18 months have Have you had to redesign all the projects? I mean, what have you changed? What have you seen changed in the last 18 months?   Antonia: Well, I mean, I think a little bit, you know, some, some project types got a little bit of a break, naturally, like hospitality did. You know, one of my projects is student housing. And they had a little bit of a break related to financing to, you know, banks were not running to finance these projects. And so, you know, these owners took the time to say, Hey, you know, what, maybe there's a better way. And there's a, there's a way where we can make this a little bit more efficient, a little bit more appropriate. And so they took the time to do it, just because, again, they had a natural break related to the fact that, you know, no capital was looking out to put money into student housing or hospitality project. I mean, hospitality was pretty, pretty hard hit.   So yeah, it's, you know, there was definitely a lot of redesigning hotel ideas in these last 18 months,   Michael: Okay. And redesign in the sense that it's no longer a hotel or redesigned from the perspective of we're just going to do it a little bit differently than it was done more traditionally in the past.   Antonia: Two different types of projects that I have redesigned predominantly to Housing has been, you know, one of the types that I've redesigned. And then the other one was hospitality. In the case of the hospitality project, it had a condo component to it, has a kind of component to it, the mix was changed a little bit, the sizes of the units were changed a little bit, you know, the amenities were changed a little bit, ultimately, I mean, so this is for an existing building that has, has this massive renovation going on.   So it was really kind of with what you had and how far they had already gone into construction, because that buildings already in construction, they are like the interior renovation was already underway, basically, they were basically looking to make it a little bit more attractive. Now understanding that COVID had to happen and how the pandemic had changed the way that people use space, particularly public space. So that was what the hotel sort of redesigned, it's still a hotel, that building is probably always going to be a hotel, it's very significant. And so we didn't change the use completely.   In the case of the student housing, for example, there was a little bit more of wanting to make the construction a little bit more efficient. And so really looking at the massing. And how much of the structure was wood, how much of the structure was concrete, you know, whether it was more or less expensive to build as a podium versus a wrap, you know, if we were going to go above four floors, and if we did, what that meant for the construction type. And so having these sort of technical conversations completely changed the massing of the building   Michael: Interesting,.   Antonia: Like altogether, completely different building completely different size. And then it again, you know, prompted a lot of conversations about public space, because this, this building is the size of a city block. And so, you know, you had a lot of like that deep in between space. So it's like, well, how do we create courtyards? You know, originally they had a massive courtyard, and we said, hey, look, you know, really big corners are usually very uncomfortable spaces. And so what are why don't why are we a little more thoughtful about how we divide this space? And and what can we do in those courtyards to program them and make the whole project just better? That's sort of the flavor and the reasoning why you'll you know, we would redesign projects. So…   Michael: That makes total sense how neat. That's really cool.   Antonia: That's pretty cool. I enjoy that a lot. Because one of the things that I don't talk a lot about on Twitter, for example, is that I am actually an urban designer, I do have a graduate degree in urban design, and I and I, like, you know, the idea of the whole building, how does that building affect the the environment around it? How do you approach it? How does it you know, address the street? What's the human scale of it? Where are the amenities? Where do you see them from? What's the good corner? What's the corner, you want to avoid? All of these sort of urban questions really come into play when we do these building redesigns? You know, where are you going to get a lot of shade in the courtyard? Where are you, you know, is that going to be an uncomfortable place to hang out? So that's pretty cool for me to get the chance to do that.   Michael: Yeah,   Antonia: Being an architect without the hassle of being,   Michael: Right, only the good parts?   Antonia: Exactly.   Michael: So it sounds like there isn't a whole lot that you don't do. And that's for sure, like a double, triple negative sentence, but that's okay.   Antonia: Something like that. Yeah. I mean, who then the reasonable, asks, we, there's, you know, and every now and then we're finding new things that people approach us for, you know, one thing that also became a little bit interesting was, I had a couple family offices reach out during pandemic to say, Hey, we have this project going on, or we're gonna invest money into this project that's kind of starting soon, we want you to look at the people who are going to build it, and let us know if you think they can pull it off. And to me, that was a little bit surprising.   But I had more than one request, like that. So that kind of thoughtfulness is really on the investor side, and a little bit, adding a little more sophistication and a little bit more data to people who aren't used to having that data or have the background to make those decisions has been really interesting.   Michael: Oh, that's great. That's great. Just a little quick word to the wise for the folks that are doing that hotel redesign, tell them not to have to fires during the course of construction, or really screw things up for him. Take it from me.   Antonia: I will. Yes, I will make sure we should add that to the list of things to watch out for.   Michael: That's great. So tell me when someone is going out and looking to hire a project manager or have a concert with the project manager, bring them into the fold? Should First off, what should they be looking for? What should some of the interview questions they speak to them about? And then you mentioned remote versus that remote could or could not be an issue. Can you speak to that a little bit?   Antonia: Sure. Um, so one of the things that you want to find out from a project manager is you really want to understand the scope of services that they provide. Not, you know, unlike some of the professional disciplines that are related to development, project management is not really regulated in any way. So different people do different things. And it really depends on their background. So you can get some project managers who are very strong during the construction process that will absolutely have no idea how to lead a design team.   So and not to their fault in any way, they will advertise that, hey, I don't, I'll take it from the moment that you have construction documents, and you have permits and your financing, I'm good. But before that, like, I can't help you. So these, like make sure that that has been spoken about, like if you need somebody to lead your design team. You know, in the instances of small projects, if you have a really good architect, they can, they should be able to project manage the whole design aspect of it. But you want to make sure that you're on the same page regarding what you need, right.   So if you need somebody to help you figure out pay applications. And if you want to carry your own ACR, that's an Anticipated Cost Report, which I highly recommend for big projects, you need to have a conversation with the project manager that they will do that, you know, even project managers that are really strong in construction will not carry an anticipated cost report for you. You know, a lot of times that falls on the finance side. And it's a little bit disjointed and difficult to do. Because if you've never done one before, and if you're not familiar with construction, it's really difficult to anticipate things like change orders, you know, so there's very little anticipated in your anticipated cost report if you can't have any foresight, because you have no technical understanding.   So again, being super upfront and clear about the things that you need. Having said that every now and then I will have clients reach out or potential clients reach out and say, You know what, Antonia, I need help on this project. And I have absolutely no idea what I need. And that's fair. And being that upfront and honest about it is a great starting point. Because then the project manager, or the potential project manager can say, Okay, tell me your situation. And we can tell you what services we offer and where we think we can fill in the gaps. And a really, really good one will say, Hey, you know what, these are things that I don't do, and either I can recommend someone to do them, or this is how we should handle them.   So again, it's just being upfront about what you need. And really being comfortable with that person's experience and, and connections in the industry, because that's really important too. And making sure that they're able to they're, they're gonna be able to pull it off and you know, someone that I respect and you trust, right, that you trust their their experience, I would also recommend asking for references.   Michael: Yep.   Antonia: I always, I always have, like, you know, about about eight people that I keep in mind for references. And the reason I do that is because my contact with them has been super varied. You know, some people are people that I've worked for some people are people that have worked for me, others are contractors I've worked with others, or architects I've worked with. And so depending on the type of project that I'm sort of going for, and if the potential client says, Hey, I need references, I'll tailor my references to be adequate for what they're going to be building so that they're appropriate and relevant. So always ask for references, you know, I mean, you just want to be comfortable with the person, you're going to spend a lot of time with this person, you want to make sure that you can communicate well with them, that you can be candid with them. It's sort of like the lawyer kind of thing, like you want to make sure that that you're comfortable telling them everything that's relevant, because if this person is supposed to represent you, and they only have half the information, you also have to trust them that they're not going to share some stuff that you don't want to share with people right at the wrong time.   So it's all of these things, I mean, that I would really watch out for on that, on how to pick a project manager.   Michael: That's great. And then remote versus local remote to the project local to the project, what are your thoughts there?   Antonia: So you know, now especially again, same thing as last 18 months have been really interesting, because for a long time a lot of people were very adamant about, well, if you're going to manage this project, you have to be there. And I've found that not necessarily to be true, because for several years ahead of 2020 I had been managing projects remote just as a result of the kind of work that I was doing. I was doing a lot of hospitality work nationally and so We lived on a plane, you know, and the rest of the time you were managing it remotely. And we had very specific systems that we had set up.   So you know, that, that's a big part of it is if you're going to go with someone remote, make sure they have strong systems to manage it. And you want to put in that agreement that, hey, you need to be there once a month, you need to have that in your agreement, and then your understanding, and you need to talk about how often you're going to need them to be there. You know, having said that, it really depends on the project. And it really depends on the investor, as what you're comfortable, you know, a lot of banks will require to walk your site once a month. And so you may want to make sure that to put that into the agreement.   You know, there's two minds about it. You know, on one hand, I will tell you, there's nothing like having someone on site all the time. But at the same time, I will tell you that I've only ever done one project where I had to be there every day. And it was extremely complicated. You know, it had a massive Historic Preservation component to it, it had crazy MEP coordination for you know, kitchens, commercial kitchens. You know, it was a large urban project, it was six acres, there was a lot to it, there was like every day it was wild. And just very few projects fit that bill. So you can have that you can request that but be willing to pay for it. Right.   So that's also a consideration. If you want somebody there every day, if you want someone, someone there once a week, or, or once a month, that's going to have a different price point. And so you have to also be really honest, a good project manager will be able to tell you that hey, you don't me to be there everyday. You do need eyes on your project, especially while it's under construction. Absolutely. But you know, now managing design. I mean, I have teams right now that are let's say my average team is like 15 people, like project team. And out of those 15 people you can have, you can have them be in like six different states.   Michael: Wow.   Antonia: And like, that's normal right now. Michael: Wow. You know, that's really cool. And it really opens up the the availability for project managers of who you can select, that's great.   Antonia: For sure. And you know, what, it also allows you to start hiring design firms that are more appropriate for projects. And a lot of times people were like, well, I want to hire a local architect, and you want to go talk to the guy, and you were doing a student housing project, but the guy had never done student housing, or multifamily, for that matter. But he had done, let's say, commercial spaces, that was kind of the closest local guy you're gonna find, you know, now you can, you can hire the best student housing architect in the country, and still feel fairly confident that they're going to be able to figure out what's appropriate for your project and working whatever jurisdiction you're in. So that's also a great advantage to owners to really open up that pool to get better resources for their projects. There's no excuse anymore. Basically,   Michael: There's no excuse for sucking.   Antonia: There's no yeah, there's no excuse for hiring a crappy team.   Michael: Oh, that's so good to keep in mind. And you touched on it, I definitely want to come back to it. So I think what's probably on a lot of people's mind is cost. What is it typical? Is there such a thing as a typical cost structure? And what should people expect to pay for project management services?   Antonia: Sure. So you know, for interior renovations, let's say that are under $5 million, which is kind of your typical hospitality renovation. For you know, the branded hotels or, and even the boutique stuff to to a certain size, you're looking at, you know, $5 million, and under, typically, those project managers will charge a percentage of the full project cost. And that doesn't include only construction, it also include your soft costs. So managing your design team, going through the process of hiring the architect everything, though manage, it's like turnkey if you will.   Those people will charge somewhere between five and 6% of the overall. And I don't agree with that general structure, I that's not how that project works. So we're fee based, right? So we'll give you a fee. That's the fee monthly for the duration of the project. Except during construction, depending on the larger projects, we actually switch our our style a little bit during construction. Actually, I put more resources on that. And so that's when it's a little bit more, but not, not so much more that you're like whoa, it doesn't double.   So, on those smaller projects, you'll see like a five to 6% that's typically what you'll also see In ultra luxury, single family, and ultra luxury, I'm talking about houses that are over maybe $4 million or so, where you absolutely need a project manager. Some of these buildings are so complicated between crazy structures insane, like audio systems, you know, really expensive materials where if you cut the marble wrong, it's like a $70,000 mistake. Yeah, so in those instances, that's what do you out, I would say that that's kind of market. So that's what you should expect to see.   On the larger projects like and larger, and you're going to realize that there's a gap here, and we can try to address the gap. So on larger projects, let's say $30 million over, particularly if it's ground up, what you'll usually see reps charges two to 3%. And again, on large projects, I don't think that that's the right way to build a project. You know, there's things that I think it sets up the wrong incentives, you know, like, oh, if your construction costs more than you pay anymore? I don't know, that doesn't seem right.   Michael: Right, right.   Antonia: And then, yeah, and then sometimes, like, there's instances where you're, and this rarely happens, but when it does, and this year was a good example of it, you know, ownership decides to redesign the building, and now you're doing an extra year of work, not necessarily for any extra fee. And when you are a smaller consulting company that can really hit you. So that also hedges for that, like I am, how much I am per month, until we reach construction, period. And if it and if you guys decide to put a pause on it to go do some exercise, and you want me involved in it, you know how much it's gonna cost you.   And so the benefit with having the fee based option, or the fee based billing that we do, is you know how much we're going to cost from day one, like, you know, you can anticipate those costs on day one, whereas a lot of project managers, or project management companies, you don't really know how much they're gonna cost you. I mean, you think they you do, but you actually don't,   Michael: Because your costs change throughout the project.   Antonia: Because your costs change throughout the project. So it's a really tough situation. And it always it's, it just always creates all kinds of funny situations with people, and you end up having conversations that are not related to moving the project forward. So you know, and then there's that gap, right? So what happens to projects that are, let's say, ground up $10 million?   My thought is, if you're in that position, and you're a developer, it is very likely that you didn't just wake up and get there, you kind of have a process of getting there.   Michael: I would hope so.   Antonia: Right. And so in those instances, and I've had people like that reach out, I will tell them, I will say, hey, look like this is how much I am because it's no less work from a project management standpoint than a $30 million project. The difference is obviously the fee, and the fee that that the sponsor will charge investors for management. And so given that the management fee is going to be a lot less, you know. Most of the time, I will say, hey, let's Why don't we set up like a retainer? That is not comprehensive project management? I have that going on right now with with one company in it, and it works fairly well with them. I mean, you know, they call me when they have a question. They call me for strategy, but I don't actually manage the day to day.   And it works really well. So on those, I just tell them like, Hey, you know what, you're, you're perfectly capable of managing this yourself. You know, if you have questions like you can call me and I have those relationships where I don't mind, like being on the phone for an hour here and there and growing those relationships so that when they do have the 100 million dollar deal, and then they're like, Hey, we're ready to have a really crazy project, and we really need you then. Then I'll be you know, we know that we work together well, and it works out.   So that's kind of the super long answer to your question how much your project managers should charge but no theories and yeah, you have to watch it To be honest, like I you know, it can there's some shenanigans in there. So just, you know,   Michael: Like anything, there's so many little shenanigans. Awesome. Well, I want to I want to start wrapping up here, Antonia and curious to get your thoughts. And if you could speak to kind of what it's like to have to be a woman in the space and any recommendations you have for women investors out there that are trying to do some projects in a space that's been traditionally male dominated?   Antonia: Yeah, for sure. Um, you know, I think one of the things as any woman, business owner in any kind of industry, to be honest, one of the things that we always have to remember that that Men are usually pretty good at. And I'm not again, usually I'm adding that…   Michael: There's an asterisk there!   Antonia: Yes, um, is setting, you know, very good professional boundaries. And I think that that is something that in my experience a lot of women have a little bit of a harder time with because we want to be nurturing, right, we want to help, we want to, we want to be like, Oh my gosh, like you I really need to help you out of this project mess that you got yourself into and and so when you actually begin to look at owning your own business and whether it's that's a development company, or whether that is just a project management company, or just the the rehab that you're doing, and you're happens to be the owner, and you happen to be a woman, you know, setting up those those boundaries ahead ahead of time, right, and saying, like, hey, like, these situations, like I'm not going to put up with or are these things are not things that are okay, interpersonally not just between men and women, like really, this is just not professional, and sort of standing your ground and, and again, being kind about and being professional about it, but really setting those boundaries and, and making sure that the that you're you're training the people around you, so that you have those boundaries, right, you want to say like, Hey, you know, you can't call me on Sunday at six in the morning about this project, like that's not okay. Whether you're the owner, or or you're the consultants, so that's a little bit, one thing that I would just say, you know, boundaries are super important when you're doing your own stuff. They, they make things much better for everybody on projects. So that's one thing.   The other thing is, you know, for me, actually, and I just picked this, for myself, the idea of the perfection, like if I don't have all of these things lined up, then I'm not going to be able to, I'm not qualified or, or I don't belong in that space, or whatever. And I struggle with that still, you know, where it's like, well, I haven't done this, and I haven't done that. And so because of that I don't belong here. That's not true. You know, like, you'll meet plenty of people that haven't done X, Y, and Z and, and contribute amazingly, into a certain community. Because we all have something to contribute.   And so having that sort of understanding there from day one to say, like, Hey, you know what, like, maybe I haven't done these things, maybe I didn't go to that school, maybe I don't know, the mayor. But you know what, I'm going to do this rehab, and I'm going to rock it. You know, being a woman shouldn't never be like, Oh, I can't go there, I can't show up to the jobsite because I'm a woman, you know, that that kind of fits into that category as well. Either you know, the things that you haven't accomplished or who you are just because of who you are, it really shouldn't hold you back from from doing the things that that you that you feel like you could you can do and if you give them your best effort, there's no reason why you know, being a woman or, or not having a certain experience should should limit you. It certainly doesn't limit a lot of people out there and so that's kind of the other thing.   And then I think finally you know, for me, you know, not to not to make it sound like it's all roses, it's definitely hard in some instances. But I've gotten really lucky in that I've run into really good mentors. And you know, they're all men because obviously the industry has a has sort of the demographic that it has and they've been fantastic you know most of them have become friends they're people that I keep in touch with the people that I've brought business to after the you know after years and so you know, if you're able to lean on them and kind of call them and say hey look like I don't have to deal with situation or they're really the people who are going to champion who and so finding those mentors and having them close by is really pretty important finding kind of not only the mentors you know, just finding your tribe eventually finding other women in the industry who are like kicking ass out there and just you know, leading mechanical companies and leading Plumbing Companies you know, developing things themselves and, and having them as a you know, as a nearby kind of support, but also a little bit of someone that you can look up to and say hey, like they've done it. So.   But it is certainly tough, I'll give you that there there's some instances where you know, there's situations where you want to make sure that you're very ready to say you know what, I'm not gonna play like that's the boundary and and to me if you're able to really set those boundaries for yourself, and you know, that really goes back into like your self worth and like all of these really big kind of sort of your emotional stability You know, making sure that your your sugar is low right now, because you haven't had lunch, you know, it really goes back to like being really good. Really good for yourself. So that then you're able to establish those boundaries so that then you're able to deal with those situations because you know, development is really hard, you have a lot of unknowns. And it does add an extra layer that you're a woman and so people sometimes react to you differently. But I think it's all you know, if you're able to say like, hey, these are my boundaries, and this is my power, and I'm gonna go conquer the world, you know, brings us back to the conqueror.   Michael: Antonia the conqueror   Antonia: Then you're able to, like, occupy those spaces and contribute, right? Because that, I think, is the part where a lot of women don't realize but like, like, we need your contribution, you know, as a as an industry and not because you're a woman, it's because of what's in your head and the ideas that you have. And, and if we're losing your contribution, because you're a woman, I mean, how stupid is that? Right? So that's kind of my, my, my bent on it. But again, you know, we could have an entire episode about the ridiculous less than professional situations that I've been in that are super salacious and ridiculous issue, we're probably like, take up a pen name and write a book. But that's not to say that, right? So, you know, that's that's kind of how it is.   Michael: I everything you just said like, yes, yes, yes, I love it all go back and re listen to the last six, seven minutes of what was just said, pure gold. Love it. Love it.   Antonia: Glad to hear it.   Michael: Well, no, absolutely, absolutely. So thank you so much. and tune in for sharing and coming on today. Any final thoughts before we let you out of here,   Antonia: Um, you know, just that same in that same vein, you know, there's so much, it's such a place of abundance, to be honest, it's such a hustle and not hustle in the bad way. But like it, you know, it's such a, an amazing, general way of doing business, you know, development has all of these amazing opportunities for all kinds of professionals, or even for people who don't have a ton of experience in it, you know, getting involved in real estate development, like owning things, you know, like, we can't say that without saying I used his name, right.   So it's like owning things, and understanding how your built environment works. And being a part of it contributing, it is just so wonderful. And I really think the sphere of community that we have is amazing. And so, you know, continuing to grow, that continuing to be a part of it continuing to contribute is just such an honor. And it's really wonderful to, you know, I'll tell anybody, if you if there's a way that you can get into owning things and into contributing to your neighborhood and to the people around you. That's just, you know, that's what being a citizen being around and being here, you know, being alive is for people like me, but then again, I grew up in development. So for me, like, it's just something I'm really passionate about, and I if you have the means to do it, and in the interest, go for it.   Michael: Love it, love it, check out Antonia on Twitter, check out her company mad project. It was such a pleasure to have you on and I'm looking forward to chatting again soon. Take care of Antonia.   Antonia: Yeah, it was wonderful. Thank you so much for having me. And I'm looking forward to being back at some point we can talk about a bunch of other things.   Michael: Absolutely. We'll take care. I'll talk to you soon.   Antonia: Thank you. Awesome, everybody. That was our show a big big big thank you to Antonia I got tons of great actionable takeaways from that. Hopefully you did too. Especially cuz I'm in the midst of a pretty significant development project. And Tony has been a really, really big help there. So go back and listen to the episode with the chorusing on the next one. Happy investing.   

Vover Sports
Former MLB Professional, Greg Vaughn, on the Importance of Hearing the Truth & Learning That Life Is Not Fair (Part 1) | Level Up w/ Dr. Mondo

Vover Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 22:56


Dr. Armando Gonzalez sits down with Retired MLB Professional and Sacramento legend, Greg Vaughn, to discuss his childhood and the importance of hearing the truth & learning that life is not fair from an early age. Greg opens up about his parents divorce and what it was like to grow up without a father figure and be forced to become the man of the house at such a young age.Also be sure to check out the work that Greg is doing with his Vaughn's Valley Foundation. Host: Dr. Armando GonzalezGuest: Greg VaughnAsk your questions about this episode or anything else on your mind by downloading the Vover app here!

The Inner Child Podcast
#28: GOODBYE, Academy... Hello, Soulmate!

The Inner Child Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 19:52


My dearest friends, we have a special announcement today! The Academy is going away forever, BUT it's being replaced by something new... (cue drumroll) Introducing... Soulmate: My signature program where I help high achievers BREAK the cycle of toxic relationships using inner child healing, so that they can ATTRACT the healthy, loving relationship of their dreams and embody inner peace.In this episode, I talk about the our epic student wins, the 3 BIGGEST changes I have made based on student feedback, and what to expect inside Soulmate.FYI this is old news, if you follow me on Instagram or are on my mailing list, we've already rolled out this program within the community months ago... And now it's finally made its public debut :) Episode Highlights:How we helped our clients and students in our previous program and why we're moving forward to an even better, higher-value upgradeThe story behind the program's name, "SOULMATE" and how it can help high achieversThe H.E.A.L. method: Hearing your inner child, Emotional mastery, Aligning with abundance, Love your shadowsSoulmate is 30% education and 70% ACCOUNTABILITY and IMPLEMENTATIONAre you a High Achiever or entrepreneur who wants to attract and create the lasting, romantic relationship of your dreams, but unhealed emotional baggage is getting in the way?

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, The Democrats are now fleeing from President Joe Biden and we are hearing more and more of them telling the truth about how bad this Administration really is

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice—God Bless America this is the Steve Gruber Show—FIERCE AND FEARLESS – in Pursuit of the truth—   Here are 3 big things you need to know right now—   Three— Paul McCartney says don't blame me—it was John's fault the Beatles split up—that revelation—came during a recent interview—   Two— Ben and Jerry the 2 capitalist ice cream titans—who embrace socialism—are caught by a cub reporter—who asks a couple honest questions—they are snake bitten—   One— The Democrats are now fleeing from President Joe Biden—and we are hearing more and more of them—telling the truth about how bad this Administration really is—   Failures in Afghanistan—at the border—with the economy and the pandemic too—have left them all wondering—who the hell is in charge of this mess—   In Pennsylvania—it seems they forgot—there is always somebody rolling tape—so when state reps and senators were on the line talking with other Democrat operatives—the soul cleansing honestly was captured for all to hear—   And now you get to hear it too—

Book Cheat
68 - Jane Eyre (With Jess Perkins and Michelle Brasier)

Book Cheat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 109:45


On this episode of Book Cheat Dave has Charlotte Bronte's classic novel Jane Eyre. Hearing all about it is Jess Perkins and Michelle BrasierSupport Book Cheat on Patreon: www.patreon.com/DoGoOnPodSuggest a book for Dave to cheat: https://goo.gl/jxMdiW To get in contact, email bookcheatpod@gmail.com or follow the show via the links below:Twitter: @BookCheatPodInstagram: @BookCheatPodFacebook: @BookCheatPodListen to Dave's other podcast Do Go On: dogoonpod.comFollow Michelle on Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/michellebrasierSee her live:michellebrasier.com/tourFollow Jess Perkins and check out her podcasts Do Go On and Simply The Jesst:https://www.jessperkins.com.au/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Shock Your Potential
Philantrotrecking - Jeff Rasley

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:22


“When getting involved in charitable work, find something that you enjoy doing that is helpful to the community.” Jeff Rasley  The one-on-one experiences between people is what builds strong communities. At its core, community is anchored in the belief that people are part of something bigger than themselves, and that they have a right and duty to participate in its progress. His whole life, Jeff Rasley has been part of multiple communities and believes that it is all about experiencing life together by being present and contributing positively. Jeff Rasley's commitment to social activism began in high school when he co-founded the Goshen Walk for Hunger. In law school he fought for renters' rights and organized the first rent strike in Indiana as president of the Indianapolis Tenants Association. As a young lawyer Jeff founded free legal clinics at two inner-city churches in Indianapolis. He was lead counsel on class action suits for prisoners which resulted in the construction of two new jails in Central Indiana. He spent five days working for NOLA Habitat for Humanity post Katrina. Jeff was plaintiff in a class action requiring clean-up of the White River after it was polluted by an industrial chemical spill. The Jeff and Alicia Rasley Internship Program was created by the Rasleys for the ACLU of Indiana in December, 2020. Jeff is the founder of the Basa Village Foundation, which funds culturally sensitive development in Nepal. He served a term as president of Indianapolis Scientech, which promotes scientific inquiry and learning. Jeff is a director of six non-profits, including the Indianapolis Peace & Justice Center, University of Chicago Alumni Club, and Phi Beta Kappa of Indiana. He is U.S. liaison for the Himalayan expedition company Adventure GeoTreks Ltd. He has taught courses on "culturally sensitive development" and philanthropy at Butler and Marian Universities and memoir writing at the Indiana Writing Center Jeff's BA is from University of Chicago magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, All-Academic All-State Football, letter winner in swimming and football; JD Indiana University Law School cum laude, Moot Court, Indiana Law Review; MDiv Christian Theological Seminary magna cum laude, covaledictorian and Faculty Award Scholar. He has been admitted to the Indiana, US District, and US Supreme Court Bars.  Jeff has published numerous articles in academic and mainstream periodicals, including Newsweek, Chicago Magazine, ABA Journal, Family Law Review, The Journal of Communal Societies, and Friends Journal. He is an award-winning photographer and his pictures taken in the Himalayas and on Caribbean and Pacific islands have been published in several journals. He has appeared as a featured guest on over 100 radio and podcast programs. In today's episode, our guest will talk about building and upholding cohesive communities. He will give us an account of his experience travelling to Basa village in Nepal and his interest in culturally sensitive developments. Listen in! Social media handles: Website: http://www.jeffreyrasley.com/ Amazon Author page: http://www.amazon.com/Jeff-Rasley/e/B004Q3D6B2 Personal Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/jrasley Facebook publisher site: https://www.facebook.com/JeffRasleyAndMidsummerBooks/   Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeffrasley   Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeff-rasley/   Goodreads page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/4114763.Jeffrey_Rasley   Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/pinner362436/ Midsummer Books link: http://www.jeffreyrasley.com/midsummer%20books.htm   Basa Foundation link on my website: http://www.jeffreyrasley.com/Basa%20Projects.htm I grew up in a town Goshen, Indiana that my ancestors were early settlers so I felt so rooted in that community. [4:00] Because I felt so rooted in that community, it was deeply a part of me and from a really age felt involved in it. [4:27] Community goes two ways where if you feel embedded in a community, you want to get back to it but you also have certain expectations of it. [5:04] One of the aspects of our modern culture is that people don't stay in their home communities. [6:12] One of the beautiful things I experienced in Basa Village is the fact that the villagers were so rooted in their community. [6:43] For the west, we have to be very conscientious about developing and supporting community, because we don't have that organic embeddedness that the traditional communities have. [7:48] Community leadership is so important when deciding about what is right for your community. [8:49] When you have an established culture, it is risky to start changing really fundamental experiences for people in the community and especially for children. [9:55] Learning how in the 21st century, there are still these communities which are so well integrated and the people looking out for each other was amazing. [12:37] Commercial break. [18:23] What really works, for almost anybody in terms of getting involved in charitable work is to find something that you enjoy doing that is helpful to the community. [21:19] I had fallen in love with trekking and mountaineering in the Himalayas and so I combined going over there on a track or an expedition with doing some philanthropic project [21:53] Each time I went back, I just tried to do something a little bigger and then I went from things to money to developing a foundation. [21:18] It may take some introspection but anybody who wants to give back can figure out something that they enjoy. [22:47] Hearing stories from from my great grandmother about what Goshen was like when she was young, it was very similar to the way people live in Basa today. [26:45] There are real risks for Basa in the sense that a road has come to the village, the internet and cell phones have come and this worries the village elders. [27:37] The kids are now being exposed to a world that is very different from what they have known for hundreds of years. [28:11] This exposure can lead to a lot of them being attracted to leave the village and for those that will stay, they will want to change the village in ways that were unforeseen. [28:20] The fundamental values of the villagers, including the kids have not changed and part of that is because they have such a strong tradition on environmental responsibility and a sense of community. [28:41] I hope it stays, because not only is it a wonderful thing, but also in terms of happiness, the villagers have a very high happiness quotient. [30:10] Find something that moves you and one that you enjoy, but will move you to be involved with your community in a productive giving way and it will give back to you. [32:11] …………………..….. TopDog Learning Group, LLC is a leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA but with “TopDoggers” (aka consultants) throughout North America and beyond. They focus on training programs (both virtual and face-to-face), keynotes and “lunch and learns,” group and 1:1 coaching, and off-the-shelf solutions. One such solution is their Masterclass on The Top 3 Strategies to be Resilient in Times of Change. This thoughtful self-paced online training will guide you through three tactics you can immediately use to—not just survive—but thrive when change comes at you. Use the code RESIL50OFF for 50% off the program! Just go to https://bit.ly/3a5mIS6 and enter the code RESIL50OFF, in all capitals, to redeem your 50% off coupon. The link and code will be available in our show notes for easy access.  

Asbury UMC
Meeting and Hearing

Asbury UMC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 20:18


Meeting and Hearing by Matt Rawle

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria
MF- On board the Red Sox bandwagon?; We laugh at dumb Sox takes from 98-5 while hearing from Sox fans

Ordway, Merloni & Fauria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:12


HOUR 3: Are you on board the Red Sox bandwagon? We laugh at dumb Sox takes from 98-5 while hearing from Sox fans as the team leads 2-1 heading into tonight's game. 10-11-21 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sh*tsNGigs
Ep 121 - Brexit is Really Brexiting/ Squid Game Review | ShxtsnGigs Podcast

Sh*tsNGigs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:20


Wasteland Travel Game - https://bit.ly/WLTShxtGigs  This Week The Guys Discuss:  0:00 Intro - 05:12, The Rubix Cube - 09:20, Hearing vs Listening To Music - 27:06, Squid Game Review - Korean Cinema 46:09, - Brexit Is Really Brexiting   JOIN THE ShxtsnGigs FANDEM ON PATREON https://www.patreon.com/shxtsngigs​    BRAND NEW SNG MERCH https://shxtsngigs-store.creator-spring.com/  Listen to SNG on:   SPOTIFY https://open.spotify.com/show/6olvQhNhQwMbGG26t3rVgM?si=GvC4B1meTXWb8eMf4qTXAQ  APPLE PODCASTS https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/shxtsngigs/id1481898329  PODCAST GEAR Camera: https://amzn.to/3g3rMdtMicrophones: https://amzn.to/3a1jCyLInterface: https://amzn.to/2RmrBjb   JUMP ON THE MONSTER HYPE https://amzn.to/3g2zzZi PICK YOUR POISON https://amzn.to/322UuTB   CHAT WITH US: Instagram @shxtsngigs_podcast Twitter @shxtsngigs

Modern Homemakers
Exhaustion Keeps Us From Hearing, Part 2

Modern Homemakers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 17:04


“Come away and rest awhile” the rest of Ruth Haley Barton’s list of what makes us exhausted.

The Vergecast
Facebook's bad week: a 60 Minutes interview, a six-hour outage, and a Senate whistleblower hearing

The Vergecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 87:30


The Verge's Nilay Patel, Dieter Bohn, Alex Cranz, and Russell Brandom discuss Facebook's bad week: from a 60 Minutes interview, to a 6-hour outage, to a Facebook whistleblower hearing. The crew also get into Android 12, Pixel 6 rumors, iOS 15.1, and more. Further reading: Verge Tech Survey 2021 Facebook encourages hate speech for profit, says whistleblower Locked out and totally down: Facebook's scramble to fix a massive outage Facebook is coming back after a six-hour outage Facebook is back online after a massive outage that also took down Instagram, WhatsApp, Messenger, and Oculus Facebook explains the backbone shutdown behind its global outage on Monday What is BGP, and what role did it play in Facebook's massive outage Everything you need to know from the Facebook whistleblower hearing The whistleblower hearing hits Facebook where the company is weakest The Facebook whistleblower hearing unearthed the danger of engagement algorithms Facebook's whistleblower report confirms what researchers have known for years Facebook runs the coward's playbook to smear the whistleblower ​What's good, bad, and missing in the Facebook whistleblower's testimony Mark Zuckerberg breaks silence to say the Facebook whistleblower's claims ‘don't make any sense Facebook reportedly slows feature development for ‘reputational reviews' Google just announced its Pixel 6 event on October 19th Android 12 review: it's mostly about the looks Android 12 will be coming to Pixel phones in the ‘next few weeks' Pixel 6's rumored 23W wireless charging stand and more details leak early iPhone 13 Mini and 13 Pro Max battery life: better, and a beast The latest iOS 15.1 beta includes iPhone 13 Pro camera features Halide's latest update brings the iPhone 13 Pro's Macro Mode to older iPhones After Epic v. Apple, a small developer is challenging Apple's in-app payment system Apple is making it easier to delete accounts attached to third-party apps Apple's healthcare division leaned on misleading data, report alleges Nintendo Switch OLED review: screentime Google's latest Next doorbell and camera are not obvious upgrades Amazon is reportedly working on a smart fridge Twitch confirms major data breach after its source code and secrets leak out Taylor Swift fans are getting caught up in the Virginia gubernatorial race The Verge is now on your smart TV Announcing Springboard: The Verge's documentary on the forgotten history of the Treo Vergecast - A Tech Podcast by Derek Rhoads bit.ly/cutthroughthenight Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices