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  • Aug 10, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about american society

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Latest podcast episodes about american society

New Books in World Affairs
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in Environmental Studies
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke, "The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945" (Harvard UP, 2016)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 68:15


The Earth has entered a new age—the Anthropocene—in which humans are the most powerful influence on global ecology. Since the mid-twentieth century, the accelerating pace of energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, and population growth has thrust the planet into a massive uncontrolled experiment. J. R. McNeill and Peter Engelke's book The Great Acceleration: An Environmental History of the Anthropocene since 1945 (Harvard UP, 2016) explains its causes and consequences, highlighting the role of energy systems, as well as trends in climate change, urbanization, and environmentalism. More than any other factor, human dependence on fossil fuels inaugurated the Anthropocene. Before 1700, people used little in the way of fossil fuels, but over the next two hundred years coal became the most important energy source. When oil entered the picture, coal and oil soon accounted for seventy-five percent of human energy use. This allowed far more economic activity and produced a higher standard of living than people had ever known—but it created far more ecological disruption. We are now living in the Anthropocene. The period from 1945 to the present represents the most anomalous period in the history of humanity's relationship with the biosphere. Three-quarters of the carbon dioxide humans have contributed to the atmosphere has accumulated since World War II ended, and the number of people on Earth has nearly tripled. So far, humans have dramatically altered the planet's biogeochemical systems without consciously managing them. If we try to control these systems through geoengineering, we will inaugurate another stage of the Anthropocene. Where it might lead, no one can say for sure. J.R. McNeill holds the appointment of University Professor at Georgetown University, serving as a faculty member of the School of Foreign Service and History Department. Professor McNeill is also a past president of American Society for Environmental History and the American Historical Association. Peter Engelke is the Deputy Director of Foresight at the Atlantic Council's Scowcroft Strategy Initiative and a Nonresident Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center. Brady McCartney is an interdisciplinary environmental social scientist at the University of Florida. Email: Brady.McCartney@UFL.edu Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Piercing Wizard Podcast
215 - Brian Skellie on mill certificates and material verification

Piercing Wizard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 117:14


Do you have a complete understanding of what a mill certificate is, how to read and verify one, and how it relates to quality body jewelry? Don't worry, I don't either. Fortunately, we have some very smart and engaged people in our industry who can help explain it to us. Brian Skellie is a current board member for the Association of Professional Piercers, a member of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), and is a leading subject matter expert on safe body jewelry materials. We put a lot of trust in our jewelry manufacturers, but it is still important to perform our due diligence to ensure that the jewelry we buy is actually made from the materials we want. Brian talks about what a mill certificate is and why piercers should care about them. We also discuss the complicated nature of verifying documents, and how the APP's new jewelry certification program looks to simplify the process. Check out my new narrated video all about VCH piercings at www.patreon.com/ryanpba. You can also get information about my upcoming webinars and seminars at www.ryanpba.com.

Concrete Garb
Episode 57: Bev Garnant, American Society of Concrete Contractors

Concrete Garb

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 50:17


Today, the garb brings you Bev Garnant with the American Society of Concrete Contractors.  Bev is the current Executive Director for ASCC and will be retiring next month and the Garb thought it would be critical to get her story recorded.  A graduate of Cornell College, Bev started her career at Widmar/Garnant & Associates in 1976, which was primarily operating in the Public Relations and Publicity sector.  In 2003, she made her final career move to ASCC as their Executive Director. The American Society of Concrete Contractors (ASCC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to enhancing the capabilities of concrete contractors and those who build with concrete, and to providing them a unified voice in the construction industry.   Ladies and Gentleman, allow the garb to introduce, Mrs. Beverly Garnant, American Society of Concrete Contractors.  

Not So Different: a Podcast from The Center for Biosimilars
S5 Ep3: Not So Different: Biosimilars Oncology Roundup for July 2022—Podcast Edition

Not So Different: a Podcast from The Center for Biosimilars

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 4:02


Show notes Written version of the roundup Phase 3 denosumab trial results Alvotech's pharmacokinetics trial for denosumab Poster from the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting Phase 1 pertuzumab trial Rituximab studies from the European Hematology Association Congress 2022 Survey on preparing patients and providers for switching to a biosimilar

S.O.S. (Stories of Service) - Ordinary people who do extraordinary work
Former Navy commanding officer, sleep & DEI crusader | Capt. (ret) John Cordle - S.O.S. Podcast #54

S.O.S. (Stories of Service) - Ordinary people who do extraordinary work

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 66:20


My next guest is at the front lines of making our Navy better by speaking up and speaking out about hard issues, such as how sleep impacts readiness and how important diversity and inclusion are even when people try to mistakingly pit these efforts against warfighting readiness. Nope! They go hand in hand, and John will explain why. He addresses the current "woke' narrative and how that is a misguided attempt to distract from the bigger issues. He has written numerous articles for the Naval Institute Press. I'm lucky to call him a friend in the fight to make the Navy better and more accountable. He is currently the principal advisor to the Commander, Naval Surface Forces Atlantic for Human Factors and Human Systems Integration (HFE/HSI) matters.He is a subject matter expert in crew endurance, Surface Ship Safety, and the use of Circadian Watch Rotations to improve operational performance. He was recognized with the 2019 American Society of Naval Engineers “Solberg Award” for Naval Research Impact. He was recognized as USNI Proceedings Author of the Year and Surface Navy Literary Award In 2018. He displayed unparalleled leadership and technical experience including Chief of Staff for COMNAVSURFLANT, two tours in Command of Navy AEGIS Warships, and two New Construction Nuclear Aircraft Carriers. He was awarded the 2010 Navy League John Paul Jones Award for Inspirational Leadership and BUMED Epictetus Award for his Innovative 3/9 watch bill - endorsed by Navy Safety Center - while in Major Command of USS SAN JACINTO.  Additionally, he was recognized with Surface Navy Association Literary Award for 2013 for an article co-authored with Dr. Nita Shattuck "A Sea Change in Standing Watch" Lastly, he received the Admiral Bulkeley Leadership Award for Excellence in Command of USS OSCAR AUSTIN.You can reach Mr, Cordle here - https://www.linkedin.com/in/cordlejp/

Future Construct
Dr. Mani Golparvar: Bringing the Project Site to Decision Makers at Reconstruct

Future Construct

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 34:04


In this week's episode of the Future Construct Podcast (34-minute podcast), our host Amy Peck (@AmyPeckXR) is thrilled to be joined by Dr. Mani Golparvar (@mgolpar2), CTO and Co-Founder of Reconstruct (@reconstructinc). Reconstruct is a startup that Mani has been a driving force behind and describes it as a “Software-as-a-Service company” that equips an “AI-powered digital twin platform.” Reconstruct operates by integrating reality modeling, building information modeling, and project scheduling to visually track progress, analyze productivity, and proactively detect potential delays using predictive analytics. We learn from Mani about the process behind Reconstruct and how they plan to impact the future of construction. Founded in 2016, Reconstruct has already been acknowledged by several industrial awards, such as Crunchbase's 50 Hot Tech Companies Globally in 2019, the 2016 World Economic Forum most innovative startup company, and the 2016 Innovation Award from Turner Construction (@turner_talk). He is also an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, Computer Science, & Technology Entrepreneurship and the director of the Real-time and Automated Monitoring and Control lab at the University of Illinois (@UofIllinois). Dr. Golparvar is highly regarded with his list of academic and lifetime achievements going on and on. His industry-leading work in the area of computer vision, machine learning, and BIM has been recognized by many awards, including the 2018 Walter Huber Research Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2017 National Top 20 Under 40 from ENR; 2016 Dan Halpin Award for Scholarship in Construction, and 2013 James Croes Medal for innovation in Civil Engineering from ASCE. Highlights of Mani's interview with host Amy Peck include:- How Reconstruct is helping construction companies design digital twins of construction sites to help paint the picture for the future of construction.- Mani discusses how he is helping influence and educate the next generation of entrepreneurs.- How KPIs can measure tangible impacts in your startup.- How Mani sees the future of robotics impacting the construction industry and coexisting with workers and management teams.Prior to his work with Reconstruct, Mani has been a part of many national and international construction companies. Most extensively with Turner Construction, where he spent 2 and a half years before becoming an assistant professor in civil engineering at Virginia Tech (@virginia_tech) and going on to become the Director of Real-Time and Automated Monitoring and Control Lab. It was through his early success and through his ongoing research that he was able to build Reconstruct into the industry-changing company it is today. Dr. Golparvar's vision is to take construction to new heights. With his expertise in AI, BIM, and augmented reality, Reconstruct is in a position to do just that. SHOW NOTES 0:12  - Amy Peck introduces Dr. Mani Golparvar, the Chief Technology Officer and Co-Founder of Reconstruct. 4:16  - Dr. Golparvar talks about weekly coordination meetings at construction sites being archaic and how Reconstruct can completely change how construction sites operate. 18:10  - Dr. Golparvar talks about his vision for the future of the construction industry and how KPIs help him and his colleagues to gauge success on several different levels. 25:16  - Amy asks Dr. Golparvar about other technologies in his industry that he is wowed by. This is followed by an interesting conversation about the impact robotics has on the future of construction.  31:19  - Dr. Golparvar talks about the “painstaking administrative work that we do in construction” and how to make it completely autonomous. “So we can have our people work, focus on more value-adding tasks.”

Oncology Data Advisor
Tackling Violence and Stigmatization to Decrease Disparities for Transgender Patients: Ash Alpert

Oncology Data Advisor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 7:49


At the recent American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago, Illinois, Dr. Ash Alpert, a postdoctoral fellow in health services research at Brown University, presented two posters regarding the associations between violence and cancer risk factors for transgender and cisgender people. In this follow-up interview with Oncology Data Advisor, Dr. Alpert delves further into the implications of these two studies' results and shares how their ongoing research in this field seeks to improve the care of transgender people in the health care setting.

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com
Challenging Your Property Assessment

MoneyWise on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 25:18


Homeowners love the fact that property values have gone through the roof this past year, but there's a downside. If you haven't gotten your latest property assessment, you could be in for a shock. Your property tax assessment will probably rise right along with your home's value. But is it accurate? We'll tell you how to challenge yours today on MoneyWise. Real estate analysts are predicting that a property assessment reckoning is coming due to dramatically higher home values. Since assessments are automatically tied to property value in most cases, tax hikes seem inevitable. Property assessments were already trending upward well before the huge value spikes of last year. In Spokane, Washington, the average property tax bill rose from $2,500 in 2019 to $3,000 in 2021, an increase of 20%. You can only imagine the increase when the 2022 bill comes around. The good news is, you can challenge your property tax assessment. It doesn't mean you'll win, but you can always try. By some estimates, you have a 20% - 40% chance of being successful in challenging an assessment. HOW TO CHALLENGE YOUR PROPERTY TAX ASSESSMENT Almost all jurisdictions have some form of appeal process, usually within 90 days of receiving a new assessment. First you need to find out the deadline for appealing. Then check to see how your home was assessed. In most cases it's simply a percentage of the market value. Then make sure that your local assessment office has applied any reductions or credits you're entitled to. These are things like homestead exemptions, and credits for veterans, the elderly, and the disabled. You may have to show evidence that you're entitled to a particular benefit. Very often, homeowners don't take advantage of these breaks. Next, make sure that the official description of your property is accurate. Your local assessor's office should have a record card on file describing your property. You can ask to see it. Look for discrepancies like an extra bedroom or bathroom that you don't really have. The assessor may be able to correct a mistake on the spot, so you don't have to make a formal appeal. If everything in the property description checks out, you next want to start comparing your property to other homes in your neck of the woods. But make sure you're doing it apples to apples.' That means comparing your property only to those with similar features roughly the same square footage and lot size and the same number of bedrooms and bathrooms. If you don't have a basement, don't compare your property to others that do. Even an unfinished basement can add 15% to a home's value. If you see that you're being assessed a higher amount than similar properties in your neighborhood, you may have grounds for an appeal. At that point, you want to start building your case. The appeal process itself will vary, so you'll need to check with your local assessment office to see how it's done and to get any forms you might need. Whatever the process, though, you'll need to gather and organize your evidence. That would be the value of comparable homes you've dug up, photographs, and even blueprints if you have them. Once you file your challenge, you may have to wait several months before you get an answer, and it may not be the answer you want. But that doesn't mean you should give up. Most jurisdictions have an appeals board, where you can make your case in person. You don't have to do this all on your own. If you're willing to shell out a few hundred dollars, you can hire an independent appraiser to get a more accurate value of your property. But first, make sure your jurisdiction allows outside appraisals, and that your appraiser is certified by the Appraisal Institute or the American Society of Appraisers. You may be wondering if all this is worth it. Well, not if you discover fairly early in the process that comparable properties were assessed the same as yours. But if they aren't, and you win your case, you'll be able to enjoy a lower tax bill year after year and that would definitely be worth it. On today's program, Rob also answers listener questions: ● How should closing costs factor into your decision about buying a home? ● How will your capital gain be determined after selling a second home and how can you minimize the tax liability? ● Would it be wise to sell your primary home and move into a rental property? ● How can you investigate pension information with your employer? RESOURCES MENTIONED: ● Bankrate.com Remember, you can call in to ask your questions most days at (800) 525-7000 or email them to Questions@MoneyWise.org. Also, visit our website at MoneyWise.org where you can connect with a MoneyWise Coach, join the MoneyWise Community, and even download the free MoneyWise app. To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/1085/29

Microbe Magazine Podcast
Diagnosis and Treatment of Monkeypox

Microbe Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 39:12


As July 26, the world has documented 19,188 cases of monkeypox, with 3,591 cases in the US alone, making the US the country with the most known infections amid the global outbreak. The WHO has declared monkeypox a public health emergency. Although this disease has been known for years, certain features suggest that we are facing a unique outbreak of monkeypox with the potential for worldwide spreading. In this special podcast edition of Editors in Conversation we will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of monkeypox with experts in the field who have dealt with significant number of cases in the US. Topics: • The significance of the monkeypox outbreak • The approach for the diagnosis of monkeypox • The treatment approaches and prevention tools for monkeypox This special episode is brought to you by Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy journals. Hosts: - Cesar A. Arias, Editor in Chief of AAC, - Dr. Elli Theel, Editor of JCM This podcast is supported by the American Society for Microbiology, which publishes both JCM and AAC. Don't forget to check the latest issues of JCM and AAC with outstanding papers on microbial diagnostics, mechanisms of resistance, pharmacology of antimicrobial agents, epidemiology and clinical therapeutics, among others. Joining us to discuss this important topic are: • Jason Zucker, MD. Assistant Professor of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center and Infectious Diseases physician at New York-Presbyterian / Columbia University Irving Medical Center • Benjamin Pinsky, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Infectious Diseases). Stanford University, palo Alto, CA. Medical Director of the Clinical Virology Laboratory for Stanford Health Care and the Stanford Children's Health.

Cleveland Clinic Cancer Advances
KRYSTAL-1 Lung Cancer Trial

Cleveland Clinic Cancer Advances

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 24:39


Director of the Lung Cancer Medical Oncology Program at Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Nathan A. Pennell, MD, PhD joins the Cancer Advances podcast to discuss the KRYSTAL-1 trial, a new treatment option for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer with KRASG12C mutation. Listen as Dr. Pennell explains the trial and findings that were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2022 annual meeting.

Hands In Motion
Treating Traumatic Injuries with Gayle Severance, MS, OT/L, CHT and Danielle Zook OTD, MOT, OTR/L, CHT

Hands In Motion

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 40:29


We are joined by Gayle Severance and Danielle Zook, both occupational therapists and Certified Hand Therapists with Penn Good Shepherd in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are no strangers to treating patients who have sustained complex traumatic injuries and they share their wisdom with us. They share tips on how to prioritize your evaluation and treatment sessions to maximize outcomes and provide some great advice on how to be an advocate for your patient.   Guest Bios Gayle Severance, MS, OT/L, CHT Gayle Severance MS, OT/L, CHT received her Occupational Therapy degree from Tufts University in 2000 and a certificate in Hand and Upper Extremity Rehabilitation from Drexel University in 2004. Gayle practices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and is the Hand Therapy Team Leader for Good Shepherd Penn Partners, the official rehab provider for Penn Medicine. Her expertise is in the area of elbows, wrists and hands. She helped develop the therapy program for Penn's Hand and Upper Extremity Transplant Program and serves as the lead therapist. Gayle is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists, the American Association of Hand Surgery and the American Society for Surgery of the Hand. In 2014 She has participated in international medical missions including her travel to Kumasi, Ghana as the AAHS Vargas Award recipient. She continued to support the site as co-project director for Health Volunteers Overseas until 2017. She has published on the subject of hand therapy and presents at conferences on the international, national and local level. Team Lead Occupational Therapist Specialties Musculoskeletal Hand, Wrist and Elbow   Danielle Zook OTD, MOT, OTR/L, CHT Danielle is an Occupational Therapist and Certified Hand Therapist with over eight years of experience treating upper extremity diagnoses. She recently completed her Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctorate, specializing in Teaching and Learning, at the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences. Her expertise is in the evaluation and treatment of the hand, wrist, and elbow. Danielle has assisted in teaching the American Society of Hand Therapists Hands-on Orthotics Course, and has served as adjunct faculty at the University of the Sciences teaching a hand therapy course. She has also acted as a lab assistant and provided guest lectures at local Occupational Therapy programs on hand therapy interventions, ergonomics, functional movement analysis, and thermal agent modalities. Danielle is a member of the American Society of Hand Therapists as well as the American Association for Hand Surgery. She has been published on the evaluation and treatment of complex trauma in the upper extremity.

Bowel and Bladder Matters Podcast
A surgeon's permission for post-op convexity: Part 2

Bowel and Bladder Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 26:10


Join us for part 2 of this series, as we continue the conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Raskin and Janet Stoia-Davis. They discuss convexity in the post-operative phase referencing the newly released Use of a Convex Pouching System in the Postoperative Period: A National Consensus.Guests' bio: Dr. Raskin is a colorectal surgeon and fellow of both the American College of Surgeons and American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and specializes in bowel conservation and minimal invasive approaches. She is currently the surgical director of the Margolis Inflammatory Bowel Disease Program at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, CA Janet is a Registered Nurse, Certified Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurse, and a Foot Care Nurse. She has been working as a CWOCN for over 36 years across the continuum with a focus on quality of life. Visit https://www.coloplast.us/professional/ for more educational offerings.

Dear Family,
Dr. Ran Anbar- Pediatric Pulmonologist Addresses All Types of Health Challenges with Hypnosis

Dear Family,

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 44:40


Dr. Ran Anbar is a pediatrician board certified in pulmonology who offers hypnosis and counseling services in La Jolla, California, and Syracuse, New York. He's past president, fellow, and approved consultant of the American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. He's here today to discuss the power of hypnosis, which has long been looked upon with confusion and skepticism. He shines a light on this underutilized field of medicine and why it should be the first line of defense before medication for mental health symptoms. With 25 years of experience, Dr. Anbar is a leader in clinical hypnosis who has successfully treated over 7,000 children. He's served as a professor of pediatrics and medicine and the director of pediatric pulmonology at SUNY Medical University in New York for 21 years. He's worked as an editor for the American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis and directed more than 20 clinic workshops on pediatric hypnosis. He's trained more than a thousand healthcare providers, been the principal investigator in 10 published case studies of pediatric hypnosis, is involved in research trials of children with cystic fibrosis and other pulmonary disorders, and has lectured all over the world.  Dr. Anbar is a published author of more than 50 articles, abstracts, and book chapters on pediatric functional disorders and pediatric hypnosis. He's just published a book titled, “Changing Children's Lives with Hypnosis” to help parents, kids, and anyone interested in using hypnosis to increase their well-being.    SHOW NOTE LINKS: Changing Children's Lives with Hypnosis: A Journey to the Center CenterPoint Hypnosis 6 Ways to Use Hypnosis for Improved Well-Being | Psychology Today 988 Official Lifeline   CONNECT WITH US! *Dear Family, Podcast Page *Write Now Rachel Website *Rachel's Blog @Medium *Rachel's Twitter *Facebook *Instagram   PLEASE JOIN: *Dear Family Members, the Private Facebook Group   WAYS TO HELP THE PODCAST: *PLEASE Leave a 5-Star Review and Subscribe!   Thank you! Your support means the world to me. Wishing you love, happiness, and good mental health always.  

The E3Rehab Podcast
68. Frozen Shoulder Updates w/ Drs. Ellen Shanley, Craig Wassinger, & Lori Michener

The E3Rehab Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 47:44


In this episode, we sat down with Drs. Ellen Shanley, Craig Wassinger, & Lori Michener to discuss the latest evidence related to Frozen Shoulder as they've been working diligently on updating the Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for the Academy of Orthopedic Physical Therapy. --- American Society of Shoulder and Elbow Therapists --- More about us:  YouTube: https://youtu.be/SV7exHYLVHU  Website: https://e3rehab.com/  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/e3rehab/ --- This episode was produced by Matt Hunter.

The Doctor's Art
Lessons from a Lifelong Patient Turned Oncologist (w/ Dr. Eric Winer)

The Doctor's Art

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 36:30


Born with hemophilia in a time before effective therapies existed and having experienced treatment complications including hepatitis C and HIV, Dr. Eric Winer spent much of his childhood and young adulthood in and out of the hospital. Today, he is the Director of Yale Cancer Center and President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the largest organization of clinicians caring for cancer patients. An internationally renowned expert in breast cancer, his research has immensely impacted how breast cancer is now treated. In this episode, Dr. Winer shares his path to oncology and his insights from being a lifelong patient on stigma, compassion, and empathy.In this episode, you will hear about:How growing up with hemophilia led Dr. Winer to the field of medicine - 1:50The patient that cemented Dr. Winer's dedication to oncology as his life's work - 7:55Dr. Winer's reflections on how his experiences as a patient shape his work as a doctor - 12:52Facing the reality of caring for patients with terminal illness - 18:21How Dr. Winer grounds the care he provides in the humanism of each patient - 23:49Dr. Winer's mission and vision as president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology - 25:49How leading by example is critical to cultivating a strong, respectful, and collaborative institutional culture - 31:02Dr. Winer's advice to medical students and new clinicians on maintaining a connection to meaningful work - 33:12Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to info@thedoctorsart.com.Copyright The Doctor's Art Podcast 2022

AJNR Podcasts
August 2022 Annotated Bibliography

AJNR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 27:54


Join Editor-in-Chief Jeffrey Ross for the August AJNR Blog Annotated Bibliography podcast, featuring an audio tour of 8 recently published articles and a commentary. (27:53) The American Society of Neuroradiology is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Visit the ASNR Education Connection website to claim CME credit for this podcast.

Life-Changing Science: The BioBuilder Podcast
Season 2 Episode 7: Meet BioBuilder Dave Westenberg

Life-Changing Science: The BioBuilder Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 34:03


Dave Westenberg, a Professor of Biological Sciences at Missouri University of Science & Technology, is widely known as a wonderful microbiologist, a great communicator and an exceptionally dedicated teacher. His students, be they undergraduates, high school teachers or public audiences, invariably feel empowered as scientists because Dave makes room for student curiosity, collaboration, and learning from mistakes. Dave attended one of BioBuilder's earliest professional development workshops and immediately saw how the curriculum could create the kind of educational experiences he wanted for his students. His enthusiasm led him to attended BioBuilder's advanced training program. He has gone on to teach professional development workshops including some in NYC @ Rockefeller with Lindsey L'Ecuyer. He regularly leads workshops in pedagogy and synthetic biology through M S&T and through the American Society for Microbiology.

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
Surviving a double attempted homicide while 8 months pregnant with Agape Garcia

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 55:33


Surviving a double attempted homicide while 8 months pregnant with Agape Garcia. Her survival of a double attempted homicide while 8 months pregnant (by the father) and the desperation to survive became the catalyst to the foundation of BYIS while achieving an undisputed outlook of independence. During her journey to overcome, Garcia learned that extreme independence is a trauma driven response and a natural one which can be defeated through focused, self awareness and intentional control. Through her own walk, harsh lessons brought on by extreme independence resulted in areas of her life being sabotaged repeatedly. Her personal journey of post traumatic growth has led Garcia to dedicating her life in developing transformational programs, various forms of coaching, certification courses and establishing a nonprofit to help real time victims. Her commitment is to provide lifelong transformational habits that can restore your powerful internal sense of control. One of her personal statements, ‘You don't live anywhere but in your head' is why some of her laser focus teachings are on aligning your mental and emotional belief system. As her passion grew from her own personal struggles, Garcia became active within the community receiving a Mayoral appointment to work with the Citizen Review board in direct conjunction with Internal Affairs. She received hands-on training from the Sheriff's department, Department of Homeland Security, and FEMA which also led to the Infrastructure Liaison Officer designation (ILO), through the local Law Enforcement Center. Garcia has spent more than 20 years in the corporate world holding positions in Office Administration, Project Management, Compliance, Policy writing, Team building, Training, Leadership, and Consulting. She continued to serve other organizations including the American Society for Industrial Security (ASIS), and Board of Directors and holds current membership in the FBI vetted private sector program of InfraGard. As VP of a Security Consultant Company, she has developed programs with leadership responsibility for security and emergency management. These emphasize awareness toward identifying different stages of human behavior leading towards violence mitigation. While working, attending school, and raising her kids as a single parent, her personal priorities of housing, safety and privacy for her children were of utmost importance. This required Garcia to navigate through various self-help centers, state, city, local programs, systems and assistance to create a stable foundation for her family while providing the ability to assist others. She also volunteers and collaborates with local law writer(s), in support of bills under Public Safety. Garcia believes in the need to feel loved, wanted, and cared for as a part of life in all of us. Living through emotional tugs of war and learning to apply a controlled healthy mindset to overcome voids, shortcomings, and to break unhealthy cycles is who she is today versus the opposite of where she came from. Today, she prides herself on meeting the daily challenges of being vulnerable and safe at the same time while empowering others to Be Your Incredible Self. Garcia's personal mission is to help lead others in transforming their survival of Domestic Violence (DV) into Post Traumatic Growth and to mitigate the depletion of resources for real-time victims. Sharing her personal testimony has empowered so many others. She loves teaching her BYIS formula of: How to combine Situational Awareness with Emotional Intelligence to control your triggers.  

Our MBC Life
S04 E18 - Report Back from ASCO 2022: What's the Latest in MBC Research?

Our MBC Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 68:42


The biggest cancer conference in the world,  the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2022 annual meeting, was back in person after 2 years online during the COVID pandemic. Some of the research highlights presented this year are “practice-changing.” and received a rarely given standing ovation. What is  practice changing in MBC?  Get the answer to this  question and a lot more in the report back from ASCO.Just like the conference itself, the report back from ASCO has become an annual event and a tradition at SHARE.  Shortly after the conference the co-producers of the Our MBC Life podcast Natalia Green and Victoria Goldberg welcomed Dr Niel Iyengar to SHARE to talk about the main highlights in Metastatic Breast Cancer from 2022 ASCO. Thanks for listening!More info is available in our episode notes for this series on our website:  www.ourmbclife.orgGot something to share? Feedback?Email: ourmbclife@sharecancersupport.org Send us a voice recording via email or through speakpipe on our website.  Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter @ourmbclife 

GSA on Aging
The Gerontologist Podcast: ”American Dementia” with Drs. Daniel George and Peter Whitehouse

GSA on Aging

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 27:43 Very Popular


Dr. Degenholtz interviewed Drs. Daniel George at Penn State College of Medicine and Peter Whitehouse at Case Western Reserve University about their co-authored book, “American Dementia: Brain Health in an Unhealthy Society,” published last year by Johns Hopkins University Press.  Information about the book can be found at http://www.AmericanDementia.com. The Gerontologist published a review of the book by Drs. Cameron J. Camp and Evan Shelton, “Zooming Out on Dementia: The Effects of American Society on Brain Health.”

Kaleidoscope of Possibilities
EP 58 – The Science of Addiction with Dr. David Smith

Kaleidoscope of Possibilities

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 44:12


To watch the video of this episode, please go to: https://youtu.be/NdaFuJuggxE   What is really happening with addiction and what does recovery actually entail?   How do psychedelics work with addiction, trauma, and mental disorders?   What is the future of addiction treatment and recovery?   Discover these fascinating insights into addiction and trauma and so much more in this powerful episode of Kaleidoscope of Possibilities: Alternative Perspectives on Mental Health in which Dr. Adriana Popescu is joined by addiction treatment pioneer Dr. David Smith. Dr. Smith brings his lifetime of leadership in the field of addiction and recovery and shares his wisdom, experience, strength, and hope.   In this episode: Dr. Smith's history Developing a free medical clinic LSD and psychedelic medicine Psychedelic revolution How psychedelics work Trauma capsule Bad trips Integration of treatment Avery Lane The disease and dysfunctional behaviors of addiction Relapse The neurology of addiction Self-medication TJ Woodward Brainspotting The addictive process Psychedelic-assisted therapies Psilocybin MAT or Medication Assisted Therapies A vision for the future   Resources mentioned in this episode: Dr. Smith's website: http://www.drdave.org/index.html Avery Lane: https://www.averylanewomensrehab.com/ TJ Woodward: https://www.tjwoodward.com/   About Dr. Smith: Dr. David E. Smith is recognized as a national leader in the areas of the treatment of addictive disease, the psychopharmacology of drugs, new research strategies in the management of drug abuse problems, and appropriate prescribing practices for physicians. He is the Founder of the Haight-Ashbury Free Clinics in San Francisco, which merged with Walden House in mid-2011 to form HealthRIGHT 360, which provides services at multiple sites throughout California. Dr. Smith is currently the Chair of Addiction Medicine for Muir Wood Adolescent and Family Services, a gender-specific residential program for teenagers suffering from substance abuse and co-occurring issues in Petaluma, California. He is also the Medical Director for Center Point, a 6-month residential therapeutic community in San Rafael, California, which provides comprehensive, integrated services to at-risk individuals and families. He also serves as Chief of Addiction Medicine for Alta Mira Recovery Programs in Sausalito, California, a private residential chemical dependency program, and is the Medical Director at Avery Lane in Novato, California, a holistic drug and alcohol rehabilitation center for women with co-occurring substance use and mental disorders and trauma. Dr. Smith has also served as Adjunct Professor at the University of California, San Francisco; as Medical Director of the California State Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs; and as Medical Director of the California Collaborative Center for Substance Abuse Policy Research. He is a Fellow and Past President of the American Society of Addiction Medicine and of the California Society of Addiction Medicine. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the University of California, San Francisco Medal, the Peter E. Haas Public Service Award from the University of California, Berkeley, the Robert D. Sparks, MD, Leadership Achievement Award of the California Medical Association, and the Annual Award of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. Dr. Smith is the Founding Editor of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs and an Editorial Board member of the Journal of Addiction Medicine. In addition, he has authored or co-authored 26 books, written over 350 journal articles, edited 28 journals, and has been the technical consultant for 28 drug abuse-related films. He is the co-author, with Dr. Daniel G. Amen, of Unchain Your Brain: 10 Steps to Breaking the Addictions that Steal Your Life.   “We are in the midst of the biggest drug epidemic in US history and the things that we have learned about how to treat addiction should be available to all people who have addictive disorders.” – Dr. Smith   Would you like to continue this conversation and connect with other people who are interested in exploring these topics? Please join us on our Facebook group! (https://www.facebook.com/groups/kaleidoscopeofpossibilitiespodcast/)   About your host: Dr. Adriana Popescu is a clinical psychologist, addiction and trauma specialist, author, speaker and empowerment coach who is based in San Francisco, California and practices worldwide.   For more information on Dr. Adriana, her sessions and classes, please visit: https://adrianapopescu.org/   To learn about her new trauma treatment program Firebird Healing, please visit the website: https://www.firebird-healing.com/   You can also follow her on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrAdrianaPopescu/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dradrianapopescu/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrAdrianaP Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adriana-popescu-ph-d-03793 Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/dradrianapopescu Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCflL0zScRAZI3mEnzb6viVA Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/kaleidoscopepossibilities TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@dradrianapopescu?   Disclaimer: This podcast represents the opinions of Dr. Adriana Popescu and her guests. The content expressed therein should not be taken as psychological or medical advice. The content here is for informational or entertainment purposes only. Please consult your healthcare professional for any medical or treatment questions.   This website or podcast is not to be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing “standard of care” in any legal sense or as a basis for legal proceedings or expert witness testimony. Listening, reading, emailing, or interacting on social media with our content in no way establishes a client-therapist relationship.

Cancer.Net Podcasts
2022 Research Round Up: Multiple Myeloma, Breast Cancer, and Cancer in Adults 60 and Over

Cancer.Net Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 31:34


ASCO: You're listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests' statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses. In the Research Round Up series, ASCO experts and members of the Cancer.Net Editorial Board discuss the most exciting and practice-changing research in their field and explain what it means for people with cancer. In today's episode, our guests will discuss new research in multiple myeloma, breast cancer, and cancer in adults 60 and over that was presented at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting, held June 3-7. First, Dr. Sagar Lonial discusses a study on treatment for newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma in people under 65.   Dr. Lonial is a professor of Hematology and Medical Oncology at Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, where he also serves as Department Chair. He is also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Myeloma. View Dr. Lonial's disclosures at Cancer.Net. Dr. Lonial: Hello, I'm Dr. Sagar Lonial from the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. And today I'm going to discuss one of the Plenary abstracts at ASCO 2022, which was the DETERMINATION study, again, presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting. For the sake of disclosure, I just want to make sure I list that I was an investigator on this study. I also have consulting relationships with Takeda, Celgene, BMS, Janssen, and other companies that have agents in the context of multiple myeloma. So the reason I want to talk about this study today is I think it's a really important study that was designed over a decade ago to really ask the question, with a really powerful induction regimen that uses what we now call the RVd regimen, lenalidomide with bortezomib and dexamethasone, do you really still need to have high-dose therapy and autologous transplant as part of the treatment approach? And so the trial was a very simple randomized trial that everybody received RVd induction. And then there was a randomization between early transplant and then going on to consolidation and continuous lenalidomide maintenance versus no transplant going on to consolidation and lenalidomide maintenance. So both arms actually received continuous lenalidomide maintenance, which is really one of the important endpoints of this study overall. And the reason I say that is there was a smaller study done in France a few years previous to this where patients only received 1 to 2 years of lenalidomide maintenance. And in that trial, clearly the use of transplant was better. And the remission duration for the group that received the transplant was about 48 months. So the question was, with continuous lenalidomide maintenance, can you make that longer? So randomized trial, over 600 patients were randomized between these 2 arms. And the follow-up now is somewhere around 7 years in total. And what was demonstrated both in the ASCO Annual Meeting as well as in the paper that came out at the same time in the New England Journal of Medicine was that the remission duration was clearly longer in the group that had the transplant than the group that did not, even with both arms receiving continuous lenalidomide maintenance. And it was almost 66 months in the group that received the transplant, 21 months longer, almost 2 years longer than the group that did not receive the transplant. And so I think this is really important because what it says is that even in an era of really good induction therapy, transplant continues to offer significant benefit in terms of progression-free survival. Now, the reason progression-free survival is so important in this study is that we know that no time is more sensitive for treatment of myeloma than that first time we treat the patient. And so prolonging that first remission is really important because the disease is at its most sensitive at that time point. Now, there were questions about overall survival. Should we see an overall survival benefit? And I'll tell you, A, this trial was never designed to measure an overall survival benefit. And, B, the median survival for myeloma patients is now between 10 and 15 years on average. And so with only 7 year follow-up, it seems to me unrealistic to expect this to have a survival benefit at this early time point. So rather than saying there's no difference in overall survival, I think it's a fair statement to say at the short follow-up we have, there is no difference in survival. But I actually don't think survival is the right endpoint for newly diagnosed myeloma trials in fit patients because we do have so many important treatments to discuss. Now, there was also discussion about adverse events. Obviously, the quality of life during the transplant dropped a little bit. Not a big surprise. That lasted about 2 to 3 weeks, and then quickly, by 3 months out, returned back to baseline for almost every patient in the study. Additionally, there was a concern about second primary malignancies. If you look at this data, it's really no different than what we saw in the French study. There was a slightly higher risk of second primary malignancy, but we know that this is the case not only in myeloma, but in patients who receive alkylate-based therapy. And despite that, the progression-free survival was 2 years longer in the group that received the transplant than the group that did not. So I think, in summary, this is really an important trial because there are many groups that are making the case that perhaps we don't need transplant in this modern era of myeloma therapy. And I think that it's important to recognize that what we're looking at are not short-term endpoints. We're not looking at early MRD (minimal residual disease) negativity. What we're looking at is really ultimate measurement of clinical benefit, which to me is prolonging that first remission as long as you can. And so this trial clearly demonstrates that for young, fit patients, transplant continues to offer significant benefit, almost 2 years of benefit with continuous lenalidomide maintenance. And while there's a push to say perhaps we can think about which patients may or may not need a transplant, honestly, as clinicians, we're not good enough to make that prediction. And what I think is really important is that we not lose sight of trying to prolong that first remission with the best tools that we have. And I think even in this modern era of 2022, high-dose therapy and autologous transplant continues to be one of those tools, and we want to use it to maximize the duration of that first remission. So thank you again for listening to this brief summary of the DETERMINATION trial presented at the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine. ASCO: Next, Dr. Norah Lynn Henry discusses new treatment advances for people with metastatic breast cancer, as well as 2 studies in early-stage breast cancer. Dr. Henry is an Associate Professor in the University of Michigan's Division of Hematology/Oncology in the Department of Internal Medicine and is the Breast Oncology Disease Lead at the Rogel Cancer Center. She is also the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Breast Cancer. View Dr. Henry's disclosures at Cancer.Net. Dr. Henry: Hi. I'm Dr. Lynn Henry, a breast cancer oncologist from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center. Welcome to this quick summary of updates in breast cancer from the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. I have no conflicts of interest for any of the trials that I will talk about. First, I'm going to give a very brief overview of the types of breast cancer, then talk about some research that was presented on both metastatic and early-stage breast cancer. As a reminder, there are multiple kinds of breast cancer. Some breast cancers are called hormone receptor-positive or estrogen receptor-positive and are stimulated to grow by the hormone estrogen. We typically treat those cancers first with antiestrogen treatments, which block estrogen or lower estrogen levels. Other breast cancers are called “HER2 positive.” These are often more aggressive cancers, but because they have extra copies of HER2, they often respond to treatments that block HER2. Finally, there are breast cancers that don't have hormone receptors or very much HER2. These are called triple-negative breast cancer and are also often aggressive cancers. One of the biggest stories from the ASCO Annual Meeting was the results of the DESTINY-Breast04 trial. In this trial, researchers studied a type of medication called trastuzumab deruxtecan, which is also called Enhertu. This drug is a combination of the anti-HER2 antibody, trastuzumab, plus a chemotherapy drug, and the antibody targets the drug to the cancer sort of like a guided missile. Trastuzumab deruxtecan is currently routinely used to treat patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. Now, the interesting thing is there was already data from studies that suggested that this drug might also work against breast cancers that have some HER2 receptors on the surface of their cells, but not so many that they meet the true definition of being HER2 positive. For the DESTINY-04 study, patients' tumors had to have either 1+ or 2+ HER2, which some people called “HER2 low,” and could be either estrogen receptor positive or negative. Two thirds of the patients were treated with trastuzumab deruxtecan, and the other one-third were treated with 1 of 4 different standard chemo regimens that their physician thought was the best treatment option for them. Treatment with trastuzumab deruxtecan was shown to lengthen the time people were able to remain on treatment. Importantly, it was also shown to increase the overall survival of patients compared to standard chemotherapy by more than 6 months for patients with estrogen receptor-positive cancer and by more than 10 months for patients with estrogen receptor-negative cancer. Since this is a drug that we currently use to treat patients with other types of cancer, we actually know a lot about its side effects. One key toxicity is it can cause a very severe inflammation of the lungs in a very small subset of patients. So this is something that we have to watch for very carefully. Otherwise, it is a relatively well-tolerated drug, especially compared to standard chemotherapy. The main side effects are nausea and fatigue. Another clinical trial presented at ASCO called TROPiCS-02 also studied a drug that is currently used to treat a different type of breast cancer. In this case, the drug is sacituzumab govitecan, also called Trodelvy. It is also a combination of an antibody that is targeted against cancer cells plus a chemotherapy drug. Sacituzumab govitecan is currently approved to treat metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. In the TROPiCS-02 trial, however, it was tested to see how effective it is for treating hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. All of the patients enrolled in this trial had already been treated with antihormone therapy medications as well as at least 2 chemotherapy regimens. Half of the patients were randomized to treatment with sacituzumab govitecan, and the other half were treated with 1 of 4 standard chemotherapy drugs that their physician thought was the best for them. Those patients who were treated with sacituzumab govitecan had a longer time on average that the treatment worked compared to those who received standard chemo. They also had improved quality of life based on responses that the participants themselves provided on questionnaires. Although the overall benefit was rather modest, this drug may represent a new treatment option for patients with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer, although at this time it isn't yet approved for treatment of this type of breast cancer. Both of these are examples of being able to take drugs that have been shown to treat 1 type of cancer and potentially expand it so that they can be used to benefit more patients with breast cancer. These drugs are also being tested to see if they are beneficial for treating early-stage breast cancer. So we await more hopefully very exciting results in the future. To switch gears a little bit, I'll now talk about another study I found interesting. This one is in the setting of early-stage breast cancer. So typically, radiation therapy is recommended after lumpectomy since it reduces the likelihood of cancer returning in the breast. However, questions have arisen about how much benefit radiation is actually providing for some patients whose risk of having cancer return in the breast is really low to start with. Therefore, these patients may be at risk of the side effects of radiation as well as other risks, such as financial problems, without actually getting much benefit from the treatment. Therefore, this trial, called LUMINA, evaluated whether radiation therapy was beneficial after lumpectomy for patients who have small, low-risk breast cancers and no lymph node involvement. The trial included 500 women who were at least 55 years of age with invasive ductal cancers that were no more than 2 centimeters in size. They had to be estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative, either grade 1 or 2, and Ki-67 low. Everyone had to be planning to take antihormone therapy for at least 5 years. During the 5-year follow-up period, a total of 10 patients out of 500, about 2.3% of all patients, had their cancer return in the breast. The researchers therefore concluded that for patients with this type of very low-risk breast cancer, it is reasonable to omit radiation therapy and just take endocrine therapy. Similar results have previously been shown for patients over the age of 70 with small lymph node-negative low-risk cancers, but this trial expands that option to patients who are as young as 55. Finally, I will touch briefly on the updated results from the ABCSG-18 clinical trial. So this trial enrolled postmenopausal women with early-stage estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer who are being treated with aromatase inhibitor therapy. Aromatase inhibitors are known to cause reductions in bone density. This trial therefore evaluated a medication called denosumab, also called Prolia, which is used to treat osteoporosis. Participants were randomized to treatment every 6 months with either denosumab or a placebo. They found that the patients who were treated with denosumab were half as likely to have a bone fracture. Importantly, patients treated with denosumab also had an improvement in bone density despite taking the aromatase inhibitor medicine, whereas those who received placebo had a decrease in their bone density over time. The other very interesting thing from this study is that patients who received treatment with denosumab were less likely to have their breast cancer return or to develop a new cancer during the 8-year follow-up period. So it's actually already recommended that postmenopausal patients with all types of early-stage breast cancer consider treatment with a different type of bone strengthening medicine called a bisphosphonate as part of their breast cancer treatment. The goal is to further reduce their risk of cancer returning. These new results will now lead experts to debate whether to also include denosumab as a potential additional breast cancer treatment option, not just to help protect people's bone density. There were a lot of other research findings presented that were related to treatment for both early-stage and metastatic breast cancer at the meeting. Importantly, we got glimpses of the many new drugs on the horizon for treatment of breast cancer, and we eagerly await the results of large, randomized trials so that the drugs that work can be used to care for patients with breast cancer. But for now, that's it for this quick summary of important research from the 2022 ASCO Annual Meeting. Stay tuned to Cancer.Net for future updates from upcoming breast cancer conferences. Thank you. ASCO: Thank you, Dr. Henry. Finally, Dr. Shakira Grant discusses 3 studies that looked at cancer in people 60 or older. This field is also known as geriatric oncology. Dr. Grant is an Assistant Professor in the Divisions of Hematology and Geriatric Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a board-certified Geriatric Hematologist/Oncologist. View Dr. Grant's disclosures at Cancer.Net. Dr. Grant: Hi, everyone. I am Dr. Shakira Grant. And I'm an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. I'm also a clinician scientist with a focus on social disparities and how they influence the health and aging of older adults with cancer, primarily multiple myeloma. And for today's talk, I have no relevant conflicts of interest to disclose. It's such a pleasure to be able to talk today about the ASCO 2022 geriatric oncology and presenting key studies, which I believe were really practice-changing or really set up the foundation for informing future research directions. And to start us off, I wanted to start us with abstract 12012 by Dr. Mackenzie Fowler. And this was presented based on the University of Alabama at Birmingham's actual research group. And the title of their presentation was “Rural-Urban Disparities in Geriatric Assessment Impairments and Mortality Among Older Adults with Cancer.” And this was the result of a large registry study, predominantly patients with gastrointestinal cancer-- so cancers such as liver cancer, colon cancer. And what the authors really wanted to do here was to explore if whether or not living in a rural location, for example, is associated with having an impairment based on what people report in their ability to function at home, their quality of life. And they also wanted to see whether or not where you live, meaning a rural location, whether that can be associated with how long you are expected to live or your overall survival. So this was really a study that took patients who were truly older. There were patients who were above the age of 60. As I mentioned, these were patients predominantly with cancers of the liver, the colon, and the pancreas. And patients completed a baseline, what we call a geriatric assessment, to try to assess their overall or global health. And on these assessments, patients are asked questions about how they would rate their physical function and their quality of life. And what the authors found here is that in general, when patients lived in rural areas, this was associated with patients self-reporting more functional deficits, meaning that they reported that they had impairments in the ability to function at home from a physical perspective. They also had impairments in quality of life—so how you rate your general life and how you're doing from a day-to-day basis. And this was impaired if you lived in a rural residence. And then, importantly, this study also showed that living in a rural location—and, again, this study was centered in Alabama—that that was also associated with a reduced overall survival, meaning that people were found in rural areas to live a shorter life with these cancers compared to those who live in non-rural places or, as we call it, urban. And I think why I chose this particular study is because it's one of the first studies using a large data set of almost 1,000 patients that they have enrolled and really looking at the idea of the physical environment, so where a person lives, and how that really interacts with everything else to influence the health of an individual. And this study, I believe, really lays the foundation for an area of work in geriatric oncology where we are moving away from just thinking about the older adult, but we're also thinking about the older adult and the other identities. So we're really considering the sociocultural influence. So we think about race. We think about socioeconomic status, income. But now, we're also including the physical environment. And that is where people are living and spending the majority of their time. And that is in this study classified as rural-urban residency. So for this study, overall, I would say that this is really moving the field forward in a direction where we're moving away from just looking at just older adults, but we're thinking about older adults and all of the other stressors that they face, especially when they live in the community and how that impacts their health. The next study that I wanted to highlight was a study that was performed by Dr. Heidi Klepin at Atrium Health, Wake Forest Baptist. And this was a study that looked at evaluating the association between an electronic health record-embedded frailty measure and survival among patients with cancer. Again, this was an older adult population. It was just over 500 patients involved, and patients were over the age of 65. They had a new diagnosis of the most common cancers, which are lung cancer, colon cancer, and breast cancer. And the good thing about this particular study is that it sought to use data that is readily captured in the electronic health record to characterize a patient as fit, prefrail, and frail. So why is that important for the geriatric oncology community and even beyond is when we're dealing with older adults, we're always thinking about ways in which we can actually characterize their fitness and their ability to hence tolerate their therapies, being chemotherapy, and how likely they are to die if they're having these functional impairments. And so importantly, what this study showed was that in their sample, they found that up to 17% of people were characterized as frail using this index. And the significance of this finding is that when they looked at how long people were likely to live with these cancers, breaking it down according to if you were fit, prefrail, or frail, those who were frail had the shortest overall survival. So it means the time from which they were diagnosed until they die was much shorter than any of the other categories. And that equated to a difference between those who were fit and those who were prefrail of 10 months for those who were frail for overall survival and more than 54 months for those who were actually considered to be fit. So this is really, really important because what we are seeing is that if you are really fit, you are living on average with these cancers—the overall survival, at least for their institution, was more than 54 months. But then as you move across that spectrum of fitness, we're actually seeing that your survival decreases significantly. And so why is this important? So this is important because it's one of the first studies that is actually looking to operationalize the frailty measure for us to be able to potentially use and adapt into other health systems using data that we already collect. So it's no longer burdensome on patients to try to fill out additional forms or for other staff to be involved and collect this data. And this data is showing us that there is an association with this particular frailty index and the ability to predict overall survival-- so, again, a critical study in the geriatric oncology population looking at patients with the 3 most common types of cancer, which are lung cancer, colon cancer, and breast cancer, and really showing us that there is a way potentially to operationalize how we characterize the fitness level of an older adult and then using that data not just to say, "Yes, this person is frail," but for us in real-time to see results where we can see that there is a significant difference in terms of overall survival. Importantly, this is going to be a study where we continue to watch closely the developments over the next few years, especially as the authors and the research team note that their next steps involve looking at how to study how these frailty measures, or the frailty scores that people get when they come in and they're at baseline, how this changes throughout the course of treatment. And that has a lot of implications because now, we have the potential to start thinking about using a frailty-adapted approach to caring for older adults with cancer. What that means is when you're getting your treatment and we are following these scores, as we see things changing, this may be an indicator to us that, "Hey, we need to make some modifications in response to these frailty measures to make sure that our older adult population is able to tolerate their chemotherapies and have maximum benefit while also enjoying a good quality of life." So finally, I want to highlight this third study. And this was a study that was presented by Dr. Etienne Brain. And. Dr. Etienne Brain was also this year's B.J. Kennedy Award recipient. And each year ASCO recognizes the B.J. Kennedy Award recipient as an outstanding investigator who has made significant contributions in the area of research and clinical care of older adults with cancer. In this particular study, Dr. Etienne presented on behalf of his team the final results from a study that was looking at using endocrine therapy with or without chemotherapy for older adult women, so characterized as those who were over the age of 70, with a diagnosis of estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer. And the importance for this study is that the question they sought to examine was whether or not patients who are in this age range still derive a benefit from receiving chemotherapy in addition to endocrine therapy. And what this study really showed is that there was no survival difference. Meaning when they looked at the data for 4 years, those who got chemotherapy plus endocrine therapy lived just as long as those who also just got endocrine therapy alone. And why this is important is because when you think about giving chemotherapy to an older adult population, as oncologists, we are always weighing the risks and the benefits associated with treatment. So we're always thinking about how tolerable is this drug likely to be? We want to minimize side effects because, at the end of the day, our goal is to treat the cancer, but we also want to focus in on the outcomes that matter most to the older adult population. And in general, these are things like maintaining your mobility, maintaining your mentation, maintaining good quality of life. And so we really want to make sure that we're balancing those risks. And this is why this particular study showing that with chemotherapy or without chemotherapy added to endocrine therapy, there seems to be no survival difference. This could be a way in which we move the field forward in thinking about a select group of patients with breast cancer and whether or not those patients truly need that extra toxicity or burden associated with using chemotherapy or whether endocrine therapy is enough. So with that, I will say across these 3 studies, even though they study different things-- we saw 1 study that looked at the intersectionality between older adults in terms of their chronological age but now starting to examine the influence of physical or social context and how that influences the health and outcomes for individuals with primarily gastrointestinal cancer. We also looked at the development of an electronic frailty index in patients with 3 most common solid tumors - lung cancer, colon, and breast cancer - and found that by using this frailty index collecting readily available data, that there was an association with predicting overall survival. And we saw that those who were characterized as frail had one of the shortest overall survivals. And then finally, in this study, looking at endocrine therapy alone versus chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, we saw that there was no survival difference again in an older adult population. And so what we are seeing here is a theme emerging as the importance of comprehensive evaluations of older adults and the importance also of these measures, when integrated across the research continuum, that they are useful in terms of predictive prognostic abilities and really lay the foundation for future research. So with that, I want to thank you for your time and thank you for listening. ASCO: Thank you, Dr. Grant. You can find more research from recent scientific meetings at www.cancer.net. Cancer.Net Podcasts feature trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, and their families and loved ones. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts for expert information and tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care. And check out other ASCO Podcasts to hear the latest interviews and insights from thought leaders, innovators, experts, and pioneers in oncology. Cancer.Net is supported by Conquer Cancer, the ASCO Foundation, which funds lifesaving research for every type of cancer, helping people with cancer everywhere. To help fund Cancer.Net and programs like it, donate at CONQUER.ORG/Donate.

The Insider Travel Report Podcast
ASTA Honors One of Its Own on the Inaugural of Emerald Luna

The Insider Travel Report Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 2:37


Zane Kirby, president and CEO of the American Society of Travel Advisors (ASTA), talks with Alan Fine of Insider Travel Report at the christening of Emerald Cruises newest ship, Emerald Luna, about her new godmother, Vanessa McGovern, chief sales and marketing officer of Gifted Travel Network, and her work with ASTA on its executive committee and board of directors. Kirby also gives his take on the recent changes in the way COVID is being handled for travelers returning to the U.S. and traveling on cruise ships.  For more information, visit www.asta.com. If interested, the original video of this podcast -- with supplemental pictures and video -- can be found on the Insider Travel Report Youtube channel  or by searching for the podcast's title on Youtube. 

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership
TCD: Dr. Lorraine Mazerolle, Ep 78, University of Queensland, Australia

The CopDoc Podcast: Aiming for Excellence in Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 30:48


Lorraine Mazerolle is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow (2010–2015), a Professorial Research Fellow at The University of Queensland, School of Social Science, and a Chief Investigator with the ARC Centre of Excellence for Children and Families over the Life Course. Her research interests are in experimental criminology, policing, drug law enforcement, regulatory crime control, and crime prevention. Professor Mazerolle is a Criminologist at the University of Queensland, Australia. She is an active member and award winner with the American Society of Criminology, and a member of the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at George Mason University.Her research interests include  Experimental Criminology, Policing, especially Third-Party Policing, Problem-Oriented Policing,  Crime Control/Crime Prevention, Crime, Analysis/Environmental Criminology, Community Regulation/Community Capacity Building,  Ecology of Crime and Urban Criminological Theories. Lorraine earned a Bachelor of Arts from Flinders University, a Master of Arts and a  Doctor of Philosophy from Rutgers University. We talked about the value of university researchers working in concert with police agencies, the changing climate for policing, worldwide, and the value of Evidence-based Policing. 

My Favorite Mistake
Six Sigma Black Belt Jonathon Andell Gloated About Solving a Quality Problem

My Favorite Mistake

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 43:10


Episode page - video, transcript, and more My guest for Episode #174 of the My Favorite Mistake podcast is Jonathon Andell. He has been a quality professional since 1987, was one of the world's first certified Six Sigma Black Belts in 1992, and has been a consultant since 1998, and a Fellow of the American Society for Quality since 2008. Among Jonathon's global clients are leading firms in such diverse industries as: aerospace, automotive, construction, design, electronics, food, healthcare, insurance, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, service, software, and telecommunications. He has published and presented extensively. Jonathon has a BS in Metallurgical Engineering from Purdue and MS in Metallurgy from Penn State. He is an avid amateur musician and a passionate community service volunteer. In this episode, Jonathon tells his favorite mistake story about “gloating a bit” when his younger self (a “hot shot”) solved a difficult quality problem at work. Why did that damage some relationships and how did he get helpful feedback about that? We also talk about questions and topics including: Solving problems – sometimes people don't want to admit problems Data driven… people and emotions and empathy, not just data Six Sigma mistakes?? Expert driven – “elitist” 30 Rock mocking Six Sigma? Mistake to “rank and yank” ala Jack Welch? “Huge opponent of rank and yank” — at Amazon? Brian Joiner “Fourth Generation Management” book Creating a culture where it's safe to talk about mistakes — what's necessary for this? Training people but then not letting them use Six Sigma afterward Working on a book with John Thacker --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/favorite-mistake/support

FemTech Focus
BD's newest HPV screening assay - Episode 173

FemTech Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 40:37


Molly Broache serves as Associate Director, US Region, Medical Affairs for BD Integrated Diagnostic Solutions (IDS) and is also licensed as a women's health nurse practitioner in both Maryland and Virginia. Molly manages a team of medical science liaisons responsible for specimen management, microbiology, and women's health & cancer. Molly's clinical areas of expertise include women's healthcare, gynecology, infectious disease diagnostic tests, and women's health screening guidelines. Molly is a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health (NPWH), American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the Medical Science Liaison Society (MSLS). She serves on the membership committee for ASCCP and the Cervical Cancer Screening Initiative – Provider Workgroup for the American Cancer Society. Molly holds two Bachelor's degrees from Johns Hopkins University, in both molecular biology and nursing. She also holds a master's degree in nursing from Georgetown University, where she received her training as a nurse practitioner. Molly is currently completing her Doctor of Nursing Practice degree at the University of Maryland, Baltimore.BD is one of the largest global medical technology companies in the world and is advancing the world of health by improving medical discovery, diagnostics and the delivery of care. The company supports the heroes on the frontlines of health care by developing innovative technology, services and solutions that help advance both clinical therapy for patients and clinical process for health care providers. BD and its 75,000 employees have a passion and commitment to help enhance the safety and efficiency of clinicians' care delivery process, enable laboratory scientists to accurately detect disease and advance researchers' capabilities to develop the next generation of diagnostics and therapeutics. BD has a presence in virtually every country and partners with organizations around the world to address some of the most challenging global health issues. By working in close collaboration with customers, BD can help enhance outcomes, lower costs, increase efficiencies, improve safety and expand access to health care.LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/bd1/ | Twitter @BDandCo | Instagram: @becton_dickinson

The Gutology Podcast
What's the link between Gut Health & Mood - with Professor Jack Gilbert

The Gutology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 57:46


Professor Jack Gilbert is a global leader in microbiome research, co-founding both the Earth Microbiome Project and American Gut Project. He has authored more than 300 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters on ecosystem ecology and is the founding editor-in-chief of mSystems, a journal of the American Society of Microbiology. In this weeks episode of the Gutology podcast - Jack discusses his research into Gut Health, Mood & depression. Struggling with Gut health issues? Head to www.gutology.co.uk

通勤學英語
回顧星期天LBS - 雜誌相關時事趣聞 All about magazines

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 9:23


Topic: The Magazine Business, From the Coolest Place to the Coldest One I miss magazines. It's a strange ache, because they are still sort of with us: staring out from the racks at supermarket checkout lines; fanned wanly around the table in hotel lobbies; showing up in your mailbox long after the subscription was canceled, like an ex who refuses to accept the breakup. 我懷念雜誌,這是一種奇怪的痛,因為它們在某種程度上仍與我們同在。超市排隊結帳時,它們從架上盯著我們;在飯店大廳桌子周圍憔悴晃動;取消訂閱很久後還會出現在信箱,像是拒絕接受分手的舊愛。 But they're also disappearing. This accelerating erosion has not been big news during a time of pandemic, war and actual erosion, and yet the absence of magazines authoritatively documenting such events, or distracting from them, as they used to do with measured regularity, is keenly felt. 但它們也在消失。在疫情、戰爭與雜誌真的衰微的時期,這種加速衰微並不是什麼大新聞,但人們敏銳地感覺到,缺乏權威性雜誌來記錄這些事件,或像過去那樣定期的讓注意力從這些事情轉移。 Time marches on, or limps, but Life is gone. There's no more Money. The print editions of their former sister publications Entertainment Weekly and InStyle, which once frothed with profit, stopped publishing in February. It's been au revoir to Saveur and Marie Claire; shrouds for Playboy, Paper and O. (As I type this, people are tweeting about The Believer being bought by a sex-toy site.) 「時代」雜誌還在前進,或說蹣跚前行,但「生活」雜誌已經逝去。「金錢」雜誌沒了。它們以前的姊妹刊物「娛樂周刊」和「InStyle」印刷版曾獲利豐厚,但已在2月停止出版。大家向「Saveur」和「美麗佳人」告別,也讓「花花公子」、「紙」與O雜誌穿上壽衣。(就在我撰寫此文時,人們在推特上說「The Believer」被一個情趣用品網站收購了。) Two recent books — “Dilettante,” by Dana Brown, a longtime editor at Vanity Fair, and a new biography of Anna Wintour, by Amy Odell, formerly of cosmopolitan.com — are graveyards of dead or zombie titles that were once glowing hives of human whim. 最近出版的兩本書,「浮華世界」資深編輯達納.布朗的「Dilettante」及柯夢波丹前成員艾咪.歐德爾的安娜溫圖新傳記,有如亡者的墓地,或曾是人類奇想的光輝巢穴冠上了殭屍名號。 “There were so many magazines in 1994,” Brown writes. “So many new magazines, and so many great magazines. All the young talent of the moment was eschewing other industries and flocking to the business. It was the coolest place to be.” 布朗寫道:「1994年有很多雜誌。很多新雜誌,很多很棒的雜誌。當時所有年輕人才避開了其他行業,湧向這個行業。那是最酷的。」 Then suddenly the coldest. On the big fancy cruise ship that Brown had just boarded — Vanity Fair, where he'd been beckoned by Graydon Carter while a barback at the restaurant 44 — he and so many others then could only see the tip of an enormous iceberg they were about to hit: the internet. Smartphones, little self-edited monster magazines that will not rest until their owners die, were on the horizon. These may have looked like life rafts, but they were torpedo boats. 然後突然變成最冰冷的地方。布朗在44號餐廳吧檯用餐時,被總編輯卡特招攬,剛登上有如大型豪華郵輪的「浮華世界」,但他跟其他許多人只能看到他們即將撞上的巨大冰山一角:網路。智慧手機這種自我編輯、直到擁有者死去才會停止的小怪物雜誌也即將來臨。這些東西可能看起來像是救生艇,但它們其實是魚雷艦。 Every year, the American Society of Magazine Editors issues a handsome award, a brutalist-looking elephant called the Ellie, modeled after an Alexander Calder elephant sculpture. Any writer would be proud to have it on the mantelpiece. 每年,美國雜誌編輯協會都會頒發一項大獎,這是一頭野獸派風格、名叫「艾利」的大象獎座,模仿考爾德大象雕塑設計而成。作家都以把它放在壁爐上為榮。 The history of modern American literature is braided together with its magazines. The future can feel like a lot of loose threads, waving in the wind. 現代美國文學史與它的雜誌彼此交織在一起。未來就像是許多鬆散的線,在風中飄揚。Source article: https://udn.com/news/story/6904/6379678   Next Article   Topic: The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines One evening in mid-September, a gaggle of writers and bon vivant editors gathered by the outdoor fireplace and ivy-covered trellis of a West Village tavern. Steak was served, and the toasts lasted late into the night, the revelry trickling out to the nearby sidewalk. 九月中旬的一個夜晚,在西村的一家小酒館,一群作家和喜歡享受生活的編輯們聚集在一個室外壁爐和常春藤覆蓋的格狀架子旁。牛排上桌後,眾人杯觥交錯直到深夜,歡鬧聲流瀉到鄰近的人行道上。 It could have been a scene from the Jazz Age heyday of the Manhattan magazine set — or even the 1990s, when glossy monthlies still soaked up millions of dollars in advertising revenue, and editors in chauffeured town cars told the nation what to wear, what to watch and who to read. 這幕場景可能來自爵士時代曼哈坦雜誌業全盛時期,甚至是90年代,以亮光紙印刷的月刊還是廣告收入淹腳目,編輯們坐在司機駕駛的豪華轎車內,告訴全國該穿些什麼、欣賞什麼、閱讀什麼人的年頭。 This night, however, had an elegiac tinge. The staff of Vanity Fair was saluting the magazine's longtime editor, Graydon Carter, who had announced that he was departing after a 25-year run. In the back garden of Carter's restaurant, the Waverly Inn, star writers like James Wolcott and Marie Brenner spoke of their gratitude and grief. 不過,這一晚透著一種悲傷的況味。《浮華世界》的員工正向雜誌的長期總編輯葛雷登.卡特致敬。卡特在任職25年後,宣布即將離職。在卡特自家餐廳「韋佛利餐廳」的後花園中,一些明星作家如詹姆士.沃科特、瑪麗.布倫納都表達了他們的謝意和感傷。 Carter has always had a knack for trends. Within two weeks, three other prominent editors — from Time, Elle and Glamour — announced that they, too, would be stepping down. Another titan of the industry, Jann S. Wenner, said he planned to sell his controlling stake in Rolling Stone after a half-century. 卡特一向走在趨勢前端。不出兩星期,又有3位知名雜誌總編,分別是《時代》、《ELLE她》、《魅力》的總編也宣布準備下台。另一個業界巨頭,《滾石》創刊人詹恩.溫納則表示,打算出售他在《滾石》已保有半個世紀的控制性持股。 Suddenly, it seemed, long-standing predictions about the collapse of magazines had come to pass. 突然之間,長久來有關雜誌業終將崩潰的預言,似乎成真了。 Magazines have sputtered for years, their monopoly on readers and advertising erased by Facebook, Google and more nimble online competitors. But editors and executives said the abrupt churn in the senior leadership ranks signaled that the romance of the business was now yielding to financial realities. 雜誌業步履蹣跚已有多年,雜誌對讀者和廣告的壟斷遭到臉書、谷歌和更靈活的網路競爭對手侵奪。編輯和高管表示,高階領導階層的突然異動,說明這一行業的羅曼史正向財務現實低頭。 As publishers grasp for new revenue streams, a “try-anything” approach has taken hold. Time Inc. has a new streaming TV show, “Paws & Claws,” that features viral videos of animals. Hearst started a magazine with the online rental service Airbnb. Increasingly, the longtime core of the business — the print product — is an afterthought, overshadowed by investments in live events, podcasts, video, and partnerships with outside brands. 隨著發行人尋找新的收入來源,「無所不試」的作法開始出現。時代公司因此有了新的串流電視節目《寵物》,主要播出網路瘋傳的動物影片。赫斯特集團與網路出租服務公司Airbnb合辦了一份雜誌。但是雜誌業長久以來的核心─紙本產品卻越來越像後來才添加的產品,對於現場直播、播客、影片的投資,以及和外面品牌的合作關係,都讓紙本產品黯然失色。 The changes represent one of the most fundamental shifts in decades for a business that long relied on a simple formula: glossy volumes thick with high-priced ads. 這些變化代表這一行出現了數十年來最根本的轉變,而這個行業一向仰賴一個簡單公式存活,光鮮亮麗的書冊和滿滿的高價廣告。 “Sentimentality is probably the biggest enemy for the magazine business,” David Carey, president of Hearst Magazines, said in an interview. “You have to embrace the future." 赫斯特雜誌集團總裁大衛.凱里受訪時說:「多愁善感恐怕是雜誌業最大的敵人。你必須迎向未來。」 Source article: https://paper.udn.com/udnpaper/POH0067/319070/web/   Next Article   Topic: Edward Enninful Is Named Editor-in-Chief at British Vogue   Edward Enninful, the creative and fashion director of the U.S. magazine W, is set to replace Alexandra Shulman as editor-in-chief of British Vogue, its parent company, Conde Nast, confirmed Monday. The first man and the first black editor to take the helm of Britain's most powerful fashion publication in its 100-year history, Enninful will begin his new role Aug. 1. A top stylist and acclaimed fashion director who migrated to Britain from Ghana as a child, the 45-year-old Enninful is known for his cheerful demeanor, his legendary fashion covers and for having an army of loyal fans in and out of the fashion business. He received an Order of the British Empire in June for his services to diversity in the fashion industry. 英國版Vogue雜誌的母公司康泰納仕4月10日證實,美國W雜誌的創意與時尚總監艾德華.恩寧佛將接替亞歷珊卓.舒爾曼,擔任該雜誌總編輯。恩寧佛將在8月1日走馬上任,他將是這個英國最有影響力的時尚刊物創立一百年來,執掌大權的第一位男性,也是第一位黑人總編輯。 45歲的恩寧佛是頂尖造型師和備受讚譽的時尚總監,他孩童時期從迦納移民英國,以快活的舉止表情、傳奇的時尚雜誌封面,以及在時尚圈內和圈外擁有大批鐵粉聞名。去年6月獲頒大英帝國勳章,表彰他對時尚產業多元化的貢獻。 Conde Nast's international chairman and chief executive, Jonathan Newhouse, called Enninful “an influential figure in the communities of fashion, Hollywood and music which shape the cultural zeitgeist,” and added that “by virtue of his talent and experience, Edward is supremely prepared to assume the responsibility of British Vogue.” The appointment comes three months after Newhouse named another man, Emanuele Farneti, to the helm of Italian Vogue, following the death of Franca Sozzani. 康泰納仕國際集團董事長兼執行長強納森.紐豪斯說,恩寧佛是「形塑時代思潮的時尚界、好萊塢和音樂界一位具有影響力的人物」,「憑他的才華和經驗,艾德華已為承擔英國版Vogue的責任做好了萬全的準備。」 在決定這項任命的三個月前,紐豪斯任命了另一位男士艾曼紐爾.法內提出掌義大利版的Vogue,接替去世的法蘭加.索薩妮。 Enninful was an unexpected choice. Born in Ghana, Enninful was raised by his seamstress mother in the Ladbroke Grove area of London, alongside five siblings. At 16, he became a model for the British magazine i-D after being scouted while traveling on the Tube, London's subway system. He has called modeling his “baptism into fashion.” By 17, he was assisting on photography shoots for the publication with the stylists Simon Foxton and Beth Summers. In 1991, at 18, he took over from Summers as i-D fashion editor, making him one of the youngest-ever leaders of a major fashion publication. He also obtained a degree from Goldsmiths, University of London. 恩寧佛是出人意料的人選。他在迦納出生,當裁縫的母親在倫敦蘭僕林區把他和5個兄弟姊妹撫養長大。16歲時,他在搭乘倫敦地鐵時被星探相中,成為英國i-D雜誌的模特兒。他把自己的模特兒經驗稱為「進入時尚界的受洗禮」。 到了17歲,他協助造型師西蒙.佛克斯頓和貝絲.桑默斯為這本刊物拍攝照片。1991年18歲時,他取代桑默斯,成為i-D雜誌時尚編輯,使他成為主要時尚刊物有史以來最年輕的主管之一。他並取得倫敦大學金匠學院的文憑。 Although there are a handful of notable exceptions, the fashion industry has a dearth of black power players, and that had been a source of immense frustration for Enninful, who has made a considerable effort to improve things. He has made headlines with accusations of racism, including after he was assigned to sit in the second row at a couture show in Paris in 2013 when white “counterparts” were in the first. 雖然有少數著名的例外,時尚產業極欠缺有權力的黑人,這一直令恩寧佛極感挫折,而他已相當努力以謀求改進。他曾因指控種族歧視而上了大新聞,包括2013年在巴黎一場高級訂製服的秀上,他被指定坐在第二排,而與他「地位相當」的白人坐在第一排。 Source article: https://paper.udn.com/udnpaper/POH0067/312421/web/

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Luke Maese, DO - Applying Therapeutic Innovations Against ALL: From Updated Evidence to Everyday Practice

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:36


Go online to PeerView.com/DGJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you up to date on recent evidence on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging from major scientific congresses? In this activity, an ALL specialist explores recent evidence presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings on developments in various treatment modalities for ALL. Watch this video to hear about the latest evidence and practical applications in asparaginase use in chemotherapy protocols, including important dosing and safety data on recombinant Erwinia; get updated on longer-term outcomes with CAR-T therapy in adult and pediatric patients and hear practical considerations when using CAR-T options; and learn about emerging chemo-sparing TKI plus bispecific combinations in Ph-positive ALL. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize new evidence on multi-faceted strategies for ALL management based on modern chemotherapy protocols, antibody-based approaches, cellular therapy, and TKIs; Cite evidence supporting the use of novel asparaginase compounds for ALL in the context of asparaginase toxicity/hypersensitivity, including in pediatric, AYA, and adult populations; and Apply new science to the team-based management of ALL, including when managing asparaginase hypersensitivity or toxicity, developing TKI-based protocols in Ph-positive disease, or when utilizing novel immunotherapy-based approaches in patient care.

PeerView Heart, Lung & Blood CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Luke Maese, DO - Applying Therapeutic Innovations Against ALL: From Updated Evidence to Everyday Practice

PeerView Heart, Lung & Blood CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:38


Go online to PeerView.com/DGJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you up to date on recent evidence on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging from major scientific congresses? In this activity, an ALL specialist explores recent evidence presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings on developments in various treatment modalities for ALL. Watch this video to hear about the latest evidence and practical applications in asparaginase use in chemotherapy protocols, including important dosing and safety data on recombinant Erwinia; get updated on longer-term outcomes with CAR-T therapy in adult and pediatric patients and hear practical considerations when using CAR-T options; and learn about emerging chemo-sparing TKI plus bispecific combinations in Ph-positive ALL. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize new evidence on multi-faceted strategies for ALL management based on modern chemotherapy protocols, antibody-based approaches, cellular therapy, and TKIs; Cite evidence supporting the use of novel asparaginase compounds for ALL in the context of asparaginase toxicity/hypersensitivity, including in pediatric, AYA, and adult populations; and Apply new science to the team-based management of ALL, including when managing asparaginase hypersensitivity or toxicity, developing TKI-based protocols in Ph-positive disease, or when utilizing novel immunotherapy-based approaches in patient care.

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Luke Maese, DO - Applying Therapeutic Innovations Against ALL: From Updated Evidence to Everyday Practice

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:36


Go online to PeerView.com/DGJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you up to date on recent evidence on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging from major scientific congresses? In this activity, an ALL specialist explores recent evidence presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings on developments in various treatment modalities for ALL. Watch this video to hear about the latest evidence and practical applications in asparaginase use in chemotherapy protocols, including important dosing and safety data on recombinant Erwinia; get updated on longer-term outcomes with CAR-T therapy in adult and pediatric patients and hear practical considerations when using CAR-T options; and learn about emerging chemo-sparing TKI plus bispecific combinations in Ph-positive ALL. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize new evidence on multi-faceted strategies for ALL management based on modern chemotherapy protocols, antibody-based approaches, cellular therapy, and TKIs; Cite evidence supporting the use of novel asparaginase compounds for ALL in the context of asparaginase toxicity/hypersensitivity, including in pediatric, AYA, and adult populations; and Apply new science to the team-based management of ALL, including when managing asparaginase hypersensitivity or toxicity, developing TKI-based protocols in Ph-positive disease, or when utilizing novel immunotherapy-based approaches in patient care.

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Luke Maese, DO - Applying Therapeutic Innovations Against ALL: From Updated Evidence to Everyday Practice

PeerView Internal Medicine CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:38


Go online to PeerView.com/DGJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you up to date on recent evidence on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging from major scientific congresses? In this activity, an ALL specialist explores recent evidence presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings on developments in various treatment modalities for ALL. Watch this video to hear about the latest evidence and practical applications in asparaginase use in chemotherapy protocols, including important dosing and safety data on recombinant Erwinia; get updated on longer-term outcomes with CAR-T therapy in adult and pediatric patients and hear practical considerations when using CAR-T options; and learn about emerging chemo-sparing TKI plus bispecific combinations in Ph-positive ALL. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize new evidence on multi-faceted strategies for ALL management based on modern chemotherapy protocols, antibody-based approaches, cellular therapy, and TKIs; Cite evidence supporting the use of novel asparaginase compounds for ALL in the context of asparaginase toxicity/hypersensitivity, including in pediatric, AYA, and adult populations; and Apply new science to the team-based management of ALL, including when managing asparaginase hypersensitivity or toxicity, developing TKI-based protocols in Ph-positive disease, or when utilizing novel immunotherapy-based approaches in patient care.

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Luke Maese, DO - Applying Therapeutic Innovations Against ALL: From Updated Evidence to Everyday Practice

PeerView Family Medicine & General Practice CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:38


Go online to PeerView.com/DGJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you up to date on recent evidence on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging from major scientific congresses? In this activity, an ALL specialist explores recent evidence presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings on developments in various treatment modalities for ALL. Watch this video to hear about the latest evidence and practical applications in asparaginase use in chemotherapy protocols, including important dosing and safety data on recombinant Erwinia; get updated on longer-term outcomes with CAR-T therapy in adult and pediatric patients and hear practical considerations when using CAR-T options; and learn about emerging chemo-sparing TKI plus bispecific combinations in Ph-positive ALL. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize new evidence on multi-faceted strategies for ALL management based on modern chemotherapy protocols, antibody-based approaches, cellular therapy, and TKIs; Cite evidence supporting the use of novel asparaginase compounds for ALL in the context of asparaginase toxicity/hypersensitivity, including in pediatric, AYA, and adult populations; and Apply new science to the team-based management of ALL, including when managing asparaginase hypersensitivity or toxicity, developing TKI-based protocols in Ph-positive disease, or when utilizing novel immunotherapy-based approaches in patient care.

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Luke Maese, DO - Applying Therapeutic Innovations Against ALL: From Updated Evidence to Everyday Practice

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 25:38


Go online to PeerView.com/DGJ860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. Are you up to date on recent evidence on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) emerging from major scientific congresses? In this activity, an ALL specialist explores recent evidence presented at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Hematology Association (EHA) annual meetings on developments in various treatment modalities for ALL. Watch this video to hear about the latest evidence and practical applications in asparaginase use in chemotherapy protocols, including important dosing and safety data on recombinant Erwinia; get updated on longer-term outcomes with CAR-T therapy in adult and pediatric patients and hear practical considerations when using CAR-T options; and learn about emerging chemo-sparing TKI plus bispecific combinations in Ph-positive ALL. Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Summarize new evidence on multi-faceted strategies for ALL management based on modern chemotherapy protocols, antibody-based approaches, cellular therapy, and TKIs; Cite evidence supporting the use of novel asparaginase compounds for ALL in the context of asparaginase toxicity/hypersensitivity, including in pediatric, AYA, and adult populations; and Apply new science to the team-based management of ALL, including when managing asparaginase hypersensitivity or toxicity, developing TKI-based protocols in Ph-positive disease, or when utilizing novel immunotherapy-based approaches in patient care.

Cancer.Net Podcasts
Reflecting on COVID-19 and Providing Reliable Information to People with Cancer, with Merry Jennifer Markham, MD, FACP, FASCO

Cancer.Net Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 17:50


ASCO: You're listening to a podcast from Cancer.Net. This cancer information website is produced by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, known as ASCO, the voice of the world's oncology professionals.  The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guests' statements on this podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement. Cancer research discussed in this podcast is ongoing, so data described here may change as research progresses.  The beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic brought with it confusion, fear, and uncertainty for most people around the globe. These feelings were often heightened for people with cancer as they experienced disruptions or changes in care, such as following greater safety precautions at their treatment centers, having their appointments shifted to televisits, and facing delays in recommended cancer screenings.  As a response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Cancer.Net developed several resources for people with cancer, including its post “Coronavirus and COVID-19: What People With Cancer Need to Know,” written by Dr. Merry Jennifer Markham. After publishing this post on March 3, 2020, Dr. Markham reviewed and updated the post for 650 days straight to make sure people with cancer were receiving the most up-to-date and relevant information about COVID-19. The post went on to receive the Award of Distinction from the eHealthcare Awards in the Best COVID-19 Pandemic Related Communications category and was translated into Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, and Arabic.     In this podcast, ASCO's Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Julie Gralow talks with Dr. Markham about her role in creating information for people with cancer throughout the pandemic, how the pandemic has shifted her perspective, and where she sees the future of the pandemic response headed. Dr. Gralow: Hello. I'm Dr. Julie Gralow, ASCO's Chief Medical Officer. Today, I'm talking with Dr. Merry Jennifer Markham, an ASCO volunteer and the Cancer.Net Associate Editor for Gynecologic Cancers. Cancer.Net is the patient information website of ASCO. Dr. Markham is also chief of the University of Florida, Division of Hematology and Oncology, a clinical professor in the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the associate director for medical affairs at the University of Florida Health Cancer Center. Dr. Markham played a key role in ensuring that ASCO provides up-to-date information about COVID-19 for patients, survivors, and caregivers through Cancer.Net. Since March 2020, she devoted a remarkable amount of time and energy to this endeavor, including a stretch of 650 straight days of reviewing and updating our patient information about coronavirus. Wow. That's true dedication, Merry Jennifer. So I would like to kick it off to you, Merry Jennifer. First of all, thank you so much for everything you've done during these past couple of years in keeping our Cancer.Net website up to date for patients during these incredibly challenging times. I'm looking forward to having a conversation with you about all of this. Dr. Markham: Thank you so much. It's been an honor and a pleasure. And the Cancer.Net team has been just fantastic to work with. Dr. Gralow: Great. Glad to hear it. So Merry Jennifer, when you suggested that ASCO provide some patient-focused content on COVID and cancer, did you think we'd still be talking about this 2 years later? Dr. Markham: Oh, I had no idea what to expect. No. I think I, like many of us, thought that this would be a very time-limited event and maybe by the Christmas time of 2020, that we would be done. We were all, of course, disappointed to learn that that was not how a pandemic plays out, but I definitely had no idea what my one email to the group would lead to. Dr. Gralow: What do you remember about March of 2020? Dr. Markham: It was a really scary time and a very uncertain time. None of us really knew what was going to come. We were watching how the pandemic or just the viral infection was playing out at the time in other countries, but really, we're not sure what was going to happen to our patients. And I was coming off a stint, I believe - the timing is a bit of a blur - on the communications committee for ASCO. And communications is something that I am passionate about, cancer communication with patients and with other colleagues. And I recall being in clinic and answering questions from patients. And really, it felt like there needed to be some broader level of communication that our patients could refer to you but also colleagues and people around the world. That's what I remember. And I remember reaching out and saying, "Hey, I wonder if maybe ASCO should do something." I didn't intend to volunteer myself to do something, but somebody needed to jump in, and I was ready. Dr. Gralow: Well, I was still practicing at the time, and I know all the different questions that we were getting. It was such a confusing time. We didn't have information. It was changing on a daily basis. I'm impressed that you thought that we were going to be dealing with this maybe even until the end of 2020 because I was thinking, "Oh, 3 or 4 weeks. We can all quarantine for 3 or 4 weeks. Right?" And here we are more than 2 years later. So you worked on the content for 650 days straight. I mean, every single day for 650 days, you looked to make sure that what we had on there was accurate, and now we backed off a little. But you're still looking at the content a couple of times a week. How has that level of focus on COVID-19 affected your perception and experience of the pandemic? Dr. Markham In the very beginning, the content was really updated daily. I think something was changing on a daily basis. And so it became part of my morning habit, first thing in the morning with a cup of coffee if I had time for that, to read whatever was happening in the news that day and just paying attention to where we were headed, knowing that there would be changes. In the beginning, there was not enough masks, so we weren't recommending everyone “Go out and buy surgical masks." And then the policies changed on that as we had plenty of masks and then, of course, vaccines and so on and so forth. I think I felt, like many people, a loss of control when the pandemic happened. Right? I think that so many people felt the sense of loss and the sense of uncertainty. And it reminded me actually of what patients with cancer probably experience with a new diagnosis, the sense of loss and uncertainty for what the future holds. And I think like many of my patients who really want to dive in deep to the research of their own cancer and treatment course, it actually gave me a sense of comfort to delve deep into the facts of what we were learning on a daily basis about COVID. Having that knowledge at my fingertips and being able to put it into layman's terms really did help me, I think, not become emotionally tied up in all of the sadness of the pandemic and the loss of travel and the loss of being able to be with loved ones. So for me, it was a little bit of a coping mechanism, I think. I didn't realize that at the time, but in hindsight, I really think it was. Dr. Gralow: So becoming a true expert in COVID and cancer was your coping mechanism. That's interesting because you were the leading authority here on what everyone was recommending. Do you have any particular moments, good or bad, that really stand out for you from those early days? Dr. Markham: I think what stands out the most is we focus so much on science as practitioners of oncology and in these health professions and as scientists. And I remember being very disappointed and hurt whenever I encountered someone, whether it was a patient or a family member or a colleague or-- not colleague but acquaintance, perhaps, who didn't believe that this was a real thing. And I was really pouring my heart and soul into the work of providing patient education on this and trying to do the same in my own clinic and with my own family members. And to have people brush it off as a non-thing, it was hurtful, and it was also just very disappointing as a physician and scientist. Dr. Gralow: And things were changing fast. Now, you yourself ended up with a COVID diagnosis at the end of 2021. Did that personal experience change the way you viewed ASCO's roles in supporting people with cancer throughout the pandemic? Dr. Markham: So I was minimally symptomatic, which was really thanks to science and thanks to the vaccines and having boosters. So number 1, it was very mild. But like many people who have a diagnosis that's new to them, I was nervous. And so I did feel reassured, though, because I had a pretty good understanding of what was happening and what was going to happen, and I knew that I was protected because of the vaccine and boosters. But it can be a scary time, and I think that it just gave me a little more insight into what people who I've taken care of, who have cancer and then have experienced a COVID diagnosis, have felt. Unlike my patients with cancer, I'm not immunocompromised, so I felt pretty comfortable. But it can certainly be scary. And I did have that appreciation for-- not just the infection but having to isolate myself from my family, I think that really was the hardest part and the inconvenience of it. Dr. Gralow: Well, I'm glad you just had a mild case, and hopefully, you have no residual symptoms. But it is interesting when you have, either within your family or yourself, a personal confrontation, either with COVID or with cancer, that it gives you a different perspective. Dr. Markham: Absolutely. That is so true. Dr. Gralow: So we're now 2-plus years into the pandemic. I know you don't have a crystal ball, and I know we've thought we were on the downswing and things picked up again. But where do you see this going? I mean, not just COVID itself but public health, immunizations, the whole pandemic awareness. Where do you see this going in the U.S. and worldwide? We've had the flu coming around every season. We didn't wear masks. We have vaccines. Not everybody got vaccines. What are we going to learn from all of this, and where do you see the future will be? Dr. Markham: I think that one of the major learning experiences that all of us who are in medicine and health care and those in health communication and health policy-- what we have learned is that science communication really does matter, and it's hard to do it in a very rapid-fire pace and do it well. But I think we've all seen examples of how communication around factual data and removing misinformation is actually critical. I would love to see this pandemic go away, but I think that what we've seen over the last couple of years with the new variants coming out, it's clear that we're not going to have 99% of our population vaccinated. I think, really, on all fronts, vaccination uptake is not that high. So there will be people who are either unable or unwilling or who will defer getting vaccinated. And unfortunately, this will lead to these waves of new variants coming like the current variant that is circulating. But I do think that there is hope. One of the reasons that a lot of my patients delayed getting vaccines in the beginning-- many of mine did, but there were some holdouts who really were not comfortable getting vaccinated. There is now more time. And so we do have more safety data, and we know that the vaccinations are safe against-- the COVID vaccinations are safe. So I think that I have seen more patients in those last 6 months become vaccinated. They were holdouts initially, and now more are doing it. And I'm hopeful that this trend will continue. I do think there are pockets where we are seeing vaccination rates start to pick up again. I don't know. I'm happy to keep reviewing content, though, and updating. The updates have become a little less frequent, which is great. I love when our focus on updating is really on new therapies and new vaccines and new vaccine sequences and schedules. So I think we're in a fairly stable place - knock on wood - right now. Dr. Gralow: In our immunocompromised population, which is only a subset of all of our patients with cancer, do you think we'll see more mask wearing in the future? Dr. Markham: I do. I do think that actually this is one area where we, as a culture, have probably begun to shift in the United States and especially among people who have a personal risk or a family member with a risk factor that might increase their chances of severe COVID. Just a personal anecdote. I traveled internationally for the first time since COVID a couple of weeks ago, and my entire family, all vaccinated and boosted, wore our masks, as it's the federal requirement to do so on planes. However, we landed in an international location where that was not a requirement. None of us wanted to take our masks off. We felt more comfortable, and I saw a lot of people who also remained masked even though it was not a requirement. So I do think there's a shift in this culture. I'm as tired of the masks as anyone, but it really does have a protective measure and is, I think, important, especially for our patients who have a weakened immune system or other medical risk factors for developing COVID or other infectious diseases. Dr. Gralow: So kind of in closing, you did such tremendous work for ASCO, for our patients with these regular updates. But what's the experience meant to you as an ASCO member and a member of the oncology community? Dr. Markham: I joined ASCO when I was a fellow, and I was taught the importance of our organization by my faculty members and my mentors. And as soon as I realized I could, I volunteered to serve on ASCO committees and task forces. And it has been one of the most rewarding parts of my career. And it's something that I encourage junior faculty and fellows to do as well. ASCO is such a leading voice. It is the leading voice for oncology care globally. And just the opportunity to contribute something back has really meant the world to me. It's been an honor to be able to do this work. Dr. Gralow: Well, on behalf of ASCO, I want to thank you again for all of your commitment to this. We're thrilled to have you as a volunteer, and we will continue to call on you as a volunteer. Really appreciate that. And I do know that throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, a lot of what ASCO was posting, a lot of the webinars we had, etc., were being used around the world. And you contributed majorly to that as well. So for that, I thank you. And I thank all of our listeners. This has been Julie Gralow and Merry Jennifer Markham talking about our Cancer.Net COVID-19 information that Merry Jennifer tirelessly led daily, essentially, for a couple of years. So thank you so much for that. It's been great talking to you. Dr. Markham: Thank you. ASCO: Thank you, Dr. Gralow and Dr. Markham. Find all of Cancer.Net's resources on COVID-19 and cancer at www.cancer.net/covid19. Cancer.Net Podcasts feature trusted, timely, and compassionate information for people with cancer, survivors, and their families and loved ones. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts for expert information and tips on coping with cancer, recaps of the latest research advances, and thoughtful discussions on cancer care.   And check out other ASCO Podcasts to hear the latest interviews and insights from thought leaders, innovators, experts, and pioneers in oncology.  Cancer.Net is supported by Conquer Cancer, the ASCO Foundation, which funds lifesaving research for every type of cancer, helping people with cancer everywhere. To help fund Cancer.Net and programs like it, donate at CONQUER.ORG/Donate. 

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast
Karl D. Lewis, MD - Immunotherapy Has Arrived in Advanced BCC: Collaborative Strategies for Making the Most of Novel Immune-Based Treatment

PeerView Clinical Pharmacology CME/CNE/CPE Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 83:43


Go online to PeerView.com/SDX860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The arrival of immunotherapy in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) increases the potential for successful treatment outcomes—are you prepared to address several practical questions related to selection and sequencing of immunotherapy, safety management, and patient monitoring? In this activity, based on a recent PeerView Live Seminars & Tumor Board educational event held at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, our expert panel links the evidence supporting the use of immunotherapy in locally advanced and metastatic BCC with case-based teaching designed to mimic the collaborative aspects of real-world, multidisciplinary tumor boards, ultimately illustrating how checkpoint inhibitors can be integrated into the care of patients with BCC. Leverage the power of immunotherapy to improve clinical outcomes for your patients with advanced BCC! Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Cite the rationale, therapeutic role, and current evidence and guidelines supporting the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in the management of advanced BCC; Integrate novel immunotherapy options into the management of appropriate patients with advanced BCC in consultation with the wider management team; and Employ proactive, team-based approaches to recognize, mitigate, and manage potential immune-related adverse events in patients receiving ICI therapy for advanced BCC.

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast
Karl D. Lewis, MD - Immunotherapy Has Arrived in Advanced BCC: Collaborative Strategies for Making the Most of Novel Immune-Based Treatment

PeerView Oncology & Hematology CME/CNE/CPE Video Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 83:47


Go online to PeerView.com/SDX860 to view the activity, download slides and practice aids, and complete the post-test to earn credit. The arrival of immunotherapy in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) increases the potential for successful treatment outcomes—are you prepared to address several practical questions related to selection and sequencing of immunotherapy, safety management, and patient monitoring? In this activity, based on a recent PeerView Live Seminars & Tumor Board educational event held at the 2022 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, our expert panel links the evidence supporting the use of immunotherapy in locally advanced and metastatic BCC with case-based teaching designed to mimic the collaborative aspects of real-world, multidisciplinary tumor boards, ultimately illustrating how checkpoint inhibitors can be integrated into the care of patients with BCC. Leverage the power of immunotherapy to improve clinical outcomes for your patients with advanced BCC! Upon completion of this activity, participants should be better able to: Cite the rationale, therapeutic role, and current evidence and guidelines supporting the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in the management of advanced BCC; Integrate novel immunotherapy options into the management of appropriate patients with advanced BCC in consultation with the wider management team; and Employ proactive, team-based approaches to recognize, mitigate, and manage potential immune-related adverse events in patients receiving ICI therapy for advanced BCC.

Red Sky Fuel For Thought
Revisiting the 2022 Red Sky Predictions: Ep. 27 of Red Sky Fuel for Thought Podcast

Red Sky Fuel For Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 44:09


Revisiting the 2022 Red Sky Predictions: Ep. 27 of Red Sky Fuel for Thought podcastWhat You'll Learn in This Episode:How some of our 2022 predictions are playing out What brand communicators and marketers should monitor heading into 2023Each February, we publish an annual Red Sky Predictions 2022 report that forecasts 10 fundamental trends shaping the integrated communications and PR landscape. It features the collective insight of Redsters from around the agency's global network and is intended to serve as a playbook for brand communicators and marketers to help make sense of the lessons the pandemic has taught us.In this month's episode, Red Havas' Linda Descano, CFA® is joined by fellow Redsters and agency leaders James Wright, Lisa Davidson, Lesley Sillaman and Matthew Thomas to discuss the current state of our 2022 predictions, including what has played out as anticipated and what in on our radar for the rest of the year heading into 2023.To start things off, James Wright, who is global CEO of Red Havas Group and global chairman of the Havas PR Global Collective, sets the scene for the current state of our 2022 predictions.“A lot of these predictions are coming to the fore in a big way,” says James. “With the unpredictable environment that we've been working and living in over the last couple of years, it can be challenging to come up with these types of predictions. But some of them have manifested themselves quite clearly in the last six months.”First up for discussion is our “Corporate Purpose or Bust” prediction, which focuses on the continued shifts in substance, style and tonality of brand communications to allow for deeper connections with consumers. “One of the biggest challenges for many of our clients is how to navigate around purpose and demonstrate it in a meaningful way,” says Matthew Thomas, executive director of corporate affairs for Red Havas Australia. “The social media conversation around major events is moving faster than some corporations can keep up with, which makes their communications feel a step behind or reactive. Fundamentally, it's about raising the profile of communications within organizations to demonstrate purpose in a period of significant change.”“Employees have been a big driver for the shift in corporate purpose," says James, referencing our “From Pledges to Progress” white paper. "Businesses have had to shift from communicating and demonstrating the 'why' of corporate purpose to demonstrating the 'how' of corporate purpose. The pressure and expectation for organizations to take a stand on key social issues has increased dramatically in recent years. Employees now expect that the companies that they work for and buy from have a purpose beyond their own profit.”“Companies also need to show an aptitude to act on their purpose very quickly,” says Lesley Sillaman, EVP. “You need to be purposeful with your purpose by determining which set of issues to stand for, where you have the right to engage, where you've earned a place in the conversation, and what is material to your business so you can speak up in a credible way with your audiences.”“It's about purpose built from the inside out, starting with employees and going outward,” says Lisa Davidson, managing director at Red Havas Health. “The companies that are genuinely invested in the issues they stand for, rather than only supporting issues as a means to an end for business purposes, will be the ones that succeed.”Next, our “Personnel Gets Personal” prediction is revisited. This prediction sees employees leveraging their voices to reshape the world of work as we know it — driving greater relevancy, meaning and value for workers personally. This trend was also explored in a recent PR Week Roundtable co-hosted by Red Havas, and is underscored by a recent ManpowerGroup survey which clearly indicated that workers want more choice, autonomy and consideration for their well-being, particularly around their mental health.“Through the pandemic, we've had to reimagine what the workplace is, how we interact with our teams and how you build culture and continue to be successful in that environment,” says James, who recently touched on this topic on the PRovoke Media podcast. “There's a rebalancing occurring between organizations and their employees as we go back into the office, because too much flexibility has created certain problems for the delivery and the outcomes that businesses are trying to deliver. The ability to be as flexible as you can is going to be vital as we move from this great resignation of the last few years, into the great reimagination of the workplace.”In many ways, moderator, Linda Descano, CFA, added, “On-site has become the new off-site, with employees using office time to drive connectivity, collaboration, and inspiration, while getting the bulk of their work completed at home.”“This has become a large conversation between employees and their employers, and some excellent ideas have come out of it,” says Lesley. “Even in our own agency, we've heard ideas from every level of employee to help us become a better place to work and establish a more productive environment while in the office.”“Patient Choice, Patient Voice” was another of our 2022 predictions, which focused on Big Pharma taking a human-first approach to addressing issues of health equity and inclusion. Red Havas recently touched on this topic at the PR Week Healthcare & Pharma Comms Summit + Awards.Lisa provides insight from her personal experience in the health sector: “Everyone is now a guru for their own health, so healthcare marketing is shifting from being purely creative to focusing more on the patient. We're seeing more programs that use inclusive messaging, a resurgence of experiential activations and collaborating with communities to help co-create solutions. Issues of inclusion and equity transcend everything — from the C-suite of pharma companies where decisions get made to clinical trial recruitment, and even building hospitals.”Linda points to various companies who have taken steps toward these initiatives, such as Johnson & Johnson's health, equity, and innovation challenge which enlists local communities to help create healthcare solutions for minority groups; GSK's inclusion of LGBTQ+ community members in its digital films and product messaging; AstraZeneca's commitment to increasing representation of BIPOC in its leadership ranks; and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and Association of Community Cancer Centers, which issued a call to boost participation rates among racial and ethnic minority groups who have been historically underrepresented in cancer studies.Finally, our guests discuss the “Experiential Retail Renaissance” prediction, which outlined the opportunity for brands to reimagine their brick-and-mortar shopping experience to complement e-commerce efforts to bring a brand more fully to life.“Whether it's in person or online, shared experiences are key to building lasting relationships between brands and audiences,” says James. “The online shopping experiences has changed and is on the rise with brands embracing a new form of brand experience for customers, and it feels like nothing is off limits now.”“We've seen many outstanding examples of brands bringing immersive, exciting, and loyal new experiences to consumers,” says Lesley. “Everybody wants an experience that is tailored to them, and they're all looking for different things out of their shopping experience. So, it gives brands an opportunity to create experiences that bring a different level of loyalty from consumers who aren't coming into a store to just make a transaction, but for an experience that makes them feel like part of the brand.”To close the discussion, James provides his takeaways for brand communicators and marketers heading into 2023.“It's more important than ever to understand your business' place in the world in terms of what you want to be known for and what you stand for,” says James. “The evolution of the 'S' in ESG has changed for organizations as they embrace social issues, labor standards, human rights, social dialogue, pay equity, diversity, and access to health care. All these areas have become much more important than ever before to employees, shareholders, and stakeholders, and it's here that businesses can find their own unfair advantage by positioning themselves in a way that makes them an attractive place to work and a brand that you want to be loyal to in the future.”The episode wraps with Red Havas VP of Content Ellen Mallernee Barnes and our Red Questionnaire guest Linda Descano, CFA®, (playing double duty this episode!) for a conversation spanning various topics, including her go-to travel destination (Machu Pichu, Peru), her favorite book (“The New Megatrends” by former Havas PR CEO, Marian Salzman), and how she would describe her job to a child (“I help tell stories about people, places and things using words pictures and music”).Give “Red Sky Fuel for Thought” a listen, and subscribe to the show on iTunes, Spotify or your favorite podcasting app. Don't forget to rate and review to help more people find us!Also mentioned on this episode:·      “Red Sky Predictions” 2022 report·      “From Pledges to Progress” white paper·      PRovoke Media Podcast featuring James Wright·      PR Week Healthcare & Pharma Comms Summit + Awards·      PR Week: Employee Engagement Roundtable·      ManpowerGroup Employee Sentiment Survey·      “The New Megatrends” by Marian Salzman·      “The Agent” podcastFollow Red Havas for a daily dose of comms news: ·      Twitter·      Facebook·      Instagram·      LinkedInSubscribe: Don't forget to subscribe to the show using your favorite podcasting app. ·      iTunes·      SpotifyWhat did you love? What would you like to hear about next?Remember to rate and review today's show; we'd love to hear from you! 

Deep Conversations OKC Podcast
A Conscious Conversation With Minda Zetlin

Deep Conversations OKC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 27:19


MINDA ZETLIN is the author of Career Self-Care and writes the highly popular “Laid-Back Leader” column for Inc. Her articles and workshops offer research-backed advice to help ambitious people get the most out of their careers and their lives. She is the author or coauthor of several books, most recently The Geek Gap. A former president of the American Society of Journalists and Authors (ASJA), she lives in Snohomish, Washington. More information at www.MindaZetlin.com.