Podcasts about Indigenous

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  • 7,189PODCASTS
  • 22,542EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
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  • May 14, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Indigenous

Show all podcasts related to indigenous

Latest podcast episodes about Indigenous

Native Calgarian
Chapters & Chat about the National Inquiry

Native Calgarian

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 96:46


Book club is now national with no barriers! We unpacked the National Inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and Two Spirit's Chapters 1 & 2. You can read them for free: https://www.mmiwg-ffada.ca/ Subscribe: Native Calgarian: https://www.nativecalgarian.com/podcast/YouTube: https://youtube.com/channel/UCW4pXUPw2NCGab9VT1UtcJQ Interested in being part of an Indigenous book club? Sign up at nativecalgarian dot comIndigenous women are on the bottom of the socioeconomic ladder because of colonialism, racism, gendered violence and land theft.Donate: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/N8V_CalgarianOr Etransfer accepted at nativeyyc@gmail.com pw: Calgary#Podcast #Indigenous #NDN #Defund2Fund #yyc #yyccc #abpoli #ableg #Cdnpoli #IndigenousPodcast #Canada #Colonialism #Genocide★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

AWAYE! - ABC RN
Celebrating a decade of Ngana Barangarai, and Troy Russell's The Last Shot

AWAYE! - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 54:07


Black Wallaby is a creative writing program started by Aunty Barbara Nicholson at the Junee Correctional Centre. Troy Russel and Lily Shearer explain how a single piece of music grew into a musical about star crossed lovers on the run.

The Business
Replay: Creating ‘Reservation Dogs' with Indigenous cast and crew

The Business

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:32


Before he co-created the FX comedy series “Reservation Dogs,” Sterlin Harjo directed three micro-budget films in his home state of Oklahoma. He had knocked on Hollywood's door but somehow he never could find financing. "I even heard, like, this film's just a little too Indian," Harjo says. "Or, this film's not Indian enough. So, it was very confusing." Now, FX is preparing to release a second season of “Reservation Dogs" and the series is looking to nab Emmy nominations this year.

Pinky Pod
Find me

Pinky Pod

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 47:17


Barry Boches, missing. So many native, indigenous people -- especially women -- missing.   This is a missing person's awareness episode. I began with Barry, and there's not much info. Then decided to highlight Native and Indigenous. 050222-for-public-release.pdf (wa.gov) The Unsolved Disappearance of Freda Knows His Gun | by Jennifer | The Mystery Box | Medium $60,000 offered as reward for missing Mary Ellen Johnson-Davis | Northwest & National News | nbcrightnow.com Besse Anne Freedom Handy – The Charley Project Washington state creates nation's first alert system for missing Indigenous people - CNN   Twitter @PodPinky email sroit@pinkyswearpress.com TikTok s_roit IG pinky_podcast    

Democracy Now! Video
Democracy Now! 2022-05-13 Friday

Democracy Now! Video

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 59:00


Indigenous writer and historian Nick Estes on a new report by the Interior Department that says at least 500 Indigenous children died at Indian boarding schools run or supported by the U.S. government; Calls grow for President Biden to grant clemency to imprisoned Indigenous activist Leonard Peltier; Journalists in Mexico are being killed with impunity in record numbers; European peace activists oppose Finland’s plans to end decades of neutrality and join NATO. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2022-05-13 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 59:00


Indigenous writer and historian Nick Estes on a new report by the Interior Department that says at least 500 Indigenous children died at Indian boarding schools run or supported by the U.S. government; Calls grow for President Biden to grant clemency to imprisoned Indigenous activist Leonard Peltier; Journalists in Mexico are being killed with impunity in record numbers; European peace activists oppose Finland’s plans to end decades of neutrality and join NATO. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

Here First
Friday, May 13th, 2022

Here First

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


A new Congressional report says that at the height of the pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions. Native communities marched throughout Sioux City Thursday to bring awareness to missing and murdered Indigenous women. Plus, IPR's Kassidy Arena reports on some of Iowa's Latina entrepreneurs who started businesses during the pandemic.

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine
Binesikwe Means's Gift for Nurturing the Next Generation of Storytellers

Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:27


Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine – Weekly Radio ShowNative Lights is a weekly, half-hour radio program hosted by Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe members and siblings, Leah Lemm and Cole Premo. Native Lights is a space for people in Native communities around Mni Sota Mkoce -- a.k.a. Minnesota -- to tell their stories about finding their gifts and sharing them with the community.Native Lights – Binesikwe Means's Gift for Nurturing the Next Generation of Storytellers On today's show, we talk with Binesikwe Means who is an enrolled citizen of the Oglala Lakota Tribe in Pine Ridge South Dakota, and a descendant of the White Earth Nation. Binesikwe is the lead instructor for Migizi's First Person Productions, a youth-led social enterprise that produces videos, design work, and social media campaigns for businesses and non-profits.We loved hearing about Binesikwe's passion for storytelling and helping Native youth develop their talents through her work at Migizi.  We were moved by hearing how the organization survived the devasting loss of its building, which caught fire and was destroyed during the uprising in the wake of George Floyd's murder in 2020.  We were inspired by Binesikwe, as she shared how the community continues to support Migizi, so it can help Native youth find their voices, develop skills, share stories, and become experienced media makers.Native Lights: Where Indigenous Voices Shine is produced by Minnesota Native News and Ampers, Diverse Radio for Minnesota's Communities with support from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage fund. Online at https://minnesotanativenews.org/

Counter Stories
A Gem of a Teacher

Counter Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 58:38


Sarah Lancaster is many things. She is a public school teacher, a coach, a director of school plays, president of the local civic association, and as the only teacher of color in her rural school district, she's an important connection between her students and the education system. Onamia is majority Indigenous students, and having grown up in the community, Lancaster made her journey back to make sure students were learning about and seeing themselves reflected in their education. Guest: Sarah Lancaster, 2022 Minnesota Teacher of the Year

Mutuality Matters Podcast
(New Voices) Subversive Grandmother & Tenacious Widows: Kat Armas' Abuelita Faith

Mutuality Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 34:18


When was the last time you read a book that told your story through the personal story of the author? Add in biblical scholarship, intersectionality, decolonization, history, and current events and you have Kat Armas' book, Abuelita Faith. In this episode, Blake and Erin have a lively discussion with Kat Armas about the “protagonistas” in Scripture, history, and Armas' own family who help us see a God who loves us and is revealed through the lived theology of women of color, indigenous voices, and cultural diversity.  Be sure to check out Abuelita Faith: What Women on the Margins Teach Us about Wisdom, Persistence, and Strength (just released in Spanish!)  Follow her on social media: @kat_armas  Subscribe to her newsletter from her website: https://katarmas.com/  Listen to her podcast, The Protagonistas: https://katarmas.com/theprotagonistaspodcast    Bio  Kat Armas is a Cuban American writer and podcaster from Miami, FL. She holds a dual MDiv and MAT from Fuller Theological Seminary, where she was awarded the Frederick Buechner Award for Excellence in Writing, and is currently pursuing a ThM at Vanderbilt Divinity School. https://www.cbeinternational.org/persons/kat-armas  Her first book, Abuelita Faith: What Women on the Margins Teach Us About Wisdom, Persistence and Strength, sits at the intersection of women, decolonialism, the Bible, and Cuban identity. She also explores these topics and more on her podcast, The Protagonistas, which centers the voices of Black, Indigenous, and other women of color in theological spaces.    Other Reading:  YHWH and Marginalization: Israel's Widows and Abuelita Theology: https://www.cbeinternational.org/resource/article/priscilla-papers-academic-journal/yhwh-and-marginalization-israels-widows-and  3 Simple Rules for Egalitarian Couples:  https://www.cbeinternational.org/resource/article/mutuality-blog-magazine/3-simple-rules-egalitarian-couples  Priscilla and Aquila Model Marriage: “More Accurately”:  https://www.cbeinternational.org/resource/article/mutuality-blog-magazine/priscilla-and-aquila-model-marriage-more-accurately  Is Complementarian Interpretation of 1 Corinthians 14 Consistent with Practice?: https://www.cbeinternational.org/resource/article/mutuality-blog-magazine/complementarian-interpretation-1-corinthians-14-consistent 

The Decibel
The fight to end forced sterilization of Indigenous women

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 16:10


Indigenous women are still being forcibly sterilized in Canada. That's one thing that Sen. Yvonne Boyer wants Canadians to know. The senator, who is Métis herself and was formerly a nurse and a lawyer, has been fighting to raise awareness of this issue. She is also a part of the Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights that is currently examining the issue.Sen. Boyer discusses how her background inspired her to devote her life to ending forced sterilization procedures, how it's part of the systemic racism Indigenous women face in Canada's health care system and why addressing it is an important part of Canada's reconciliation efforts.

Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio
Ancient oyster mounds, seagrass' sweet secret, saving the Mekong delta, reading minds to produce sound and next-gen COVID-19 vaccines

Quirks and Quarks Complete Show from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 54:09


Oyster shell mountains show history of sustainable Indigenous fisheries; Seagrass is hiding a submerged sweet CO2 secret; Saving the Mekong delta in six (not) easy steps; Researchers can read a bird's brain to tell what it's about to sing; The first COVID-19 vaccines were a medical miracle – the next ones could be even better.

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
Atlantic Business Magazine has named its first ever Indigenous CEO of the year

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 7:34


Atlantic Business Magazine just named its top 50 CEOs of the year. For the first time, an Indigenous business leader is at the top of that list. He heads a corporation that encompasses a dozen businesses, and two years ago he negotiated the purchase of Clearwater seafoods. Hear from Chief Terry Paul is CEO of Membertou.

Civic
Reconciling John Muir, Racial Politics and the Restoration of Indigenous Lands in Yosemite

Civic

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 25:46


John Muir is considered the father of the National Parks and has been honored extensively around California. But in 2020, the Sierra Club began reexamining their founder's words. Was John Muir racist? Civic took a trip up to Yosemite to speak with Lee Stetson, a Muir historian and actor, and Sandra Roan Chapman, chairperson of the Southern Sierra Miwuk Nation, to discuss Muir's legacy, current efforts to increase recognition of and resources for indigenous people, and the impact of the conservation movement in the region.

KZMU News
Thursday May 12, 2022

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 8:49


The Grand County Sheriff's Office identified Adam Pinkusiewicz as a suspect in the double homicide of Kylen Schulte and Crystal Turner. This major development comes nearly nine months after the Moab couple's remains were found at a campsite in the La Sal Mountains. Authorities are still looking for information about Pinkusiewicz, who died by suicide in September 2021. Plus, a new report by the US Interior Department is sharply critical of the Indian boarding school system. And, a group of Indigenous runners is currently traveling over 360 miles from Bears Ears National Monument to Warm Springs Park in Salt Lake City. Two runners speak about their connection to running as medicine. // Show Notes // Authorities are still looking for information about Adam Pinkusiewicz and his vehicle, a 2007 Toyota Yaris. If you might have information please call the Grand County Sheriff's Office at 435- 259-8115. // Seekhaven Family Crisis and Resource Center says trauma is a shared experience for many community members at this time. If you need support, counseling or other resources call their helpline at 435-259-2229. // Photo: A cross marks the turnoff for the campsite where Kylen Schulte and Crystal Turner were camping in August 2021. Nearly nine months since their bodies were found, law enforcement released the name of a suspect. // 5-11-22 GCSO Press Release (Includes Suspect and Vehicle Photos) https://www.kzmu.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/5-11-22-GCSO-Press-Release-1.pdf // KSJD: New report investigates traumatic legacy of federal Indian boarding schools https://www.ksjd.org/podcast/ksjd-local-newscasts/2022-05-11/new-report-investigates-traumatic-legacy-of-of-federal-indian-boarding-schools // Running As Medicine Indigenous Prayer Run https://www.facebook.com/runningasmedicine

American Indian Airwaves
Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic, Part 2

American Indian Airwaves

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 58:23


Thursday, 5/12/2022, on American Indian Airwaves, 7pm to 8pm (PCT) “Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic, Part 2“ Part 1 William I. Robinson's new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic, is a big picture synthesis of a global capitalism in a state of deep crisis that is cascading social, political, and cultural conflicts all over Mother Earth with dire implications for not only Indigenous peoples and their respective First Nations, but also the futures of lives unless massive structural changes immediately occur. One major factor to the inordinate concentration of political, economic, and cultural power is a much more advanced digitalization of the entire global economy and society and of the social and political during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic; and Robinson contends the pandemic lockdowns served as dry runs for how digitalization may allow the dominant groups to step up restructuring time and space and to exercise greater control over the global working class. The global capitalist system is now pushing toward expansion through militarization, wars, and conflicts, through a new round of violent dispossession, and through further plunder of the state. All this and more in part one of a three-part interview with William I. Robinson on Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic (2022). Guest: William Robinson, professor of sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), affiliated with the Latin American and Iberian Studies Program, and with the Global and International Studies Program at UCSB. He is the author of the new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic (2022), and The Global Police State (2020), Global Capitalism and the Crises of Humanity (2014) and We Will Not Be Silenced (2017). Robinson joins us for the first part of three-part interview on his brand-new book, Global Civil War: Capitalism Post-Pandemic (2022). Click here for archived American Indian Airwaves programs on the KPFK website within the past 60-days only or click on (below) after 8pm for today's scheduled program. Soundcloud Apple Podcast Google Podcast iHeartRadio Pocket Casts Spotify Podcast Stitcher Podcast Tunein Podcast

On Being with Krista Tippett
Robin Wall Kimmerer — The Intelligence of Plants

On Being with Krista Tippett

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 50:39


Few books have been more eagerly passed from hand to hand with delight in these last years than Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass. Krista interviewed her in 2015, and it quickly became a much-loved show as her voice was just rising in common life. Robin is a botanist and also a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She's written, “Science polishes the gift of seeing, indigenous traditions work with gifts of listening and language.” An expert in moss — a bryologist — she describes mosses as the “coral reefs of the forest.” Robin Wall Kimmerer opens a sense of wonder and humility for the intelligence in all kinds of life we are used to naming and imagining as inanimate.And, this week, an invitation: Krista recently announced that in June we are transitioning On Being from a weekly show to a seasonal podcast. We hope you'll help us celebrate this threshold, and these first two decades, by sharing how you've made this adventure of conversation your own:Is there a guest, an idea or a moment from an episode that has made a difference, that has stayed with you? We've created a way for you to record your reflection simply — and at the same time sign up to stay on top of what's happening next: onbeing.org/staywithus. Krista will be offering some of her defining memories, too: in a special online event in June, on social media, and more. So — please and thank you — go to onbeing.org/staywithus.Robin Wall Kimmerer is the State University of New York Distinguished Teaching Professor at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse. She is founding director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment. She works with tribal nations on environmental problem-solving and sustainability. Part of that work is about recovering lineages of knowledge that were made illegal in the policies of tribal assimilation which did not fully end in the U.S. until the 1970s. Her books include Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses and Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.Find the transcript for this show at onbeing.org.This show originally aired in February 2016.

On Being with Krista Tippett
[Unedited] Robin Wall Kimmerer with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 86:38


Few books have been more eagerly passed from hand to hand with delight in these last years than Robin Wall Kimmerer's Braiding Sweetgrass. Krista interviewed her in 2015, and it quickly became a much-loved show as her voice was just rising in common life. Robin is a botanist and also a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She's written, “Science polishes the gift of seeing, indigenous traditions work with gifts of listening and language.” An expert in moss — a bryologist — she describes mosses as the “coral reefs of the forest.” Robin Wall Kimmerer opens a sense of wonder and humility for the intelligence in all kinds of life we are used to naming and imagining as inanimate.And, this week, an invitation: Krista recently announced that in June we are transitioning On Being from a weekly show to a seasonal podcast. We hope you'll help us celebrate this threshold, and these first two decades, by sharing how you've made this adventure of conversation your own:Is there a guest, an idea or a moment from an episode that has made a difference, that has stayed with you? We've created a way for you to record your reflection simply — and at the same time sign up to stay on top of what's happening next: onbeing.org/staywithus. Krista will be offering some of her defining memories, too: in a special online event in June, on social media, and more. So — please and thank you — go to onbeing.org/staywithus.Robin Wall Kimmerer is the State University of New York Distinguished Teaching Professor at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse. She is founding director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment. She works with tribal nations on environmental problem-solving and sustainability. Part of that work is about recovering lineages of knowledge that were made illegal in the policies of tribal assimilation which did not fully end in the U.S. until the 1970s. Her books include Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses and Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants.This interview is edited and produced with music and other features in the On Being episode "Robin Wall Kimmerer — The Intelligence of Plants." Find the transcript for that show at onbeing.org.This show originally aired in February 2016.

Redeye
Beyond Extinction: Sinixt Resurgence

Redeye

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 18:06


In 1956, the Canadian government declared the Arrow Lakes Indian Band, people of the Sinixt Nation, to be extinct. This was one in a long line of colonial attacks against an Indigenous nation whose territory encompasses a long valley that spans what is now the US-Canada border. The Sinixt were not extinct, and continue an active resistance to protect and regain their territories. A new film, Beyond Extinction: Sinixt Resurgence tells the “ongoing story of a people who reject their colonial ghost status.” The film is available online until May 15. We speak with filmmaker Ali Kazimi.

New Books Network
Ryan Hall, "Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877" (UNC Press, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 76:39


No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries and enforcing power between both European empires and Indigenous neighbors, the Blackfoot were able to carve out a lasting niche in the contested borderlands of the early North American West of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Although disease, resource depletion, and colonization would eventually be visited upon the Blackfoot, along with American settler colonialism, this outcome was never preordained. Nor was that the entire story, as Blackfoot history carries on well after such well known events as the Montana gold rush and the Marias Massacre. Beneath the Backbone of the World is an example of Native history's power to force a rethinking of North American history's arc. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Ryan Hall, "Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877" (UNC Press, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 76:39


No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries and enforcing power between both European empires and Indigenous neighbors, the Blackfoot were able to carve out a lasting niche in the contested borderlands of the early North American West of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Although disease, resource depletion, and colonization would eventually be visited upon the Blackfoot, along with American settler colonialism, this outcome was never preordained. Nor was that the entire story, as Blackfoot history carries on well after such well known events as the Montana gold rush and the Marias Massacre. Beneath the Backbone of the World is an example of Native history's power to force a rethinking of North American history's arc. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Native American Studies
Ryan Hall, "Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877" (UNC Press, 2020)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 76:39


No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries and enforcing power between both European empires and Indigenous neighbors, the Blackfoot were able to carve out a lasting niche in the contested borderlands of the early North American West of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Although disease, resource depletion, and colonization would eventually be visited upon the Blackfoot, along with American settler colonialism, this outcome was never preordained. Nor was that the entire story, as Blackfoot history carries on well after such well known events as the Montana gold rush and the Marias Massacre. Beneath the Backbone of the World is an example of Native history's power to force a rethinking of North American history's arc. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books in American Studies
Ryan Hall, "Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877" (UNC Press, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 76:39


No matter what people call them today the northwestern Great Plains have been and continue to be Blackfoot country, argues Colgate University assistant professor Ryan Hall in Beneath the Backbone of the World: Blackfoot People and the North American Borderlands, 1720-1877 (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). By maintaining their boundaries and enforcing power between both European empires and Indigenous neighbors, the Blackfoot were able to carve out a lasting niche in the contested borderlands of the early North American West of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Although disease, resource depletion, and colonization would eventually be visited upon the Blackfoot, along with American settler colonialism, this outcome was never preordained. Nor was that the entire story, as Blackfoot history carries on well after such well known events as the Montana gold rush and the Marias Massacre. Beneath the Backbone of the World is an example of Native history's power to force a rethinking of North American history's arc. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

There has always been a pervasive greed and hatred toward Natives and other peoples of color in this country. The desire to not be inclusive is a part of the everyday behaviors of State and local governments. When it comes to the overall inequality people of color face in this country, the phrase; ”Let them eat grass.” comes to mind.

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand
Visit the tribal lands in Arizona

Chicago's Afternoon News with Steve Bertrand

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022


Dawn Melvin, Tribal Tourism Relations Manager for the Arizona Office of Tourism, joins Lisa Dent on Chicago's Afternoon News to talk about tribal nations in Arizona. Indigenous cultures have made their mark on the state over the years, from petroglyphs to traditional foods and homemade goods. Find your itinerary at www.letsseeaz.com. Follow Your Favorite Chicago’s Afternoon News Personalities […]

5 Plain Questions
Dakota Mace

5 Plain Questions

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 27:07


Dakota Mace (Diné) is an interdisciplinary artist whose work focuses on translating the language of Diné history and beliefs. Mace received her MA and MFA degrees in Photography and Textile Design at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her BFA in Photography from the Institute of American Indian Arts. As a Diné (Navajo) artist, her work draws from the history of her Diné heritage, exploring the themes of family lineage, community, and identity. In addition, her work pushes the viewer's understanding of Diné culture through alternative photography techniques, weaving, beadwork, and papermaking. She has also worked with numerous institutions and programs to develop dialogue on the issues of cultural appropriation and the importance of Indigenous design work. She is currently a grad advisor in painting and drawing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the photographer for the Helen Louise Allen Textile Center and the Center of Design and Material Culture. Her work as an artist and scholar has been exhibited nationally and internationally at various conferences, collectives, museums, and galleries, including: Textile Society of America, Weave a Real Peace, Indigenous Photograph, 400 Year Project, Wright Art Museum, Contemporary Arts Center, Kemper Museum of Art, and the Wallach Art Gallery. Website: https://www.dakotamace.com/ IG: https://www.instagram.com/dmaceart/

For The Wild
ALOK on Unruly Beauty [ENCORE] /286

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


This week we are rebroadcasting our interview with ALOK, originally aired in August of 2021. “I validate the idea that survival is the ultimate act of creation in a world that has reduced us to fascist arithmetic, of being a quantitative statistic, not a human soul. So we still found a way to care, love, and create - isn't that art? I teach people to decipher the art that they're already doing, recognize the artistry and the everyday miracles of life around them, and create from that place.” This week we immerse ourselves in the aforementioned call to recognize the myriad of creations all around us from guest ALOK, who guides us in an ever-expansive dialogue around spiritual wellbeing, the importance of creative literacy, and the tremendous freedom that awaits us when we make gender unknowable. We begin our conversation by foregrounding the importance of moving out of the paradigm of understanding trans and queer as something that is exclusive to the body. Instead, ALOK shares how challenging the gender binary is not only in service to our collective wellbeing but is a reverential offering in acknowledging our true celestial expansiveness that has been dimmed under binarism, heteronormativity, and colonialism. ALOK is a gender non-conforming writer and performance artist. Their distinctive style and poetic challenge to the gender binary have been internationally renowned. As a mixed-media artist Alok uses poetry, prose, comedy, performance, fashion design, and portraiture to explore themes of gender, race, trauma, belonging, and the human condition. They are the author of Femme in Public (2017) and Beyond the Gender Binary (2020). Music by Soda Lite, Rising Appalachia, and Lady Moon & The Eclipse.  Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Seedcast
Indigenous Peoples Hold the Planet: A Conversation with Nara Baré

Seedcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:30


“It's as if the Indigenous peoples were holding the whole planet. And the time will come when if you don't come with us for this fight, we won't be able to do it alone.” – Nara Baré In this episode of Seedcast, meet Nara Baré, member of the Baré Nation. Nara's story is one of empowerment through knowledge. She shares how her educational pursuits, including participation in student protests, prepared her to join the larger movement to support land sovereignty for the Indigenous peoples across the Brazilian Amazon. Nara currently serves her community as the first female General Coordinator for COIAB (Coordination of Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon). Host: Jessica Ramirez. Producer: Marianna Romano. Story editor: Jenny Asarnow. Learn more about COIAB on their website and follow their work on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. Enjoy the Seedcast podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, and your other favorite podcast platforms. 

Sense-making in a Changing World
Episode 73: Regenerating Australia with Damon Gameau and Morag Gamble

Sense-making in a Changing World

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:45


In this episode, Morag Gamble talks with Damon Gameau about his latest film, Regenerating Australia. The Permaculture Education Institute's Film Club is hosting a free livestreaming on May 20th. BOOK HERE.Damon Gameau is an award-winning filmmaker, author, father and activist. His 2015 movie, That Sugar Film, broke Australian box office records, and his other feature-length film, 2040, was one of the highest-grossing Australian documentaries of all time.His latest offering, Regenerating Australia, is a short film that explores what Australia could look like in 2030 if we listened to the needs of its people. Based on interviews with a diverse group of Australians about their hopes for the future, the film features well-known voices like Kerry O'Brien, Sandra Sully, Gorgi Coghlan, Tim Flannery, Larissa Behrend and David Pocock.Morag and Damon discuss:Creating a safe space for young people to talk about climate change and take action;The power of storytelling for creating change;The upcoming Australian Federal election;There is no saviour coming to combat climate change – it requires action from the network of changemakers within Australia and the world – our very own mycelial network;What the Northern Rivers flooding in NSW taught us about the importance of localisation and self-governance;How we measure success now and how we might measure it in the future;Kate Raworth's Doughnut Economics;The problem with apocalyptic storylines;How do we put climate change solutions front and centre so they're funded;What drives change;Regenerating Songlines Australia, a continent-wide network that connects regenerative projects and practitioners led by First Nations peoples and inclusive of all Australians;The rise of regenerative farming in Australia, contributed partly by Southern Cross University's Regenerative Agriculture Course;How we can incentivise regeneration of our land;Gregory Landau's recently formed Regen Network;Australia's reliance on fossil fuels and reluctance to give them up;The power of Indigenous knowledge and the role it can play in healing our planet.This podcast is bought to you by The Permaculture Education Institute.Please rate and review this podcast in the Apple Podcast app, Spotify, or wherever you listen. By giving this podcast a five-star review, we can help bring Permaculture into other people's lives.

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) Candace Fujikane · Author of "Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


“The struggle for a planetary future calls for a profound epistemological shift. Indigenous ancestral knowledges are now providing a foundation for our work against climate change, one based on what I refer to as Indigenous economies of abundance—as opposed to capitalist economies of scarcity. Rather than seeing climate change as apocalyptic, we can see that climate change is bringing about the demise of capital, making way for Indigenous lifeways that center familial relationships with the earth and elemental forms. Kānaka Maoli are restoring the worlds where their attunement to climatic change and their capacity for kilo adaptation, regeneration, and tranformation will enable them to survive what capital cannot.”Candace Fujikane is an author and professor of English at the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa, teaching aloha ʻāina and the protection of Hawaiʻi. Having grown up on the slopes of Maui's Haleakalā, Candace has stood for the lands, waters, and political sovereignty of Hawaiʻi for over 20 years. Her newest book, Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future, contends that “Indigenous ancestral knowledge provides a foundation for movements against climate change, one based on Indigenous economies of abundance as opposed to capitalist economies of scarcity.”· english.hawaii.edu/faculty/candace-fujikane/· www.dukeupress.edu/mapping-abundance-for-a-planetary-future · www.oneplanetpodcast.org· www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process Podcast
Candace Fujikane · Author of "Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future"

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022


Candace Fujikane is an author and professor of English at the University of Hawaiʻi at Manoa, teaching aloha ʻāina and the protection of Hawaiʻi. Having grown up on the slopes of Maui's Haleakalā, Candace has stood for the lands, waters, and political sovereignty of Hawaiʻi for over 20 years. Her newest book, Mapping Abundance for a Planetary Future, contends that “Indigenous ancestral knowledge provides a foundation for movements against climate change, one based on Indigenous economies of abundance as opposed to capitalist economies of scarcity.”“The struggle for a planetary future calls for a profound epistemological shift. Indigenous ancestral knowledges are now providing a foundation for our work against climate change, one based on what I refer to as Indigenous economies of abundance—as opposed to capitalist economies of scarcity. Rather than seeing climate change as apocalyptic, we can see that climate change is bringing about the demise of capital, making way for Indigenous lifeways that center familial relationships with the earth and elemental forms. Kānaka Maoli are restoring the worlds where their attunement to climatic change and their capacity for kilo adaptation, regeneration, and tranforma- tion will enable them to survive what capital cannot.”· english.hawaii.edu/faculty/candace-fujikane/· www.dukeupress.edu/mapping-abundance-for-a-planetary-future · www.oneplanetpodcast.org· www.creativeprocess.info

Late Night Live - ABC RN
Indigenous news, recycled phones saving the rainforest and a history of surgery

Late Night Live - ABC RN

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 53:36


Sarah Collard reports on the issued that Indigenous Australians would like to see debated, Topher White explains how recycled phones are helping save rainforests and Ira Rutkow on the surprising history of surgery.

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast
Indigenous News with Sarah Collard

Late Night Live - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:19


Sarah Collard reports on her week on the campaign bus with Scott Morrison and the issues that Indigenous Australians would have liked to see on the front pages. She also profiles some of the Indigenous candidates that are running this election across the nation and the political divide.

5 Things
Should you delete your period-tracking app?

5 Things

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 13:03


Reporter Amanda Pérez Pintado talks about privacy concerns, amid the Supreme Court Roe v. Wade leak. Plus, an update on inflation, lawmakers pass more aid for Ukraine, reporter Chris Quintana looks into changes to Title IX and the Interior Department will begin to reveal truths about Indigenous schools.(Audio: Associated Press)Episode Transcript available hereAlso available at art19.com/shows/5-ThingsSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Books in American Studies
Samuel J. Redman, "Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:27


Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeologists, and other chroniclers began amassing Indigenous cultural objects—crafts, clothing, images, song recordings—by the millions. Convinced that Indigenous peoples were doomed to disappear, collectors donated these objects to museums and universities that would preserve and exhibit them. Samuel Redman dives into the archive to understand what the collectors deemed the tradition of the “vanishing Indian” and what we can learn from the complex legacy of salvage anthropology. The salvage catalog betrays a vision of Native cultures clouded by racist assumptions—a vision that had lasting consequences. The collecting practice became an engine of the American museum and significantly shaped public education and preservation, as well as popular ideas about Indigenous cultures. Prophets and Ghosts teases out the moral challenges inherent in the salvage project. Preservationists successfully maintained an important human inheritance, sometimes through collaboration with Indigenous people, but collectors' methods also included outright theft. The resulting portrait of Indigenous culture reinforced the public's confidence in the hierarchies of superiority and inferiority invented by “scientific” racism. Today the same salvaged objects are sources of invaluable knowledge for researchers and museum visitors. But the question of what should be done with such collections is nonetheless urgent. Redman interviews Indigenous artists and curators, who offer fresh perspectives on the history and impact of cultural salvage, pointing to new ideas on how we might contend with a challenging inheritance. Alex Golub is associate professor of anthropology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Samuel J. Redman, "Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:27


Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeologists, and other chroniclers began amassing Indigenous cultural objects—crafts, clothing, images, song recordings—by the millions. Convinced that Indigenous peoples were doomed to disappear, collectors donated these objects to museums and universities that would preserve and exhibit them. Samuel Redman dives into the archive to understand what the collectors deemed the tradition of the “vanishing Indian” and what we can learn from the complex legacy of salvage anthropology. The salvage catalog betrays a vision of Native cultures clouded by racist assumptions—a vision that had lasting consequences. The collecting practice became an engine of the American museum and significantly shaped public education and preservation, as well as popular ideas about Indigenous cultures. Prophets and Ghosts teases out the moral challenges inherent in the salvage project. Preservationists successfully maintained an important human inheritance, sometimes through collaboration with Indigenous people, but collectors' methods also included outright theft. The resulting portrait of Indigenous culture reinforced the public's confidence in the hierarchies of superiority and inferiority invented by “scientific” racism. Today the same salvaged objects are sources of invaluable knowledge for researchers and museum visitors. But the question of what should be done with such collections is nonetheless urgent. Redman interviews Indigenous artists and curators, who offer fresh perspectives on the history and impact of cultural salvage, pointing to new ideas on how we might contend with a challenging inheritance. Alex Golub is associate professor of anthropology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Native American Studies
Samuel J. Redman, "Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Native American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:27


Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeologists, and other chroniclers began amassing Indigenous cultural objects—crafts, clothing, images, song recordings—by the millions. Convinced that Indigenous peoples were doomed to disappear, collectors donated these objects to museums and universities that would preserve and exhibit them. Samuel Redman dives into the archive to understand what the collectors deemed the tradition of the “vanishing Indian” and what we can learn from the complex legacy of salvage anthropology. The salvage catalog betrays a vision of Native cultures clouded by racist assumptions—a vision that had lasting consequences. The collecting practice became an engine of the American museum and significantly shaped public education and preservation, as well as popular ideas about Indigenous cultures. Prophets and Ghosts teases out the moral challenges inherent in the salvage project. Preservationists successfully maintained an important human inheritance, sometimes through collaboration with Indigenous people, but collectors' methods also included outright theft. The resulting portrait of Indigenous culture reinforced the public's confidence in the hierarchies of superiority and inferiority invented by “scientific” racism. Today the same salvaged objects are sources of invaluable knowledge for researchers and museum visitors. But the question of what should be done with such collections is nonetheless urgent. Redman interviews Indigenous artists and curators, who offer fresh perspectives on the history and impact of cultural salvage, pointing to new ideas on how we might contend with a challenging inheritance. Alex Golub is associate professor of anthropology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/native-american-studies

New Books Network
Samuel J. Redman, "Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:27


Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeologists, and other chroniclers began amassing Indigenous cultural objects—crafts, clothing, images, song recordings—by the millions. Convinced that Indigenous peoples were doomed to disappear, collectors donated these objects to museums and universities that would preserve and exhibit them. Samuel Redman dives into the archive to understand what the collectors deemed the tradition of the “vanishing Indian” and what we can learn from the complex legacy of salvage anthropology. The salvage catalog betrays a vision of Native cultures clouded by racist assumptions—a vision that had lasting consequences. The collecting practice became an engine of the American museum and significantly shaped public education and preservation, as well as popular ideas about Indigenous cultures. Prophets and Ghosts teases out the moral challenges inherent in the salvage project. Preservationists successfully maintained an important human inheritance, sometimes through collaboration with Indigenous people, but collectors' methods also included outright theft. The resulting portrait of Indigenous culture reinforced the public's confidence in the hierarchies of superiority and inferiority invented by “scientific” racism. Today the same salvaged objects are sources of invaluable knowledge for researchers and museum visitors. But the question of what should be done with such collections is nonetheless urgent. Redman interviews Indigenous artists and curators, who offer fresh perspectives on the history and impact of cultural salvage, pointing to new ideas on how we might contend with a challenging inheritance. Alex Golub is associate professor of anthropology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Anthropology
Samuel J. Redman, "Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:27


Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeologists, and other chroniclers began amassing Indigenous cultural objects—crafts, clothing, images, song recordings—by the millions. Convinced that Indigenous peoples were doomed to disappear, collectors donated these objects to museums and universities that would preserve and exhibit them. Samuel Redman dives into the archive to understand what the collectors deemed the tradition of the “vanishing Indian” and what we can learn from the complex legacy of salvage anthropology. The salvage catalog betrays a vision of Native cultures clouded by racist assumptions—a vision that had lasting consequences. The collecting practice became an engine of the American museum and significantly shaped public education and preservation, as well as popular ideas about Indigenous cultures. Prophets and Ghosts teases out the moral challenges inherent in the salvage project. Preservationists successfully maintained an important human inheritance, sometimes through collaboration with Indigenous people, but collectors' methods also included outright theft. The resulting portrait of Indigenous culture reinforced the public's confidence in the hierarchies of superiority and inferiority invented by “scientific” racism. Today the same salvaged objects are sources of invaluable knowledge for researchers and museum visitors. But the question of what should be done with such collections is nonetheless urgent. Redman interviews Indigenous artists and curators, who offer fresh perspectives on the history and impact of cultural salvage, pointing to new ideas on how we might contend with a challenging inheritance. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in Art
Samuel J. Redman, "Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology" (Harvard UP, 2021)

New Books in Art

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 50:27


Prophets and Ghosts: The Story of Salvage Anthropology (Harvard UP, 2021) is a searching account of nineteenth-century salvage anthropology, an effort to preserve the culture of “vanishing” Indigenous peoples through dispossession of the very communities it was meant to protect. In the late nineteenth century, anthropologists, linguists, archaeologists, and other chroniclers began amassing Indigenous cultural objects—crafts, clothing, images, song recordings—by the millions. Convinced that Indigenous peoples were doomed to disappear, collectors donated these objects to museums and universities that would preserve and exhibit them. Samuel Redman dives into the archive to understand what the collectors deemed the tradition of the “vanishing Indian” and what we can learn from the complex legacy of salvage anthropology. The salvage catalog betrays a vision of Native cultures clouded by racist assumptions—a vision that had lasting consequences. The collecting practice became an engine of the American museum and significantly shaped public education and preservation, as well as popular ideas about Indigenous cultures. Prophets and Ghosts teases out the moral challenges inherent in the salvage project. Preservationists successfully maintained an important human inheritance, sometimes through collaboration with Indigenous people, but collectors' methods also included outright theft. The resulting portrait of Indigenous culture reinforced the public's confidence in the hierarchies of superiority and inferiority invented by “scientific” racism. Today the same salvaged objects are sources of invaluable knowledge for researchers and museum visitors. But the question of what should be done with such collections is nonetheless urgent. Redman interviews Indigenous artists and curators, who offer fresh perspectives on the history and impact of cultural salvage, pointing to new ideas on how we might contend with a challenging inheritance. Alex Golub is associate professor of anthropology, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/art

Impact Journey with Julia S
The sacred in the science - Dekila Chungyalpa, Loka Initiative

Impact Journey with Julia S

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 22:52


In my attempts to connect with people on some of our most important issues like climate change, I have been missing a huge pathway - faith. These issues need hard conversations, and hard conversations need us to tap into more than facts and fears. My conversation with Dekila opens the door to bringing the sacred back into science. THE IMPACT. Dekila Chungyalpa: - is the founder and director of the Loka Initiative, an interdisciplinary capacity building and outreach platform at the University of Wisconsin - Madison for faith leaders and culture keepers of Indigenous traditions who work on environmental and climate issues. Its mission is to support faith-led environmental and climate action efforts, locally and around the world, through collaborations on project design and management, capacity building, training, media and public outreach. Their vision: that inner, community, and planetary resilience are interdependent and that we cannot achieve any one of these goals without working on the other two. To sign up for their quarterly newsletter: https://go.wisc.edu/lokanewsletter - founded and led Sacred Earth, a faith-based conservation program at the World Wildlife Fund; at WWF-US she was also Director for the Greater Mekong Program - serves as the environmental adviser for His Holiness the 17th Karmapa, head of the Karma Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism. - received the prestigious Yale McCluskey Award in 2014 for conservation innovation - recently published in Psychology Today on how to cope with eco-anxiety THE JOURNEY. In our conversation, we explore: - Her path to wholeness: bridging her spiritual heritage growing up in Sikkim in a Tibetan Buddhist community and her environmental conservation background, after being “an environmentalist by day and a person of faith by night” - Eco-anxiety amidst success: her own path through the urgency and panic while being externally “successful” at the World Wildlife Fund - People and planet: why faith leaders are uniquely positioned to lead us in spiritual truth-seeking on some of our toughest issues

House of X - An X-Men Podcast
Episode 138 - I am Mutant

House of X - An X-Men Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 94:06


We review Giant Size X-Men Thunderbird, Marauders and AXE Judgement Day from Free Comic Book Day

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
May 10, 2022 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 53:30


Tuesday on the NewsHour, Russian forces bombard Mariupol and the port city of Odesa, but are pushed back in northeast Ukraine. Then, a lawyer who argued against abortion rights before the Supreme Court reflects on the justices' expected ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade. Also, a Colorado school reconfigures campus life to reckon with a troubling legacy aimed at erasing Indigenous students' culture. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

7am
The Vote: Hiding the Aboriginal vote

7am

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 29:45


When Australia heads to the polls in a couple of weeks, 1 in 5 Indigenous people who are eligible to vote won't be enrolled and won't be able to cast a ballot.  60 years after First Nations people won the right to vote in Australia, why is access to democracy still a challenge? Today, producer for 7am Ruby Schwartz travels to remote Australia to find out why some people are more enrolled than others. Guest: Producer for 7am, Ruby Schwartz. Stay in touch with us on Twitter and Instagram

The Thought Leader Revolution Podcast | 10X Your Impact, Your Income & Your Influence
EP362 - The Hon. Tony Clement: Freedom Principles - From Politics To Business

The Thought Leader Revolution Podcast | 10X Your Impact, Your Income & Your Influence

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 55:06


“We have to be compassionate as conservatives. We have to show that we care what people are going through.”   In business, your message needs to be aimed at people who have an acute problem that needs to be solved. This same principle applies to politics and there are powerful examples of this from the last several decades. The Honourable Tony Clement came into politics in his mid-teens, when free choice and free markets were being threatened by the spread of communism, before the fall of the Soviet Union. As a member of the conservative party and minister of health and industry, Tony has always worked to protect individual freedom from big government. Tony believes that big government is now on the rise again.   Expert action steps: Never give up. It's about how you step up and face adversity. Hope is not a strategy. When you have goals in mind, you have to know how you're going to get things done. Have grace in your life. Be understanding. Be compassionate. Power is good but love and compassion are even more important. Go online and register as a conservative at conservative.ca.   Check out Tony's podcast, And Another Thing. https://www.andanotherthingpodcast.ca/.   eCircle is holding a live, in-person event!! Dare 2 Win - Own Your Freedom. May 13 & 14 at the Toronto Pan Pacific Hotel. Find more information and register at https://ecircleacademy.mykajabi.com/dare-2-win-home. Speakers include: Marc Von Musser - Sales Mastery Nicky Billou - Branding & Leadership Theresa Dugwell - Health & Fitness Brian Scudamore - Founder 1-800 Got Junk - Building Billion Dollar Brands Jean Taillon - How To Scale To A $100 Million Company Dan Hill - World-renowned Singer. #1 Hit "Sometimes When We Touch" Don Bentley - Nyt #1 Bestselling Author & Branding Expert Dr. Valerie Franc - Wellness & Anti-aging Danny Z777 - Motivation & Entrepreneurship Raymond Aaron - Branding   Visit eCircleAcademy.com and book a success call with Nicky to take your practice to the next level.

Voices of Greater Yellowstone
08 | The Bold Art of Yellowstone

Voices of Greater Yellowstone

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 53:05


As Aristotle once said, “The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” It is no secret that the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem inspires countless artists using every medium imaginable to create masterpieces depicting what this landscape means to them. In Episode 08, we sit down with artist DG House in her studio in Bozeman, Montana. DG is a contemporary Indigenous painter and photographer who is best known for her boldly colored and beautifully rendered paintings of iconic Yellowstone wildlife. She is an artist-in-residence within both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.In the colorful front room of her studio, surrounded by house plants and stacks of books, we discussed the role of art in our ecosystem, artists as conduits for bringing the natural world to others, and learn how ice hockey played a role in how her name came to be. Voices of Greater Yellowstone was created by the Greater Yellowstone Coalition, a conservation nonprofit dedicated to working with people to protect the lands, waters, and wildlife of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, now and for future generations.The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is the land of 49+ Indigenous Tribes who maintain current and ancestral connections to the lands, waters, wildlife, plants, and more.> Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get podcasts.> Sign-up for our podcast supporter email list> DG House's Website> Support the podcast and give a gift to GYCPodcast Artwork > Rachel Dunlap ArtMusic >Redwood Trail by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/...)Artist: http://audionautix.com/Support the show

MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program
The Colonial Complications of Indigenous Reproductive Choice (ep 289)

MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 31:10


For our eighth 'MINI' INDIGENA of the season, MI regular Kim TallBear (professor in the Faculty of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) and special guest January Rogers (Mohawk/Tuscarora poet, author, and media producer from Six Nations of the Grand River) join host/producer Rick Harp via the Callin app to discuss: i) Jacqueline Keeler's recent piece, “Striking Down Roe v. Wade Leaves Native Women and Girls Even More Vulnerable”; ii) why the time may be right for a Mister Indian World competition; iii) how the pro sports team that brought us the ‘Tomahawk Chop' took it upon themselves to add their voice to National Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Awareness Day; iv) intersections between forced sterilization and criminalizing abortion >> CREDITS: 'Microship' by CavalloPazzo (CC BY-SA 4.0)

The Trail Ahead
Kinship, Connectedness, and Activism with Alex Piechowski-Begay

The Trail Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 68:27


Alex is an Indigenous artist and activist who spends much of his time on the road, often moving between communities to stand in solidarity with their pressing calls to action. He is a member of the Navajo Nation, a vocal advocate in the Land Back movement, and a supporter of Indigenous-owned businesses. His jewelry and pottery convey traditional designs and stories of the Navajo people - serving as a form of resistance. He joins the podcast for an eye-opening look into the meaning of kinship and connectedness. Alex shares stories from his childhood and how his upbringing, especially his grandparents, played a major role in shaping and influencing his life today. We also ask Alex about his practice as an artist, how his jewelry and crafts serve as a form of resistance, and why each piece he creates is filled with intention and meaning. Alex shares what Land Back is and why it's so important, as well as our society's need to acknowledge the inequities all around us and learn to care for one another.Tune in to this conversation all about expression, connectedness, and how we can be better relatives to our communities.

ON Point with Alex Pierson
Half of Women in Canadian Federal Prisons Are Indigenous

ON Point with Alex Pierson

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 9:52


Guest Host Angela Kokott speaks with Dr. Vicki Chartrand, an associate professor in the Sociology Department at Bishop's University and Founder and Director of the Justice Exchange Research Clinic. Dr. Chartrand tells Angela that for the first time in recorded history, half of the women in federal prisons in Canada are indigenous, marking a serious problem with our prison systems.  Let's get talking See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Big Picture Science
Catching Fire

Big Picture Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 54:14


We have too much “bad fire.” Not only destructive wildfires, but the combustion that powers our automobiles and provides our electricity has generated a worrying rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide. And that is driving climate change which is adding to the frequency of megafires. Now we're seeing those effects in “fire-clouds,” pyrocumulonimbus events. But there's such a thing as “good fire.” Indigenous peoples managed the land with controlled fires, reaped the benefits of doing so, and they're bringing them back. So after millions of years of controlling fire, is it time for us to revisit our attitudes and policies, not just with regard to combustion, but how we manage our wildfires? Guests: David Peterson - Meteorologist, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Stephen Pyne - Emeritus professor at Arizona State University, fire historian, urban farmer, author of “The Pyrocene: How We Created an Age of Fire, and What Happens Next” Richard Wrangham - Ruth B. Moore Research Professor of Biological Anthropology at Harvard University and author of "Catching Fire: How Coooking Made Us Human" Margo Robbins - Co-founder and president of the Cultural Fire Management Council (CFMC), organizer of the Cultural Burn Training Exchange (TREX) that takes place on the Yurok Reservation twice a year, and an enrolled member of the Yurok Tribe Featuring music by Dewey Dellay and Jun Miyake Big Picture Science is part of the Airwave Media podcast network. Please contact sales@advertisecast.com to inquire about advertising on Big Picture Science. You can get early access to ad-free versions of every episode by joining us on Patreon. Thanks for your support!   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices