Podcasts about Indigenous

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  • 6,021PODCASTS
  • 17,875EPISODES
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  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Indigenous

Show all podcasts related to indigenous

Latest podcast episodes about Indigenous

KZMU News
Friday October 22, 2021

KZMU News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 27:46


Over the next few months at the Moab Museum, Hopi artists will demonstrate carving katsintithu (also known as ‘kachina dolls'). The artist demonstrations are part of a temporary exhibition titled ‘Hopi Katsina: Evolving Styles, Enduring Meanings,' aiming to explore the cultural significance and artistic tradition related to katsintithu. Staff at the Moab Museum say this exhibit is an opportunity to honor Indigenous culture today. And, our radio partners profile a racetrack establishment in Southwest Colorado helping create community. Plus, the Weekly News Reel where we check in with reporters on their latest stories about the Moab area. Carter Pape of The Times-Independent talks election coverage, a reservation proposal for Aches National Park, and the future of Mill Creek Canyon's management. Alison Harford of the Moab Sun News discusses voter registration, the Moab Valley Multicultural Center's upcoming Day of the Dead/Día de los Muertos Festival, and a haunted house fundraiser for Community Rebuilds. Show Notes: Photo: Katsintithu made by Hongvi Marquez on exhibit at the Moab Museum. Hopi artists are demonstrating carving at the exhibit now through December. Courtesy Moab Museum Hopi Katsina: Evolving Styles, Enduring Meanings https://moabmuseum.org/hopi-katsina-evolving-styles-enduring-meanings/ Moab Museum https://moabmuseum.org KSJD: Montezuma County's speedway is more than just a racetrack. It's also a resource fo the community's kids https://www.ksjd.org/podcast/ksjd-local-newscasts/2021-10-19/montezuma-countys-speedway-is-more-than-just-a-racetrack-its-also-become-a-resource-for-the-communitys-kids Weekly News Reel Mentions – The Times-Independent: Comprehensive guide to Moab's 2021 election https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/comprehensive-guide-to-moabs-2021-election/ The Times-Independent: Candidates make their closing statements https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/candidates-make-their-closing-statements/ The Times-Independent: NPS urges locals to offer feedback on Arches reservation proposal https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/nps-urges-locals-to-offer-feedback-on-arches-reservation-proposal/ The Times-Independent: County to consider Mill Creek Canyon's future management https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/county-to-consider-mill-creek-canyons-future-management/ Moab Sun News: 10 days left to postmark your ballot – Moab mayoral, city council seats up for grabs https://www.moabtimes.com/articles/county-to-consider-mill-creek-canyons-future-management/ Moab Sun News: 2021 Election Candidate Profiles https://www.moabsunnews.com/news/article_53221654-2977-11ec-9498-d79634d85cc3.html Moab Sun News: Multicultural Center hosts 11th annual Day of the Dead Festival – Free, family-friendly event will be on October 31 https://www.moabsunnews.com/get_out_and_go/article_bfc5e8c4-32de-11ec-9a9a-ef2f49b6b46d.html Moab Sun News: Get spooky with Community Rebuilds ¬–Nonprofit hosts haunted house and Halloween activities fundraiser https://www.moabsunnews.com/get_out_and_go/article_56bff840-32c2-11ec-b8a5-4be68186a151.html

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle
10-22-21 The Menu: Owamni, TV show meat pies and food sovereignty online

Native America Calling - The Electronic Talking Circle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 56:30


For the debut of The Menu food show we'll hear about Chef Sean Sherman's successful launch of the full-service Minneapolis restaurant Owamni, a brand new Native cookbook and those meat pies featured in the HULU show “Reservation Dogs.” Native America Calling's resident foodie Andi Murphy explores the latest developments in Indigenous food and food sovereignty.

Unreserved
Indigenous women creating new paths in film and TV

Unreserved

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 51:26


This week on Unreserved, Indigenous women who are telling their own stories on big and small screens and breaking barriers for other Indigenous storytellers. Jennifer Podemski took the long way to success in her TV, film and theatre career. Now she wants to make the path easier for others by producing Indigenous-led shows. Her latest TV show, Unsettled, was shot on Nipissing First Nation in northern Ontario and debuted this September on APTN. And Sherry McKay didn't let failure get in the way of her media dream… she simply changed the medium to become a social media star. Mckay goes by the nickname Nish Bish on TikTok. Her following on the video-sharing app sits at 493 thousand and her biggest video has 12 million views. As an Anishinaabe comedian and influencer, Mckay uses the platform to educate and inspire... and to show the world that Indigenous people are so much more than stereotypes.

Cathedral Conversations
Episode 8: Representation: Media

Cathedral Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 51:38


(Content warning: domestic violence, self-harm ideation, racial violence) Cara and Michael conclude their conversation about why representation of BIPOC people is so important; from the characters we see on TV, to the names being read out during the prayers of the people. To find out more about missing Black women and missing Indigenous women, go to https://ourblackgirls.com/ and https://juustwa.org/.

The Impact Investing Podcast
38 - Accelerating investment into diverse emerging fund managers

The Impact Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:54


Today there is a growing recognition that we need to get far more capital into the hands of people who have been systematically excluded from entrepreneurship. Historically capital has disproportionately been allocated to a very narrow slice of entrepreneurs who are ivy league educated, white men. Meanwhile, women, people of colour, LGBTQ and Indigenous communities, and many others have been systematically excluded.And while today there is a growing number of funds, incubators, and accelerators that have been established to get capital into the hands of a much more diverse group of entrepreneurs, we still have a long way to go.According to RateMyInvestor and Diversity VC's second "Diversity in U.S. Startups" report, "VC-backed startups in the United States are still significantly male (89.3%), white (71.6%), based in Silicon Valley (35.3%) and Ivy-educated (13.7%)."Part of the problem is that those who allocate capital to entrepreneurs (e.g. fund managers) are still mostly represented by wealthy white men. According to our next guest's research, of the roughly $70 trillion of investment assets in the United States, just about 1% is managed by diverse asset managers.In this episode, we're joined by Bahiyah Yasmeen Robinson, Founder & CEO of VC Include. What distinguishes Bahiyah's efforts are that while others are focused on supporting diverse entrepreneurs, Bahiyah's efforts are focused on supporting diverse fund managers. Bahiyah's expertise in leading technology, investment, and social impact initiatives since the early 2000s culminated in her creating VC Include in 2018 to build platforms and programs for diverse emerging managers globally. VC Include was established to meet the market opportunity by building an ecosystem of women, Black, Latinx, Indigenous, and LGBTQ+ fund managers.During the episode, we discuss who and why certain groups of people get systematically excluded from the private equity industry, conscious vs unconscious bias, the moral imperative, structural inequalities, and how VC Include supports diverse emerging fund managers to overcome the hurdles that prevent them from raising and managing more capital.Resources from this episode:VC Include website, Twitter, and LinkedInGender Lens Investing In and By Private Market Funds, During the Global COVID-19 Pandemic: a View from Capital Connect written by Bahiyah and Suzanne Biegel

PBS NewsHour - World
Uganda's Batwa tribe, considered conservation refugees, see little government support

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:19


The Batwa people are one of the oldest surviving Indigenous tribes in Africa. They live high in the mountain forests, straddling several East African countries. The Batwa are now also called conservation refugees, as governments scramble to cope with the pressures of population growth and climate change. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from western Uganda. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Uganda's Batwa tribe, considered conservation refugees, see little government support

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 8:19


The Batwa people are one of the oldest surviving Indigenous tribes in Africa. They live high in the mountain forests, straddling several East African countries. The Batwa are now also called conservation refugees, as governments scramble to cope with the pressures of population growth and climate change. Special correspondent Fred de Sam Lazaro reports from western Uganda. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Life Uncut
BACHETTE UNCUT - We are back baby!

Life Uncut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:02


WE ARE BACK BABY and it's BACH-ETTE UNCUT TIME! After the mild success that was Bach Uncut last season with our Kinky Captain, a few of you wanted to hear us squabble our way through this season of the Bachelorette. Matty J is back behind the microphone and Laura is back behind a glass of wine! It is a Bachelorette world first...history making stuff! Australia's sweetheart Brooke Blurton our very first bisexual, Indigenous lead takes her third shot at love!  Episode one kicks off with a traumatic walk down memory lane where the Honey Badger is thrust back onto our screens and to be honest, Australia wasn't ready for this yet. But Bachi makes up for this with the most heart warming Welcome To Country and who the hell is cutting onions!!  Next up it's time to bring in the suitors!  Matt has picked Konrad to win and Laura thinks it's going to be Darvid… ONLY TIME WILL TELL! Episode one sees some drama over an IKEA chair, and well we all know what a b*tch flat pack can be in a relationship.  Some guy goes home. We can't remember his name.  Episode 2: Our Persian Pirate prince Darvid gets the first single date, and he scores himself a big old sloppy kiss and a rose. And in true Bach form the first group date is the illusive group photo shoot and it did not disappoint. The cocktail gets a little spicy and Beautiful Beau goes home. We just hope the producers made him delete his camera roll before he left the mansion.

Skylight Books Author Reading Series
SKYLIT: Savannah Johnston, ”RITES” w/ Addie Tsai

Skylight Books Author Reading Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:20


In Rites, a collection of short stories that focuses on the modern-day experiences of Indigenous people living in Oklahoma, Savannah Johnston documents the quiet sorrow of everyday life as her characters traverse the normalized, heartbreaking rites of passage such as burying your grandfather, mother, or husband, becoming a sex worker, or reconnecting with your family after prison; the effects are subtle, yet loud, and always enduring. Whether Johnston's characters are coming of age and/or grappling with complex family dynamics, Johnston delivers the economy of loss and resilience that marks this post-colonial collection with biting, captivating prose that demands to be read from start to finish.   Johnston discusses her collection in this episode with Addie Tsai. _______________________________________________   Produced by Maddie Gobbo, Lance Morgan, Natalie Freeman, & Michael Kowaleski. Theme: "I Love All My Friends," an unreleased demo by Fragile Gang. Visit https://www.skylightbooks.com/event for future offerings from the Skylight Books Events team.

Cultivating Place
Growing Flavor Past & Present, Chef Dave Smoke-McCluskey & Corn Mafia

Cultivating Place

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:48


This week on Cultivating Place we're in delicious conversation with Chef Dave Smoke McCluskey, founder of Corn Mafia, and a grower/producer of such traditional corn products as Longhouse Selections' hominy, masa, and grits. Based in South Carolina, Dave is an Indigenous foods educator and member of the Mohawk Nation, who invites us all to think about the history of the ingredients in our food, especially those originating from the Native American lands we in the US live on. Dave's belief in the power of flavorful, real food stems from a very basic and lifelong curiosity about his peoples' culinary past and trying to determine not only “What has been lost?”, but also how to re-envision, and imaginatively recreate a more accurate, flavorful, and probable culinary narrative for the past, present, and future. Listen in! Cultivating Place now has a donate button! We thank you so much for listening over the years and we hope you'll support Cultivating Place. We can't thank you enough for making it possible for this young program to grow even more of these types of conversations. The show is available as a podcast on SoundCloud, iTunes, Google Podcast, and Stitcher. To read more and for many more photos please visit www.cultivatingplace.com.

Signal Boost
Edgar Villanueva!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 17:18


Author of 'Decolonizing Wealth,' Edgar Villanueva joins Jess and Zerlina to talk about Native American Heritage Month!

LEONARD: Political Prisoner
Good Indian Guides

LEONARD: Political Prisoner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 48:11


In the early morning hours of June 28th, 1975, daylight was breaking on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation when Leonard Peltier, Bob Robideau, and Dino Butler discovered they'd been hiking in the wrong direction. Instead of finding themselves in Manderson, a nearby community home to numerous allies, they were in Pine Ridge village, the command center for the largest manhunt in American history. Hear how a handful of unsung local heroes risked it all to rescue the fugitives from the belly of the beast. 

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast
Will a digital label confirming authenticity help protect Indigenous artists?

RN Drive - Separate stories podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:13


The government has released their National Indigenous Visual Arts Action Plan today providing a welcomed financial boost to the sector.  But does their plan to rollout digital labelling for artworks leave some independent Indigenous artists out in the cold?   

Wedded Wellness
Indigenous Representation and Inclusion in Yoga with Shayla Oulette Stonechild

Wedded Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 45:00


Ashley is joined by Shayla Oulette Stonechild. Shayla is a Mètis and Nehiyaw Iskwew (Plains Cree Woman) from Muscowpetung First Nations and is a yoga instructor as well as founder and host of Matriarch Movement. She has always been a catalyst for Indigenous youth and women unlocking their full potential and reclaiming their voices and believes the arts, meditation, movement and reclaiming an Indigenous worldview all play a part in amplifying voices to bring upon much needed change. Matriarch Movement is a non-profit organization dedicated to highlighting Indigenous voices and providing wellness workshops to BIPOC women across Canada.Ashley and Shayla discuss her personal journey into yoga and the underrepresentation she saw in the community, her positive outlook and where she sees progress being made in the wellness and yoga space as well as where she still sees room for improvement, and ways to decolonize the practice of yoga. She also shares ways to avoid cultural appropriation, the importance of healing (and honoring) your own lineage and history, epigenetics and intergenerational trauma, why science and spirituality are so intersected, and so much more. Through her work, Shayla hopes to bring difficult, yet necessary Indigenous topics into mainstream conversations. From impacts of intergenerational trauma to suicide prevention, a cause she has a personal connection to as her father took his life when Shayla was just 16. Suicide is the leading cause of death in First Nations communities, and she's bringing stories to the light and using her platform for future sustainable change in society.  Learn more:Follow Shayla on Instagram: @shayla0hLearn More about Shayla: https://www.shaylastonechild.com/Learn more about Matriarch Movement: https://www.matriarchmovement.ca/Listen to the Matriarch Movement podcastFollow along on Instagram: @yogamagicpodcast and @ashleysondergaard.yogaLearn more about Ashley and Yoga Magic at www.ashleysondergaard.com Sponsors:BetterHelp | Receive 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/yogamagic. Work with Ashley:Book a 1:1 Cosmic Self-Care Session with Ashley  | Learn how to use your astrological birth chart to personalize your self-care routines, rituals and practices. Use code ‘yogamagic' to get $10 off a 1:1 session.  Upcoming Yoga Magic EventsCosmic Self-Care: Using Sagittarius Energy | 11/22 4:00 PM CT | Learn It Live

The Current
Actions speak louder than words when it comes to Indigenous land acknowledgements, says reporter

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:05


Land acknowledgements are becoming more common, but it is not always clear whether the nods to traditional Indigenous territory are accurate, welcome, or useful. Matt Galloway talks to Niigaan Sinclair, a professor in native studies at the University of Manitoba, and a columnist for the Winnipeg Free Press; Hayden King, executive director of the Yellowhead Institute, a First Nations-led research centre based at Ryerson University in Toronto; and Ka'nhehsí:io Deer, a reporter with CBC Indigenous in Kahnawake, Que.

Mindful
12 Minute Meditation: Connecting to Your Body with Jeanne Corrigal

Mindful

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 16:54


The elements have the ability to connect us, both internally and externally, with the world around us. Jeanne Corrigal brings her Métis heritage, and her training as an insight meditation teacher, to this guided practice to connect with the four elements within our own body. You can read more about Jeanne and her work at the intersections of mindfulness and Indigenous and tribal people in the December issue of Mindful magazine or at mindful.org. Find more of Jeanne Corrigal here: “All Our Relations: Four Indigenous Lessons on Mindfulness” Jeannecorrigal.com And more from Mindful on our conversation podcast, Real Mindful. Let us know what you thought of this episode of 12 Minute Meditation by leaving a review or by emailing yourwords@mindful.org.  

Gender Forking: a Life and Death Podcast
Emily's Boys (Chap. 13-14)

Gender Forking: a Life and Death Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 70:51


Donate to Move to Higher Ground: mthg.orgWe are #TeamPaul. We discuss Team Jacob, Emily & Sam, and Bella's misgivings about the pack & the Cullen's. Sam reads old Twilight journal entires. Content warning: discussions of racism, sexual & domestic violencePatreon: https://www.patreon.com/genderforkingInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/genderforking/Tumblr: https://bowlingshirtbellas.tumblr.com/Email: bowlingshirtbellas@gmail.comHuge thank you to our Patreon Producers:  Cammi K and Desirae.

TheKnuckleHeadsPodcast
387. Indigenous Person Day and Squid Games..

TheKnuckleHeadsPodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 72:12


Hey Knuckleheads, in today's episode lets we talk Indigenous Person Day and Squid Games.. (recorded on 10/15/21)   ApplePodcast (PLEASE!! rate, review and subscribe) Spotify! ANYWHERE YOU LISTEN TO PODCASTS! Reach out to us if you need an ad or review of something! Follow us on Twitter! Email us! MERCH!!! Check out our Maker Channel on YouTube! Thesupermakerbros. https://www.youtube.com/thesupermakerbros

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human
#1449 Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls, 2Spirit and Relatives (MMIWG2S+)

Best of the Left - Progressive Politics and Culture, Curated by a Human

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 62:22


Air Date 10/20/2021 Today we take a look at the flip side of the so-called "Missing White Woman Syndrome" and highlight the structural legacies of colonialism that have put indigenous communities in North America at the greatest at risk of murder and rape among all demographics in the US and Canada.  Be part of the show! Leave us a message at 202-999-3991 or email Jay@BestOfTheLeft.com  Transcript BestOfTheLeft.com/Support (Get AD FREE Shows & Bonus Content) BestOfTheLeft.com/Refer Sign up, share widely, get rewards. It's that easy! BestOfTheLeft.com/Advertise Sponsor the show! SHOW NOTES Ch. 1: The Search: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women | Fault Lines - Al Jazerra English - Air Date 5-8-19 Indigenous women in the United States experience some of the highest rates of violence and murder in the country, according to federal data. Tribes and advocates attribute this to a confluence of factors - institutional racism, a lack of resources. Ch. 2: How prejudice affects official search for missing Indigenous women other women of color - PBS NewsHour - Air Date 9-27-21 While Gabby Petito's death has captured national attention, tens of thousands of people are reported missing or murdered every year in the U.S. Native women are murdered at rates 10 times the national average. Ch. 3: Gabby Petito, ‘Missing White Woman Syndrome,' And Misogynistic Violence - GBH News - Air Date 9-23-21 As the disappearance and later confirmed murder of Gabby Petito has grabbed headlines, many observers have pointed to the thousands of other cases – many of them women of color – that have never garnered national attention. Ch. 4: MMIW Day 2021 - Let's Talk Native with John Kane - Air Date 5-5-21 May 5th has been designated as MMIW Day since 2017 but 2021 is ushering in "MMIW National Week of Action!" Ch. 5: Canada's missing and murdered Indigenous women - AJ+ - Air Date 10-16-18 AJ+'s Dena Takruri visits Winnipeg, Manitoba, where more Indigenous women and girls have gone missing or been murdered than anywhere else in the country. Ch. 6: MMIWG2S+: No more red hand prints! - The Red Nation Podcast - Air Date 5-10-21 Guests Jennifer Marley (@JenMarley1680) and Cheyenne Antonio join RPH co-hosts Elena Ortiz (@spiritofpopay) and Melanie Yazzie (@melanie_yazzie) to discuss efforts to end MMIWG2+ from a left Indigenous feminist perspective. MEMBERS-ONLY BONUS CLIP(S) Ch. 7: Understanding How the Laws Encourage Violence | History of MMIW - Nonviolence International New York - Air Date 4-22-21 5500 Indigenous women and girls go missing or murdered every year. We need to change the laws that govern the Indigenous Tribes because they make it easier for people to attack indigenous people. Ch. 8: The Red Nation Slams Cooptation of Indigenous Peoples' Day Amid Global Colonial Resource Extraction - Democracy Now! - Air Date 10-11-21 We continue our look at Indigenous Peoples' Day with Jennifer Marley, a citizen of San Ildefonso Pueblo and a member of the grassroots Indigenous liberation organization The Red Nation. VOICEMAILS Ch. 9: r/Antiwork: Unemployment for all, not just the rich! - Anonymous FINAL COMMENTS Ch. 10: Final comments on the impacts of pandemics on labor through the centuries MUSIC (Blue Dot Sessions): Opening Theme: Loving Acoustic Instrumental by John Douglas Orr  Voicemail Music: Low Key Lost Feeling Electro by Alex Stinnent Closing Music: Upbeat Laid Back Indie Rock by Alex Stinnent SHOW IMAGE:  Description: A young, Native American woman looks toward the camera. She has a red paint hand print over her mouth. She wears a gray beanie, burgundy jacket and her dark hair is in braids.  "A participant in the Greater Than Fear Rally & March in Rochester Minnesota. The rally & march were held in response to President Trump's Rally at the Mayo Civic Center in downtown Rochester." by Lorie Shaull, Flickr | License | Changes: Cropped Produced by Jay! Tomlinson Visit us at BestOfTheLeft.com

For The Wild
SAMUEL GENSAW III on the Restorative Revolution /256

For The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


The abundance of the Klamath River has been severely restricted since the late 1700s by way of mining, logging, and damming. Once home to the third-largest salmon run in the lower 48, now Northern California is risking the collapse of its entire salmon population. After two decades of activism, the Klamath River dams will finally be removed by 2023, restoring salmon access to more than 400 miles of habitat. However, this is merely one example of the ways in which land has been chronically mismanaged across the so-called United States. This week we speak to Yurok fisherman and activist, Samuel Gensaw III, on the ways in which Northern California has served as a continuous extraction site for colonial development. This expansive conversation begins by looking at resource extraction, but moves into a larger dialogue on our collective responsibility to world renewal, bringing back balance to our relationships, how to instill new values without appropriating cultural traditions, and the Ancestral Guard's Victorious Gardens program featured in the film Gather. Samuel Gensaw III is the founding director of the Award-winning Ancestral Guard program. Currently, he is the youngest person to serve as the vice-chairman of the Yurok tribe's natural resources committee. He and fellow Ancestral Guard members are featured in the documentary, Gather, which focuses on the growing movement among Native Americans to reclaim their spiritual, political, and cultural identities through food sovereignty. Music by Lake Mary, All The Queen's Ravens, Jess Williamson. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

Change the Story / Change the World
Episode 34: Henry Frank - Unlocking the Doors

Change the Story / Change the World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 42:06


Henry Frank was rotting in prison alone with no escape. Then, everything changed. In our conversation we talk about the heavy lift of imagining a different future, becoming an artist, discovering true friendship, and embracing his Yurok and Pomo cultures. Delicious QuotesAnd I was like, I refuse to die in prison. And from that point forward, I started my journey of introspection through the arts, through education, through workshops, through self-help groups to really become comfortable with the ugliness that I had at that time, and really confronted and release it by talking about it. So, I started learning more about my culture all because, I want to put these things into my painting, which opened up this box that I didn't even know it was in there that was empty. And then it just started filling up. And in my case, it really helped me connect back to my roots, to my culture, to my heritage, and to give me that thirst for more knowledge of where I came from and the history of my people. I was just thinking like, how did we lose our language? … And when I'm in the sweat lodge it's connected for me. And it's just man, the brutality. That my people, indigenous people, not just here, what they had to go through to be afraid to speak their own language, to be afraid, to do their own ceremonies, to be afraid to show who their children are so they can't beat them and make them do something. It was just, it was a mind opening. It's oh, this man cares about me... cause he knew how much I cared about him. He was my elder and my mentor and my teacher. And he was the one who changed my mind about the outside. And I'm just like, wow, I never had a friend before, a real friend. Don't go in thinking that you're going to change, somebody, and don't go in thinking you're gonna save somebody and don't go in with judgment, I did that for 35 years of my life and it got me into prison with a life sentence.  Hey, none of us are trash. None of us are unredeemable. … if you give us the opportunities and you give us the right environment and you give us the right teachers that we all, can be better. We can all evolve, and we can all learn how to be better people… I have really benefited from non-violent communication. Learning about how not to be violent with yourself, with your thoughts and how to really cherish express and just honor what you're feeling in a moment… Notable Mentionshttps://www.marinindian.com/ (The Museum of the American Indian): “Located in Marin County and situated on a site of an actual Miwok Village, the Museum is dedicated to providing the people of Northern California with programs and exhibits that deepen understanding and appreciation of Native American cultures.” https://www.yuroktribe.org/ (Yurok) People: “The mission of the Yurok Tribe is to exercise the aboriginal and sovereign rights of the Yurok People to continue forever our Tribal traditions of self-governance, cultural and spiritual preservation, stewardship of Yurok lands, waters and other natural endowments, balanced social and economic development, peace and reciprocity, and respect for the dignity and individual rights of all persons living within the jurisdiction of the Yurok Tribe, while honoring our Creator, our ancestors and our descendants.”  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pomo (Pomo) People: “The Pomo are an https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_peoples_of_California%22%20%5Co%20%22Indigenous%20peoples%20of%20California (indigenous people of California). The historical Pomo territory in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northern_California%22%20%5Co%20%22Northern%20California (Northern California) was large, bordered by the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Coast%22%20%5Co%20%22Pacific%20Coast (Pacific Coast) to the west, extending inland to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clear_Lake,_California%22%20%5Co%20%22Clear%20Lake,%20California (Clear Lake), and mainly between... Support this podcast

SOFcast
S2E3 Legendary Green Beret J. Stryker Meyer - MAC-V SOG, indig partnerships, and jungle warfare!

SOFcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 62:25


Members of today's US Special Operations Forces are often regarded as heroes, but there are those that today's elite operators look up to and regard as their own heroes. John Stryker “Tilt” Meyer is one of those men! As a member of the clandestine MAC-V SOG operating in the midst of the Vietnam War, Tilt recounts his combat experiences, some very close calls, and how close partnership with indigenous forces along with coordinated joint operations lead to successful missions in places where American troops “officially” never were. Subscribe today and leave us a review!

CEimpact Podcast
Uncovering Cognitive Biases: Part 1

CEimpact Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 18:04


Repost Episode: Cognitive biases are pervasive and particularly troublesome in medicine. And guess what...we are all susceptible to cognitive biases! However, it is possible to learn to identify our biases and mitigate them. The decisions clinicians make in medicine can significantly impact an individual's life, morbidity, and mortality. And precepting is the perfect time to help students learn to identify their own cognitive biases. However, to help a student identify their own cognitive biases, we have to be able to identify our own. Tune in to this episode of Precept2Practice to discover your own cognitive biases.Pearl 1: Identify cognitive biases. Pearl 2: Describe the types of cognitive biases most common in medical settingsGuests:Tracy Pettinger, PharmDClinical Associate ProfessorIdaho State UniversityKasidy McKay, PharmD, BCPSClinical Assistant ProfessorIdaho State UniversityWant more education on this topic? Visit these courses at www.CEimpact.com!Leading with G.R.A.C.E.: Leveraging Diversity, Inclusion and Equity in your Pharmacy PracticeUnderstanding the clash between culture, class, and race is more important now than ever before. This course will provide you with the knowledge, skills, and resources to gain a deeper understanding of systemic racism, its impact on the Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) community, and how to leverage your role in the pharmacy profession to impact sustainable change.All Preceptors' Hands on Deck in Breaking the Barriers of Structural RacismThere are different types of racism, and most individuals do not know the difference among them. Structural racism is the root cause of unequal distribution of resources, services, and healthcare. A lot of practicing pharmacists do not fully understand the concept of structural racism in relation to not only patients' medication adherence but also students' success during experiential education. This course is designed to educate preceptors on the impacts of structural racism on patients' clinical, economic, and humanistic outcomes; and learners' professional growth and success.Become a member today with our CEimpact Membership! 

Hack
How safe are alcohol delivery services?

Hack

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:00


A ton of alcohol delivery services have popped up across the country during the pandemic. They can be super convenient - but some people are worried they could also be damaging and even fatal. Young people all over the world are getting ready to protest at Glasgow's climate conference, including a 16-year-old climate activist from the US. Plus, while Canberra is on track to become the most vaccinated places in the world, remote Indigenous communities are still struggling to get their first jabs. Live guests: Professor Peter Miller, alcohol and violence researcher at Deakin University Alexandria Villaseñor, American climate activist Professor James Ward, Pitjantjatjara and Nukunu epidemiologist from The University of Queensland

Doula Stories
When Your Client Is a Survivor of Sexual Assault

Doula Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 87:20


Eri Guajardo Johnson (she/they) and Micaela McHenry (or Mickey, she/her/ella) share the inspiring story of what it was like for them to support a fellow Indigenous person through their empowering birth experience. With Eri as birth consultant for survivors of trauma, and Micaela in the doula role, the two worked together and witnessed the healing power of birth and community for their client. Eri Guajardo Johnson is a queer, bi-racial birthworker, rape crisis peer counselor, holistic wellness coach, community organizer, and host of the Birth Bruja Podcast. They are based on unceded Anishinaabe and Potawatomi land, in what is now known as the metro Detroit area of Michigan. If you'd like to connect with Eri, you can follow them on Instagram at @birthbruja or visit their website, birthbruja.com Micaela McHenry is a mixed Indigenous full spectrum doula. Her focus is on BIPOC birthing people and Indigenous traditions from her direct lineages (she carries both Native American and Native Mexican ancestry) and birth-centered activism. Her life goal is to make a positive impact in her community and the families she works with by focusing deeply on the decolonization of wellness spaces. She is based on unceded Anishnaabe and Potawatomi land, in what is now known as the metro Detroit area of Michigan. If you'd like to connect with Micaela or learn more about her, you can follow her on Instagram @bossa_novaaa, and her website sageandrebozos.com You can follow the Doula Stories podcast on Facebook or Instagram @DoulaStories or learn more on their website, doulastories.com

The Art Show
Public art, toppled monuments and the statue in the crate

The Art Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:07


What do artists think about when making huge public art? Lindy Lee is making the most expensive work commissioned by the NGA, and Judy Watson's bara will grace Sydney's harbour with a giant Gadigal fish hook. Then, the US art lab addressing the problem of confederate monuments to racist causes... and Indigenous artists Julie Gough, Nicholas Galanin and Yhonnie Scarce on Australia's own colonial memorialising.

Simple English News Daily
Wednesday 20th October. World News. Today: US Trump sues riot committee. Ecuador indigenous protests. UK Bill Gates renewables. Germ

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 7:06


World News in 7 minutes. Wednesday 20th October 2021.Transcript at: send7.org/transcripts Today: US Trump sues riot committee. Ecuador indigenous protests. UK Bill Gates renewables. Germany 96 year old mass murder charges. Iraq elections. Pakistan India submarine. Japan nuclear waters. Mali Al Qaeda talks. Senegal cocaine haul. Liberia honest teenager praised.Send your opinion or experience by email to podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at send7.org for us to broadcast. With Stephen Devincenzi and Khadija Tahir.SEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells news in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories in the world in slow, clear English. This easy English news podcast is perfect for English learners, people with English as a second language, and people who want to hear a fast news update from around the world. Learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Your Call
655 Indigenous Activists & Allies Arrested in DC Last Week & 900 Arrested During Protests To Stop Line 3

Your Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 52:20


Embodiment Matters Podcast
I Wish You Heartbreak- An Exploration of the 19 Ways with Deena Metzger

Embodiment Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 63:56


I Wish You Heartbreak - An Exploration of the 19 Ways with Deena Metzger   We're so grateful and honored to begin the 3rd season of the Embodiment Matters podcast by sharing with you this rich conversation with wise elder Deena Metzger.    A poet, novelist, essayist, storyteller, teacher, healer and medicine woman who has taught and counseled for over fifty years, in the process of which she has developed therapies which creatively address life threatening diseases, spiritual and emotional crises, as well as community, political and environmental disintegration.   Deena has spent a lifetime investigating Story as a form of knowing and healing.  She conducts training groups on the spiritual, creative, political and ethical aspects of healing and peacemaking, individual, community and global, drawing deeply on alliance with spirit, indigenous teachings and the many wisdom traditions. You can read a longer story about Deena's extraordinary life here http://deenametzger.net/bio/   Deena teaches powerfully through asking challenging questions, and we have been grateful to be her students for several years.   Her current work is envisioning a new future for all beings. Considering new forms of peacemaking, healing, and sanctuary for all beings is encoded in the 19 Ways to a Viable Future for All Beings. Essential to the 19 Ways are respecting and restoring Indigenous ways, the Pathless Path, and the No Enemy Way. Deena works with writers to develop the literary voices essential for this time and she is a mentor to those who are seeking their own paths to be healing presences for the future. For many years Deena has lived at the end of the road at the edge of the wild in Topanga, California, with various animal companions.    In this conversation we explore Deena's articulation of the 19 Ways. We talk about working with dreams not in a personal, psychological way, but in a communal way. We talk about what she wishes for all of us - and the answer might surprise you. We explore illness as a messenger - through her own personal history with cancer as well as the covid 19 pandemic. I also share a powerful story of an experience with Deena many years ago which changed my life in a powerful way and which had both of us in tears. We hope you enjoy this clarion call from a wise elder to live differently and to meet these times with courage, community, and heart.    Some relevant links:  Deena's Website: http://deenametzger.net/ The 19 Ways: http://deenametzger.net/19-ways/ This powerful poster of Deena made decades ago http://deenametzger.net/the-poster/ A list of Deena's published works: http://deenametzger.net/published-works-3/ Deena mentions this book, Blackfoot Physics, in our conversation  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/110248.Blackfoot_Physics

Trickle-Down Socialism
Abolition Should be Our Goal w/ Awkword of @TenDemands

Trickle-Down Socialism

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 78:07


Pat spoke to Awkword, a founding member of Ten Demands, the Road to Abolition about the need for transformational change to our systems of policing and incarceration. With a system that was founded on racism, with its roots in slave-catchers, activists like Awkword contend that the system as it currently exists cannot simply be reformed. The conversation touched on many important aspects of an Abolitionist mindset: Mutual Aid, providing for key essentials in underserved communities, and helping communities thrive in order to eliminate the need for police and prisons. Also discussed: why the recent "crime wave" is just another scare tactic from the establishment to justify further investment in law enforcement. In the open, Dan, C-Money, and Pat discuss the need to ditch Columbus Day, move to naming it Indigenous People's Day, AND couple that change with real progress making with Indigenous groups across the US - like the Land Back movement. For more information on Ten Demands, the Road to Abolition: https://www.tenforjustice.com/demands --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/trickledownsocialism/support

Capital Daily
Examining Relationships at Fairy Creek as Blockaders Brace For Enforcement

Capital Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 32:59


We take a trip up to the Fairy Creek blockades in the pause between periods of injunction enforcement. We break down the back-and-forth in the BC Supreme Court over the injunction granted to Teal-Jones, and hear from long-haul blockaders about their relationship with the RCMP and clashes with loggers. Get more stories like this in your inbox every morning by subscribing to our daily newsletter at CapitalDaily.ca Check our membership opportunity at CapitalDaily.ca/MemberAnd subscribe to us on our socials! Twitter @CapitalDailyVic  Instagram @CapitalDaily  Facebook @CapitalDailyVic 

Better Together with Maria Menounos
355. America's Maternal Mortality Crisis Explained by Birthing Doula Callie Chamberlain

Better Together with Maria Menounos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 61:02


Did you know that black and Indigenous birthing people in the U.S. have a higher chance of dying in childbirth than a U.S. soldier has of dying in combat. Yeah. And that is only ONE of the terrifying statistics we learned on today's show. Maria sat down with Callie Chamberlain, birthing doula and Optum Social Responsibility program leader, to talk about the U.S. maternal health crisis. Callie educated us on the inequality that many minority populations face from the medical system, and also shares how we all can help. This is a really important episode and we hope it was informative and helpful. Please share with anyone you think would benefit. RESOURCES: ‘Until It's Fixed' podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/until-its-fixed/id1531518492 Optum website: www.optum.com/about-us/health-equity.html IG: @optum and @ckchamberlain --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/better-together-w-maria/support

The Decibel
Iqaluit's contaminated water

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 15:55


People in Iqaluit are in the midst of a water crisis. On Oct. 12 a state of emergency was declared when some of the 9,000 residents in Nunavut's capital city complained of a suspicious fuel-like odour coming from their taps. Since then, they've been told to avoid drinking that water. Recent test results confirmed the water is contaminated with high levels of hydrocarbons consistent with diesel fuel or kerosene.National news reporter Willow Fiddler has been following the story and she explains what we know about the situation so far, how people in Iqaluit have been managing without any tap water and how it's related to a broader water crisis facing many Indigenous communities in Canada.

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Indigenous Mapping: The One Holding the Pen Tells the Story - HeVo 56

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 72:18


On today's podcast Jessica interviews Steve DeRoy (Buffalo Clan, Anishinaabe/Saulteaux, Ebb and Flow First Nation), co-founder, director and past president of The Firelight Group and founder of the Indigenous Mapping Workshop. Steve and Jessica do a deep dive into Indigenous mapping. How does one Indigenize mapping, why is that important, and what are some of the ethics involved? We also discuss the 2021 Indigenous Mapping Workshop coming up November 1-5, 2021 as well as ongoing resources available (free for Indigenous individuals, Nations, and organizations!) through the Indigenous Mapping Collective. Register to attend the 2021 Indigenous Mapping Workshop: Turtle Island, by RSVPing on the Indigenous Mapping Collective in the links below. Links Heritage Voices on the APN 2021 Indigenous Mapping Workshop Indigenous Mapping Collective The Firelight Group Contact Jessica Jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org @livingheritageA @LivingHeritageResearchCouncil ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

Green Dreamer: Sustainability and Regeneration From Ideas to Life
329) Kristina Lyons: Soil as cultural, relational, historical

Green Dreamer: Sustainability and Regeneration From Ideas to Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:11


What does it mean to "see" soil beyond their chemistry and biology—understanding also their cultural, relational, and historical embodiment? How have Colombian small and Indigenous farmers resisted—and thrived—even amidst decades of armed conflicts, scientific colonization, and epistemological and ontological violences? In this episode, we welcome Dr. Kristina Lyons, an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, whose current research is situated at the interfaces of socio-ecological conflicts, transitional justice, community-based forms of reconciliation, militarized psychologies, and science and legal studies in Colombia. Her book, Vital Decomposition, weaves together an intimate ethnography of two kinds of practitioners: state soil scientists and small farmers who attempt to cultivate alternatives to commercial coca crops and the military-led, growth-oriented development paradigms intended to substitute them. *** Green Dreamer is a community-supported podcast and multimedia journal exploring our paths to collective healing, biocultural revitalization, and true abundance and wellness for all. Find our show notes, transcripts, and newsletters at GreenDreamer.com. *Our episodes are minimally edited; please view them as open invitations to dive into every topic and resource explored.

The Brand is Female
Michelle Audoin | MBC Advocate, Rethinker, Changemaker | Showing your scars

The Brand is Female

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 36:40


October is Breast Cancer Awareness month and behind it is a reality that affects women first and foremost - directly and indirectly. That's why we're proud to share that we have partnered with Rethink Breast Cancer for a special series on The Brand is Female podcast today and in the coming weeks.Today's guest is Michelle Audoin. Michelle happily wears the hats of wife and mom to two wonderful kids, home baker and doggy mama. She was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2017. Prior to her diagnosis, Michelle worked for almost 2 decades as a passionate educator in Toronto. She brings an equity lens to Rethink's MBC Advisory Board and as a member of Rethink's Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Working Group. Michelle has been involved in numerous advocacy and awareness campaigns for breast cancer and MBC. Specifically she's participated in Rethink's Queen's Park Advocacy Day and MBC campaigns, was featured in the MCB Time 2020 video, and has written a blog for Rethink about being a young woman with MBC. Most recently, Michelle is proud to have partnered with Rethink to create Uncovered: A Breast Recognition Project. This resource shares the stories and images of Black, Indigenous and women of colour and it shines a light on how women of colour often see their needs overlooked and underrepresented in the cancer care community.Listen to this episode to hear why representation matters and all about her journey from diagnosis to bringing forth change within the breast cancer industry.Rethink Breast Cancer aims to empower, educate, and support all young people impacted by breast cancer. In this series, we will be discussing and re-thinking the narrative around breast cancer in today's world. As part of this series, you will meet women who are making a difference as leading changemakers in the community. Everyone on the Rethink Breast Cancer team is focused on offering relevant and accessible spaces for the new generation of young people affected by breast cancer, and we are so happy we can share their knowledge on this platform.Thanks to our partners at Rethink Breast Cancer for their support of this episode of The Brand is Female. Rethink Breast Cancer is celebrating 20 years of fostering safe and inclusive spaces, and together, the mission is to empower, connect, educate and rethink our conversations around breast cancer and be of support to those impacted. Please visit www.rethinkbreastcancer.com to find out more.This season of The Brand is Female is brought to you by TD Bank - Women Entrepreneurs. TD is proud to support women entrepreneurs and help them achieve success and growth through its program of educational workshops, financing, and mentorship opportunities! Find out how you can benefit from their support!————Visit: TBIF: thebrandisfemale.com //TD Women Entrepreneurs: td.com/ca/en/business-banking/small-business/women-in-business //Follow us on Instagram: instagram.com/thebrandisfemale

THE IDEALISTS.
#38: Jenn Harper on the Ojibwe and Iroquois Teachings that Guide Her Business

THE IDEALISTS.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 45:36


In this episode of The Idealists. (formerly Grit & Grace), host and entrepreneur Melissa Kiguwa interviews Jenn Harper, founder and CEO of Cheekbone Beauty, a Canadian, Indigenous-owned beauty brand that gained popularity after being on the hit show, Dragons Den. And excitingly, on November 6th, Cheekbone Beauty products will be available in Sephora. So make sure to support and pick up a Warrior Woman Lipstick on Sephora's website because as anyone listening to this podcast knows— our money and patronage matter. In this episode, Jenn shares her deeply personal reasons for building a business that helps indigenous youth see themselves and their beauty. . . . . In the episode: - Jenn begins by describing the different worlds she inhabits and how they collide in her mission to make indigenous youth feel seen. - She then goes on to describe what fuels her and the emotional work she has had to do. She explores her childhood and how her consistent desire to be seen as worthy continues to propel her today. She also vulnerably shares how her sobriety allows her to thrive. - Jenn shares her familial history starting with her grandmother's experience in Residential Boarding Schools where many indigenous children in North America were sent between the early 19th century through the mid-20th centuries. - Jenn ends the episode sharing her goals to expand her brand and her hopes for indigenous youth. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theidealists/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theidealists/support

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
Why aren't Black and Indigenous missing persons cases covered enough?

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 25:17


Jermain Charlo was an Indigenous mother who went missing in Montana in the summer of 2018. Relisha Rudd, an 8-year-old Black girl, went missing in Washington, D.C. in March 2014. Neither has been found. Unlike Gabby Petito, these cases didn't grab national headlines. Connie Walker, host of Stolen: The Search for Jermain, and Jonquilyn Hill, host of Through the Cracks, join Sam to discuss why cases of missing Black and Indigenous people don't get the same kind of attention from media and law enforcement. You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

Lannan Podcasts
Consequences of Capitalism – 13 October 2021 – Audio

Lannan Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 80:12


Recorded on YouTube on 13 October 2021. Join Noam Chomsky for a talk, then in conversation with E. Tammy Kim on the brutal realities laid bare by the COVID-19 pandemic—and the urgent need for an alternative to capitalism. This was a Readings and Conversations event. This event was in partnership with Haymarket Books. https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.lannan.org/podcasts/consequences-of-capitalism-211013.mp3 Duration: […]

Jessup Think
First Nations Version: an Indigenous Translation of the New Testament

Jessup Think

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 39:48


Lead editor of the First Nations Version, Terry Wildman, joins the show to talk about this excited new indigenous translation of the New Testament. For more info on the translation, go to firstnationsversion.com.

Word To Your Mama
(Classic) ep. 49 Linda Morel: Don't talk about it, Be about it

Word To Your Mama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Since Linda loves her some Hallow's Eve and does a countdown, we thought it would great to repost her classic episode this month. Originally posted March 2021Linda Morel | Emmy Award Winning Producer for Key & PeeleOn the heels of wrapping season 2 of A Black Lady Sketch Show, Linda Morel talks about having to focus on her rad, chola mom's (Echo Park Represent) health during the pandemic, her non-linear career path, the need to cultivate Black, Indigenous, and People of Color talent in the Entertainment industry, her desire to break the Emmy Award tie with her younger brother and so much more.Questions from the audience: Sean Serino and Linda's husband, Carlos Morel During The Supernatural Bear corner, The SNB shout outs the ladies for Women's History Month.Episode linksChaz and Christina BojorquezMy Boo by Ghost Town DJs WTYM is brought to you byWord To Your Mama Store: Use code WTYM at check out to receive 10% off any order WTYM Patreon PagepanoplyBPO : Mention WTYM and get your 13th month of service free.ritzyperiwinkle.com DONATEAVAILABLE WHERE EVER YOU CONSUME PODCASTS

PRI's The World
American missionaries held hostage in Haiti 

PRI's The World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 47:31


One of the most notorious gangs in Haiti is holding hostage a group of American missionaries, including children. The country has the highest kidnapping rate in the world. The threat of being taken hostage is one that Haitians— rich and poor alike — face every day. And when people in the US and the UK donate clothes they don't want anymore, those clothes end up for sale in a massive secondhand market in Accra, Ghana. But the boom in quickly made, inexpensive clothing around the world has led to an environmental crisis in countries like Ghana. Plus, TikTok has come a long way from its lip-syncing days for Generation Z. Now, innovators are using the app to help teach and spread the word on Indigenous languages across the globe. 

In The Moment podcast
110. Margaret D. Jacobs with Steve Scher: After One Hundred Winters

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 64:59


Can there ever be reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in a nation rooted in a legacy of violence and systemic racism? In Town Hall's 110th Episode of the In the Moment podcast, Steve Scher interviews Margaret D. Jacobs, who explores such questions in her book After One Hundred Winters: In Search of Reconciliation on America's Stolen Lands. Jacobs' book confronts the painful foundation of the United States through stories of the individuals and communities who are trying to work together by healing historical wounds. But healing doesn't come through denying history; it comes through listening, learning, and putting Indigenous land rights, sovereignty, and values at the forefront of the discussion. Margaret D. Jacobs is professor of history and director of the Center for Great Plains Studies at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. Her books include White Mother to a Dark Race: Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880–1940. Steve Scher is a podcaster and interviewer and has been a teacher at the University of Washington since 2009. He worked in Seattle public radio for almost 30 years and is Senior Correspondent for Town Hall Seattle's In The Moment podcast. Buy the Book: https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691224336/after-one-hundred-winters  Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation online click here. 

Give The People What They Want!
Give The People What They Want! October 15

Give The People What They Want!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 31:08


This week on Give The People What They Want! Prasanth R., Vijay Prashad, & Zoe Alexandra discuss the anniversary of the assassination of Burkinabé revolutionary leader Thomas Sankara and the beginning of the trial of those implicated in his murder, 60 years of the Non-Aligned Movement, Striketober in the US, World Food Day and the continuing struggle against hunger globally, mobilizations in Italy against fascist attacks on Labor, & Indigenous resistance across the Americas.

MPR News with Angela Davis
The heartache and grief of losing your parents' language

MPR News with Angela Davis

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 49:53


It's a common American story: Immigrants and refugees come to the United States, and within a generation or two, children no longer speak the language of their parents and grandparents.  Evan Frost | MPR News 2018 Star Tribune columnist and former MPR News editor Laura Yuen interviews Yar Kang about the Miss South Sudan USA pageant in 2018. The loss of a language comes with its own kind of grief. Sometimes grandparents are left literally unable to speak to their own grandchildren. MPR News host Angela Davis explored the complex swirl of emotions around language loss, reasons for language attrition and efforts to ensure that more American children keep speaking the language of their elders.  As Star Tribune columnist Laura Yuen wrote in a recent column, the collective heartache over language attrition is felt by children and grandchildren of immigrants everywhere.  Yuen told Davis about being unable to speak the Mandarin or Cantonese of her immigrant parents. “It's this weird sense of shame that follows me even to this day,” Yuen said. “When I walk into a Chinese restaurant, I can exchange pleasantries, but not really much beyond that.” The embarrassment of being unable to fluently speak a parent's language was in display recently after Olympic gold medal gymnast Suni Lee was asked by a reporter to say something in Hmong to her Hmong audience. After stumbling through a phrase, Lee was later criticized on social media by some in the Hmong community. “A lot of folks commented on her inability to speak Hmong, even questioning if she was Hmong,” said psychologist Ia Xiong, who wrote about Lee's experience in a Facebook post that went viral. Xiong, who says she identified with Lee's embarrassment, made the point that loss of language is not an individual's fault. It's the result of social pressure and historical trauma. “What Ia has been able to do is speak directly to this generation and say, ‘the problem is not you,"‘ said Yuen. “We need to encourage our young people to have confidence. … We can't keep shaming them. If the end goal is to farther fluency of our cultural language, then we need to be more positive about how we embrace young people for trying.” Reasons for language loss are complex, said Jenna Cushing-Leubner, an assistant professor of world language education at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. “The history of language loss is really the history of the United States,” she said. It's been experienced by Indigenous people, African language communities brought through enslavement and every subsequent wave of immigrants. “That actual physical freezing up when it comes to using your own family or heritage language, that's really the embodied response of trauma experiences.” Cushing-Leubner said acceptance is growing for multilingualism in the United States and more programs are being created to preserve and teach children the language of their elders, from preschool settings to universities. “We also have different ways of doing ESL that are multilingual ways of learning English while also continuing to use and strengthen the home language at the same time,” said Cushing-Leubner. “There are powerful ways this is happening in pockets and it absolutely can be happening more.” One of these programs is a new Somali elementary language program in Minneapolis Public Schools headed up by the district's ESL and Somali heritage language facilitator Deqa Muhidin. Just a few weeks ago, Muhidin watched children learn how to say “Good morning” in Somali. “Giving kids the opportunity to be able to hear speak and learn their heritage language only enhances their ability to succeed academically, and it strengthens their bonds with their families,” Muhidin said. Guests:  Laura Yuen is a columnist for the Star Tribune and former editor and reporter at MPR News. Ia Xiong is a first-generation Hmong American and psychotherapist in private practice in the Twin Cities. Jenna Cushing-Leubner is an assistant professor of world language education at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

Cloth Diaper Podcast
Kaleimama Hawai‘i with Pōhai

Cloth Diaper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 30:48


Sharing with you one of the NEWEST cloth diaper brands to launch this month! Pōhai is the mama and owner behind Kaleimama, a small 'Ohana-owned business based in Honolulu Hawai'i. Kaleimama is one of the first Indigenous-owned cloth diaper brands to launch into this community, and I've got the exclusive details. Shop: https://kaleimamo.com Unboxing on Instagram: https//www.instagram.com/clothdiaperpodcast

CANADALAND
Enormous Fires Everywhere

CANADALAND

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 56:28


Support us here: https://canadaland.com/join Raging wildfires are now a normal part of summertime in Canada. Climate change comes at you fast, but the impact of these fires is far from equal across different regions. Those most likely to have to flee their homes are Indigenous people, and this disproportionate risk is only growing. The number of evacuees from First Nation reserves doubled over the last decade. Producer Sarah Lawrynuik travels to a remote Manitoba community to look at what fire has done to one community, and examines the implications for tens of thousands of other people in the years to come.  Further Reading: Social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in the 21st century and future research needs (Amy Cardinal Christianson) - https://www.publish.csiro.au/WF/pdf/WF13048 Indigenous fire teams in Sask. aim for bigger role after B.C. blazes - https://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/indigenous-fire-teams-in-sask-aim-for-bigger-role-after-b-c-blazes U of S prof studies impact of fire evacuations on First Nations (2015) - https://www.ckom.com/2015/07/17/u-of-s-prof-studies-impact-of-fire-evacuations-on-first-nations/ From the Ashes: Reimagining Fire Safety and Emergency Management in Indigenous Communities: https://www.ourcommons.ca/Content/Committee/421/INAN/Reports/RP9990811/inanrp15/inanrp15-e.pdf  The art of fire: reviving the Indigenous craft of cultural burning: https://thenarwhal.ca/indigenous-cultural-burning/   Additional music by Audio Network Support CANADALAND: http://canadalandshow.com/join See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A Kids Book About: The Podcast
Taboo Talks About Identity

A Kids Book About: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 20:43


Taboo, author of A Kids Book About Identity and member of Black Eyed Peas, talks about how we can honor and embrace every facet of our identities, even when they change.A Kids Book About Identity (view book)Full Book Description:Your identity can be a lot of things: your heritage, gender, hometown, school, faith, or even what you've been through. The awesome thing is nobody is just one thing! Your identity can grow and change as you do! This book explores all the different parts of identity: who you are, what you love, and what's true about you.About the Author:Jimmy Gomez—or better known as Taboo Nawasha—is a husband, father, cancer survivor, MC, performer, writer, creator, and Indigenous activist. He also has an amazing day job as one of the founding members of the award-winning music group, the Black Eyed Peas. While Tab loves making music, his goal is to leave a legacy his kids will be proud of.*If you want to be on a future episode of A Kids Book About: The Podcast or if you have a question you'd like us to consider, have a grownup email us at listen@akidspodcastabout.com and we'll send you the details.

Democracy Now! Audio
Democracy Now! 2021-10-15 Friday

Democracy Now! Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 59:00


Indigenous leaders and climate activists in Washington, D.C., on leading protests to demand that President Biden declare a climate emergency; Activists and advocates weigh in on Governor Kathy Hochul addressing inhumane conditions at Rikers Island by transferring women and transgender people into upstate prisons; Larry Hamm on the People's Organization for Progress 67-mile march to demand police accountability. Get Democracy Now! delivered right to your inbox. Sign up for the Daily Digest: democracynow.org/subscribe

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

This week, Georgia and Karen cover the unsolved cases of three Indigenous women, Kiana Klomp, Amber Tuccaro, and Ella Mae Begay, and the disappearance of Lawrence Joseph Bader.