In The Thick

Follow In The Thick
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

Journalists of color tell you what you’re missing from the mainstream news. Co-hosted by award-winning journalists Maria Hinojosa and Julio Ricardo Varela, IN THE THICK has the conversations about race, identity and politics few people are discussing or want to discuss.

The Futuro Media Group


    • May 26, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekdays NEW EPISODES
    • 28m AVG DURATION
    • 572 EPISODES

    Listeners of In The Thick that love the show mention: maria hinojosa, latino usa, thick, thank you julio, futuro media, issues that affect, latinx perspective, hear maria, chancla, pocs, thank you maria, media group, ricardo, gracias por sus, need to be aware, white dudes, love itt, political coverage, pa lante, issues affecting.



    Search for episodes from In The Thick with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from In The Thick

    ITT Sound Off: Uvalde

    Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 21:54

    Maria and Julio process the tragic mass shooting that occurred in Uvalde, Texas on Tuesday, when an 18-year-old man opened fire at an elementary school, killing two teachers and 19 children. They get into the systemic issues of gun control, border policing, and how this intersects with immigration.  ITT Staff Picks: “There are parents today scrolling through photographs of their children, realizing that there will be no more photographs of them to take. We cannot continue to live like this, but I fear we will,” writes Clint Smith in this piece for The Atlantic.  Mike Hixenbaugh spoke with a teacher in Uvalde, Texas. She was at the school on Wednesday and said it was the longest 35 minutes of her life, via NBC. Bindu Bansinath writes about ways to support the community in Uvalde, in this piece for The Cut.   Photo credit: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

    The Warfare of Messaging

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 40:20

    Maria and Julio are joined by Danielle Moodie and Wajahat Ali, co-hosts of the Democracy-ish podcast. They talk about the latest in immigration news, including the continued enforcement of Title 42. They also unpack the mainstream media's coverage of the white supremacist attack in Buffalo, and the murder of journalist Shireen Abu Akleh by Israeli forces. And, they reflect on the latest attacks on abortion rights in the lead up to the midterms. ITT Staff Picks: “For a segment of Christians, the battle over abortion is just one front in a wider war to make America Christian again — by any means necessary. They are not pro-life so much as pro-control,” write Samuel L. Perry and Philip S. Gorski in this piece for The Washington Post. Much of the media coverage that followed Shireen Abu Akleh's killing by Israeli forces showed a pattern of euphemisms, false equivalencies, and double standards, writes Jon Allsop for Columbia Journalism Review. For The Intercept, reporter Jordan Smith unpacks the repercussions of Oklahoma's new highly restrictive abortion ban, which is currently awaiting signature by Gov. Kevin Stitt. Photo credit: AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

    ITT Sound Off: When Will We Wake Up?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:36

    Maria and Julio react to the deadly white supremacist attack at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York. They talk about the rise in mass shootings rooted in racist and anti-Black ideologies, and the culpability of right-wing media and politicians. They also discuss the primary elections held this week across the country. ITT Staff Picks: In this piece for The Grio, David A. Love analyzes the ways that journalists and all-white newsrooms have failed in their coverage of the Buffalo shooting by refusing to reckon with the reality of white supremacist and racist violence.  “A question remains for those who still reside in this republic: What do we owe the deceased in Buffalo and all those who preceded them? It cannot be anything less than pursuing the truth and unveiling all the interconnected evils that led to their tragic end,” writes Esau McCaulley for The Atlantic. Ryan Cooper writes about how the results of the 2022 midterm elections could have big repercussions for key election administration posts, and the integrity of the 2024 presidential election, in this piece for The American Prospect.  Photo credit: AP Photo/Matt Rourke

    The Rise of Anti-Asian Hate

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 30:29

    Julio is joined by Jason Wu, public defender at the Legal Aid Society's Harlem Community Law Office, and Tiffany Diane Tso, freelance writer, editor, and co-founder of the Asian American Feminist Collective. They reflect on the rise in hate crimes targeting different Asian American communities, and how to build community safety beyond policing. They also get into the opportunity for multiracial solidarity in light of the increasing white supremacist violence in this country. ITT Staff Picks: “A year after the shootings, many additional attacks on Asian Americans have continued across the country, something activists view as part of the long tradition of violence and discrimination against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders woven through the nation's history,” by Frances Kai-Hwa Wang for PBS Newshour in April 2022. In this analysis of data from AAPI Data and Momentive, professors Janelle Wong and Sara Sadhwani found that “all racial groups experienced a hate crime over the first months of 2022 at very similar rates to one another.” “In interviews with more than a dozen community members — from shopkeepers to long term residents and elected officials — one particular sentiment coursed through the interviews: The systems that were supposed to protect people — from homeless people to the elderly and women — have failed Chinatown,” writes Lam Thuy Vo in this piece for Documented. Photo credit: AP Photo/Yuki Iwamura

    The End of Roe

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 49:06

    In this rebroadcast episode from 2020, Maria and Julio are joined by Dr. Michele Goodwin, law professor at the University of California, Irvine, host of Ms. Magazine's On The Issues podcast and author of the book, Policing the Womb: Invisible Women and the Criminalization of Motherhood, and Mary Ziegler, law professor at Florida State University, historian and author of the book, Abortion and the Law in America: Roe v. Wade to the Present. They talk about the future of Roe v. Wade and unpack the history of reproductive justice for women of color and immigrants. ITT Staff Picks:  Michele Goodwin writes about the new “Jane Crow era” in the United States, for The Atlantic: “Leaving the protection of people who can become pregnant to the devices of hostile state legislatures has been and will be disastrous.” Tech reporter Louise Matsakis writes about the privacy experts who are warning about data-tracking if Roe is overturned, for NBC News.  As the country faces the prospect of a post-Roe future, The Washington Post spoke to people who remember what life was like before the landmark decision. Photo credit: AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana This episode originally aired in September 2020 and was mixed by Leah Shaw Dameron.

    Disinformation and Misinformation

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 38:35

    In this special collaboration with Latino USA, Maria and Julio are joined by Maria Teresa Kumar, founding president and CEO of Voto Latino, and Jaime Longoria, manager of research and training for the Disinfo Defense League at Media Democracy Fund for a conversation about misinformation and disinformation in the Latino community. They get into who is behind these disinformation campaigns, their impact on communities, and the organizing that is being done to counter these issues.  ITT Staff Picks: In this research study for First Draft News, Jaime Longoria, Daniel Acosta, Shaydanay Urbani and Rory Smith examine how vaccine misinformation has impacted the Latino community.  “What the tech platforms actually showed us is the silver lining: We're all being manipulated the same way,” writes journalist Maria Ressa for The Atlantic.  For The New Yorker, Graciela Mochkofsky writes about the misconception of the Latino community and misinformation: “It's not that Spanish-speaking Latinx people are the most gullible people in the country but that they are among the most wary.” Photo credit: AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File

    ITT Sound Off: A Right to Privacy

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 20:32

    Maria and Julio share their responses to the leaked Supreme Court draft opinion to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade case. They talk about the vulnerable communities who will be impacted if abortion bans go into place across the country. They also get into how Republican candidates for Congress, like J.D. Vance, are vying for Trump's endorsement to push ahead in their primaries. ITT Staff Picks: In this personal essay for Prism, Tina Vasquez writes about her experience and struggles with getting an abortion and why it's “a matter of life and death.” Andrea González-Ramírez lists ways to support abortion rights in this article for The Cut.  “Trump now has a definitive rebuttal to those who believed his grip over the party was loosening, and Republican candidates in other states are certain to exert even more energy trying to win his approval,” writes Alex Shepard for The New Republic on Republican J.D. Vance's Ohio primary win. Photo credit: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

    A Lack of Urgency

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 38:27

    Maria and Julio are joined by Tanya Ballard Brown, executive editor at Government Executive, and Vann Newkirk II, senior editor at The Atlantic and host of the podcast Floodlines. They reflect on 30 years since the police officers who brutally beat Rodney King were acquitted and the uprisings in Los Angeles that followed. They also get into the Biden administration's potential plans for student loan forgiveness, and the latest on voting rights in the lead-up to the midterms.  ITT Staff Picks: “The 1992 riots were in many ways a product of segregation. The sense of disorder they caused only accelerated white flight,” writes Héctor Tobar in The New York Times Magazine. In this thread on Twitter, journalist Michael Harriot expands on the pay, wealth and education disparities between Black and white Americans, and its connection to student loans.  For The Atlantic, Van Newkirk II interviewed Crystal Mason, a Black woman who was convicted to five years in prison for attempting to vote in 2016 and unknowingly violated a Texas voting law. Photo credit: AP Photo/Evan Vucci

    ITT Sound Off: How Power Works

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 17:24

    Julio and guest co-host Jamilah King, deputy inequality editor at BuzzFeed News, talk about Elon Musk's deal to buy Twitter. They also get into the Supreme Court's decision to continue excluding Puerto Rico from federal benefits, and the future of the Trump-era Remain in Mexico policy. And, they discuss new revelations on Republican politicians' involvement in the January 6 insurrection. ITT Staff Picks: “Now one of the world's biggest bullies will soon control one of the world's biggest and most influential bully pulpits,” writes Renée Graham in this piece for the Boston Globe. “I felt like a bucket of cold water fell on me,” said one woman affected by the Supreme Court's decision to deny Puerto Ricans access to SSI benefits, in this NBC News piece by Nicole Acevedo. For Mother Jones, Noah Y. Kim unpacks the implications of newly released recordings of Republican politicians in the aftermath of the January 6 insurrection. Photo credit: Patrick Pleul/Pool Photo via AP, File

    The Perpetual Loop of Injustice

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 40:36

    Maria and Julio are joined by Jullian Harris-Calvin, director of the Greater Justice New York program at the Vera Institute of Justice, and David Luis “Suave” Gonzalez, artist and a former juvenile lifer. They discuss systemic issues within the criminal legal system, the case of Melissa Lucio, and the humanitarian crisis at New York City's Rikers Island jail complex. ITT Staff Picks: “The idea that my decision to take another person's life was not based on complete and accurate information in a fair trial is horrifying,” writes Johnny Galvan Jr., a juror in Melissa Lucio's case, in this opinion piece for the Houston Chronicle. Sara Dorn and Kimberly Gonzalez lay out a timeline of the calls to close Rikers Island and the steps that have been taken so far, for City and State New York. In a collaboration between ProPublica, The Marshall Project and NBC News, reporters investigated abuses at a new juvenile lockup in Louisiana, including 23-hour solitary confinement. Photo credit: AP Photo/Jeenah Moon

    ITT Sound Off: Deeply Broken Systems

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 21:27

    Maria and guest co-host Jamilah King, deputy inequality editor at BuzzFeed News, discuss a federal judge's decision to strike down the federal mask mandate on airplanes and public transportation. They also get into the pushback from some Democrats against the repeal of Title 42, and talk about the case of Melissa Lucio, the first Latina woman to be put on death row in Texas. ITT Staff Picks: Aaron Blake breaks down the decision by Trump-nominated judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle against the CDC's mask mandate on airplanes and public transportation in this piece for The Washington Post. In this piece for The Intercept, journalists Liliana Segura and Jordan Smith dive deep into the case of Melissa Lucio, and efforts from trial jurors, activists, and lawmakers to prove her innocence. “The end of Title 42 paired with a new approach to asylum processing presents an opportunity to pivot not from a draconian border approach to chaos, as moderate Democrats fear and Republicans anticipate, but to a much more orderly and charitable system,” writes immigration reporter Felipe De La Hoz in this piece for The New Republic. Photo credit: Representante estatal de Texas, Jeff Leach, vía AP

    Oppressive States

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 36:45

    Julio and guest co-host Terrell Jermaine Starr, senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and host of the Black Diplomats podcast, are joined by Renée Graham, associate editor and columnist for The Boston Globe, and Shefali Luthra, health reporter for The 19th. They talk about the latest on the war in Ukraine, and attacks by Israeli forces on Palestinians in occupied East Jerusalem. They also discuss the rise of restrictive anti-abortion and anti-trans legislation across the country.  ITT Staff Picks: Mohammed El-Kurd writes about Land Day in Palestine on March 30, and the “Israeli regime's architecture of displacement,” in this article for The Nation.  Shefali Luthra writes about Kentucky's far-reaching abortion ban, which takes effect immediately, making it the first state where clinics will completely stop providing abortions, via 19th News.  “Alabama isn't the first state to ban health care specific to transgender youth,” writes Renée Graham, “But Ivey is the first governor to endorse making criminals of medical professionals who offer necessary care to youth related to gender identity,” for the Boston Globe.  Photo credit: AP Photo/Stephen Spillman, File

    ITT Sound Off: Dystopian Adventure

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 20:07

    Julio and guest co-host Jamilah King, deputy inequality editor at BuzzFeed News, discuss the Brooklyn subway shooting and the calls for more policing in response. They also get into the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation's purchase of a six million dollar mansion in California. And, they unpack the latest on COVID-19. ITT Staff Picks: Nick Pinto writes about the failure of aggressive policing to prevent potential tragedies like the Brooklyn subway shooting in this piece for The Intercept. In this piece for NY Mag, journalist Sean Campbell dives deep into the Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation's purchase of a $6 million mansion in California. For The Atlantic, Ed Yong documents the prolonged grief of those who've lost loved ones to COVID-19: “Every news story twisted the knife. Every surge salted the wound. Two years later, she is still inundated by her grief. ‘And now people are saying we can get back to normal,' she told me. ‘What's normal?'” Photo credit: AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File

    The Great Labor Injustice

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 43:21

    Maria and Julio are joined by Ai-jen Poo, co-founder and executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, and Pablo Alvarado, co-executive director of the National Day Laborer Organizing Network, to discuss labor organizing for workers. They get into the pandemic's impact on informal economies, on-the-ground movements to protect low-wage workers, and what meaningful labor reforms would look like. ITT Staff Picks: Due to the caregiving crisis, Juanita Sharpe writes about having to choose between her career and caring for her aging mother in this column for Fortune. For The American Prospect, Jon Hiatt lays out how organizations like the AFL-CIO can transform the Staten Island Amazon worker's union success into a broader movement. On worker dissatisfaction, Timothy Noah writes for The New Republic that “nothing much will be done to relieve this misery until unions become powerful enough to reshape the industries in which they reside.” Photo credit: AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File

    ITT Sound Off: An American Moment

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 19:13

    Maria and Julio talk about Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's historic confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court. They also get into the Oklahoma state legislature's anti-abortion bill, and the dangerous repercussions of media language and framing around immigration. ITT Staff Picks: For The New York Times, reporter Linda Qiu spoke with Black women of the Harvard Black Law Students Association about what Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's confirmation to the Supreme Court means to them.  Oklahoma's abortion ban will have ripple effects throughout the country, with little hope that the Supreme Court will uphold Roe vs. Wade, reports Susan Rinkunas for Jezebel.  “The vow to treat asylum-seekers with “dignity” was a broken campaign promise from Biden,” writes Julio in his latest piece for MSNBC.  Photo credit: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

    Two Years of COVID-19

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 36:19

    Maria and Julio reflect on the last two years of the coronavirus pandemic with guests Umair Irfan, staff writer at Vox covering Covid-19 and climate change, and Kiera Butler, senior editor and public health reporter at Mother Jones. They discuss government response to the health crisis, the disproportionate impact on Black and brown communities and what we can expect next. ITT Staff Picks: For Vox, Umair Irfan dives into what is needed at a scientific research and policy level in order to spot the next pandemic virus. Kiera Butler writes about what it means for the coronavirus to become an “endemic” disease in this piece for Mother Jones. “The truth is that America's battle with covid-19 has been more damaging than we like to think. And it is still ongoing,” writes Dhruv Khullar in this piece for The New Yorker. Photo credit: AP Photo/Brittainy Newman, File

    ITT Sound Off: Hoodwinked and Bamboozled

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 18:58

    Maria and Julio discuss the news of the Biden administration finally putting an end to Title 42, a Trump-era public health order. They also unpack the media's coverage of Russia's invasion of Ukraine, and the latest on the January 6 attempted coup. ITT Staff Picks: In this piece for Al Jazeera, Jihan Abdalla reports on how immigrant rights groups are reacting to the Biden administration's indications that it will revoke Title 42 in the coming months. “National security coverage largely relies on official and military sources that, like a man with a hammer who always sees a nail, are likely to favor intervention,” writes Mark Hannah, senior fellow at the Eurasia Group Foundation, for Foreign Policy. Legal analyst Lisa Rubin explains how the January 6 committee ought to respond to a major gap in Donald Trump's call logs in this piece for MSNBC. Photo credit: AP Photo/Mariam Zuhaib

    Tough Guy Talk

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 36:53

    Maria and Julio are joined by Aisha Mills, political strategist and former host of “Amplified with Aisha” on the Black News Channel, and Dr. Jason Johnson, professor at the School of Global Journalism & Communication at Morgan State University and political contributor at MSNBC. They react to the 94th annual Academy Awards, including the controversy over Will Smith slapping Chris Rock. They also discuss the latest on the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and the state of independent journalism made by and for people of color. ITT Staff Picks: “There's definitely nuance here, and something to be said about the use of physical force to defend Pinkett Smith and the inherent toxic masculinity in the act, but Smith's actions do feel like solidarity,” writes Ineye Komonibo for Refinery29. For Mother Jones, reporter Fernanda Echavarri dives into President Biden's off-script remarks during his trip to Poland, and the reactions since. Non-white students who have fled the war in Ukraine are being detained in closed facilities by EU border authorities, May Bulman and Nadine White report for The Independent. Photo credit: AP Photo/Chris Pizzello

    ITT Sound Off: Saving the Supreme Court

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 21:50

    Maria and Julio discuss the uncovered text messages between Mark Meadows and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' wife Ginni Thomas, revealing new efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results. They also get into the latest news out of the war in Ukraine, and President Biden's meeting abroad with world leaders. And, they unpack Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson's confirmation hearings. ITT Staff Picks: MSNBC's Mehdi Hasan makes the case for the impeachment of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, on violating ethics and being subject to conflicts of interest, in this opinion piece. For The Atlantic, Tom McTague unpacks the NATO alliance, asking what they ultimately stand for and against, as President Biden travels to Europe to discuss the war in Ukraine. On Ketanji Brown Jackson's confirmation hearings, Elie Mystal writes in The Nation: “It was emotionally affecting to watch Jackson, a ridiculously accomplished Black woman, be forced to dance to the tune of these mediocre white senators who were trying to reduce her to a caricature.” Photo credit: AP Photo/Alex Brandon

    Lights, Camera… ¡Acción! A Latino Take on the Oscars

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 47:11

    In The Thick presents an episode from our sister podcast, Latino USA. In this episode, Maria talks with Latino and Latina film critics Clayton Davis, Cristina Escobar, and Jack Rico about Latinos in film this past year. Ahead of Hollywood's biggest night, they discuss the honors (and snubs) for Latino-led films this awards season. They also talk about the importance of diversity in criticism, and push the conversation past the topic of “representation” to envision a more inclusive future for Latinos in Hollywood and the film industry as a whole. Subscribe to Latino USA for more episodes. Photo Credit: Collage by Luis Luna (Photo credits: Walt Disney Pictures/Disney Animation Studios, Macall Polay/Warner Bros. Entertainment via AP, 20th Century Studios, Amazon Studios)

    ITT Sound Off: War Has No Logic

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 19:33

    Julio and Maria discuss Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky's address to Congress, and the recent granting of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Afghan refugees. They also dive into the lack of accountability in the police shootings of Adam Toledo and Anthony Alvarez. And, they unpack the latest government spending bill, which cut funding for COVID-19 relief and prevention. ITT Staff Picks: Months after the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, the Biden administration extended eligibility for temporary protected status to over 70,000 Afghan refugees in the country, reports Hamed Aleaziz for Buzzfeed News. For Latino Rebels, senior editor Hector Luis Alamo writes about the announcement that no charges would be filed in the Chicago police killings of 13-year-old Adam Toledo and 22-year-old Anthony Alvarez. “Older, disabled, poor, Black, or brown Americans, whose excess deaths were tolerated long before COVID, have borne the brunt of the pandemic, while privileged people have had the swiftest access to medical interventions—and have been quickest to declare the crisis over,” writes Ed Yong for The Atlantic. Photo Credit: AP Photo/Felipe Dana

    The Great American Tradition of Fear

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 36:19

    Julio and guest co-host Jenni Monet, independent investigative journalist and founder of the newsletter Indigenously, are joined by Karen Attiah, columnist for The Washington Post, and Sabrina Rodríguez, national political correspondent for Politico. They unpack the latest coverage on the war in Ukraine, its ramifications for U.S. immigration and refugee policy, and the Biden administration's enforcement of Title 42. We also hear from Hansi Lo Wang, NPR national correspondent, on a report estimating undercounts of Black, Latino, and Indigenous Americans in the 2020 census. ITT Staff Picks: “It took three days to cross the border. You cannot warm your car because you don't have enough petrol to move. We moved three meters and we stopped the car,” said Iryna, a Ukrainian refugee, in this piece for Politico by Eugene Daniels. The Biden administration has been planning conversations with Mexican officials about ending its enforcement of Title 42, reports Hamed Aleaziz for Buzzfeed News. In this piece for NPR, Hansi Lo Wang breaks down the reasons, ramifications, and possible remedies for the U.S. Census Bureau's perennial undercount of Black, Latino, and Indigenous Americans. Photo credit: AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File

    ITT Sound Off: Toxic Dude Culture

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 18:46

    Maria and Julio talk about Russia's continued invasion of Ukraine, including increasing sanctions from Western governments and private companies. They also get into the latest in the January 6th investigation, and the arrest of Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio. And, they end by talking about the “Don't Say Gay” bill in Florida. ITT Staff Picks: “It's really exhausting being a queer person in Florida trying to fight against everything going on. I should be focused on my schoolwork, not the GOP trying to police our education,” said Jack Petocz, a student activist in Florida, in this piece by Elizabeth Djinis, for Teen Vogue. For Business Insider, Laura Italiano and Haven Orecchio-Egresitz unpack the latest news on the Proud Boys' recruitment efforts in the lead-up to the Jan. 6 insurrection. Derek Thompson writes about the possible repercussions of Russia's financial, commercial, and cultural isolation in the aftermath of its invasion of Ukraine in this piece for The Atlantic. Photo credit: AP Photo/Allison Dinner, File

    A Dispatch From Ukraine

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 34:14

    Maria and Julio are joined by ITT All-Star Terrell Jermaine Starr, senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and host of the Black Diplomats podcast, to discuss his reporting on the ground in Ukraine and the impact of Western sanctions on Russia. They also unpack political responses to the invasion. And we hear from Asami Terajima, political reporter for the Kyiv Independent. ITT Staff Picks: “Ukraine's crisis has made clear who creates the Western news landscape, and perhaps more important, who the news is made for,” writes Ayman Mohyeldin in this piece for MSNBC. In this piece for The Nation, Ruchi Kumar and Ivan Flores write about Afghan refugees experiencing war and displacement once again after settling in Ukraine.    Trans and non-binary people in Ukraine are fearful for what the future holds — and struggling to flee the country due to documentation requirements — reports Ben Hunte in this piece for Vice News.  Photo credit: AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda

    ITT Sound Off: The Uninspiring Administration

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2022 17:11

    Julio and guest co-host Jamilah King, deputy inequality editor at BuzzFeed News, discuss the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and critique Western media coverage of the war. And, they talk about the ongoing January 6th trials. We also hear from Analilia Mejia, co-executive director of the Center for Popular Democracy, on policing and President Biden's State of the Union address. ITT Staff Picks: Western media has shown a double standard in its coverage of the ongoing war in Ukraine, writes Ishmael N. Daro in The Nation. For BuzzFeed News, Zoe Tillman reports on the first January 6 trial, beginning with defendant Guy Reffitt who is facing five felony counts for his participation in the attack. “When politicians promote policing as a solution to crime, they fail to reckon with the real roots of policing and its impact on the most affected communities,” writes Lexi McMenamin for Teen Vogue on President Biden's State of the Union address. Photo credit: Shawn Thew/Pool via AP

    The Disinformation Cocktail

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 35:07

    Maria and Julio are joined by Ayman Mohyeldin, host of the MSNBC show “Ayman” and host of the podcast “American Radical.” They dive into the story of Rosanne Boyland and her participation in the January 6 insurrection. They also talk about radicalization when it comes to white people, the issues with media coverage of war and a recent New York Times report about Justice Clarence Thomas and his wife, Ginni. ITT Staff Picks: In this piece for Vanity Fair, Ayman Mohyeldin and Preeti Varathan expand on the radicalization of Rosanne Boyland, which ultimately led to her death.  On Justice Clarence Thomas and Ginni Thomas, Michael Tomasky writes, “Democrats, it's long past time to make an issue of him and his wife,” for The New Republic. “They must understand that there are no civilized wars,” writes Rafia Zakaria — an attorney, journalist and author — about the media coverage of Russia's invasion in Ukraine. Photo credit: AP Photo/John Minchillo, File

    ITT Sound Off: The Fog of War

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 18:40

    Julio and guest co-host Jamilah King, deputy inequality editor at Buzzfeed News, discuss the latest on the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and the role of the United States in the crisis. They also get into Colombia's recent ruling to decriminalize abortion, and the tenth anniversary of Trayvon Martin's murder. ITT Staff Picks: For the latest on the situation in Ukraine, check out The Kyiv Independent's Live Updates page here. Khanyi Mlaba and Tess Lowery round up a list of ways folks can help those most affected in Ukraine for the Global Citizen, including organizations to donate to and how to stay informed. “Black sons and daughters shouldn't have to be on murals, posters, and slogans for the world to recognize racism is a problem,” writes Murjani Rawls on the 10th anniversary of Trayvon Martin's death, for The Root. Photo credit: AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti

    Hope in Hopeless Times

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2022 34:03

    Maria and Julio are joined by ITT All-Star Wajahat Ali, columnist for The Daily Beast, to discuss his new book, “Go Back to Where You Came From: And Other Helpful Recommendations on How to Become American.” They get into disparities in reactions to white violence versus nonwhite violence, the upcoming midterms, and reflect on who is seen as American in this country. ITT Staff Picks: For The Atlantic, Wajahat Ali writes about his parents' arrest in 2002, and the hardships that followed. Many Muslim families see their lives in two chapters: before and after the 9/11 attacks, reports Brittny Mejia in this piece for The LA Times. Daniel Strauss and Grace Segers of The New Republic recap the latest news with the January 6 committee's investigation, including what might come next. Photo courtesy of Wajahat Ali

    ITT Sound Off: Unchecked American Power

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2022 20:01

    Maria and Julio get into the latest on Russia's increasing escalation in Ukraine. They also talk about the double standard in the Olympics' treatment of U.S. athlete Sha'Carri Richardson compared to Russian athlete Kamila Valieva. And, they discuss the U.S. government's extradition request for former Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández. ITT Staff Picks: “I came to believe that Ukraine matters because its fate is, in some sense, our own,” writes Franklin Foer in this piece for The Atlantic. “U.S. sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson is calling out Olympic and anti-doping officials, after Russian skater Kamila Valieva was allowed to compete despite testing positive for a banned drug,” reports Bill Chappell in this piece for NPR.  El Faro English reports on the extradition request from the U.S. government for former Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández. Photo credit: AP Photo/Richard Drew

    Power Concedes Nothing

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 32:47

    Maria and Julio are joined by Bree Newsome Bass, artist, writer, activist, and organizer. They talk about where the movement for Black lives stands today, and the power of grassroots organizing. They also reflect on the rise of far-right movements globally, including ongoing protests in Canada, and the fight against voter suppression in the lead up to the midterm elections. ITT Staff Picks: In this special issue of New York Magazine, read essays, reflections and reporting on the last 10 years since Trayvon Martin's death, which ignited the Black Lives Matter movement. “They are angry because they have lost,” writes Zack Beauchamp about the Canadian truckers' convoy in this piece for Vox. Texas is seeing a rise in rejections of mail-in voting applications as SB 1 — the new voting law — goes into effect, reports Ursula Perano for The Daily Beast. Photo credit: AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File

    ITT Sound Off: Marginalize Joe Rogan

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 20:21

    Maria and Julio get into the latest on COVID-19 and the states lifting mask mandates. They also challenge media narratives comparing the January 6th insurrection to the 1954 attack by Puerto Rican nationalists on the U.S. Capitol. They also talk about misinformation and racism on Joe Rogan's podcast, and how Spotify is handling the controversy. ITT Staff Picks: Melody Schreiber writes about the blue states that are rolling back mask mandates and how some experts are warning it is too soon, for The Guardian. Brittany Valentine writes about the difference in reaction to Puerto Rican nationalists who stormed the Capitol in 1954 and the violent insurrectionists who attempted a coup on January 6th in this piece for Al Día News. “I do not wish to spend ancestral energy this Black History Month relitigating the lineage of the n-word and why it is never okay for White people to say it,” writes Karen Attiah in this piece for the Washington Post. Photo credit: AP Photo/Gregory Payan, File

    The America We Deserve

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 29:56

    Maria is joined by LaTosha Brown, co-founder of Black Voters Matter, and Dr. Christina Greer, associate professor of political science at Fordham University and co-host of the podcast FAQ NYC. They get into the latest on the January 6th insurrection, and the connection between voter suppression and anti-Black racism. They also discuss the nuances of Black and Brown voters, and the recent wave of book banning in schools. ITT Staff Picks: On the aftermath of the January 6 insurrection, Kali Holloway writes, “we are nowhere near the end of this assault on democratic norms and principles,” for The Nation. Pamela Moses, a Black Lives Matter activist, was sentenced to six years in prison because of a voting error conviction, reports Timothy Bella for The Washington Post. In this piece for The Guardian, Adam Gabbatt reports on teenagers in Pennsylvania who are fighting back against the banning of books. Photo credit: AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

    Death Note — Introdcuing Ídolo: The Ballad of Chalino Sánchez

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2022 24:24

    From Futuro Studios and Sonoro Narcocorrido superstar Chalino Sánchez sings to a sold-out crowd for the first time in Sinaloa. It's the best night of his career until someone hands him a note. His face turns pale and his smile slowly disappears. That night, after the show, Chalino will be executed. But who killed him and why? We begin a journey to understand Chalino's life and impact, and the theories behind his unsolved murder. For more episodes, subscribe here.

    ITT Sound Off: US 'Credibility'

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 20:29

    Maria and Julio talk about the Biden administration's response to a U.S. raid in Syria that led to the death of ISIS leader Abu Ibrahim al-Hashimi al-Qurayshi. They also discuss the latest on immigration, Donald Trump's interference in the 2020 presidential election results, and CNN president Jeff Zucker's resignation. ITT Staff Picks “Despite these repeated tactical victories, from which U.S. presidents have extracted much political capital over the years, the underlying wars themselves have continued and even worsened,” writes Murtaza Hussain for The Intercept. For The Nation, Joan Walsh writes about former president Trump's plan to seize voting machines after the 2020 election, and just how serious the attempted coup was. On Jeff Zucker, Margaret Sullivan writes that ultimately, his relationship with Donald Trump will define his legacy in this piece for The Washington Post. Photo credit: Adam Schultz/The White House via AP

    Machinery of Corruption and Impunity

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2022 38:46

    Maria and Julio are joined by Anayansi Diaz-Cortes, senior reporter and producer at Reveal, and Kate Doyle, senior analyst at the National Security Archive. They discuss Reveal's new podcast series “After Ayotzinapa”, a three-part investigation into the disappearance of 43 students from a Mexican teacher's college in 2014. They also unpack the role of the U.S. in Mexico's drug war, and the human consequences of corruption. You can listen to the full series here. ITT Staff Picks“It was evident from the beginning that state violence, including enforced disappearances, was a feature, not a bug, of this new war,” writes journalist Ryan Devereaux in this June 2021 piece for The Intercept on Mexico's unsolved disappearances. Reporter Jeremy Kryt unpacks how collusion between police and organized crime led to the disappearances of the 43 students in Ayotzinapa in this piece for The Daily Beast from October 2021. This episode of Latino USA from 2016 dives into the context and immediate aftermath of the students' disappearances in Mexico. Photo credit: AP Photo/Claudio Cruz, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ITT Sound Off: Politics Is Transactional

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 17:37

    ITT Sound Off: Politics Is TransactionalMaria and Julio discuss Justice Stephen Breyer's decision to retire from the U.S. Supreme Court, and President Biden's commitment to appoint a Black woman in his place. They also give an immigration update, and reflect on the heartbreaking killing of Mexican journalist Lourdes Maldonado López.ITT Staff Picks:Elie Mystal, justice correspondent at The Nation, gives a detailed look into the potential Black women nominees for the Supreme Court.Medical advisers are urging DHS to expand protections for COVID-19, as cases have soared by over 800 percent in detention centers this year, reports Camilo Montoya-Galvez for CBS.“When someone kills a journalist or tries to silence an independent critical voice, the journalist is not the ultimate target. You are,” writes Katherine Corcoran in this opinion piece for The Washington Post. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    America Is Shady

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2022 33:35

    Julio is joined by Danielle Moodie, host of the show Woke AF and co-host of the podcast Democracy-ish, and Nathalie Baptiste, opinion writer for HuffPost. They reflect on President Biden's first year in office, and unpack the latest on voter suppression and ongoing threats to U.S. democracy. We also hear from ITT All-Star Terrell Jermaine Starr, senior fellow at the Atlantic Council and host of the Black Diplomats podcast, on the context behind Ukraine-Russia relations. ITT Staff Picks:On President Biden's first year in office, Nathalie Baptiste writes, “it's clear his to-do list has become more of a wish list,” in this opinion piece for HuffPost. In his latest episode of the Black Diplomats podcast, Terrell Jermaine Starr speaks with Polina Sinovets, an international relations specialist, for a deep-dive into Ukraine-Russia relations. In Texas, hundreds of mail-in ballot applications are already being rejected as confusion arises over the new voter restriction rules under SB 1, reports Alexa Ura for The Texas Tribune. Photo credit: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Introducing ÍDOLO: The Ballad of Chalino Sánchez

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 1:00

    From Futuro Studios and Sonoro, a show that examines the extraordinary life of the “King of Corridos” and attempts to unravel the mystery of his death. Coming next week to all podcast platforms.Subscribe here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ITT Sound Off: American Arc of Injustice

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 18:53

    Maria and Julio talk about President Biden's press conference to mark his first year in office, and they get into the latest on voting rights. They also discuss a new plan to resolve Puerto Rico's bankruptcy and give an update on the COVID-19 pandemic. ITT Staff Picks:For Latino Rebels, correspondent Pablo Manríquez reports from the Senate chamber on the debate over the John L. Lewis Voting Rights Act.“Pandemics do not end ‘individually,' and vaccines aren't meant to work only as individual protection,” writes Abdullah Shihipar in this piece for Teen Vogue.Nicole Acevedo breaks down the history, context, and next steps for the debt restructuring plan aimed at ending Puerto Rico's nearly five-year-long bankruptcy in this piece for NBC News.Photo credit: AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Obvious Racism

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 34:13

    Maria and Julio are joined by Elie Mystal, justice correspondent at The Nation, for a conversation about the latest on voting rights and the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. They unpack the whitewashing of Dr. King's words, what he stood for, and how to meaningfully honor his work. ITT Staff Picks: In this article for The Nation, Elie Mystal writes about what the late Harvard Law professor and icon, Lani Guinier, taught him about voting rights. “When Biden fully entered the battle, the other warriors were already bloody, bruised and exhausted,” writes opinion columnist Charles Blow about President Biden's speech on voting rights in this piece for the The New York Times. “This holiday honoring Martin Luther King, Jr., sees a nation embroiled in conflicts that would have looked numbingly familiar to him,” writes Jelani Cobb in this article for The New Yorker.Photo credit: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ITT Sound Off: Too Little, Too Late

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 18:46

    Maria and Julio talk about the latest on federal voting rights legislation, a devastating fire in the Bronx, and give an update on grassroots organizing in New York City. They also reflect on the growing number of non-white NPR hosts who have recently left the network. ITT Staff Picks:President Biden gave a strong speech on voting rights and filibuster reform, but it's unlikely to make meaningful legislative change, reports Li Zhou for Vox. This post from Epicenter NYC, a community journalism initiative founded by S. Mitra Kalita, lists ways to help out those affected by the Bronx fire. Former NPR host Audie Cornish is among the latest to leave the media outlet, joining part in what is being known as “The Great Resignation,” with a majority of women of color leaving their employment, reports Alexandra Jane for The Root. Photo Credit: AP Photo/Patrick Semansky See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Pandemic in the Time of Capitalism

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 40:23

    Maria is joined by Abdullah Shihipar, public health researcher at the People, Place & Health Collective at Brown University, and Jessica Malaty Rivera, infectious disease epidemiologist and a senior adviser at the Pandemic Prevention Institute. They break down the latest on the COVID-19 surge, including guidance on the new Omicron variant, and how capitalism is influencing the CDC's shifting public health response. They also talk about ways to protect the most vulnerable, and what a post-pandemic world might look like. ITT Staff Picks:For The Marshall Project, reporters Beth Schwartzapfel and Keri Blakinger warn about what the latest omicron-driven COVID-19 surge could look like in jails and prisons, many of which are already experiencing staffing shortages, vaccine hesitancy, and overcrowding. “In the US, we are so accustomed to paying out of pocket for essential health care that when it is provided for free, it is a foreign concept,” writes Abdullah Shihipar in this piece for The Nation on how a lack of universal health care coverage has aggravated the pandemic in the US.Aaron Short writes about the brutal toll of pandemic-induced burnout and staffing shortages on the nursing industry in this piece for New York Magazine. Photo credit: AP Photo/David Dermer, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ITT Sound Off: A Self-coup

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 18:48

    Maria and Julio reflect on the one-year anniversary of the January 6th insurrection. They get into President Biden's remarks this week and what accountability looks like for the attack. We also hear from Renée Graham, opinion columnist at the Boston Globe, about the language surrounding the attack and how local extremist movements have expanded in the year since. ITT Staff Picks:“It's infuriating when someone in the media or a pundit insists on calling Jan. 6 a riot. What millions witnessed live at the U.S. Capitol was not a protest spurred by passions that spontaneously combusted,” writes Renée Graham for the Boston Globe.Elie Mystal writes about the implications of attorney general Merrick Garland's slow-moving prosecution of participants of the January 6 insurrection in this piece for The Nation.In this piece for Vice, Tess Owen reports on the evolving tactics of the Proud Boys, a far-right neo-fascist gang, in the year following the Capitol insurrection. Photo credit: AP Photo/John Minchillo, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Achilles Heel of Democracy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 34:20

    Maria and Julio are joined by Jelani Cobb, staff writer at the New Yorker and co-editor of the new book “The Matter of Black Lives: Writing from the New Yorker.” They reflect on the history and legacy of the Black Lives Matter movement. They also unpack the latest in attacks on voting rights in the lead up to the midterm elections, and the state of U.S. democracy as we approach the one year anniversary of the Jan. 6 insurrection.ITT Staff Picks:As we approach the 10-year mark since the murder of Trayvon Martin, we're sharing Jelani Cobb's first piece in The New Yorker about his death and its aftermath.In his 1962 essay printed in The New Yorker, James Baldwin writes about growing up in Harlem, his experiences with racism, Black people's struggles in the United States and the myths that white Americans cling to. “America's political system is broken, seemingly beyond its normal capacity to repair,” writes senior correspondent Zack Beauchamp in this piece for Vox.Photo credit: AP Photo/Ashley Landis, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A Lot of Grief and Joy

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 25:03

    Happy New Year ITT familia! In this special episode, Maria and Julio reflect back on 2021 and how they found joy throughout a turbulent year. They revisit some of the top ITT moments, from the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, where they spoke with journalists Jazmine Ulloa and Wajahat Ali to unpack the aftermath of it all, to the virtual live show featuring two Minneapolis-based journalists, which marked one year since the murder of George Floyd. To the roundtable episode the dove into white supremacy and racial justice with guests Elie Mystal and Michael Harriot…and much more!Photo credit: AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    White Supremacy Is Evergreen

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 37:44

    Maria and Julio are joined by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, historian, writer and professor at Princeton University, and Adam Goodman, professor at the University of Illinois Chicago, for a conversation about the deep-rooted history of white supremacy in this country. They discuss their chapters in a new anthology titled “A Field Guide to White Supremacy,” and also get into how white supremacy manifests in our society today, from the immigration system to policing. ITT Staff PicksIn this piece published over the summer in The New Yorker, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor writes about the impact from the protests following the police murder of George Floyd in 2020.“Americans are familiar with white-supremacist movements like the Klan, skinheads, neo-Nazis, and the Proud Boys. But they don't seem to recognize white-supremacist ideology—the most venomous form of racist ideology,” writes Ibram X. Kendi for The Atlantic. For The Brookings Institution, Charles Kamasaki, Senior Cabinet Advisor of UnidosUS, writes about the history of immigration compared to the systemic racism we see in the system today. Photo credit: AP Photo/Peter Dejong See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    A 2021 Holiday Message

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 2:27

    Futuro Media is off for winter break, and Maria and Julio want to send all of you, our ITT familia, lots of love, light and appreciation during this holiday season. Be sure to keep checking your feeds, because we will be dropping fresh content for you throughout the break. And, we can't wait to dive back into the latest news and political analysis in the new year. Photo credit: AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    West Side Story: Why Now?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 29:15

    In The Thick is excited to share a recent episode from Latino Rebels Radio, which gets into the remake of West Side Story from director Steven Spielberg. Julio talks to Erica González Martínez and Frances Negrón Muntaner, who are part of a new series from the Women's Media Center called “Latinas are not in love with West Side Story. Here's why.” Subscribe to Latino Rebels Radio wherever you get your podcasts. Photo credit: Niko Tavernise/20th Century Studios via AP See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ITT Sound Off: Love and Resistance

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 20:45

    Maria and Julio talk about former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's guilty plea for violating George Floyd's civil rights, as well as the ongoing trial of former Brooklyn Center police officer Kim Potter, who shot and killed Daunte Wright last April. They also discuss the latest with the January 6th investigation, as well as a new House bill to combat Islamophobia. Finally, they reflect on the legacy of author, feminist scholar, and poet bell hooks.ITT Staff Picks: The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports on the ground with the latest on the Kim Potter trial, including Potter's expected testimony.“Meadows is hiding what happened in the White House on January 6. It's no wonder he does not want to testify,” writes David Corn for Mother Jones.Marian Jones writes about bell hooks and her impact on Black feminist cultural studies and criticism for Teen Vogue.Photo credit: AP Photo/Morry Gash, File See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Social Disasters

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 38:54

    Maria and Julio are joined by Karen Attiah, columnist for The Washington Post, and Aaron Morrison, national race and ethnicity writer for the Associated Press. They talk about the devastating tornadoes in Kentucky and other states this past weekend, and the connection to climate change. They also discuss the fatal truck crash in Mexico that killed 55 migrants, and unpack the latest with voting and reproductive rights in Texas.ITT Staff Picks:This piece in Latino Rebels via the AP describes anguish amongst the families of migrants in Guatemala in the wake of the deadly truck crash in Chiapas, Mexico.“The first warning came, and they just had us go in the hallway. After the warning, they had us go back to work. They never offered us to go home,” recalled one worker at a candle factory decimated by a tornado in Kentucky in this piece by Deon J. Hampton for NBC News. For the Texas Tribune, journalists James Barragán and Cassandra Pollock examine the implications of the Supreme Court's ruling on states seeking to challenge other constitutional rights.Photo credit: AP Photo/Michael Clubb See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ITT Sound Off: We Don't Get Ownership

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 20:56

    Maria and Julio reflect on conversations around use of the term Latinx, and highlight what's missing from political outreach and media coverage when it comes to Latino communities. They also get into the new “West Side Story” remake, and unpack the broader need for more diversified narratives about Puerto Ricans and communities of color in Hollywood.ITT Staff Picks:For MSNBC, Julio writes about how the debate over the term Latinx distracts from more important issues, including the Biden administration's promises to Latino communities. “It's not just imperfect, it continues the original's tradition of advancing a dangerous narrative even as it offers Latinx people some important opportunities,” writes Cristina Escobar, co-creator of LatinaMedia.Co, in this review of “West Side Story” for Latino Rebels. For the New Yorker, Graciela Mochkofsky writes about how the Instagram account Nuevayorkinos is redefining the history and identities of New York's Latinx community.Photo credit: Niko Tavernise/20th Century Studios via AP See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Claim In The Thick

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel