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In politics, you’re often told not to get lost in the weeds. But we love the weeds! That’s where politics becomes policy – the stuff that shapes our lives. Every Tuesday and Friday, Matthew Yglesias is joined by Ezra Klein, Sarah Kliff, Dara Lind, Jane Coaston and other Vox voices to dig into the we…

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    • Jun 14, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 58m AVG DURATION
    • 628 EPISODES

    Listeners of Vox's The Weeds that love the show mention: sarah kliff, dara, policy issues, policy podcast, ezra's, white papers, matt s voice, wonky, upspeak, public policy, weeds podcast, policy topics, speech patterns, ezra klein show, matt yglesias, jane coaston, policy wonks, politics and policy, matt and ezra, jerusalem.



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    Latest episodes from Vox's The Weeds

    How the world became rich

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 63:11

    Dylan Matthews sits down with economic historians Jared Rubin and Mark Koyama to discuss their new book, How the World Became Rich. It tries to answer one of the hardest questions in history: Why, roughly 200 years ago, did parts of the world start experiencing sustained economic growth?  References: How the World Became Rich by Jared Rubin and Mark Koyama Dylan also wrote about the book Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Does the US need a National Guard of nurses?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 46:03

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Vox senior correspondent Dylan Scott (@dylanlscott) to discuss the shortage of nurses in the American health care workforce. The nursing shortage goes back many years, and not only did the pandemic exacerbate the problem, it also put it under a microscope. The US needs more nurses, but what can be done?  References: America needs more doctors and nurses to survive the next pandemic The way the United States pays for nurses is broken Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The gun control stalemate, explained

    Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 48:20

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Vox politics reporter Nicole Narea (@nicolenarea) to talk about gun violence. They discuss the findings of three different research studies related to gun policy, which gun control policies are effective, the outcomes of specific violence interventions, and how state legislatures respond to mass shootings.  Editorial note: This episode touches on gun violence and suicide. If you want to talk to someone, you can call 1-800-273-8255 or visit www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org   References: The Uvalde massacre and America's unique gun violence problem, explained Dylan on how gun ownership became a powerful political identity  White paper 1: “The Science of Gun Policy” White paper 2: “Presence of Armed School Officials and Fatal and Nonfatal Gunshot Injuries During Mass School Shootings, United States, 1980-2019” White paper 3: “The Impact of Mass Shootings on Gun Policy” Press coverage of mass shootings can cause copycat shootings Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The Most Dangerous Branch: A well-regulated militia

    Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 68:52

    This episode originally published in October 2021 as the second installment of our “Most Dangerous Branch” miniseries about the Supreme Court. Vox senior correspondent Ian Millhiser (@imillhiser) talks with law professor Joseph Blocher and historian Carol Anderson about the Second Amendment, the triumph of the NRA's vision for that amendment, and an upcoming Supreme Court case that endangers more than a century of American gun control laws. References: The Positive Second Amendment Rights, Regulation, and the Future of Heller, Joseph Blocher  The Second: Race and Guns in a Fatally Unequal America, Carol Anderson Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial advisor Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Immigration, democracy, and the rise of the Western far right

    Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 76:01

    This special episode of The Weeds was taped live at TruCon 2022! Join Dara Lind, Zack Beauchamp, and Jen Kirby for a live panel discussion about the state of global democracy. They discuss the complicated relationship among migration, the threat of the populist far right, and what this means for global democracy.  References: Zack's latest piece on “replacement theory” He also wrote about Democrats and immigration policies in 2019 And more from Zack about Hungary, Tucker Carlson, and the election in the Philippines  Jen wrote about the French presidential runoff elections in April  She also recommends this piece about far-right politics in Germany The first installment of the multi-part series from NYT about Tucker Carlson and Fox News White paper: Waking Up the Golden Dawn: Does Exposure to the Refugee Crisis Increase Support for Extreme-Right Parties?  White paper: Refugee Migration and Electoral Outcomes  Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Jen Kirby (@j_kirby1), foreign and national security reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The scourge of the “time tax”

    Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 53:46

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Annie Lowrey (@annielowrey), a staff writer at the Atlantic, to talk about why it's so hard for people to get government benefits. Frequently called the “time tax,” the administrative burden of applying for and distributing government benefits leads to thousands of people not getting the aid they qualify for.  References: Annie Lowrey on Code America's efforts to fight the Time Tax Pamela Herd and Don Moynihan's book on administrative burden Why Is It So Hard to Make a Website for the Government? from the New York Times White paper — Program Recertification Costs: Evidence from SNAP A sudden change to SSI eligibility had huge, lasting negative consequences Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Ukraine and the global food supply crisis

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 47:08

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind talk with Washington Post economic columnist Heather Long (@byHeatherLong) about the global food supply crisis spinning out of the war in Ukraine. The crisis is so bad that the United Nations said it could be the worst shortage since World War II. What, if anything, can be done? Dylan, Dara, and Heather discuss how we got here and the costs of potential solutions. References: The war in Ukraine is triggering a global food crisis. Here's how the U.S. can help. A global famine looms. The U.S. could prevent it. How war in Ukraine is making people hungry in the Middle East  Russian Blockade Prompts Ukraine to Find New Ways to Shift Vital Wheat Exports  Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    What the Alito leak means for Roe — and everything else

    Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 58:21

    Dara Lind sits down with Vox Supreme Court correspondent Ian Millhiser (@imillhiser) for a deep dive into the leaked draft opinion on abortion written by Justice Samuel Alito. They discuss the text of the opinion itself; why Alito was chosen to write it; and what could happen in the days, weeks, and months following a ruling overturning Roe v. Wade.  References: The Roe opinion and the case against the Supreme Court  Ian's explainer on the draft memo What happens next if the Supreme Court strikes down Roe  Ian's interview with Professor Melissa Murray Professor Melissa Murray NYT op ed from December: What would a post-Roe America look like? Hosts: Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The Most Dangerous Branch: Roe v. Wade

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 73:41

    This episode originally published in October 2021 as the first installment of our “Most Dangerous Branch” miniseries about the Supreme Court. Vox senior correspondent Ian Millhiser (@imillhiser) talks with NYU professor Melissa Murray about the future of Roe v. Wade, specifically discussing some of the legal theories used to chip away at the law. References: What we know and don't know on the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade draft opinion Supreme Court has voted to overturn abortion rights, draft opinion shows  Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Why do we go to war?

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 50:20

    Dylan Matthews interviews economist Chris Blattman (@cblatts) about his new book Why We Fight, which examines the root causes of war and what can be done to stop it. In a wide-ranging discussion that touches on conflict all over the world, Dylan and Chris discuss the role of the state, commonalities among historical conflicts, and the game theory of war. References: Chris Blattman's book, Why We Fight Chris's research work Research on how drug gangs govern in Colombia How therapy can reduce conflict Using summer vacations to study peace deal mediators The influence of royal mounties in the 19th century may make Canadian hockey less violent now Blattman on Ukraine before the war Civil war predictions in the US Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Weeds Time Machine: The Clean Air Act

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 48:30

    Buckle up! The Weeds Time Machine is back. Today, Dylan Matthews, Dara Lind, and special guest Maureen Cropper, economist and professor at the University of Maryland, travel back in time to the 1970s to discuss one of the most important pieces of environmental legislation of the 20th century: the Clean Air Act.  References: White paper: Looking Back at 50 Years of the Clean Air Act  Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Tax time at the culture wars

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 55:56

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Washington Post reporter Toluse Olorunnipa (@ToluseO) to talk more taxes for our hot! tax! policy! episodes this month. Today's topic: Sen. Rick Scott's 11-point plan to rescue America. Dylan, Dara, and Tolu get into the specifics of Scott's policy proposal and speculate if the culture wars have seeped into tax policy. Plus, a white paper about unemployment benefits and opioid overdose mortality rates.  References: Preorder His Name Is George Floyd by Toluse Olorunnipa and Robert Samuels The Tax Policy Center's analysis of the Rick Scott plan How many people don't pay income tax? The original 47% remarks The folk Republican morality behind the plan White paper: “Unemployment Insurance and Opioid Overdose Mortality in the United States” Medicaid expansion reduced opioid deaths too The relationship between the economy and the opioid epidemic Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Taxes! Let's get right Intuit.

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 52:22

    Weeds co-hosts Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Vox policy editor Libby Nelson (@libbyanelson) to talk about some hot! tax! policy! But mostly, why it's so annoying to file our taxes every year. The three discuss why the tax code is so complicated to begin with; compare our filing system to other countries; and daydream about what could be done to fix the system. Plus, a white paper about, you guessed it: taxes. References: How to get free tax prep, or volunteer to provide tax prep to others TR Reid's A Fine Mess Justin Trudeau's return-free tax promise Dylan explaining near-term options to reform tax filing “What is return-free filing, and how would it work?” The benefits of return-free filing Option one: the pre-filled return Option two: pay-as-you-earn ProPublica on Intuit/H&R Block lobbying that's kept taxes complicated White paper: “Inertia and Overwithholding: Explaining the Prevalence of Income Tax Refunds” by Damon Jones Does the EITC promote work? Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The Great Expiration

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 53:28

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Washington Post columnist Christine Emba (@ChristineEmba) to discuss the end of Covid-era welfare programs. We just hit two years of the pandemic, and some of those social safety programs, most notably the child tax credit, have expired. These policies dramatically improved the lives of millions of Americans; did we waste an opportunity to make these policies permanent? And later, a conversation about the politics of sex and consent as discussed in Christine's new book, Rethinking Sex. References: Christine's book, Rethinking Sex A guide to all the Covid-era social safety net expansions Li Zhou on the child tax credit's expiration 3.4 million more children were in poverty in February than December Up to 16 million Americans could lose Medicaid after the public health emergency lifts The effect of bonus unemployment insurance expiring last year Sam Adler-Bell's profile of David Leonhardt Ed Yong on reopening and the lack of a safety net The enormous learning loss caused by the pandemic White Paper: “Consent, Legitimation, and Dysphoria” by Robin West BDSM-interested parents have lost child custody just for their kink Oklahoma's new abortion ban Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The art of the gerrymander

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 55:02

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Vox Senior Politics Correspondent Andrew Prokop (@awprokop) for a dive deep into the newly redrawn 2022 congressional maps. They discuss what makes a fair map, the strategy behind gerrymandering, and what this could mean for the 2022 midterm elections. Plus, a white paper about the Voting Rights Act and Black electoral representation in Congress. References: Andrew's explainer on the redistricting wars The Supreme Court's last ruling on partisan gerrymandering An argument that the 2022 redistricting has featured “an unprecedented attack … on the political power of communities of color” White Paper: "The Triumph of Tokenism: The Voting Rights Act and the Theory of Black Electoral Success" “The US Senate considerably dilutes the voting power of African Americans” Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The myth of US energy independence

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 51:29

    Dylan Matthews and Dara Lind are joined by Robinson Meyer (@robinsonmeyer), a staff writer at the Atlantic, to talk about the illusion of US energy independence. They discuss how the US produces its oil; the fracking boom and bust; and the country's position in the global market. Plus, a white paper about carbon taxes and CO2 emissions in Sweden.  References: Robinson's piece about America's “independence” from Russian oil He was also on Today, Explained to talk about the US banning Russian oil imports And, you can sign up for Rob's newsletter here Vox reporter Rebecca Leber busted a few myths about oil and gas prices Biden's administrative authority to lower gas prices Russell Gold's The Boom: How Fracking Ignited the American Energy Revolution and Changed the World White Paper: “Carbon Taxes and CO2 Emissions: Sweden as a Case Study” Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Why it's so hard to move in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 45:49

    Dylan Matthews and Jerusalem Demsas are joined by Nick Buttrick (@NickButtrick), a psychologist at Princeton, to talk about interstate mobility in the US (or the lack thereof). They talk about why it is so hard to move; why some of those reasons, Jerusalem argues, are arbitrary; and what an immobile population means for American culture.   References: Jerusalem's article about why it's so hard to move in America Nick Buttrick's research: The cultural dynamics of declining residential mobility A paper from David Schleicher called Stuck! The Law and Economics of Residential Stagnation   Research from the Brookings Institution: US migration still at historically low levels NBER paper: The China Shock: Learning from Labor Market Adjustment to Large Changes in Trade Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Russia's terrible invasion

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 69:49

    Dylan Matthews and Jerusalem Demsas are joined by Vox senior correspondent Zack Beauchamp to talk about Russia's invasion of Ukraine. They discuss Ukraine's surprising strength to date, plus Europe's and America's overwhelming economic response to the invasion. Plus, a white paper about how citizens in authoritarian regimes think about war. References: Vox's podcast playlist: What to know about Russia and Ukraine All of Vox's written coverage on Russia and Ukraine  Zack's piece on why Putin is attacking Ukraine Adam Tooze on the economic war with Russia Putin's brother died in the siege of Leningrad The real history of the Soviet-Pepsi submarine deal WHITE PAPER: “Authoritarian Public Opinion and the Democratic Peace” Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Zack Beauchamp (@ZackBeauchamp), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and mix engineer Dara Lind, studio engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    A quick update

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 1:35

    We're hitting snooze on Friday episodes, but they're not going away forever. We're just slowing things down while we work on some special projects. We'll see you on Tuesday! Important Links: Send us an email at weeds@vox.com  Check out The Weeds Facebook group Sign up for our newsletter at vox.com/weedsletter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Why San Francisco's school board got booted

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 53:55

    Dylan Matthews, Jerusalem Demsas, and Dara Lind discuss the recent school board recall election in San Francisco and also whether the Great Resignation is boosting inflation. References: Clara Jeffery's summary of why the recall succeeded Former Green Party mayoral nominee Matt Gonzalez's case for the recall Former board president Gabriela López's post-mortem after she was recalled López's 2021 interview with the New Yorker on school renaming The $87 million lawsuit Lowell alum Justin Lai arguing in favor of the new admissions policies The Asan American backlash against changing Lowell admissions (see also) Students in selective exam schools don't seem to reap many benefits A review of exam schools nationwide Putting “non-gifted” students in gifted classrooms helps them a lot White Paper: The Effects of the “Great Resignation” on Labor Market Slack and Inflation Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds co-host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Democracy in crisis: The two-party problem

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 18, 2022 59:31

    Vox Senior Correspondent Zack Beauchamp talks with political scientist Lee Drutman, author of Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop. They discuss the history of the two-party system in American politics, and examine a number of possible structural reforms that could work to get the U.S. out of the morass it's in, looking to several other countries' democracies for inspiration. Host: Zack Beauchamp (@zackbeauchamp), Senior Correspondent, Vox Guest: Lee Drutman (@leedrutman), senior fellow, New America References:  "How does this end?" by Zack Beauchamp (Vox; Jan. 3) Breaking the Two-Party Doom Loop: The Case for Multiparty Democracy in America (Oxford; 2020) "Democracy in America? Partisanship, Polarization, and the Robustness of Support for Democracy in the United States" by Matthew H. Graham and Milan W. Svolik (American Political Science Review, 114 (2); May 2020) "One way to reform the House of Representatives? Expand it" by Lee Drutman and Yuval Levin (Washington Post; Dec. 9, 2021)   Enjoyed this episode? Rate Vox Conversations ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear the next episode of Vox Conversations by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Support Vox Conversations by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts This episode was made by:  Producer: Erikk Geannikis Editor: Amy Drozdowska Engineer: Paul Robert Mounsey Deputy Editorial Director, Vox Talk: Amber Hall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The curse of the midterms

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2022 60:33

    Dylan Matthews and Jerusalem Demsas are joined by Vox's Andrew Prokop (@awprokop) to talk about the midterm elections. More specifically, why the president's party almost always loses seats in Congress. They discuss the theories of this phenomenon and what, if anything, can work on the margins. Plus, a white paper about Obamacare and the 2010 midterm elections. References: Why the president's party almost always has a bad midterm The political science of door-knocking and TV ads White paper: “One Vote Out of Step? The Effects of Salient Roll Call Votes in the 2010 Election” Dylan's old, wrong article arguing that congressional position-taking doesn't matter much Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer Dara Lind, engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Beijing, boycotts, and the enduring politics of the Olympics

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2022 35:48

    Dylan Matthews talks with Victor Cha (@VictorDCha) about the international politics surrounding the 2022 Beijing Olympics. The US and several other countries are boycotting the games to protest China's human rights record, which brings up the question: What does this boycott mean for US-China relations? References: Beyond the Final Score by Victor Cha  Cha on the politicization of the 2022 Games Vox's Jen Kirby on the Biden administration's diplomatic boycott of the 2022 Olympics Vox's Bryan Walsh on the failure of the Games to promote international peace Olympic sponsors are facing pressure over China's human rights violations Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Affirmative action could be doomed (again). What comes next?

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 8, 2022 42:20

    Dylan Matthews, Dara Lind, and Jerusalem Demsas talk about affirmative action. They dig into the current Supreme Court case about Harvard's admission rates and ask: How do we make sure our elite institutions adequately reflect the population? Plus, a white paper about the effects of education on mortality. References: Vox senior correspondent Ian Millhiser's explainer about the SCOTUS cases Peter Arcidiacono, Josh Kinsler, and Tyler Ransom's empirical papers on Harvard admissions Jay Caspian Kang on the Harvard case Ending affirmative action in California pushed Black and Latinx students into worse schools and jobs Randall Kennedy's case for affirmative action Sheryll Cashin's case for “place-based affirmative action” An argument that class-based affirmative action produces more racial diversity than regular affirmative action Nicholas Lemann on affirmative action for the New Yorker How the Texas “10 percent” rule changed high school enrollment White paper: "The Effects of Education on Mortality: Evidence Using College Expansions" “A Generation of American Men Give Up on College: ‘I Just Feel Lost,'” the Wall Street Journal Opinion | “Affirmative Action Was Never a Perfect Solution,” the New York Times  “Estimating Benefits from University-Level Diversity”  Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), Weeds cohost, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    It's not about Ukraine. It's about Putin.

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 4, 2022 53:55

    Dylan Matthews talks with Mark Galeotti (@MarkGaleotti), director of Mayak Intelligence, about what's going on in Ukraine. They discuss in depth the historical tensions between Russia and Ukraine, Russia's NATO problem, and the calculations and motivations behind President Vladimir Putin's moves. References: Today, Explained's episode about Ukraine's pipeline problem  Vox's Jen Kirby wrote an explainer about Russia-Ukraine tensions Adam Tooze on Russia as a petro-state An excellent 2019 episode from NPR's Throughline about the rise of Putin The Weaponisation of Everything: A Field Guide to the New Way of War, by Mark Galeotti  Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Think of the children

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 47:20

    Dylan Matthews, Dara Lind, and Vox policy editor Libby Nelson discuss the findings of two recent studies on early childhood development. One study found that cash transfers increase brain activity in infants, while the other found a negative impact of universal pre-K on academic outcomes. So ... what's actually going on here? Does one negate the other? The Weeds team talks it out. Plus, a white paper on the effects of parenthood on voter turnout. References: Dylan's story on the cash-transfer study and his piece on the universal pre-K findings The impact of a poverty reduction intervention on infant brain activity. PNAS The New York Times's Jason DeParle's take on the cash-transfer study Scott Alexander summarizes the skeptical takes on the cash transfer study Noah Smith's review of the research on pre-K, and Kelsey Piper's Effects of a Statewide Pre-Kindergarten Program on Children's Achievement and Behavior Through Sixth Grade White Paper: Parents, Infants and Voter Turnout: Evidence from the United States Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Libby Nelson (@libbyanelson), policy editor, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Unions!

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2022 53:46

    Dara Lind talks with professor Gabriel Winant of the University of Chicago about the new Bureau of Labor Statistics report that showed a topline decline in union membership despite increasing labor-oriented momentum. And later, journalist Rachel Cohen (@rmc031) joins to talk about the importance of teachers' unions in the labor movement and in Democratic politics.  References: The Next Shift: The Fall of Industry and the Rise of Health Care in Rust Belt America, Gabriel Winant  Rachel Cohen's recent article about school closures and Democrats  The recent Bureau of Labor Statistics report on union membership numbers Hosts: Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    What happens to voting rights now?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 45:34

    Dylan Matthews and Jerusalem Demsas talk with Emily Rong Zhang, a PhD candidate in political science at Stanford and a former Skadden Fellow at the ACLU's Voting Rights Project, about the recent attempts in Congress to pass voting rights legislation. And, a white paper about voter ID laws, written by Emily herself! References: Recapping Congress's failed voting rights push Why some Dem strategists were skeptical of the effort The case for fixing the Electoral Count Act What happens after the voting rights fights White Paper: “What the Debate over Voter ID Laws' Effects Teaches about Asking the Right Questions” Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Are corporations winning at inflation?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 42:34

    Jerusalem Demsas and Dylan Matthews talk with Joey Politano (@JosephPolitano), economics blogger and self-described "mid-tier take-haver," to go over one big question on people's minds right now: are corporations profiting off of inflation?  References: Joey's blog post about rising corporate prices and inflation Sen. Elizabeth Warren on rising corporate profit margins Paul Krugman's newsletter from this week Binyamin Appelbaum on the meatpacking industry The White House's statement on meat companies taking advantage of market power  The letter from President Joe Biden to FTC chair Lina Khan “Could strategic price controls help fight inflation?” in the Guardian Rethinking Inflation Policy: A toolkit for economic recovery by JW Mason and Lauren Melodia Hosts: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    What BBB means for climate policy

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 70:35

    Weeds co-hosts Jerusalem Demsas and Dara Lind talk with Robinson Meyer (@yayitsrob), staff writer at the Atlantic, about the climate provisions in President Joe Biden's Build Back Better bill. They discuss specific climate-focused policy proposals and the political stalemate Congress is in, thanks to the filibuster in the Senate. Plus, a white paper about building codes and wildfires in California. References:  Robinson Meyer on the climate gamble going on in Congress Weeds alum Matt Yglesias on the Build Back Better Bill Vox's Rebecca Leber on why Joe Manchin may have doomed climate policy A 2016 piece from Vox's Dylan Matthews about money in politics “Progressive leader calls on Biden to unilaterally act on agenda,” The Hill “Manchin's $1.8 trillion spending offer appears no longer to be on the table,” The Washington Post  “Noisy and Unsafe: Stop Fetishizing Old Homes,” The Atlantic Hosts: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind) immigration reporter and Weeds host, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    How the 1918 flu pandemic ended

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 38:48

    Dylan talks to John M. Barry, distinguished scholar at Tulane University and author of The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History, about the Spanish flu of 1918-1919, its parallels to Covid-19, and what that pandemic's end tells us about how this one might end. References: The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The case for more babies

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 55:01

    Dylan, Jerusalem, and special guest Bryan Walsh discuss the slowing population growth in America, and what a smaller-than-expected America could mean. They also talk about which immigration and child care policies could speed up population growth. Finally, they discuss a paper on why Europe is so much more equal than America. References: The Great Population Slowdown How immigration could reverse population decline The rise of childlessness The climate case that it's okay to have kids The link between fertility and income The complex relationship between housing prices and fertility Changes in abortion access in a post-Roe America Romania's abortion ban and its effect on fertility Recent research on global fertility patterns and cohabitation What is the relationship between gender equality and fertility rates?  The Conservative Fertility Advantage White paper: “Why Is Europe More Equal than the United States?” A critique of the paper's approach to health care Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Bryan Walsh (@bryanrwalsh), editor for Future Perfect, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The building blocks of radicalization

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 58:21

    How does someone get radicalized? What do political scientists see as the building blocks of political violence? Is there anything we can do to stop radicalization? One year after the insurrection on January 6, 2021, Vox policy reporter Jerusalem Demsas talks with Peter Neumann, a professor of security studies at King's College in London, to answer these questions.  References: Vox's Zack Beauchamp on where the crisis in American democracy might be headed Peter Neumann's paper: The trouble with radicalization A Q&A with a French philosopher about the fear of replacement within white nationalism Colin Clarke writes for Politico on what happened after January 6 Northwestern University research about the perceived threat of a racial demographic shift in the US Hosts: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Why hasn't student debt been canceled?

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 56:03

    Dylan and Dara are joined by Vox's Libby Nelson to talk about the policy merits and political implications of plans to cancel some or all student loans. They also discuss whether President Joe Biden has the power to cancel student debt unilaterally. And, Vox's Jerusalem Demsas joins Dylan and Dara for a white paper about prisoners of war and genetics.  References: Brookings Institution's Andre Perry on why student loan forgiveness isn't regressive How canceling student debt helps beneficiaries get out of other debt The racial justice case for student loan cancellation Luke Herrine arguing that the Department of Education can erase debt unilaterally Is there a secret memo saying Biden can erase the debt? David Leonhardt's case against debt cancellation White Paper of the Week: “Health Shocks of the Father and Longevity of the Children's Children” Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter Libby Nelson (@libbyanelson) policy editor, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Best Of: The coming climate exodus

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 60:58

    Vox senior reporter Rebecca Leber (@rbleber) joins The Weeds to explain the problem of migration caused by climate change, such as that due to wildfires, rising seas, and crop failures. She explains how a warming planet is forcing people to move both in the US and internationally, and how policymakers are and aren't adapting. Vox reporters Dylan Matthews and Jerusalem Demsas continue the conversation with ProPublica's Dara Lind, discussing a new white paper arguing that social mobility in America rose in the 20th century. References: ProPublica's feature on climate migration in Central America How climate change is driving up flood insurance premiums in Canarsie, Brooklyn NPR's investigation into the federal government selling flood-prone houses to low-income families California is encouraging rebuilding in fire-prone regions The case for “managed retreat” from coastal areas A New York Times feature on how climate migration will reshape America The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck Why Greg Clark is pessimistic that social mobility even exists White Paper of the Week: Intergenerational Mobility in American History: Accounting for Race and Measurement Error, Zachary Ward Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@DLind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weeds-newsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    America's Public Health Experiment: Federal failures

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 58:27

    In the final episode of our series, America's Public Health Experiment, Dylan, Dara, and Jerusalem discuss how the CDC and the FDA failed the American public in the early months of the pandemic. Plus, a white paper about excess deaths in the first year of Covid-19. References:  How the experts botched masking advice Zeynep Tufekci on the case for masks (in March 2020) Inside the Fall of the CDC Can the CDC be fixed? How the CDC failed to detect Covid early Scott Gottlieb on CDC versus FDA turf wars The Government Asked Us Not To Release Records From The CDC's First Failed COVID Test. Here They Are. Zeynep Tufekci in the Atlantic: ​​The CDC Is Still Repeating Its Mistakes Dylan Scott on FDA approval of controversial Alzheimer's drug White paper: Excess Deaths in the United States During the First Year of COVID-19 What happened to drug deaths in 2020 Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    America's Public Health Experiment: More checks, less politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:11

    In the penultimate episode of our series America's Public Health Experiment, Vox policy reporter Jerusalem Demsas talks to Arnab Datta, senior counsel at Employ America, about automatic stabilizers: what they are and how they could help during a crisis that affects the economy, such as a global pandemic. References: Vox's Emily Stewart on Democrats abandoning automatic stabilizers Recession Ready: Fiscal Policies to Stabilize the American Economy Structuring Federal Aid To States As An Automatic (And Autonomous) Stabilizer  A Historic Decrease in Poverty GOP Governors Reject Extra Federal Unemployment Payments Host: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Can school be normal again?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 61:04

    Dylan and Jerusalem are joined by Vox Policy Editor Libby Nelson to talk about the current state of Covid-19 and schools. They discuss vaccine mandates, rapid testing – or a lack thereof – and teacher burnout. Plus, a white paper about college majors and GPA requirements.  References: Why schools weren't “back to normal” this year The pandemic caused huge levels of learning loss, especially in districts with less in-person schooling, and especially in poor countries Can pandemics affect educational attainment? Evidence from the polio epidemic of 1916 Some schools are going remote on Fridays to address “burnout” Schools cre closing classrooms on Fridays. Parents are furious. Do school closures and school reopenings affect community transmission of COVID-19? A systematic review of observational studies  Quarantines are driving down attendance The “test to stay” alternative to quarantines How school districts have used their Covid relief funds White Paper: “College Major Restrictions and Social Stratification” Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Libby Nelson (@libbyanelson), policy editor, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    America's Public Health Experiment: The agencies Covid broke

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 65:46

    In the second episode of our series, America's Public Health Experiment, Weeds co-host Dara Lind looks at two government agencies that went from quietly to loudly broken during the Covid-19 pandemic. Dara is joined by the Washington Post's Jacob Bogage (@jacobbogage) and Jeremy McKinney (@McKJeremy) from the American Immigration Lawyers Association. Host: Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Learning to love rent control

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 59:22

    Dara and Dylan talk to Jerusalem about her new article defending rent control laws. The three discuss the policy impacts of rent limits and the politics driving their adoption in large American cities. Finally, they discuss a new paper on declining fertility in 18th-century France. References: Jerusalem's case for rent control A poll of leading economists, who almost all oppose rent control Economist Rebecca Diamond on the effects of rent control Manhattan Institute fellow Michael Hendrix's case against rent control Time for revisionism on rent control?  The Invention of Brownstone Brooklyn by Suleiman Osman Review of the literature by the Urban Institute White paper: “The Cultural Origins of the Demographic Transition in France” by Guillaume Blanc Blanc's Twitter summary of his paper The demographic transition for beginners Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    America's Public Health Experiment: The testing failure

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 41:08

    German talks with Dr. Neeraj Sood, director of the Covid Initiative at the University of Southern California's Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics, about the US's many failures on Covid-19 testing. They dive into the country's original mistakes, then go into how lack of testing continues to plague America's pandemic response. They conclude with what this means not just for the current pandemic but for future public health crises, too. Host: German Lopez (@germanrlopez), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Defund the police?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 63:51

    German, Jerusalem, and Dylan talk about an idea that has come to dominate national discussions of policing: defunding the police. They walk through the pros and cons of the idea as a policy proposal, then discuss how it's affecting the politics of criminal justice. Finally, they discuss new research on discrimination against Black and Latinx renters. References: German's article on police research German's article on guns and policing Austin's defunding journey Study finding more police mean fewer homicides Study finding London police closures led to more violent crime Expert survey finding most say more police funding would mean public safety improvements 2020's protests led to state policing reforms, but not defunding Pew on public opinion toward defunding the police Rogé Karma interviews Patrick Sharkey on The Ezra Klein Show White paper: “Racial Discrimination and Housing Outcomes in the United States Rental Market” Jerusalem's article on discrimination against housing voucher recipients Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox German Lopez (@germanrlopez), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Biden's $3.40 a gallon problem

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 51:02

    Dylan, Jerusalem, and Dara talk about the specific kind of inflation that's roiling American politics: the heightened price of gas. They discuss how and why gas prices have shot up in recent months, and what it means for Joe Biden's popularity and presidency. Plus, a white paper about the most important labor market of all: the global market for soccer (excuse me, football) players. References: Biden's strongly worded letter on gas prices Biden is tapping the strategic petroleum reserve Reuters on why gas prices are high Why OPEC isn't lowering gas prices Eric Levitz on what Biden should do to combat inflation The correlation between Biden's popularity and gas prices Lasting Impacts of a Gas Price Shock during Teenage Driving Years Voters who drive a lot are likelier to vote based on gas prices Presidential approval is historically strongly affected by gas and food prices (and not due to media coverage) The collapse of New England's Transportation and Climate Initiative White paper: “Does Employing Skilled Immigrants Enhance Competitive Performance? Evidence from European Football Clubs” Mo Salah reduced prejudice Newcastle Football Club controversy Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Taxing Back Better

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 49:28

    Dylan talks to Chye-Ching Huang, the executive director of the Tax Law Center at NYU Law, about the many, many, many tax provisions in Democrats' Build Back Better package. First they dive into the new tax benefits in the bill, from the expanded child tax credit to the $7,500 credit for electric cars. Then they talk about how the bill raises money through taxes, especially through higher taxes on high-income people and corporations. Then they talk about the future of taxes, like what will happen when most of the Trump tax cuts expire at the end of 2025.  References: A breakdown of the components of the House Build Back Better bill Whose taxes Build Back Better would raise and cut Huang's testimony to Congress on Build Back Better UChicago and Columbia researchers on the Child Tax Credit and employment The health care tax credit provisions of Build Back Better, explained The clean energy tax credits would help cut emissions by 40-50 percent The bill's minimum corporate tax plan and millionaire surtax, explained How rebuilding the IRS would boost tax compliance Host: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    How does the pandemic end?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:54

    Now that nearly 60 percent of the US population is fully vaccinated, Dylan, German, and Jerusalem discuss potential exit strategies for policies such as mask mandates and mandatory quarantines. They also talk about what an “endemic” Covid might be like in the US and which aspects of pandemic life might stick around. Finally, they discuss how better access to mental health care could affect crime. References: Mandate the vaccines, not masks The case for ending school mask mandates at the end of the year The case for keeping mask mandates Emily Oster on kids and masks The Black Death and its Consequences for the Jewish Community in Tàrrega Against “deep cleaning” surfaces for COVID Vaccines are coming along for children under 5 Do booster shots make vaccinating the world harder? White paper of the week: Better access to outpatient psychiatric care reduces crime Cognitive-behavioral therapy reduced crime in Liberia Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox German Lopez (@germanrlopez), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Reshaping America's cities

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 58:46

    Vox policy reporter Jerusalem Demsas talks with the Atlantic's Derek Thompson (@DKThomp) about how the future of remote work could reshape America's cities, upend US labor markets, and cause fundamental shifts in where people live. Derek and Jerusalem discuss how it would take only a small percentage of remote workers to impact the urban geography of the US — with complicated implications for electoral politics and the climate. References: Jerusalem's Q&A with housing economist Enrico Moretti on the future of remote work: Remote work is overrated. America's supercities are coming back. Superstar Cities Are in Trouble [The Atlantic] How America Lost Its Mojo [The Atlantic] The Coronavirus is Creating a Huge, Successful Experiment in Working From Home [The Atlantic] Where Americans Are Moving [Bloomberg] Could a Heartland visa help struggling regions? [Economic Innovation Group] Host: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Pass the SALT?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 64:36

    Dylan, Jerusalem, and Dara discuss congressional Democrats' efforts to uncap the state and local tax (SALT) deduction, and how the party found itself proposing a massive tax cut for high-income households. They also dive into the deduction's stated purpose (encouraging states to spend on social programs) and talk about other programs that could encourage states to invest in health and education. Finally, they examine a white paper showing that domestic violence crimes didn't increase during the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020. References: The state and local tax deduction, explained [Vox] SALT cap repeal would overwhelmingly benefit high income households [Tax Policy Center] Reconciliation may deliver a tax cut to the rich [Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget] 5-Year SALT cap repeal would be costliest part of Build Back Better [Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget] Senators Menendez and Sanders show the way forward on the SALT cap [Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy] Easy on the SALT: A qualified defense of the deduction for state and local taxes [Daniel J. Hemel, University of Chicago Law School] Congress can help state and local governments prepare for a rainy day without repealing the SALT cap [Tax Policy Center] What you don't know about fiscal federalism can hurt you [Milken Institute Review] Progressive politics from the ground up [CommonWealth Magazine] California is making liberals squirm [The New York Times] Effects of COVID-19 shutdowns on domestic violence in US cities [Amalia R. Miller, Carmit Segal, and Melissa K. Spencer, National Bureau of Economic Research] One explanation for conflicting reports on domestic violence during the pandemic [Aaron Chalfin, Twitter] Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The Most Dangerous Branch: Covid-19 v. The Constitution

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 56:14

    Vox senior correspondent Ian Millhiser talks to law professor Nicholas Bagley about the pandemic — and how the courts are undermining the government's ability to respond to emergencies. They discuss the constitutionality of vaccine mandates, religious exemptions to public health laws, and court decisions undermining the power of public health agencies. References: Delegation at the Founding (Columbia Law Review) The Supreme Court's coming war with Joe Biden, explained Religious conservatives have won a revolutionary victory in the Supreme Court A New Supreme Court case could gut the government's power to fight climate change Hosts: Ian Millhiser (@imillhiser)  Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer and engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Is Facebook really that bad?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 53:03

    Dylan, German, and Dara talk about Facebook and the controversy surrounding it in recent weeks. They cover just how much — and how little — we know about Facebook's impact on the world and talk about whether there are good policy solutions to Facebook's problems. For the white paper of the week, they break down a study on free school lunch programs. References: The Wall Street Journal's reporting on how Facebook's efforts to improve the platform backfired  The Washington Post's reporting on how Facebook prioritized “angry” over “like” The Washington Post's reporting on Facebook picking engagement over fighting misinformation Section 230 basics, explained  Vox's Recode Daily podcast What happened when experimenters paid people to deactivate Facebook before the 2018 midterms Max Fisher and Amanda Taub on Facebook-inspired anti-Muslim violence in Sri Lanka Facebook did enable the Arab Spring Farhad Manjoo on how bad regulations could make Facebook worse A child psychologist on what we don't know about Instagram's effect on teen girls  Kevin Drum's counter-takes on Facebook NBER study on school lunch programs reducing grocery costs Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox German Lopez (@germanrlopez), senior correspondent, Vox Dara Lind (@dlind), immigration reporter, ProPublica Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial advisor Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    Housing policy, but make it British

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 43:06

    America's housing market is failing to meet the needs of most Americans. Rents have skyrocketed, homeownership is slipping out of grasp for young and other first-time homebuyers, and policymakers have struggled to meet the moment. But we're not alone. The UK is also facing a dire housing shortage, one that is leading to skyrocketing rents and home prices. Usually, the solution to this problem is pushing higher levels of government to step in where local government has failed, but today's guest, John Myers, the co-founder of London YIMBY, thinks his country should go in the opposite direction: more local. References: More Housing? YIMBY, Please (Bloomberg) Strong Suburbs: Enabling streets to control their own development (Policy Exchange) Seoul searching – does the Korean capital have the solution to the housing crisis? (CapX) How Houston Achieved Lot Size Reform (Planetizen) California is ending a rule that helped cause its housing crisis (Vox) Hosts: Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial adviser Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    The case for and against open borders

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:52

    Dylan, German, and Jerusalem get together to discuss one of the world's least likely but most interesting utopian ideas: open borders. They discuss the moral and economic logic for making it easy to move to and work in different countries, and the political constraints that make such an idea anathema in most rich countries. Also, they discuss a new paper about how housing regulation is making it hard for Americans to move to where they'd get the best jobs. References: Bryan Caplan's case for open borders, on Vox and in comic book form Matt Yglesias's case for more immigration Michael Clemens's economic case for broader migration A review of the evidence on voter backlash to immigration Angela Nagle's leftist case against open borders Arlie Hochschild's Strangers in Their Own Land Jerusalem on the intersection of refugee policy and housing policy ”Angela Merkel Was Right” by NYT's Michelle Goldberg  “Does Immigration Produce a Public Backlash or Public Acceptance? Time-Series, Cross-Sectional Evidence from Thirty European Democracies” White Paper: “Location, Location, Location” by David Card, Jesse Rothstein, and Moises Yi Hosts: Dylan Matthews (@dylanmatt), senior correspondent, Vox German Lopez (@germanrlopez), senior correspondent, Vox Jerusalem Demsas (@jerusalemdemsas), policy reporter, Vox Credits: Sofi LaLonde, producer & engineer Libby Nelson, editorial advisor Amber Hall, deputy editorial director of talk podcasts Sign up for The Weeds newsletter each Friday: vox.com/weedsletter  Want to support The Weeds? Please consider making a donation to Vox: bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

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