Podcasts about Golden Age

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard
  • 3,274PODCASTS
  • 6,142EPISODES
  • 1h 3mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 27, 2021LATEST
Golden Age

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about Golden Age

Show all podcasts related to golden age

Latest podcast episodes about Golden Age

Shedunnit
E.C.R. Lorac Rises Through The Ranks

Shedunnit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 27:26


Her WW2 mysteries are best of all. This is the second episode of Queens of Crime at War, a six part series looking at what the best writers from the golden age of detective fiction did once that period came to an end with the start of the Second World War. The Shedunnit Pledge Drive continues. I'm aiming to add 100 new members to the Shedunnit Book Club by the end of 2021. You can get some great perks, like bonus episodes and extra audiobooks — if you'd like to be part of that and feel able to offer some support, please visit shedunnitshow.com/pledgedrive. Thanks to my guest, Martin Edwards. He is a crime writer and the author of, among many other books, The Golden Age of Murder. Find out more about all his work at martinedwardsbooks.com or via his Twitter as @medwardsbooks. There are no spoilers in this episode. Books referenced: — The Murder on the Burrows by E.C.R. Lorac — Crime Counter Crime by E.C.R. Lorac — The Organ Speaks by E.C.R. Lorac — These Names Make Clues by E.C.R. Lorac — Bats in the Belfry by E.C.R. Lorac — The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie — Checkmate to Murder by E.C.R. Lorac — Murder by Matchlight by E.C.R. Lorac — Fell Murder by E.C.R. Lorac — Murder in St John's Wood by E.C.R. Lorac — Murder in Chelsea by E.C.R. Lorac Thanks to today's sponsor: — Roanoke Falls, an audio series by Realm. Listen now on your podcast app of choice and find out more at realm.fm. To be the first to know about future developments with the podcast, sign up for the newsletter at shedunnitshow.com/newsletter. Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/ecrloracrisesthroughtherankstranscript. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice. The original music for this series, "The Case Of The Black Stormcloud", was created by Martin Zaltz Austwick. Find out more about his work at martinzaltzaustwick.wordpress.com. Links to Blackwell's are affiliate links, meaning that the podcast receives a small commission when you purchase a book there (the price remains the same for you). Blackwell's is a UK independent bookselling chain that ships internationally at no extra charge.

The Fried Egg Golf Podcast
A Pair of Golden-Age Munis: George Wright and Swope Memorial

The Fried Egg Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 53:29


Andy Johnson's recent travels have taken him to two municipal golf courses with A-1 architectural pedigrees: Donald Ross's George Wright Golf Course near Boston, Massachusetts; and A.W. Tillinghast's Swope Memorial Golf Course in Kansas City, Missouri. In this episode, Andy sits down with Garrett Morrison to reflect on what makes these courses special. They discuss Ross's clever drainage methods at George Wright and Tillinghast's adventurous use of hilly land at Swope Memorial. They also debate whether the restoration trend in the golf course industry, which has primarily affected private clubs so far, will soon filter down to municipal facilities.

Criminalia
Trick or Treat: A Pirate in Sheep's Clothing

Criminalia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 33:53


As long as there have been pirates, there have been people hired to make them stop what they're doing. And, sometimes, those individuals hired to catch pirates are, themselves, pirates. From Woodes Rogers to Benjamin Hornigold, Holly and Maria tell the stories of the influential pirate hunters of the Golden Age of Piracy. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Golden Age of Grappling Podcast!
The Golden Age of Grappling Podcast Episode 287 (WCW Halloween Havoc 1992)

The Golden Age of Grappling Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 216:19


Welcome One, Welcome ALL! To another over-stuffed edition of The Golden Age of Grappling! This week the Ghouls and Goblins come out for another night of Spooky Promos, Scary Matches, and Scintillating Segments filled with the verbosity of Cowboy Bill Watts! Will the Steves co-exist and win the Tag Titles? Who will Rick Rude choose as his personal Referee? WILL THE JUDGES halt the match with an Injunction?!?All these answers and more as we discussed World Championship Wrestling's 4th annual Halloween Havoc Pay Per View from 1992!

Comp + Coffee
Ep 66 - Is this the Golden Age of HR?

Comp + Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 28:58


With businesses taking a renewed focus on retention, hiring, Pay Equity, and employee engagement we stop and ask: Are we in a golden age for HR?

The Rest Is History
110. Golden Ages

The Rest Is History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 52:23


Oh, to be Dutch in the seventeenth century. Or Roman in 150 AD. Or British in the 1990's. Tom and Dominic debate the merits of various "Golden Ages" in history, and ask whether we might have seen the last. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Finding Harmony Podcast
Lu Duong: The Western Wing

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 111:39


It is probably no secret to you all that we (Harmony & Russell) enjoy watching television together (shhh…!). After finishing over 21 seasons of Hell's Kitchen, we moved on to prestige dramas like The Handmaid's Tale and Mrs. America, and our current obsession, Succession… and often you'll find references to these narratives percolate in conversations with our guests. We're in the Golden Age of Television, but the real prototype of our time is the “Walk and Talk” by Aaron Sorkin, The West Wing, which is absolutely beloved. For many of our generation it was the show that precipitated an interest in sincere and earnest political activism. Our guest today, Lu Q. Duong, is both a result of that movement and quite coincidentally an example. Lu's father, a French Vietnamese chef, was founder of a restaurant in DC that became the center for Republican Beltway work lunch. It was not uncommon, for example, to see former GOP VP Dick Cheney eating there on any given day. Lu's father remains a dynamic example of the immigrant experience: An indefatigable worker and idealist for the American way of life. Lu is now Principal Director for the Tech and STEM Initiatives unit for The United Negro College Fund and a former communications lead at the very influential education initiative the Aspen Institute. He took his degree in Political Science at Virginia Commonwealth University and applied his expertise in growth and marketing to his interest in Ashtanga Yoga (in his spare time!). He created Ashtanga: Parampara, an online magazine, which sought to build on and develop the stories told in Guy Donahaye's book “Guruji” with long form interviews from other teachers within our global Ashtanga yoga community. We think it's fair to say, Lu is kind of a big deal (not to mention a incredibly talented, thoughtful, empathetic and all-round fabulous human being). In today's episode we asked Lu his professional opinion to the question... “What would you do with the Ashtanga Yoga brand?” Listen along as he reluctantly explains his opinion from the perspective of a political marketing expert. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT LU - ASHTANGA PARAMPARA I INSTAGRAM - ashtangaparampara.org The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations. ❤ Your contributions have allowed us to keep our podcast ad and sponsor free. If you've enjoyed today's podcast, please consider supporting our future episodes by making a donation. Every little bit goes a long way and we are immensely grateful for any and all of your support. Find out more about Harmony - harmonyslater.com Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review! ❤ Give us a 5★ rating! We love to read and respond to your comments - So drop us a note in the comments below and give us a shout out on IG! Opening & Closing Music by Nick Evans - purchase your own copy - Click Here.

Earth Ancients
Hugh Newman & Jim Vieira: The Giants of Stonehenge and Ancient Britain

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 135:43


Stories of giants being involved in the construction of megalithic sites, earthworks and other ancient monuments have been alive in the consciousness of the British for millennia. Legends and creation stories hark back to an earlier age of elemental beings, high magic and giant kings ruling the land. Religious documents, medieval chronicles, oral traditions and origin stories all recount converging tales of giants being an integral part of the founding of the British Isles. Giant effigies are still paraded around many cities and towns, keeping this ancient memory alive. Mystics, sages and esoteric sources all speak of giants as a literal reality, often originating in a lost sunken realm off the coast of Ireland. Even Stonehenge's creation is attributed to remarkably tall and powerful builders. These were not only giant in stature, but also giants in intelligence, skill and wisdom. Collating hundreds of historical accounts of massive bones and skeletons being found in the vicinity of sites such as Stonehenge, adds some credence to the idea that age-old myths encoded detailed histories and insights from many thousands of years ago. These were often linked with the secret arts, forgotten sciences and magic from a fabled “Golden Age." The once-lost epic annals of Ireland, secret Scottish archives, old manuscripts of Wales and Druidic traditions of England have revealed a lost timeline, a missing chapter in human history that provides evidence of giant human beings inhabiting, ruling and building the megalithic master works of Albion. The reality of giants existing in prehistoric times is put under the microscope in this book, with the investigation of obscure newspaper accounts, antiquarian diaries, archaeological reports, local history records, newly-translated ancient texts, academic papers, and written evidence from hundreds of sources going back over a 2000 year period. It seems that the giants were also ‘geomancers', having a mastery of surveying, astronomy and landscape knowledge to an extremely high degree. Many were remembered as high-kings and rulers of the country, often inhabiting mountain-tops or hillforts. The origins of all four countries of the British Isles are intimately connected to ruling giants. We hope this book can bring this obscure but fascinating story to life and highlight what a truly immense mystery this is.http://www.megalithomania.co.uk/

Kitco NEWS Interviews
Is the golden age for stocks and Bitcoin over? Clem Chambers says to look here instead

Kitco NEWS Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 19:30


Current valuations for the major cryptos, including Bitcoin, are "miraculous" and prices should be much lower, said Clem Chambers of InvestorsHub.com. Chambers told David Lin, anchor for Kitco News, that there are several other tokens to look at, and in particular, the DeFi space overall has more long-term potential.

Breaking Walls
When James Earl Jones Guest-Starred on ABC Radio's Theater Five

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 27:15


This is a snipper from Breaking Walls Episode 119: Radio and The Diner (1937 - 1965) ___________ The American Broadcasting Company never overtook NBC or CBS in ratings or revenue during the Golden Age of Radio. But by 1964, the only network drama airing was part of vignettes on NBC's Monitor. That spring, ABC announced they were launching a new show. They hired former NBC writer Jack Wilson as story editor and assigned the series to directors Warren Sommerville and Frederick Bell. Edward Byron, creator of Mr. District Attorney was brought in to advise. Fred Foy, longtime Lone Ranger announcer, joined the production. The new series would be a weekday half-hour anthology called Theater Five in honor of its broadcast time in the New York market. Theater Five premiered on August 3rd with a play called “Hit and Run.” A month after its launch, sixty-one stations were carrying the transcribed series. ABC President Robert Pauley announced they were hiring a dedicated salesman to pitch Theater Five in the country's top markets. The kinds of stories produced ran the gamut. Many plots were taken from contemporary newspapers. A funny thing happened along the way: As young actors turned to TV in the 1950s, radio child actors became extinct. In November of 1964, Broadcasting Magazine announced that ABC Radio was setting up a Children's Acting Workshop to teach kids how to perform for radio. Classes were ninety minutes long and students would work with director Ted Bell. In January of 1965 ABC's radio department reported a sixteen percent gross billing increase. That same month actor Lee Bowman joined the team as an executive producer. On May 4th, Theater Five broadcast “Incident on U.S. One.” It guest-starred James Earl Jones.

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall
1323. "The Golden Age of Chinese Art: T'ang Dynasty." Play Books. (10/21/21)

An Even Bigger Fly On The Wall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 73:13


"For almost three hundred years the noble T'ang Dynasty fostered a period of artistic and intellectual endeavor which has never been equaled in the history of China. Sculpture, ceramics, glass, and textiles were some of the major artifacts that emerged from this glorious renaissance of Chinese taste and skill. This book is the story of the T'ang told through objects in the author's collection, one of the most representative in private hands. It includes a marvelous array of gold and silver mirrors, jade, jewelry and gilt bronzes. The 124 illustrations, 24 in full color are accompanied by a history of the T'ang era, and a chapter on each of the categories in the collection gives a comprehensive background to the illustrations. The knowledgeable comments of a well-known collector are authoritative, and will be invaluable to other collectors, was well as to all connosseurs of Chinese art." (For Educational and inspirational materials. The Creators own their content and music/songs).

The Salesforce Admins Podcast
The Golden Age of the Admin with Shannon Gregg

The Salesforce Admins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:59


Today on the Salesforce Admins Podcast, we talk to Dr. Shannon Gregg, Ph.D., MBA, and president of Cloud Adoption Solutions. She's also the author of It's About Time, a book about refocusing on the things that you think are really important. Join us as we talk about how work has changed since COVID, why it […] The post The Golden Age of the Admin with Shannon Gregg appeared first on Salesforce Admins.

Shedunnit
Agatha Christie Writes Alone (Queens of Crime At War 1)

Shedunnit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:09


Agatha Christie had a very productive WW2. This is the start of Queens of Crime at War, a six part series looking at what the best writers from the golden age of detective fiction did once that period came to an end with the start of the Second World War. This episode also marks the start of the Shedunnit Pledge Drive! I'm aiming to add 100 new members to the Shedunnit Book Club by the end of 2021, with the aim of producing more mini series like this one. If you'd like to be part of that and feel able to offer some support, please visit shedunnitshow.com/pledgedrive. Thanks to my guests: — J.C. Bernthal is an Agatha Christie scholar and the author of Queering Agatha Christie. His website is jcbernthal.com and he is on Twitter as @jcbernthal — Martin Edwards is a crime writer and the author of, among many other books, The Golden Age of Murder. Find out more about all his work at martinedwardsbooks.com or via his Twitter as @medwardsbooks There are no spoilers in this episode. Books referenced: — The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards — Agatha Christie Goes To War edited by Rebecca Mills and J.C. Bernthal — And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie — Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie — Murder Must Appetise by Harry Keating — The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie — The ABC Murders  by Agatha Christie — Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie — One, Two Buckle, My Shoe by Agatha Christie — An Autobiography by Agatha Christie — Sad Cypress by Agatha Christie — Evil Under the Sun by Agatha Christie — N or M?  by Agatha Christie — The Body in the Library by Agatha Christie — The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie — Partners in Crime by Agatha Christie — Bletchley Park: The Codebreakers of Station X by Michael Smith — The Moving Finger by Agatha Christie — Curtain by Agatha Christie — Sleeping Murder by Agatha Christie — The Labours of Hercules by Agatha Christie — Taken at the Flood by Agatha Christie — A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie — The Hollow  by Agatha Christie — Five Little Pigs by Agatha Christie Thanks to today's sponsor: — Girlfriend Collective. Get $25 off your $100+ purchase of sustainable, ethically made activewear at girlfriend.com/shedunnit. — Milk Bar. Get $10 off any order of $50 or more when you go to milkbarstore.com/shedunnit. To be the first to know about future developments with the podcast, sign up for the newsletter at shedunnitshow.com/newsletter. Find a full transcript of this episode at shedunnitshow.com/agathachristiewritesalonetranscript. The podcast is on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram as @ShedunnitShow, and you can find it in all major podcast apps. Make sure you're subscribed so you don't miss the next episode. Click here to do that now in your app of choice. The original music for this series, "The Case Of The Black Stormcloud", was created by Martin Zaltz Austwick. Find out more about his work at martinzaltzaustwick.wordpress.com. Links to Blackwell's are affiliate links, meaning that the podcast receives a small commission when you purchase a book there (the price remains the same for you). Blackwell's is a UK independent bookselling chain that ships internationally at no extra charge.

New Books Network
Roger Penrose, “The Cyclic Universe” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 151:15


In the last twenty years, cosmology has unexpectedly emerged as one of the most exciting and dynamic fields of modern science. From astoundingly precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background to the ongoing mysteries of dark energy and dark matter, modern cosmology is unquestionably in the midst of its Golden Age. And yet, one of the most eminent mathematical physicists of our age, Roger Penrose is convinced that there is one fundamental problem that is consistently being overlooked: why did our universe begin in such a particular state of extremely low entropy? His Conformal Cyclic Cosmology (CCC) is an attempt to directly address that question. The Cyclic Universe is based on an extensive conversation between Howard Burton and Roger Penrose, co-recipient of the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics and Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford, and explores his motivation to come up with this theory in the first place and provides detailed insights into his groundbreaking research and Conformal Cyclic Cosmology. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Arts & Ideas
New Thinking: Black British Theatre. An Afro-Cuban star

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:16


Who complained about Olivier's Othello? Stephen Bourne has been mining the archives to find out who raised questions about Laurence Olivier's blacked up performance in 1964. It's one of the stories he tells in his new book, which also includes memories of meeting performers including Carmen Munroe, Corinne Skinner-Carter and Elisabeth Welch. Nadine Deller hosts a podcast linked to the National Theatre's Black plays archive and she's particularly interested in women playwrights whose work deserves to be better known including Una Marson. They talk to performer and historian of women in theatre Naomi Paxton. Plus New Generation Thinker Adjoa Osei tells the story of Afro Cuban performer Rita Montaner who straddled the worlds of opera and cabaret between the 1920s and 1950s. Deep Are the Roots: Trailblazers Who Changed Black British Theatre is out now from Stephen Bourne. His other books include Black Poppies and Playing Gay in the Golden Age of British TV. The National Theatre Black Plays archive is at https://www.blackplaysarchive.org.uk/ and Nadine's podcast is called That Black Theatre Podcast. You can hear Dawn Walton who directed the Hampstead Theatre production of Alfred Fagon's drama The Death of a Black Man in this Free Thinking conversation about black performance From Blackface to Beyoncé https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000tnlt Naomi Paxton is the author of Stage Rights! The Actresses' Franchise League, activism and politics: 1908-1958 and has written an introduction to the new book 50 Women in Theatre. Naomi and Adjoa are New Generation Thinkers on the scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to turn research into radio. A playlist of discussions, features and essays about Black history, music, writing and performance is available on the Free Thinking programme website https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p08t2qbp This episode is part of the New Thinking series of conversations focusing on new research put together in partnership with the Arts and Humanities Research Council, part of UKRI. Producer: Tim Bano

Murder Most Foul
MYSTERY AT THE BLUE SEA COTTAGE

Murder Most Foul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 58:23


It was the roaring 20's, the Golden Age of Jazz, Prohibition, bathtub gin, Eliot Ness, speakeasies, flappers and newly found sexual freedom. Fritzie Mann was a young, beautiful club dancer with everything to live for. In 1923, her scantily clad body was found on a San Diego beach, up the road from the Blue Sea Cottage. Was it suicide or murder staged to look like Fritzie took her own life? Author James Stewart joins us here today on Murder Most Foul to help unravel the MYSTERY AT THE BLUE SEA COTTAGE.

Breaking Walls
Jim Jordan on the Origin of Fibber McGee and Molly

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 2:39


In 1971 Jim Jordan, better known as Fibber McGee, sat down with Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for WTIC's the Golden Age of Radio to talk about his career (full interview here - https://goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-14.html). In this clip Jim explains how Fibber McGee and Molly came to be in the mid 1930s.

The Best Little Horror House in Philly
The Wolf Man (1941) with Patrick Cotnoir

The Best Little Horror House in Philly

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 70:03


“Even a movie that's 80 years old, And says its prayers by night, May become "the best" when the wolfbane blooms, And BLHHiP is full and bright.” That's right folks, Patrick Cotnoir is here to talk about our first Universal classic from the Golden Age of Monsters - the Wolf Man (1941)! We're talking about the Muppets Haunted Mansion, Lon Chaney Jr & the incredible makeup, what tropes stuck around versus the ones that didn't, and much more! Don't miss out, and check out the patreon for bonus episodes and more!

Talk Without Rhythm Podcast
31 Days of Halloween 2021 - Day 15: Nightmare (1981)

Talk Without Rhythm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 22:26


31 Days of Halloween continues with one of the grimiest entries in the Golden Age of Slashers: 1981's Nightmare. ENDING MUSIC: Nightmares in a Damaged Brain by F.K.Ü. Support TWoRP Contact Us talkwithoutrhythm@gmail.com

90's NOW
S10 E6: Usher‘s New Baby!

90's NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 30:09


We've got the word on new music from one of our faves and no more music from another. Also, one more Raymond added to Usher's brood. We'll tell you which one of our favourite odd couples is back in the kitchen. See if you can do better than Sharon and Adam with Kelly's Trivia and Sharon will take us back to the Golden Age of Hip-Hop with a 90's Rewind. Thank you for listening to 90's NOW!

Total Spotfest Wrestling Podcast
Golden Age of the Indies? Impact Knockouts Knockdown & GCW Fight Club Review + Shoot on WWE

Total Spotfest Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 81:11


JJ and Jamie discuss if we are truly living in the "Golden Age of Indie promotions with the obliteration of the Forbidden Door.  Also, they review this past weekend's Impact Knockouts Knockdown and GCW PPVs, plus shoot on WWE's total abandonment of respect for their main roster women's division.  Also they take a second look at NXT 2.0 and are surprised by what they find.

The Hifi Podcast with Darren and Duncan
A Golden Age for the Budget Audiophile

The Hifi Podcast with Darren and Duncan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 147:40


Have you noticed the absolute proliferation of cool digital audio products in the sub-$500 market lately? With so much buzz around new class D modules and affordable R2R DACs and even budget speakers that are "specs monsters", the hosts of The Hifi Podcast believe now is the best time to be a budget audiophile.There are some interesting quirks in some of the eye-poppingly cheap gear from China, with occasional designs focused solely on being impressive in one area or specification. Still, the sheer volume and variety of enjoyable and reasonably-priced products coming from the world's most populous country is energizing, and a complete boon for the growth of our zany hobby.Earlier in the episode, the guys find it difficult to stay "on segment", with a diversion into the self noise of resistors and a discussion about objectivism and subjectivism in hifi audio. A listener question about power cables brings the boys back to reality.This week's album recommendation is surprising. Debut albums shouldn't sound this good, and this one from an up and coming UK artist is musically fascinating to boot.

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

The Golden Age of Grappling Podcast!
GAGP - Current Wrasslin' Catch-up!

The Golden Age of Grappling Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


Welcome One, Welcome ALL! To yet another edition of the Golden Age of Grappling! This week the boys are catching up on all the wrestling that's taken place during vacation time away! So join us as we talk the 2021 WWE Draft! NXT 2.0 pros and cons! And AEW's Continued Hot-streak of great shows!

New Books in Film
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Film

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/film

New Books in Biography
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in American Studies
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Phil Rosenzweig, "Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men" (Fordham UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 68:25


Phil Rosenzweig's Reginald Rose and the Journey of 12 Angry Men (Fordham Press, 2021) is the first biography of a great television writer, and the story of his magnum opus In early 1957, a low-budget black and white movie opened across the country. Consisting of little more than a dozen men arguing in a dingy room, it was a failure at the box office and soon faded from view. Today, 12 Angry Men is acclaimed as a movie classic, revered by the critics and beloved by the public, and widely performed as a stage play, touching audiences around the world.  Rosenzweig is a Professor of Business Administration at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland, where he has used 12 Angry Men for many years to teach executives about interpersonal behavior and group dynamics. It is also a favorite of the legal profession for its portrayal of ordinary citizens reaching a just verdict, and widely taught for its depiction of group dynamics and human relations. The book tells two stories: the life of a great writer and the journey of his most famous work, one that ultimately that outshined its author. More than any writer in the Golden Age of Television, Reginald Rose took up vital social issues of the day - from racial prejudice to juvenile delinquency to civil liberties - and made them accessible to a wide audience. His 1960s series, The Defenders, was the finest drama of its age, and set the standard for legal dramas. This book brings Reginald Rose's long and successful career, its origins and accomplishments, into view at long last.  Drawing on extensive research, and brimming with insight, it casts new light on one of America's great dramas - and about its author, a man of immense talent and courage. Joel Tscherne is an Adjunct History Professor at Southern New Hampshire University. His Twitter handle is @JoelTscherne. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

LINKS Golf Podcast
Ep. 97: Inside the Fall 2021 Issue of LINKS with George Peper

LINKS Golf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 42:30


Is it time we stop glorifying Golden Age architects? LINKS Editor George Peper is back to break down his column on that topic and more from the Fall 2021 issue on this episode of the LINKS Golf Podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Besties
The Golden Age of Sega is Upon Us

The Besties

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 58:08


This week, we're sorta discussing Super Monkey Ball: Banana Mania, but to be honest, it's more of a table setter for Chris' thesis that it's never been a better time to be a Sega fan. Which is, to put it lightly, a divisive position to take. Other games discussed include: Sonic Mania and Sonic Colors, Phantasy Star Online, Shenmue, Yakuza, Farm RPG, Box One, Jenny LeClue, Diablo 2 Resurrected, and The Exorcist.

Radio ITVT
Televisionation: Screen Culture: Matt Brennan, Senior Editor for Television and Pop Culture at the Los Angeles Times

Radio ITVT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:36


ITVT is pleased to present the latest episode of Televisionation: Screen Culture, our new video series exploring the symbiotic relationship between culture and filmed content—television, streaming, and cinema. Hosted by fandom expert Lisa Crawford, Screen Culture was created for thoughtful discussions about the impact of premium filmed content on today's society. Matt Brennan is Senior Editor for Television and Pop Culture at the Los Angeles Times. Before joining the Times as television editor, Matt served as Paste Magazine's TV editor. His writing has also appeared in Indiewire, Slate, and numerous other publications. Born in the Boston area, educated at USC and an adoptive New Orleanian for nearly 10 years, he currently resides in Los Angeles. Matt can be found on Twitter as @thefilmgoer, and recently spearheaded the launch of the LA Times' Screen Gab newsletter. In this episode of Screen Culture, Matt shares the realities of a career in entertainment journalism, his focus on covering television not solely as a product or “artifact” but instead as “the conversation around the artifacts,” and his belief that we're now in a “Gilded Age” of television. Expressing his view that the widely regarded “Golden Age” of television in the aughts was more an “aesthetic movement” than time period, Matt compares the era of Don Draper and Walter White against the large ensembles of Succession and The Crown. He envisions today's “Gilded Age” of TV content as one where forms—drama and comedy—are melding together and shows more closely reflect contemporary societal issues. In a brief discussion of an essay by critic James Wolcott, Matt suggests that we must adapt further to recognize and respond to TV's cultural dominance and the way it's being consumed and understood. Matt and Lisa also cover:The need for accurate and effective depictions of the working class on TV;The importance of greater diversity and representation in writers' rooms;The underrated status of The Americans, and Matt's ongoing love for The Good Fight as his “favorite show on TV right now.”

Starlight Radio Dreams
S5E8: June is Busting Out Of Your Pants!

Starlight Radio Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021


With summer came all of our most lightly dressed comedy. Even we weren't sure what exactly would make it to air. So, make sure you're there to find out alongside our long suffering ancient relic of Hollywood's Golden Age, Burlington Showtime as he provides all the precious context your heart can handle for the shorts we've been releasing for the past six weeks!Written, Directed and Produced by Ansel Burch, Jared McDaris and Kat Evans. Foley for Chekhov's Date by Ele Matelan. Chekhov's Date by Cassandra Rose. Featuring the vocal talents of Hanna Blazer, Kat Evans, Jared McDaris and Ansel Burch. The SRD theme song was written and performed by Arne Parrott.

LGBTQ+U
ENCORE: A History of Gay Pirates w/ Rebecca Simon

LGBTQ+U

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 33:54


In honor of LGBTQ History Month, we are revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the podcast. Enjoy our return to A History of Gay Pirates! How do pirates know they're pirates? They think… therefore they ARRR. Sorry for that terrible joke. But I want us all to get into the space of pirates. The open sea, violence, stealing, run-ins with the law, and above all, freedom -- from the social burdens of the Early Modern Era and -- freedom to love who they loved. Pirates have been around forever. From the Vikings in the 8th century to Somali pirates in recent years, there is something undeniably exciting about sailing the ocean and taking what you want. My guest today is pirate scholar and aficionado, Rebecca Simon. The pirates we'll meet today were way more exciting than eye patches and wooden legs. Get ready for a crash course on the Golden Age of piracy -- the time of Blackbeard and the real Pirates of the Carribean. We'll meet famous queer pirates like John Swann, Robert Culliford, Ann Bonnie, and Mary Read. And maybe we'll go home with a few pirate-inspired tips on how to use your style to intimidate. Be sure to follow Becka on Twitter Your host is Levi Chambers, co-founder of Gayety. Follow the show and keep up with the conversation @Pride. Want more great shows from Straw Hut Media? Check out or website at strawhutmedia.com. Your producers are Levi Chambers, Maggie Boles, Ryan Tillotson and Edited by Silvana Alcala Have an interesting LGBTQ+ story to share? We might feature U! Email us at lgbtq@strawhutmedia.com. *This podcast is not affiliated with Pride Media.

Stargirl Aftershow
STARGIRL 209

Stargirl Aftershow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 88:55


We can not overstate how thrilled we are to have the original Scarlet Speedster, the Golden Age guru of the JSA, JOHN WESLEY SHIPP join us on this episode to discuss all things Flash, covering 3 decades! And of course, Sarah and I do our deep-dive on episode 209 of #DCStargirl, so don't miss it!Remember you can follow Stargirl Aftershow on Instagram and Twitter: @StargirlPodWE HAVE MERCH AVAILABLE! Just go to merch.stargirlaftershow.com!Stargirl Aftershow is available on Apple Podcasts, Google, Spotify and Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts! Just search for “Stargirl Aftershow” on your favorite platform, or visit https://linktr.ee/stargirlpod for direct links to each service.We're also part of the Fandom Limb podcast network… you can find tons of great TV/Film/Nerd podcasts at www.FandomLimb.com And, of course, you can visit our website, https://www.StargirlAftershow.com for the latest episodes, news and supplemental materials all in one place!If you have questions for cast or crew, you can reach out to us via Twitter, (@StargirlPod) via email (stargirlaftershow@gmail.com) or via the contact us link on our website!‘Raise to Heavens' by Rafael Krux (orchestralis.net) – Used with permission.

Breaking Walls
Vincent Price On Why He Loves Radio Drama

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 1:33


In November of 1972 Vincent Price appeared on WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio with Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran (full interview here - https://goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-32.html). During the interview he spoke about why he loved radio drama so much and why he feels the networks made a big mistake in forgoing the medium for television.

Eerie International
#306 – Berserk: The Golden Age Arc (Part I)

Eerie International

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 121:22


A title almost as long as Guts’ sword. Featuring: Dave Roberts, and David Hopkins. Running Time: 2:01:22 Andi is out again, so you know Dave and David are gonna sneak in some anime! We kick off our three-part series (not to be recorded or aired weekly though!) with Berserk: The Golden Age Arc – The

Axe of the Blood God: USG's Official RPG Podcast
PC RPG Quest - 1980s: The Golden Age Of RPGs

Axe of the Blood God: USG's Official RPG Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 77:30


The '80s are alive and well in our souls -- and on Axe of the Blood God, too. This week, Nadia and Kat are joined by their good pal Jason Wilson as they continue the PC RPG Quest. It all started in the '70s, but PC RPGs got a major boost thanks to the rapid growth of the home computer market. It's a very important chapter of RPG history. After all, without Ultima, Wizardry, or SSI's Gold Box games, there'd be no Dragon Quest or Final Fantasy. What a sick, sad world that would be. Also in this episode: A new Nintendo Direct brings a deluge of RPG news, and Super Mario now shares his soul with Chris Pratt. Mama Mia!

TRT Revolution Podcast
The BIGGEST Misconceptions About the Golden Age (And What's Stopping us From Raising Our Vibration) w/Sean McCormick

TRT Revolution Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 53:37


Raising our vibration is the first step towards indescribable bliss and optimal love creation. The problem is, many of us have been misled on what the process of increasing our consciousness entails.   What does the journey to enlightenment look like? Which tools can help us raise our vibration, and how can we be doing everything ‘right' and still fail to increase our levels?   In this episode, host of the Optimal Performance Podcast, Sean McCormick delves into the surprising roadblocks that hold us back from a higher spiritual optimization.  Three Curiosity-Driven Takeaways    The difficult truth about the impending ‘Golden Age' We're heading into an age of unbelievable enlightenment. How is that likely to affect us as beings?   1 thing to remember when using plant medicine Plant medicine can have a great impact on improving our consciousness, but what are the risks involved if we use them incorrectly?   How to feel the effects of fasting in every area of our lives Fasting from food has numerous benefits, so how would we react if we chose to temporarily abstain from things like the media?   Guest Bio-    Sean McCormick is the host of the Optimal Performance Podcast and a certified life and performance coach. An expert in performance biohacking, Sean's clients include NFL and MLS players, CEOs and Television stars. Having tested, studied and applied hundreds of health and performance approaches for himself and his clients, Sean knows how to get the most from the least. More productive thinking, faster recovery techniques, sleep hacking, lifestyle hacking, habit and routine creation - Sean helps people improve rapidly, with the least amount of work.   To find our more, go to: http://seanmccormick.com https://www.instagram.com/realseanmccormick/?hl=en

Critical Q&A
Critical Q&A #333

Critical Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 70:14


This week, it's answers about the Golden Age of Cults, the Cult Wars in academia, the big difference between L. Ron Hubbard and Donald Trump and a lot more. Enjoy! (1) I think there is a widespread perception of the Seventies as being the Golden Age of Cults, at least in the United States and […] The post Critical Q&A #333 appeared first on Chris Shelton - Critical Thinker at Large.

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg
E49: Coinbase CEO reflects on controversial blog, state of the markets, 1000 unicorns, tax reform & more

All-In with Chamath, Jason, Sacks & Friedberg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 89:00


Show Notes: 0:00 Brian Armstrong follows up on his one-year old blog post "Coinbase is a mission focused company" 19:27 Authoritarianism on the left 33:04 Newsom's new vaccine mandate, NBA vaccine coverage, Merck COVID pill 45:51 Golden Age of VC, 1000 unicorns & the impact on private/public markets 57:45 Corporate tax reform, Roth IRAs & the "Peter Thiel Provision" 1:06:36 Chances of a VC bubble, why notable VCs are retiring, building a modern venture firm 1:23:51 All-In summit planning Follow the besties: https://twitter.com/chamath https://linktr.ee/calacanis https://twitter.com/DavidSacks https://twitter.com/friedberg Follow the pod: https://twitter.com/theallinpod https://linktr.ee/allinpodcast Intro Music Credit: https://rb.gy/tppkzl https://twitter.com/yung_spielburg Intro Video Credit: https://twitter.com/TheZachEffect Referenced in the show: https://blog.coinbase.com/coinbase-is-a-mission-focused-company-af882df8804 https://twitter.com/brian_armstrong/status/1443727729476530178 https://blockchain.news/news/workers-quit-coinbase-exchange-apolitical-stance https://twitter.com/DavidSacks/status/1443846265582735362 https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2021/09/psychological-dimensions-left-wing-authoritarianism/620185/ https://ktla.com/news/california/gov-newsom-to-make-major-announcement-on-efforts-to-protect-teachers-students-from-covid/ https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/01/merck-to-seek-emergency-authorization-for-oral-covid-19-treatment.html https://www.wsj.com/articles/university-endowments-mint-billions-in-golden-era-of-venture-capital-11632907802 https://news.crunchbase.com/news/crunchbase-unicorn-board-1000-companies/ https://siblisresearch.com/data/us-stock-market-value/ https://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-number-of-companies-publicly-traded-in-the-us-is-shrinkingor-is-it-2020-10-30 https://www.cnbc.com/2021/09/17/house-tax-bill-would-likely-force-peter-thiel-to-pull-5-billion-from-his-ira.html

Two Bad Neighbors - A Simpsons Podcast
199. SPECIAL 8: The First Annual TBEnnies

Two Bad Neighbors - A Simpsons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 83:19


In our penultimate special we serve up some all time critics choice awards recognizing the Best of the Golden Age of the Simpsons. We reveal the winner of the coveted People's Choice award voted by YOU the listener. Who will take home the gold? And who will be showered with boos until our throats are sore? Find out as we separate the winners from the losers, the haves from the have nots, and the beautiful from the very very ugly. E-mail us at thehammockdistricton3rd@gmail.com, follow us on twitter @BadNeighborsPod, and like us on Facebook to never miss an episode! If you like what you hear please consider leaving us a review on iTunes, and becoming a patreon member here: www.patreon.com/boathausstudios Patreon members will gain exclusive access to our bonus episodes!

Checks and Balance
Checks and Balance: Taxing times

Checks and Balance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 42:17


Democrats are in a fight to turn President Biden's signature economic proposals into law. They want to raise the top rates of income tax and increase corporate tax to fund them. It would be the first big hike in federal taxes in nearly three decades. What is the best way to pay for Joe Biden's vision of America? The Economist's Simon Rabinovitch takes us through the president's tax plans. We go back to the time when the stars of Hollywood's Golden Age became tax dodgers. And Erica York from the Tax Foundation tells us America's fiscal system is surprisingly progressive.  John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Economist Radio
Checks and Balance: Taxing times

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 42:17


Democrats are in a fight to turn President Biden's signature economic proposals into law. They want to raise the top rates of income tax and increase corporate tax to fund them. It would be the first big hike in federal taxes in nearly three decades. What is the best way to pay for Joe Biden's vision of America? The Economist's Simon Rabinovitch takes us through the president's tax plans. We go back to the time when the stars of Hollywood's Golden Age became tax dodgers. And Erica York from the Tax Foundation tells us America's fiscal system is surprisingly progressive. John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/USpod See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Perceptive Readers
YouTube Golden Age

Perceptive Readers

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 15:33


YouTube's Golden Age or Era Taken From The Product of Culture Article "This is Chrissy Costanza"

Innovation Heroes
Innovation Heroes Season 3: Welcome to the Golden Age

Innovation Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 1:33


SHI's Innovation Heroes is back for a third season of exploring the people and businesses giving us hope in a drastically disrupted world. With new host Ed McNamara at the helm, we're breaking ground - and stories - in even more unprecedented ways. In the last year of the show, we've explored huge innovations that are helping us to stay afloat and start down the road to recovery: technology to transition us to the hybrid working world, AI that developed the COVID-19 vaccines, how the father of VR, Jaron Lanier, is making virtual meetings more human...and that's just to name a few.  This season, we're looking forward with hope and finding the hero stories that will define our industries and society in the years to come. Featuring amazing returning guests like Stratascale's Michael Wilcox and Intel's Stacey Shulman, as well as new voices from universities, businesses, and maybe even some robots, Season 3 premieres October 14th with new episodes every two weeks after that. Be our hero – like and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You won't want to miss it!  Innovation Heroes is an original podcast from SHI and Pilgrim Content.  For more on SHI, visit SHI.com. 

Breaking Walls
Radio Announcer Tony Marvin on the Importance of Announcer Flexibility

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 1:14


In the spring of 1973, longtime radio announcer Tony Marvin sat down with Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio to discuss his life and career (full interview here - https://www.goldenage-wtic.org/gaor-39.html). During the course of the interview Marvin explained why it was so important for a staff announcer to be able to handle a wide variety of news, sports, and product hawking.

The Scuffed Soccer Podcast | USMNT, Yanks Abroad, MLS, futbol in America
#203: Office Hours, Vol. 1 — Live roster reaction, the golden age of piracy, etc.

The Scuffed Soccer Podcast | USMNT, Yanks Abroad, MLS, futbol in America

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 65:01


Chris Russell (aka @watke_) joins for a live roster reaction on the Discord, a dive into the philosophy of little brothers, a look at the first ever pirate and the ballad mongers who made him famous, several listener questions, several soccer-adjacent topics dealt with. Pretty good episode.contact: scuffedpod@gmail.com drop us a question at this link and we'll try to answer it: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdJdevo3myfLQuaH5LwZRmahNTSimCwP3VQLLXu5I_yxZWfvg/viewform?usp=sf_linksupport Scuffed on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scuffedjoin the Discord: https://discord.gg/X6tfzkM8XU buy our merch: https://my-store-11446477.creator-spring.com/

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro
Radio Free Skaro #817 - Bad Wolf Too

Doctor Who: Radio Free Skaro

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 83:57


This was supposed to be a slow news week but a phoenix in the form of one Russell T Davies smashed such expectations with news he is returning to re-helm Doctor Who's 60th anniversary and beyond in a new Golden Age of Telestreaming Audiovisuals. What does it all mean? Join the Three Who Rule as they madly cogitate over the implications of the announcement and muddle through their own complicated feelings on this most weighty of developments. Plus the usual Timelashing, Big Finish updates, video game-ry, and more! But mostly, let's be honest, all-consuming RTD banter.  Links: Support Radio Free Skaro on Patreon! The Timelash (This Week in Doctor Who History) Russell T Davies returns as Doctor Who show runner from 2023 The Long Game book about the return of Doctor Who due November Extended Doctor Who universe? Bad Wolf Productions Doctor Who Mystery clues John Bishop wraps filming US approves travel for fully-vaccinated people from more countries Fan Expo Canada going ahead as planned Big Finish Ninth Doctor Lost Warriors set Big Finish Missy and the Monk available Big Finish Doctor Who The War Doctor Begins – Warbringer due December Andrew Skilleter Exterminart! book due November Edge of Reality due on consoles in October John Challis died Morris Perry died

Breaking Walls
BW - EP120: Radio and The Harvest (1936 - 1954)

Breaking Walls

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 185:35


In Breaking Walls episode 120, we continue our Americana mini-series in autumn with a host of harvest-centered radio programing. We'll warm by the fire and listen in on stories from some of the medium's most prominent. —————————— Highlights: • Welcome to October, Welcome to Harvest Season • Fibber and Molly Launches • Feast from Cavalcade's Harvest • Mel and Dennis Get Their Own Shows • Gale Gordon's Green Acres • How Mild Can Richard Diamond on ABC Be? • From Peary to Waterman as Gildy Changes Leads • Escape From the Death of Network Dramatic Radio • Looking Ahead to the Homecoming —————————— The WallBreakers: http://thewallbreakers.com Subscribe to Breaking Walls everywhere you get your podcasts. To support the show: http://patreon.com/TheWallBreakers —————————— The reading material used in today's episode was: • On the Air - By John Dunning • Network Radio Ratings — By Jim Ramsburg —————————— On the interview front: • Mel Blanc, Dennis Day, Gale Gordon, Phil Harris, Jim Jordan, Jim Jordan Jr., Harold Peary, and Willard Waterman spoke to Chuck Schaden. Hear their full chats and many others from Chuck's forty year career at SpeakingOfRadio.com. • Mel Blanc, Jim Jordan, and William N. Robson spoke with Dick Bertel and Ed Corcoran for WTIC's The Golden Age of Radio. Hear these full interviews at Goldenage-WTIC.org. • Harry Bartell and Virginia Gregg spoke to SPERDVAC. For more information, go to SPERDVAC.com. • Don Quinn was interviewed by Owen Cunningham in 1951. • Ozzie Nelson was a guest of Johnny Carson's in 1969. • Mel Blanc also spoke with Jack Carney. • Dennis Day also spoke with John Dunning for his 71KNUS program from Denver. —————————— Selected music featured in today's episode was: • Autumn — By Michael Silverman • Ghost Bus Tours — By George Fenton for High Spirits • Moon — By George Winston • Shine On Harvest Moon — By Joan Morris and William Bolcom —————————— Special thanks to: The Fireside Mystery Theatre https://www.firesidemysterytheatre.com/ The Mysterious Old Radio Listening Society https://www.ghoulishdelights.com/ Twelve Chimes, It's Midnight https://www.twelvechimesradio.com/ —————————— Subscribe to Burning Gotham—the new audio drama set in 1835 New York City. It's available everywhere you get your podcasts and at BurningGotham.com. —————————— A special thank you to Ted Davenport, Jerry Haendiges, and Gordon Skene. For Ted go to RadioMemories.com, for Jerry, visit OTRSite.com, and for Gordon, please go to PastDaily.com. —————————— Thank you to: Tony Adams Steven Allmon Orson Orsen Chandler Phil Erickson Briana Isaac Thomas M. Joyce Ryan Kramer Gary Mollica Barry Nadler Christian Neuhaus Aimee Pavy Chris Pilkington —————————— WallBreakers Links: Patreon - patreon.com/thewallbreakers Social Media - @TheWallBreakers