Podcasts about chatbots

Program that simulates conversation

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Latest podcast episodes about chatbots

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co
IAM1506 - Founder Creates an AI-Powered Building Relationship Chatbot to Connect with People

CEO Podcasts: CEO Chat Podcast + I AM CEO Podcast Powered by Blue 16 Media & CBNation.co

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 16:49


Rabi is a serial entrepreneur. Working alongside his current founding team for 10+ years, they have used AI to build recommendation engines, social platforms and enterprise software. His first startup iDubba/iCouchapp was a “TV show recommendations + social engagement” app that had 2M+ monthly active users at the time it got acquired. Rabi then made a bold move to Silicon Valley to start a new company. While there, Rabi became frustrated that the ability to build relationships lacked technological innovation and intelligence. And so, EvaBot was born. EvaBot is an emotionally intelligent gifting relationship solution that enables thoughtful companies to accelerate the key relationships that increase both growth and competitive advantage. With a platform built to generate emotional engagement and to collect actionable intelligence, they are the standard in amplifying the customer and employee experience, creating an unforgettable journey for the recipient and truly valuable insight for the company. Their vision is to set the standard for business relationships by using AI to personalize the physical and digital experience. Website: www.evabot.com Twitter: @rabigupta LinkedIn: rabigupta

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM38: How to Use the Emotional Highs and Lows in Business to Create Lasting Success with Nathan Hirsch

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 17:29


Nathan Hirsch shares how at 20 he was on an entrepreneurial high making $1,000 in profit per day in his ecom business, and by 21 he was dropped by his only manufacturer, had his business manager quit, and had his identity stolen so he owed the government over $40,000. This experience made him resilient and more successful than ever, and he continues to learn lessons and experience mindset shifts through company exits, launches and all aspects of business life.

RecruitingDaily Podcast with William Tincup
isolved – Should AI And Chatbots Be Trusted To Onboard New Hires With Geoff Webb

RecruitingDaily Podcast with William Tincup

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 26:10 Transcription Available


On today's episode of the RecruitingDaily Podcast, William Tincup speaks to Geoff from isolved about Ai and chatbots and whether or not they should be trusted to onboard new hires.

UI Breakfast: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy
Episode 248: Mapping Conversations with Rebecca Evanhoe

UI Breakfast: UI/UX Design and Product Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 41:10 Very Popular


These days, you can talk with the digital things around you, like voice assistants and chatbots. How are these experiences designed? Our guest today is Rebecca Evanhoe, co-author of Conversations with Things. You'll learn about the four pillars of conversational design, what prototyping looks like for this field, how to develop a personality for your voice application, and more.Podcast feed: subscribe to https://feeds.simplecast.com/4MvgQ73R in your favorite podcast app, and follow us on iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Podcasts.Show NotesConversations with Things – Rebecca's book with Diana DeibelUI Breakfast Episode 68 with Jonathan StarkUI Breakfast Episode 173 with Sina KahenSiri, Alexa – some of the first voice assistantsWizard of Oz testingRoo – Planned Parenthood's chat botVoiceflow, Botmock, Botsociety – popular mapping toolsFollow Women in Voice on Twitter and LinkedInLisa Falkson, Cathy Pearl – conversational designersFollow Rebecca on TwitterThis episode is brought to you by Zeplin. Publish finalized designs with one click, provide developers the specs they really need, and share your design system all in an organized workspace that's easy for the entire team to use. From PMs, QA engineers, to executives, Zeplin gives you a place where everyone can collaborate to ship beautiful products together. Get started for free at zeplin.ioInterested in sponsoring an episode? Learn more here.Leave a ReviewReviews are hugely important because they help new people discover this podcast. If you enjoyed listening to this episode, please leave a review on iTunes. Here's how.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM37: Which Specific Tactics Will Make Your Marketing Match What Your Audience is Thinking with Chad Maghielse

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 16:28


Chad Maghielse shares his success tips for anyone launching physical products. Discover which channels you should use first to launch, and why you shouldn't do ads.

The Voicebot Podcast
Rabi Gupta CEO of the Gift Giving Evabot - Voicebot Podcast Ep 273

The Voicebot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 64:44


Rabi Gupta and his co-founder created Evabot, the gifting assistant, in 2017. The company went through the Boost VC accelerator, where he was also an entrepreneur in residence, in 2017. Rabi was also CEO and co-founder of iCouchapp, which was acquired by Vidooly in 2016. Our discussion today is about a practical application for a virtual assistant. The corporate gift-giving market is $250 billion annually. Gupta and his co-founder created Evabot to make that process easy, efficient, and better matched with what the gift recipients actually like.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM36: Why Building Your Audience of Ideal Buyers is More Important Than Selling Your First Anything with Chad Maghielse

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 16:10


Our guest on the show today asks an important question that will help anyone in business stop and think about their fundamental road to success. Which do you prefer, selling products, or having a brand with loyal customers who love everything you sell?

Digital Conversations
A Conversation with Emily Gibb, Head of Patient Services and President of the Patient Access Foundation at GSK

Digital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 22:06


As medications get more specialized, so has the need for better engagement to help patients with their prescriptions. Manufacturers are investing in tools and programs that can help patients on their medication journeys, and digital strategies are front and center. In this episode, Greg Kefer is joined by Emily Gibb, who leads the patient service organization at GSK, a global biopharma company with a purpose to unite science, technology, and talent to get ahead of disease together. In this wide-ranging discussion, Emily shares her thoughts about innovation and how modern, mobile technology is maturing and lowering barriers for patients. Ultimately, the goal is to provide a digital experience that is simple and natural, so patients can get the answers and support they need to stay healthy.

Digital Conversations
A Conversation with Emily Gibb, Head of Patient Services and President of the Patient Access Foundation at GSK

Digital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 22:06


As medications get more specialized, so has the need for better engagement to help patients with their prescriptions. Manufacturers are investing in tools and programs that can help patients on their medication journeys, and digital strategies are front and center. In this episode, Greg Kefer is joined by Emily Gibb, who leads the patient service organization at GSK, a global biopharma company with a purpose to unite science, technology, and talent to get ahead of disease together. In this wide-ranging discussion, Emily shares her thoughts about innovation and how modern, mobile technology is maturing and lowering barriers for patients. Ultimately, the goal is to provide a digital experience that is simple and natural, so patients can get the answers and support they need to stay healthy.

Le Super Daily
Un ChatBot pour mon compte Instagram : Bonne idée ?

Le Super Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 23:42


Épisode 837 : Et si, les chatbots étaient permettaient de créer davantage de lien. D'engager efficacement et humainement ses audiences ? On revient sur les préjugés pour vous présenter les Chat Bots v.2022 !Bot vs ChatbotAttention, quand on parle de chat bot, d'outil d'automation, on ne parle pas d'outils qui vont venir simuler des likes, des abonnements ou des vues de stories ! On va parler de gentils Bots, des bots légaux. Vous le savez, chez Supernatifs on aime l'humain. On pense que la richesse des réseaux sociaux réside notamment dans leur capacité à créer des liens, des relations, vraies, authentiques… Et là on déboule les 2 pieds devant avec un sujet sur les bots et l'automation. Forcément vous vous dites : WTF !? Ok, ok mais ouvrons nos chakras quelques minutes….Et si, les chatbots étaient un outil permettant justement de créer davantage de lien. D'engager efficacement mais aussi humainement ses audiences ?Dans cet épisode on va s'attacher à faire un point lucide et dépassionné sur le sujet.Est-ce une bonne idée d'ajouter de l'automation dans ses mp et commentaires Instagram ?——C'est quoi un Chatbot ?Un chatbot Instagram est un système de messagerie qui répond à des questions humaines à l'aide de réponses automatisées. D'un côté la conversation : « chat ».De l'autre l'automatisation : « bot ».La fonction principale d'un chatbot est d'entretenir une conversation. Sa mission : apporter des réponses aux demandes des internautes. De manière totalement automatisée, sans aucune intervention humaine.—Attention Chatbot ce n'est pas la même chose que botLes bots ce sont ces outils tiers un peu filous qui proposent des services de like et de commentaires automatisés. En gros je peux paramétrer un outil pour qu'il imite des actions humaines d'interactions avec d'autres comptes. Liker automatiquement tous les posts avec le #lesuperdaily. Balancer un petit com automatique dés que la photo est localisée à Lyon…Soyons clairs. Ces bots ne sont pas autorisés par Instagram et concrètement vous prenez des risques de suspensions de votre compte.——Instagram a ouvert son API aux chatbots conversationnelsDepuis un peu plus d'un an, Instagram a officiellement ouvert son API à plusieurs services tiers de chatbots.Objectif : permettre de concevoir des chatbots conversationnels dans Instagram comme on peut aussi le faire sur Facebook avec Messenger.Pour que ça marche il va vous falloir un compte Instagram business et passer par un service tiers homologué.Chatfuel ou Manychat par exemple.—Qu'est-ce qu'on peut faire avec un chatbot Instagram ?La mise en oeuvre d'un chatbot Instagram nécessite un vrai travail de préparation en mont. On créer des scénarios de conversations avec une logique de question à choix multiple.Tout commence par la configuration de « conversation starters ». En gros quelqu'un qui s'engage dans une interaction en MP Instagram avec ma marque va se voir proposer un certain nombre de champs prédéfinis. Comme un menu.Choix 1 : J'ai une question sur un produit ?Choix 2 : Quels sont vos horaires d'ouverture ?Choix 3 : J'ai un problèmeUn chatbot se construit ensuite dans une logique d'arborescence avec plusieurs scénarios.—Quelques exemples d'utilisations de chatbot InstagramPour répondre aux question fréquentesKusmi tea propose par exemple un chatbot très poussé pour prendre en charge toutes les questions fréquentes du type : politique de livraisons ou retours produits.https://heyday.hootsuite.com/customer-stories/kusmi-tea/En 3 mois, la marque a réduit le temps de réponse global de l'entreprise, de 10 heures à une moyenne de 3 h 30.—Pour saluer les nouveaux followersUn chatbot peut écrire de façon pro active a un nouveau follower et lui proposer d'en savoir plus sur la marque.Ca peut-être un bon moyen aussi de pousser vers une newsletter ou même un contenu vidéo Instagram qui présente la marque.—Un chatbot Instagram peut aussi se plugger sur vos storiesOn peut par exemple paramétrer un scénario d'interaction en stories. « Hey vous voulez recevoir mon livre blanc sur tel truc ? Répondez ebook en mp. »Et ensuite un scénario chatbot prend le relai. Demande un email et fait automatiquement partir le ebook. Efficace et c'est un bon moyen de générer des leads qualifiés.L'automation par Chatbot comme passerelle entre mes contenus et mes MPLà où l'automation peut être très très efficace c'est quand elle fait le lien entre mes contenus organiques et la messagerie privée.Par exemple, dans un contenu je présente mon dernier service, mon offre de formation ou la nouvelle casquette de ma collection et mon wording vient questionner mon public sur leur avis, plutôt canon ou bof ?Je peux automatiser la reconnaissance de certains mots comme « canon » puis envoyer automatiquement un MP avec un lien vers l'offre à tous les gens ayant fait cette réponse.Idem pour une promotion «  souhaitez-vous recevoir une promotion » Au delà du Business, l'automation entre mes contenus et mes MP peut venir engager la conversation lorsque des mots clefs sensibles ou stratégiques sont abordés.Un chatbot peut aussi détecter les mentions de mon compte dans les stories des autres en engager une conversation en MPOn peut programmer un message de remerciement en MP et pourquoi pas déclencher un inventive commercial. Par exemple : « Merci pour le partage ! Pour te remercier, on t'offre ce code promo de 10% ».—Un chatbot peut aussi répondre en MP à des commentaires sous un postPar exemple, je lance un jeu concours. Pour participer il faut répondre en commentaire avec un mot clé, genre : « vas y envoi les cadeaux ».Le chatbot va détecter le mot clé et peut envoyer un mp a tous les participants pour les remercier de leur participation et les inviter à relayer le concours par exemple.—Un chatbot peut aussi faire de la recommandation de produitsOn peut paramétrer son chatbot pour qu'il interprète seul un message Instagram. Il va regarder si certains mots clés sont présent et en fonction dégainer une réponse.Par exemple : « Bonjour, je une chemise bleu ciel pas trop formelle pour un mariage ? »Le chatbot va détecter « chemise bleu ciel » et proposer des produits associés avec lien direct vers le site commerce.——Pourquoi utiliser un chatbot Instagram ?Utilisation des Instagram Chatbots peut s'avérer particulièrement intéressant pour améliorer son service à la clientèle et son service commercial (customer social care)Les chatbots permettent d'améliorer la réactivité de vos réponses sur InstagramLes attentes des consommateurs se sont développées via Internet, aujourd'hui ces derniers exigent une réactivité hors pair des entreprises .Si vous êtes objectivement dépassés par l'ensemble des messages reçues en privé, un chatbot Instagram peut vous sauver la vie.Si vous utilisez un chatbot Instagram, tous les messages privés peuvent recevoir automatiquement une réponse. ——Les chatbots Instagram peuvent permettre d'étoffer la connaissance que vous avez de vos clientsLes chatbots Instagram gardent la trace du type de questions que posent vos clients, ce qui en fait une source précieuse d'informations sur votre public de consommateurs.Par exemple, si vous constatez que des centaines de personnes posent la même question sur votre politique de retour, il est peut-être temps de revoir la formulation de cette politique. —Les chatbots Instagram vous permettent de répondre aux messages en plusieurs languesIl est essentiel de pouvoir communiquer en plusieurs langues si votre entreprise a (ou souhaite !) une base de consommateurs diversifiée.—Laissez vos CM gérer les demandes complexesLes robots ne sont pas parfaits. Même si les chatbots Instagram se révèlent pertinents pour les questions courantes des clients (genre horaires d'ouverture, ou prix d'un produit) il vont fréquemment se retrouver coincés.Vous avez la possibilité d'écrire des scénarios qui renvoient vers un vrai CM pour les questions complexes.—Il existe deux types de chatbot :Le chatbot avec un programme qui agit dans un cadre défini dont les réponses sont issues d'une base de données. Cela est surtout pour les questions récurrentes comme les délais de livraison.Le chatbot utilisant l'intelligence artificielle qui va venir s'améliorer dans ses réponses au fur et à mesures du temps.--Le Super Daily est le podcast quotidien sur les réseaux sociaux. Il est fabriqué avec une pluie d'amour par les équipes de Supernatifs.Nous sommes une agence social media basée à Lyon : supernatifs.com/. Ensemble, nous aidons les entreprises à créer des relations durables et rentables avec leurs audiences. Ensemble, nous inventons, produisons et diffusons des contenus qui engagent vos collaborateurs, vos prospects et vos consommateurs.

• El siglo 21 es hoy •

Chatbot es un software que se comunica con personas a través de mensajes de texto.Un chatbot, también llamado "Bot conversacional", sostiene una conversación con una persona real. Puede hacerlo en sitios web pero también puede sostener una conversación de WhatsApp entre un usuario final y una marca comercial o una institución o sistema de ambiente educativo.Hay marcas de chatbots de todos los colores y sabores. En serio, están por ejemplo:- Chatbotchocolate- Chatbot.com- AWS contact-center: Amazon Connect, concebido como un “chat call center”- Oracle: IA conversacional de nombre "Oracle Digital Assistant"- Cliengo- Clientify- Hello My BotEn este episodio conversamos con un humano: Gilberto Garza, Vicepresidente de Zendesk LATAM, a partir de su artículo titulado: "¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Transcribimos a continuación su artículo:¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Por Gilberto Garza Es muy probable que ya te haya respondido un chatbot cuando llamas al soporte de una empresa o pides ayuda a través del chat de una aplicación. Si tuviste la impresión de hablar con un robot, impersonal y distante, debes saber que esto está cambiando. Cada vez son más las empresas que invierten en hacer estas conversaciones más personalizadas y humanizadas, deconstruyendo algunos mitos sobre la tecnología. También llamados asistentes virtuales, los chatbots son programas preconfigurados que pueden descifrar preguntas de forma inmediata, consultar bases de datos y responder a las preguntas de los usuarios, mediante respuestas automatizadas o creadas por la Inteligencia Artificial (IA). Sin embargo, es un error pensar que los humanos no son necesarios. Como todo software, el chatbot funciona a base de programación, que puede variar en complejidad y debe estar bien orientada. A principios de la década de 1940, el escritor Isaac Asimov planteó por primera vez el tema de los robots inteligentes con capacidad de diálogo y pensamiento en el libro "I Robot". Sin embargo, no fue hasta la década de 1960 cuando se introdujo oficialmente la tecnología a través del programa informático Eliza, de 1965. Creada por el investigador del Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT) Joseph Weizenbaum, Eliza consistía en un programa para reconocer palabras o frases clave y mostrar en respuesta preguntas construidas a partir de esas palabras, con capacidad para identificar unos 250 tipos de frases. Aunque rudimentaria, llegó a confundir a algunas personas durante su uso y así preparó el camino para el desarrollo de la tecnología en las décadas siguientes. Desde entonces, los cambios tecnológicos han seguido los parámetros cada vez más exigentes de naturalidad y fluidez con los interlocutores. Entró en juego una mirada cada vez más precisa sobre la experiencia del usuario. Esto se debe a que uno de los principales objetivos de la inteligencia artificial en su conjunto es optimizar las interacciones entre las personas y los servicios para mejorar la experiencia. Otro mito es que el uso del chatbot se limita a las actividades de atención al cliente. En marketing, los chatbots pueden configurarse tanto para realizar los contactos iniciales con los potenciales clientes, siendo muy efectivos en la prospección, como en la generación y cualificación. Sin olvidar que un chatbot puede generar conexión con la audiencia de una marca, haciendo que se identifique y se comprometa con ella. Un ejemplo es la influencer virtual de origen brasileño, "Lu", de Magalu, que recientemente ganó un León de Oro en la categoría “Social & Influencer Lyons 2022” en el más reciente Festival Internacional de Creatividad de Cannes. De haber sido creada como una voz de asistencia virtual para un sitio de comercio electrónico en 2003, pasó a ser una influencer en redes sociales y ahora es toda una celebridad virtual que habla, baila, interactúa y toma partido en diversas causas, como la lucha contra la violencia de género. De hecho, encabeza la lista como influencer digital con más seguidores, dejando en segundo lugar nada menos que a Barbie. El informe CX Trends 2022 demostró que estamos en el buen camino: el 88% de los consumidores ya aprueba el uso de la IA como algo bueno para la sociedad. Sin embargo, dejando a un lado el optimismo, está claro que todavía hay que mejorar en términos de efectividad y resolutividad con el uso del chatbot, y es imposible decir que funcionará al 100% en todas las ocasiones, entre otras cosas porque cada empresa programa el flujo de respuestas de forma diferente. El propio estudio de Zendesk reveló cierta frustración por parte de los clientes en este sentido: el 54% de los participantes en la encuesta dijo que se necesitan muchas preguntas para que el bot reconozca que no es posible responder al problema. En este sentido, es fundamental destacar que para que un chatbot desempeñe su papel con éxito, la injerencia humana es imprescindible, ya que es el hombre quien configura, entrena y optimiza el software. Para evitar el ruido de la comunicación y la frustración, es fundamental poner al cliente en el centro a la hora de planificar, analizar y establecer la estrategia para el uso del chatbot en la rutina de la empresa, definiendo incluso cuándo es conveniente utilizarlo o no. Aunque la mayoría sigue prefiriendo la IA para resolver problemas sencillos y de mayor volumen, los más complejos y estratégicos suelen acabar pasando por el servicio humano. Todo es cuestión de tiempo, desarrollo tecnológico y adaptación por parte de los clientes y las empresas. Pero esa pregunta siempre permanece: si en los años 60 algunos dudaban con el uso de Eliza, ¿alguna vez te ha asistido (bien) un chatbot sin darte cuenta?

Engati CX
5G enhancing network-intelligent applications | Nicholas McQuire talks to engatica

Engati CX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 38:15


From Marketing to Technology, from a start-up to a Fortune 500 company, from an Analyst to SVP and Director - with experience of over 20 years, we have with us today, Nicholas McQuire. He talks about the ways in which businesses can effectively use these large-scale AI models to solve their problems The engatica interview series is a powerhouse of insights from industry experts and influencers from around the world. A platform that provides the latest news on AI, Automation, and technologies that will help you grow your business. Website: www.engatica.com Follow us on- LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/join-engatica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/joinEngatica Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joinEngatica Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joinengatica/ Come, be a part of our community - learn, share and grow with us. About Engati: Engati believes that the way you deliver customer experiences can make or break your brand. Our mission is to help you deliver unforgettable experiences to build deep, lasting connections with our Chatbot and Live Chat platform. It is a one-stop platform for powerful customer engagements. With our intelligent bots, we help you create the smoothest customer experiences, with minimal coding. And now, we're even helping you answer your customers' most complicated questions in real time with Engati Live Chat. Website: https://www.engati.com/ Talk to us: contact@engati.com  #artificialintelligence #business #security #technology

@LocutorCo Blog / Podcast en ELTIEMPO.com

Chatbot es un software que se comunica con personas a través de mensajes de texto.Un chatbot, también llamado "Bot conversacional", sostiene una conversación con una persona real. Puede hacerlo en sitios web pero también puede sostener una conversación de WhatsApp entre un usuario final y una marca comercial o una institución o sistema de ambiente educativo.Hay marcas de chatbots de todos los colores y sabores. En serio, están por ejemplo:- Chatbotchocolate- Chatbot.com- AWS contact-center: Amazon Connect, concebido como un “chat call center”- Oracle: IA conversacional de nombre "Oracle Digital Assistant"- Cliengo- Clientify- Hello My BotEn este episodio conversamos con un humano: Gilberto Garza, Vicepresidente de Zendesk LATAM, a partir de su artículo titulado: "¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Transcribimos a continuación su artículo:¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Por Gilberto Garza Es muy probable que ya te haya respondido un chatbot cuando llamas al soporte de una empresa o pides ayuda a través del chat de una aplicación. Si tuviste la impresión de hablar con un robot, impersonal y distante, debes saber que esto está cambiando. Cada vez son más las empresas que invierten en hacer estas conversaciones más personalizadas y humanizadas, deconstruyendo algunos mitos sobre la tecnología. También llamados asistentes virtuales, los chatbots son programas preconfigurados que pueden descifrar preguntas de forma inmediata, consultar bases de datos y responder a las preguntas de los usuarios, mediante respuestas automatizadas o creadas por la Inteligencia Artificial (IA). Sin embargo, es un error pensar que los humanos no son necesarios. Como todo software, el chatbot funciona a base de programación, que puede variar en complejidad y debe estar bien orientada. A principios de la década de 1940, el escritor Isaac Asimov planteó por primera vez el tema de los robots inteligentes con capacidad de diálogo y pensamiento en el libro "I Robot". Sin embargo, no fue hasta la década de 1960 cuando se introdujo oficialmente la tecnología a través del programa informático Eliza, de 1965. Creada por el investigador del Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT) Joseph Weizenbaum, Eliza consistía en un programa para reconocer palabras o frases clave y mostrar en respuesta preguntas construidas a partir de esas palabras, con capacidad para identificar unos 250 tipos de frases. Aunque rudimentaria, llegó a confundir a algunas personas durante su uso y así preparó el camino para el desarrollo de la tecnología en las décadas siguientes. Desde entonces, los cambios tecnológicos han seguido los parámetros cada vez más exigentes de naturalidad y fluidez con los interlocutores. Entró en juego una mirada cada vez más precisa sobre la experiencia del usuario. Esto se debe a que uno de los principales objetivos de la inteligencia artificial en su conjunto es optimizar las interacciones entre las personas y los servicios para mejorar la experiencia. Otro mito es que el uso del chatbot se limita a las actividades de atención al cliente. En marketing, los chatbots pueden configurarse tanto para realizar los contactos iniciales con los potenciales clientes, siendo muy efectivos en la prospección, como en la generación y cualificación. Sin olvidar que un chatbot puede generar conexión con la audiencia de una marca, haciendo que se identifique y se comprometa con ella. Un ejemplo es la influencer virtual de origen brasileño, "Lu", de Magalu, que recientemente ganó un León de Oro en la categoría “Social & Influencer Lyons 2022” en el más reciente Festival Internacional de Creatividad de Cannes. De haber sido creada como una voz de asistencia virtual para un sitio de comercio electrónico en 2003, pasó a ser una influencer en redes sociales y ahora es toda una celebridad virtual que habla, baila, interactúa y toma partido en diversas causas, como la lucha contra la violencia de género. De hecho, encabeza la lista como influencer digital con más seguidores, dejando en segundo lugar nada menos que a Barbie. El informe CX Trends 2022 demostró que estamos en el buen camino: el 88% de los consumidores ya aprueba el uso de la IA como algo bueno para la sociedad. Sin embargo, dejando a un lado el optimismo, está claro que todavía hay que mejorar en términos de efectividad y resolutividad con el uso del chatbot, y es imposible decir que funcionará al 100% en todas las ocasiones, entre otras cosas porque cada empresa programa el flujo de respuestas de forma diferente. El propio estudio de Zendesk reveló cierta frustración por parte de los clientes en este sentido: el 54% de los participantes en la encuesta dijo que se necesitan muchas preguntas para que el bot reconozca que no es posible responder al problema. En este sentido, es fundamental destacar que para que un chatbot desempeñe su papel con éxito, la injerencia humana es imprescindible, ya que es el hombre quien configura, entrena y optimiza el software. Para evitar el ruido de la comunicación y la frustración, es fundamental poner al cliente en el centro a la hora de planificar, analizar y establecer la estrategia para el uso del chatbot en la rutina de la empresa, definiendo incluso cuándo es conveniente utilizarlo o no. Aunque la mayoría sigue prefiriendo la IA para resolver problemas sencillos y de mayor volumen, los más complejos y estratégicos suelen acabar pasando por el servicio humano. Todo es cuestión de tiempo, desarrollo tecnológico y adaptación por parte de los clientes y las empresas. Pero esa pregunta siempre permanece: si en los años 60 algunos dudaban con el uso de Eliza, ¿alguna vez te ha asistido (bien) un chatbot sin darte cuenta?

Engati CX
Cybersecurity Practices for AI solutions| Shiv Kataria talks with engatica

Engati CX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 11:55


In today's episode of the Engatica interview series, we spoke to , Technical Expert- Cybersecurity at Siemens Technology - Shiv Kataria , about what steps should organisations take to ensure the cybersecurity of their AI-powered solutions, and much more. The Engatica interview series is a powerhouse of insights from industry experts and influencers from around the world. A platform that provides the latest news on AI, Automation, and technologies that will help you grow your business. Website: www.engatica.com Follow us on- LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/join-engatica/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/joinEngatica Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joinEngatica Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joinengatica/ Come, be a part of our community - learn, share and grow with us.   About Engati: Engati believes that the way you deliver customer experiences can make or break your brand. Our mission is to help you deliver unforgettable experiences to build deep, lasting connections with our Chatbot and Live Chat platform. It is a one-stop platform for powerful customer engagements. With our intelligent bots, we help you create the smoothest of customer experiences, with minimal coding. And now, we're even helping you answer your customers' most complicated questions in real-time with Engati Live Chat. Website: https://www.engati.com/ Talk to us: contact@engati.com  #artificialintelligence #cybersecurity #technology #aisolutions #business #ai

The Recruitment Hackers Podcast
Could sugarcoated job descriptions be impacting your recruitment efforts?

The Recruitment Hackers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 29:12


Max: Hello, everyone. Welcome back to the Recruitment Hackers Podcast. I'm your host, Max Armbruster. And today on the show, James Ellis from Employer Brand Labs.Ellis: He got it. He got it.Max: Yes. James is an expert in helping employer brands stand out from the crowd. And today we decided we'd have a conversation for you, our audience on this topic on employer branding and specifically how you can gently indicate to some people that this is not the right place for them. And how many employers sometimes fall into this trap of trying to welcome everybody? And so they end up standing out for nobody and James, thanks for joining. And how did you end up in this very specific field of employer branding? Did you come in through marketing or from recruiting?Ellis: I did Max. And first off, thanks for letting me join this. I'm looking forward to this conversation. But yes, most people in Employer Brand come from two routes. They come from either the recruiting side where they realize that they have a different kind of point of view from most recruiters, some successful recruiters. And that means they don't really succeed as greatly as recruiters and they find that there's a space called Employer Brand where their skills do make sense. The rest of us come from marketing where we realize that marketing has been done and it's a machine.You go to school; you learn your four or five Ps. You apply them every day. It's all the fun stuff in the tactics or in the insight and that's great. And try not going to downplay marketers because I think they're amazing and they do amazing work, but this is the tiniest slice of marketing in which marketing isn't about more. It's the only kind of marketing and branding in which more is actually worse, right? If you're selling an ice cream cone and you sell a million ice cream cones, your employer of the month, they're going to put your name on a face, on a poster. It's going to be great.You're a recruiter and you get a thousand applicants. You should think about another line of work. You have made a poor choice; you've done something wrong. And so that to me is the fine crux of what employer brand is and why it's interesting and fascinating and still has so much to uncover, to really understand what it's all about. Right now, even like seasoned, respected Employer Brand professionals argue all the time over just basic ideas because we still haven't figured it all out. And that's what makes me so excited about the field. Even though it's only a couple of thousands of us. Max: Well I guess jumping on the question, the number that you just mentioned that employer branding would be, you have to right-size it and if you have a thousand applicants per position, you've wasted some resources.Ellis: Yeah.Max: Perhaps, I could challenge that a little bit by saying that well, if you haven't paid too much for the thousand candidates, then that's all right.Ellis: Well here's the deal. The problem is often that there is a gap between hiring managers and recruiters. The hiring manager says I need a, whatever it is. It's a nurse, it's an electrician, it's a data scientist. It's a litter of people, whatever that thing is and they think that's enough information as if all nurses and data scientists and electricians are the same and they are absolutely not. Anybody who's met three nurses goes, oh wow, they are all different. And they have very different skill sets, but they also have very different approaches to how they do that work.The hiring manager doesn't want to get into that. So they just throw the requisition over to the recruiter who says, okay, so who are you looking for? They want someone great. And then they walk away to do their day job because they're busy, right? They've got stuff to do. And the recruiter says, I don't know what the hiring manager wants. So I'm going to write a job ad, add a job description, and a job posting and those things are all slightly different. And we don't have to get into that today, but they write it to be so generic and that opens the door so wide. Is that anybody who can pretty much spell their last name is encouraged to apply? It just gets crazy.You've opened the doors and the metaphor of course is always, you're trying to find a needle in a haystack. And you're trying to say, well look, if I get a thousand or a hundred people to apply, I'll find that needle. But now we're in a world where we need more needles and the answer to creating more needles isn't to make bigger haystacks. It's not how needles work. That's not how needles are created. That's not how needles are found. The goal of good recruiting is when you have enough information, and that means about what the team's all about, what the company rewards, what they want to be motivated for and rewarded by, and what the tasks are, what the future of that job might be. The ultimate situation, the platonic ideal of recruiting is you really only get two candidates to apply. The person you hire, who is amazing, and the person you don't hire who is almost equally as amazing and you put them in your back pocket because you know, one day you're going to want them. And you only have that second person. So the hiring manager feels like they made a choice, right? That's all it is. Everything after that is time the recruiter now has to spend burning up, filtering through resumes and filtering through CVs saying, nope, nope, nope, nope. Or worse yet, it's time the interview loop has to spend on the sixth candidate to say, yeah, no, not quite because they haven't communicated what they're actually looking for.Max: Yeah, well, James, I mean, there are tools available to--Ellis: There are.Max: -- do a lot of selection, but I guess you're right in the sense that the hiring manager ideally would in a dream situation, would just have two or three to choose from. Ellis: Yeah. Max: I think it's also the recruiter's job to expand a little bit and we're in contradictions here. You're saying, narrow it down, get it down to this one. Now, two perfect profiles, but I would say, maybe the recruiter can expand a little bit on the definition and say--Ellis: Yeah.Max: -- well, you're looking for a nurse, to take your healthcare example with all the professional credentials, certification, that lives 20 minutes away from the hospital, et cetera, et cetera. This perfect candidate when probably doesn't exist.Ellis: Probably not.Max: And so then oftentimes they have to stretch and therefore, I guess play the numbers game. Now let's go a little bit broader.Ellis: Yeah. And I think my position is very extreme simply because I think the pendulum swung too far on we've made it so easy for anybody to apply. Like I could use my elbow and just hit an apply button and click, connect to LinkedIn. Yes, I accept. Okay, I've applied for this job. You don't want to hire me. I don't do that job, but you've made it so easy that I might as well. And so I want to swing the pendulum back to say, look, it's not about making things easy. It's really about how do you speak to this job. How do you speak to this opportunity in such a way that the person who isn't just going to be okay at this or even good at this, but the person who is that magical unicorn, we all know purple squirrels will have you? Doesn't just say yes, I'll apply, but says, wow.That sounds like the exact job I was looking to do next. That's where I need to take my career. And it's because we've put enough information in the job, the brand, the company that we're not hiding behind platitudes and cookie cutter and fortune cookie kind of BS junk and the verbiage on most career websites which is garbage because it says the same thing. You might as well copy and paste from every other career site. And that means the candidate can't choose. And I think there's this interesting kind of spin where if you look at modern hiring, it's a Kabuki theater.The candidate has decided I'm going to put all my info and quotes, all my information in two or three pages. But it's never the negative stuff. It's never, I got fired. It's never, I got accused of something. Yeah, I showed up late 14 times in a row when they were forced to ask me to leave. It's never anything like that. If I look at your resume or my resume or your CV or your CV, it sounds like you're mother Teresa, you're amazing. You've never done anything wrong. It's perfect. It's polished. And on the other side, you have this job posting or job ad, which says nothing. It says, yes, must be an excellent written or a communicator.So I got to write novels or do I got to write haiku? What are you saying? You're just saying garbage because you think you have to, so you don't push anybody away, God forbid. And consequently, there's this huge gap. Both sides are lying in different ways, trying to suss the other out and come to find a match. What I think of as employer branding is a function of every hire should be a perfect match between the company, which is what's their culture? What do they have to offer? What do they reward? The role?  So the team, the manager, the mission of that job, the job itself, and the person. And if those three things match, you have an amazing opportunity not just to hire, but to hire someone who's incredibly successful long term. If one of those things is an out of line, it's not going to be a great hire.Max: I think anybody would agree with your wish and is like the purple squirrel perfect match, but the way to get there, the risk of sounding a bit cynical is—Ellis: No, no, go.Max: -- to play the game--Ellis: Yeah.Max: -- the rules of the game that we're all in. Ellis: Yeah.Max: And if indeed, we live in a world where 70% of candidates are going to come from Indeed and everybody has the quick apply button with the elbow.Ellis: Yep.Max: Well, are you going to just gonna count yourself out and just move out of Indeed and then just do hyper-targeted marketing using social media or will you perhaps do a second layer of selection post apply so that, the application and the job description and the ad is as inclusive as possible, kind of like cast a wide net and then do all the selection automatically afterward?Ellis: Yeah, that's a setup and I love that setup. It's fantastic because no one's going to out cynical me. You can try it, but I am the most bitter black-hearted human being you've ever met. It's the coffee. It's amazing. I think there's something there's an option. I'm not saying throw away job boards. In my last job I got as a cold applicant, I got the absolute wrong way. I'm a pretty experienced and skilled professional. I should be in that hey, he's in my network. Let's talk to him. I am that candidate, but my last job was a cold LinkedIn job post and that I went “sure apply” it was a great role, but that's the rarity. Yes, you should use job boards. Yes, you should use social media.Yes, you should have all the tools at your disposal. But instead of saying, hey, we're hiring an MBA graduate, come join our wonderful company. We're a great place to work. We have great rewards and we'll have lots of opportunities, which by the way, is a pretty standard, slim-down job posting, right? What if instead, you say, what we're really looking for is an MBA grad who maybe was at the top or near the top of their class, but more importantly, they were the shark who stabbed everyone in the back to get what they needed to get? We want the person who is so cutthroat, they would sell their grandmother down the river for 14 cents. That is the MBA grad we want. And in return, we will offer you this track towards growth. Yes, it's rewards. Yes, it's benefits. But what we're really looking at is we're looking forward to growing a team of sharks and cutthroat and ninjas and assassins who are going to do this, this, this, this.Max: This is to work on the death star, right?Ellis: Yeah, exactly, exactly. Or write it the other way. Hey, we're looking for an MBA grad, but we're not looking for necessarily the person who stabbed me in the back. We're looking for the person who others looked up to, who was a leader without any authority or any power. It doesn't matter where you graduated from the class. It doesn't matter if you nailed that accounting class or not. It's really about, are you someone people look to when there's a challenge? Now, have you ever seen either of those like paragraphs in a job posting? No. Why? But they are writing--Max: No. I mean, sometimes you see some great efforts. Ellis: You see, you do. But when you are that specific about an MBA grad, you can apply that to any role.Max: Yeah.Ellis: Suddenly, you're not going to get a thousand people to apply because effectively what happens is by being honest about the role, you force the candidate to be honest about what they want. So if you say, are you a cutthroat? By applying you're saying I'm a cutthroat bastard. Well, that's great, you know yourself and that's fantastic. And now what do you think the interview process is like? Who is more cutthroat bastardly than I? I mean, what do you do there? What's the process? I don't know. Or you go the other way, you say, look, this isn't about the head of the class. This wasn't about the valedictorian; this wasn't the do anything to win person.This is the person with that really interesting leadership quality. We don't find them everywhere. That person has to say, this sounds like me and because I'm not that cutthroat and I'm not that diligent and I'm not this, I have this particular flavor of myself and they say, I want that. You're going to get less applicants. And the pendulum starts to swing the other way. Sure, post it on Indeed and LinkedIn and every other job board under the sun, it's not about channels. It's about the message you put on that channel so that you're no longer focused on it because we all know those metrics.I posted on Indeed, I got X number of applicants. I got posted on LinkedIn, I got Y number of applicants, which is better. No, where'd the hire come from? That's the most important thing. And let's be fair our metrics don't always make it that easy to find and figure out and have confidence in. But, the more you change your message to be specific and attractive and real and different, the more the person who is, I want that job, who falls in love with that job. And that's a phrase we don't use enough.You want someone who desires that job, not someone who deigns to apply, not someone who is willing to go through the interview process. Someone who goes that sounds perfect. It serves my needs. It sounds like me. It sounds like what I want. Let's have a conversation. That's where you want to bring the recruiting conversation, not to bend in people's arms and twist people's arms and hustling them and selling them. That's not where recruiters want to be, is it?Max: We started out talking about the volume and the numbers that recruiters naturally gravitate to in an understandable feeling towards safety.Ellis: Yeah.Max: Safety in the numbers.Ellis: Yeah.Max: And so your approach, which would significantly reduce the size of candidates?Ellis: Yes.Max: Could we think of ways to balance that out with ways that we could increase the size?Ellis: Absolutely. Max: That you don't end up with a goose egg or with just one candidate?Ellis: Yeah. Like I said, I'm only kind of taking this very polarizing opposite to swing the pendulum back towards the middle, to a better middle. And then that's a place where, the recruiter gets to be the expert in the marketplace of talent, which is where recruiters should want to be. It's where they have their most value. It's what they do their best work. The hiring manager gets to actually say, look it's a nurse, but we want this kind of nurse and someone who sounds like this and feels like this--Max: Cutthroat killer nurse. Ellis: Yeah. That's got to be a thing somewhere. Look, here's the deal. There's only two of those jobs, but those two nurses are like, yes, that's what I want. And that's where you want to be. You don't want to be a choice among many. You want to be the choice for the few.Max: I think that would be very effective in social media if it was shared because like then, let's say you're that MBA student and as soon as you see the ad, you know who this makes you think about.Ellis: Yes.Max: This is perfect.Ellis: Oh, that's Bob. Yeah, Steve and Bob.Max: And actually Steve will love it.Ellis: Yeah, exactly. Yeah, and that's the game of marketing. Is that there's so much about, we say the same things over and over again? We have to remember. Literally, depending on the time of day we roll this, there could be 8 billion people on this planet and that's a number that is so big. It's hard to get our heads around. There's 50 million businesses in this world. So you're talking about a game where you're trying to figure out how you sort these people and where do you put them? And we've made the game about putting all the power in the hands of the hiring manager and letting them pick.And I don't want to be picked, I don't want someone to say, wow, what he has, or if I'm talking to somebody, else's what she has. It's not about that. What she has is exactly what we want and we want to find a match. It's not a game of, I'm going to accuse you of lying on your resume, or I'm going to accuse you, or let's negotiate and squeeze each other to death and then decide at the end of it we're all best friends. It's about saying it doesn't have to be confrontational in that way. It can be, I'm going to open up and be more transparent about what this job is about. Here's another way, let me put this different spin on. It's a rare, rare, rare day that you see a job posting with a section that functionally says, here's why you won't love this job. Everything about this job is great. There's puppy dogs, and daisies. It's lots of great, it's free food, it's all these wonderful things, but there needs to be a part that says, and by the way, this job has a lot of paperwork. No, it's not to say, the funny thing is that if I were to talk about a friend or a car, or I was trying to sell you something, I said, here are the 10 things that are all positive about this friend or this car and I list them. They're great. They're funny. They're wonderful. They're always there for you. Like after I get like number seven, you start wondering what's the catch. What's with this guy? What's wrong with them? And if I never list a negative, I've put the seed of the negative in your head and now your brain says, oh, they're probably racist.Max: You have to go--Ellis: Oh, they're probably horrible, right? There's something. No, it's not even that you look, it's that your brain does all the work and projects stuff. But if I say here's my friend, funny, wonderful, but by the way, chews with her mouth open. Okay, suddenly that negative proves, makes all the positive things more believable.Max: I know I don't want to have lunch with her and that's fine. And--Ellis: There you go.Max: -- just eat meals. No problem.Ellis: There you go. Max: Yeah. I think if you say the reasons why people will not join you, you control the narrative. And if you don't say it--Ellis: YesMax: -- people are going to either subconsciously create those stories like you said-- Ellis: A hundred percent.Max: -- they have to fill those gaps or they'll go look on a glassdoor. And then they'll get it straight from the angriest of the angry crowd. Ellis: But the nice thing about that, if you control the narrative hearing from the angriest of the angry crowd, doesn't dissuade, it proves. So if I say, let's go work at Goldman Sachs, you're going to get paid really well. You have a huge opportunity, it's a great logo on your resume. There's a status call. There's a productivity call. There's an opportunity call. By the way, you're going to work a hundred hours a week. And you go on Glassdoor and they say, you won't believe this place.They make you work a hundred hours a week. It's slave labor. It's insane. Yeah, it's nuts. And you go, well, if that negative is proved by Glassdoor, I guess all the positives must be true too. It's an amazing kind of process where suddenly the negative proves positive. And now, when I choose to apply to Goldman Sachs, I don't go in with my eyes closed about how hard the work is. I know exactly what I'm getting into, but I also know the trade. I know the value proposition. I'm going to give you my twenties and thirties, and you're going to make me a millionaire.Max: And at Goldman Sachs, everybody knows about it, but--Ellis: Exactly.Max: If you're a company with a hundred to 10,000 employees, most people have never heard about you. You have to get out there and let them know. So--Ellis: And you have to control that narrative. Like you said.Max: You think that when you're dealing with experienced professionals, people have a little bit more self-knowledge and they know what they want, but then if you go a little bit younger--Ellis: Yeah.Max: -- then you have to be more cautious because they may, I don't know. Ellis: YeahMax: They may be more sensitive.Ellis: I think, and that's a nice way to dance around that and I don't disagree with any of that. So I've got two things I could say. First off, I spent a little time at Universum and they do amazing research in the US because it's where I am. I know it's not where you are. In the US, most of their research is around graduating student cohort, right?Max: Universum does a lot of research in Asia as well.Ellis: Oh, they do it everywhere. It's fantastic work. But I just know that when you look at just the junior-level talent, they all say the same thing. I want to work at Google, SpaceX, and Tesla. Why? Because Elon Musk is on Twitter, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. And there's a cohort of people who say he's the best, even though, no thanks. They talk him up and if you have no frame of reference, you think, oh, that must be a great place to work. However, I did some research when I was with TMP now Radancy where we looked at the impact of content on job postings. Now, this was about six years ago, but I think the idea still holds. And that is if you're showing content if you're able to say, here's 10 senior jobs and here's 10 junior jobs, and you look at the people who apply and who looked at those jobs and they did, they look at content.Even in a senior role, if they looked at content, they were far more likely to apply because they understood what the job was. They said, ah, yes, I understand what these companies are about. I understand what they reward. I want to be a part of them. Interestingly, if you push content to junior audiences, instead of saying, well, I'm just fresh out of school. I don't know what I want. I'm just going to hit apply as many times as I can, right? We've all been there. I've been there. I know for sure. And I know my sister who's 25. I know she's going through that too. But if you start to see stories and content about this, this is what the job is like, it suddenly becomes less abstract. You suddenly go, oh, the jobs like that. I don't want to do that and they walk away. So content--Max: I think it also equips you for the interview. It makes you a little bit more prepared. Like--Ellis: Yes, absolutely. Max: Like the counterpoint to your recommendation if we want to be very direct and incisive in our messaging is that no, no, no. What I want to do is make people feel at ease, tell them that everybody here is super nice--Ellis: Yeah.Max: -- rainbows and puppies--Ellis: Yeah.Max: -- so that they can relax. And when they're relaxed, then I'll grill them and then I'll slam them and then I'll screen them. But actually, if you do deliver sharp content at the front, I guess, a person comes into the interview, they can be prepared. They know what's coming a little bit.Ellis: Yeah. And I think it's an interesting kind of, I personally believe that the candid experience and the work experience should be mirrored. They should be very much similar. You shouldn't have, no one goes to apply for the army by taking a written test. What you do is you go out, you run for four miles with 60-pound packing because that's the actual job, is to run and try not to get shot at and jump over things and right. That's the job. That's the interview, but it's also the job.Max: That sounds like a pretty cool job description. I've never wanted to join the army until this very moment.Ellis: Yeah, there you go. There you go. I mean that they literally do that. If you're trying to join the Rangers, they call it hell week. They run with packs and they shoot over your head and they go, if you can't handle this, this is not the job for you. So--Max: [Inaudible] gun.Ellis: Yeah. let's hope so. But at the same time, if you're applying for an accounting job and it's a grueling kind of job, but you make the candidate experience happy fuzzy bunny, they're going to say, great. I love this job. And they're going to walk in and say, whoa, this isn't the job I thought I was getting into. And they're gone three weeks later because they're valuable. So there needs to be some mirror. So to me, Employer Brand isn't the thing that attracts them. Employer Brand is a strategy all through the entire candidate journey. Frankly, all the way from the top to the bottom to say, this is why people work here. This is what we reward, proving it through the candidate's journey, supporting it in the job and when knowing that, by telling them all those things, when they tell their friends or people at a bar, what it's like to work there, they're telling similar stories to bring them back to the top of the funnel. Employer Brand is not just attraction, it's the whole thing. Now I might focus on attraction because that's what gets me the most bang for my buck early on. But I know, here's a good example. If I say, hey, I'm going to put this message out. We want just cutthroats I'm going back to this because it's funny. We just want these cutthroat nurses, these two cutthroat nurses and we're not drunk. Ladies and gentlemen, listening to this, we are very, very stone sober I promise you.So you get these cutthroat nurses and the cutthroat nurse goes, oh, that sounds like a cool job and they apply. You don't ignore the cutthroatness of the job. And in fact, when you get-- you touch on it, the recruiter should be touching on it through the journey. And then when they get to the offer stage, the offer stage should literally start with, you applied because you saw this cutthroat job and it sounded like something you wanted to do. All you have to do is touch on it. All you have to do is just tap it to remind them. This is what got you excited in the first place. Just doing stuff like that increases your offer acceptance rate. Because you're reminding them why, you're not saying, hey, let's switch the conversation is nothing but salary and benefits and negotiation, which is sadly where most offer conversations go. If you say, look, here's an offer, it's fair. But I want to remind you what you get is the subjective value you wanted. You said you want at the beginning, reminding them, squeeze and re-anchor it at the offer level, they're more likely to say yes. So Employer Brand impacts even things like offer acceptance. Max: Yeah that's a solid takeaway here. Remind them at the offer stage why this offer is unique?Ellis: Yeah.Max: Also I love the tip about telling them a list of reasons why you will not like this job. One of my favorite interview questions is you're not working here six months from now. Well, tell me what happened.Ellis: Yeah. Oh, wow, that's a good one.Max: I got, that one from a friend at Google and the answer usually help you yeah understand what candidates considered to be the main risk factors, which is a little bit more self-centered rather than company centered usually. But still very insightful.Ellis: Yeah.Max: Great. Well, James' final question. And because we're up on time.Ellis: You make it sound like there's a trap door, right under me. Like the final question, sir. Are you ready for this?Max: Well this one is a bit tricky. It's walking back to a dark place, which is a mistake that you have made in recruitment because anyone who's done recruitment has made a recruitment mistake at some point. Ellis: Yes. Max: And if you could illustrate that. Think back to someone that you hired and you made a mistake and then what can the audience learn from that?Ellis: Way back when I was a hiring manager, I had a team of -- well, Max there were 19 people helping us build social media and content for clients and whatnot. And so we were hiring our a regular basis. We were hiring very junior people and we didn't-- it wasn't the top-of-the-scale pay. So we were hiring people who were 21, 22, 23, fresh out of school, maybe one job before that. And my mistake I made and it's a rookie mistake, but I think everybody has to learn the hard way, is to just listen to me. And so I found someone, I thought they were great. I kind of said, yep. I think we should hire them. Did it. Hired them. And three months later, they hated their job.You know, making people around them miserable and they eventually left. Thank goodness. And the little lesson I learned was that look, I have to have other people's weigh in and kind of balance me out. Like I get into folks, like many people. I kind of get fixated and say, oh, this is the right person. And then the blinders come up and I say, this is what I want. I needed to kind of build my own little, you might call it an interview loop, but I really thought of it more as a board, a personal board to say, look, you know me and you know what I'm looking for because you do the job.But I also know, you know my blind spots. So check my blind spots and I've had almost screaming fights with people who said, James, you don't understand, do not hire this person. And I'm like, I love them. I think they're amazing. And then I had to listen to them and I did. I think I was all the better for it, but that's the lesson I learned is that you do need to kind of understand your own blind spots and you have to build systems that balance against them otherwise you're just going to keep making the same mistakes over and over.Max: That's very hard to do because if you don't hire someone, then you don't really know, let's say you fall in love with a candidate.Ellis: Yeah.Max: And then somebody tells you not to, and then you don't hire them. You follow their advice, but you never know what could have been, you could live in regret.Ellis: The FOMO. Max: Yeah, the FOMO is strong and real.Ellis: It's real. It's real. Max: Yeah. It's a real problem.Ellis: Yeah. Max: Well, I don't think we'll solve that one today, but--Ellis: No, no.Max: For everything else t thanks a lot, James. Where can people get a hold of you and read your content perhaps?Ellis: Sure. I do a free newsletter. It's called Employer Brand headlines. If you go to employerbrandheadlines.substack.com, or if you go to employerbrandlab.com, it's right there. It's free and I think right now it's the biggest newsletter in employer branding. I don't know. I don't have metrics for that stuff, but let's say it is. Let's pretend it is. Why not? What the heck, it's a podcast. Just say anything.Max: This is branding. If you say it is. And so--Ellis: Yeah, exactly. If Joe Rogan can say whatever he wants to say on his podcast, why can't we say whatever you want? What's up with that? Anyway, employerbrandlab.com. Max: To subscribe, spell it out again for the substack.Ellis: Sure. It's employer brandheadlines.substack.com. It's free. It's really designed to help you get kind of sharp at employer branding and how to think about it. It's not tactics, it's not tricks and hacks. It's really about look, employer branding is a way of looking at the world. Here's a way to kind of help shift your perspective.Max: Great. Well, I'm going to go online right now and subscribe to it. Thanks a lot, James. Thanks for having you.Ellis: No, it's been a blast. Thanks for having me on.Max: And that was James Ellis from Employer Brand Labs. Hope you enjoyed the discussion we had particularly around volume, James arguing for less is more to get the perfect candidate in and I always arguing for more volume and then let the machines do the sorting for you. Both approaches of course are not incompatible. And James and I had a great little discussion afterward discussing how people, employers could expand the front of the funnel and then use their branding too as well, make sure that every candidate is a good culture fit with your company. So I think both are very compatible in fact, and that we live in a world where we can get very targeted candidates, but still insufficient volume. Hope you enjoyed it and that you'll subscribe for more and share with your friends.

El Siglo 21 es Hoy
Chatbots 🤖

El Siglo 21 es Hoy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 37:11


Chatbot es un software que se comunica con personas a través de mensajes de texto.Un chatbot, también llamado "Bot conversacional", sostiene una conversación con una persona real. Puede hacerlo en sitios web pero también puede sostener una conversación de WhatsApp entre un usuario final y una marca comercial o una institución o sistema de ambiente educativo.Hay marcas de chatbots de todos los colores y sabores. En serio, están por ejemplo:- Chatbotchocolate- Chatbot.com- AWS contact-center: Amazon Connect, concebido como un “chat call center”- Oracle: IA conversacional de nombre "Oracle Digital Assistant"- Cliengo- Clientify- Hello My BotEn este episodio conversamos con un humano: Gilberto Garza, Vicepresidente de Zendesk LATAM, a partir de su artículo titulado: "¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Transcribimos a continuación su artículo:¿Te ha atendido alguna vez un robot sin darte cuenta?Por Gilberto Garza Es muy probable que ya te haya respondido un chatbot cuando llamas al soporte de una empresa o pides ayuda a través del chat de una aplicación. Si tuviste la impresión de hablar con un robot, impersonal y distante, debes saber que esto está cambiando. Cada vez son más las empresas que invierten en hacer estas conversaciones más personalizadas y humanizadas, deconstruyendo algunos mitos sobre la tecnología. También llamados asistentes virtuales, los chatbots son programas preconfigurados que pueden descifrar preguntas de forma inmediata, consultar bases de datos y responder a las preguntas de los usuarios, mediante respuestas automatizadas o creadas por la Inteligencia Artificial (IA). Sin embargo, es un error pensar que los humanos no son necesarios. Como todo software, el chatbot funciona a base de programación, que puede variar en complejidad y debe estar bien orientada. A principios de la década de 1940, el escritor Isaac Asimov planteó por primera vez el tema de los robots inteligentes con capacidad de diálogo y pensamiento en el libro "I Robot". Sin embargo, no fue hasta la década de 1960 cuando se introdujo oficialmente la tecnología a través del programa informático Eliza, de 1965. Creada por el investigador del Instituto Tecnológico de Massachusetts (MIT) Joseph Weizenbaum, Eliza consistía en un programa para reconocer palabras o frases clave y mostrar en respuesta preguntas construidas a partir de esas palabras, con capacidad para identificar unos 250 tipos de frases. Aunque rudimentaria, llegó a confundir a algunas personas durante su uso y así preparó el camino para el desarrollo de la tecnología en las décadas siguientes. Desde entonces, los cambios tecnológicos han seguido los parámetros cada vez más exigentes de naturalidad y fluidez con los interlocutores. Entró en juego una mirada cada vez más precisa sobre la experiencia del usuario. Esto se debe a que uno de los principales objetivos de la inteligencia artificial en su conjunto es optimizar las interacciones entre las personas y los servicios para mejorar la experiencia. Otro mito es que el uso del chatbot se limita a las actividades de atención al cliente. En marketing, los chatbots pueden configurarse tanto para realizar los contactos iniciales con los potenciales clientes, siendo muy efectivos en la prospección, como en la generación y cualificación. Sin olvidar que un chatbot puede generar conexión con la audiencia de una marca, haciendo que se identifique y se comprometa con ella. Un ejemplo es la influencer virtual de origen brasileño, "Lu", de Magalu, que recientemente ganó un León de Oro en la categoría “Social & Influencer Lyons 2022” en el más reciente Festival Internacional de Creatividad de Cannes. De haber sido creada como una voz de asistencia virtual para un sitio de comercio electrónico en 2003, pasó a ser una influencer en redes sociales y ahora es toda una celebridad virtual que habla, baila, interactúa y toma partido en diversas causas, como la lucha contra la violencia de género. De hecho, encabeza la lista como influencer digital con más seguidores, dejando en segundo lugar nada menos que a Barbie. El informe CX Trends 2022 demostró que estamos en el buen camino: el 88% de los consumidores ya aprueba el uso de la IA como algo bueno para la sociedad. Sin embargo, dejando a un lado el optimismo, está claro que todavía hay que mejorar en términos de efectividad y resolutividad con el uso del chatbot, y es imposible decir que funcionará al 100% en todas las ocasiones, entre otras cosas porque cada empresa programa el flujo de respuestas de forma diferente. El propio estudio de Zendesk reveló cierta frustración por parte de los clientes en este sentido: el 54% de los participantes en la encuesta dijo que se necesitan muchas preguntas para que el bot reconozca que no es posible responder al problema. En este sentido, es fundamental destacar que para que un chatbot desempeñe su papel con éxito, la injerencia humana es imprescindible, ya que es el hombre quien configura, entrena y optimiza el software. Para evitar el ruido de la comunicación y la frustración, es fundamental poner al cliente en el centro a la hora de planificar, analizar y establecer la estrategia para el uso del chatbot en la rutina de la empresa, definiendo incluso cuándo es conveniente utilizarlo o no. Aunque la mayoría sigue prefiriendo la IA para resolver problemas sencillos y de mayor volumen, los más complejos y estratégicos suelen acabar pasando por el servicio humano. Todo es cuestión de tiempo, desarrollo tecnológico y adaptación por parte de los clientes y las empresas. Pero esa pregunta siempre permanece: si en los años 60 algunos dudaban con el uso de Eliza, ¿alguna vez te ha asistido (bien) un chatbot sin darte cuenta?

CISO Tradecraft
#96 - The 9 Cs of Cyber

CISO Tradecraft

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 30:33


Ahoy! and welcome to another episode of CISO Tradecraft -- the podcast that provides you with the information, knowledge, and wisdom to be a more effective cyber security leader.  My name is G. Mark Hardy, and today we're going to -- talk like a pirate.  ARRR As always, please follow us on LinkedIn, and make sure you subscribe so you can always get the latest updates. On today's episode we are going to talk about the 9 Cs of Cyber Security.  Note these are not the 9 Seas that you might find today, the 19th of September, which happens to be the 20th annual International Talk like a Pirate Day.  They are the nine words that begin with the letter C (but not the letter ARRR): Controls, Compliance, Continuity, Coverage, Complexity, Competency, Communication, Convenience, Consistency. Please note that this talk is inspired by an article by Mark Wojtasiak from Vectra, but we have modified the content to be more aligned with our thoughts at CISO Tradecraft. Now before we go into the 9 Cs, it's important to understand that the 9 Cs represent three equal groups of three.  Be sure to look at the show notes which will link to our CISO Tradecraft website that shows a 9-box picture which should make this easier to understand.  But if you're listening, imagine a three-by-three grid where each row corresponds to a different stakeholder.  Each stakeholder is going to be concerned with different things, and by identifying three important priorities for each, we have our grid.  Make sense?  Okay, let's dig in. The first row in our grid is the focus of Executive Leaders. First, this group of executives such as the CEO, CIO, and CISO ensure that the IT controls and objectives are working as desired.  Next, these executives want attestations and audits to ensure that compliance is being achieved and the organization is not just paying lip service to those requirements.  Thirdly, they also want business continuity.  IT systems must be constantly available despite attacks from ransomware, hardware failures, and power outages. The second row in our grid is the focus of Software Development shops. This group consists of Architects, Developers, Engineers, and Administrators.  First, they need to ensure they understand the Coverage of their IT systems in asset inventories -- can we account for all hardware and software.  Next, developers should be concerned with how Complexity in their environment can reduce security, as these tend to work at cross-purposes.  Lastly, developers care about Competency of their teams to build software correctly; that competency is a key predictor of the end quality of what is ultimately produced. The third and final row in our grid is the focus of Security Operations Centers. This group consists of Incident Handlers and Responders, Threat Intelligence Teams, and Business Information System Officers commonly known as BISOs.  They need to provide clear communication that informs others what they need to do, they need processes and tools that enable convenience so as to reduce friction.  Finally, they need to be consistent.  No one wants a fire department that only shows up 25% of the time. So now that we have a high-level overview of the 9 C's let's start going into detail on each one of them.  We'll start with the focus of executive leaders.  Again, that is controls, compliance, and continuity. Controls- According to James Hall's book on Accounting Information Systems[i], General Computer Controls are "specific activities performed by persons or systems designed to ensure that business objectives are met." Three common control frameworks that we see inside of organizations today are COBIT, COSO, and ITIL. COBIT®, which stands for The Control Objectives for Information Technology was built by the IT Governance Institute and the Information Systems Audit and Controls Organization, better known as ISACA®.  COBIT® is primarily focused on IT compliance, audit issues, and IT service, which should not be a surprise given its roots from ISACA® which is an Audit and Controls organization.  Overall, COBIT® 2019, the latest version, is based on the following six principles[ii] (note that the prior version, COBIT® 5[iii], had five): Provide stakeholder value Holistic approach Dynamic governance system Governance distinct from management Tailored to enterprise needs End-to-end governance system COSO  stands for The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.  Their latest version is the 2017 Enterprise Risk Management - Integrated Framework, which is designed to address "enterprise risk management and the need for organizations to improve their approach to managing risk to meet the demands of an evolving business environment.[iv]"  COSO states that internal controls are a PROCESS, effected by leadership, to provide reasonable assurance with respect to effectiveness, reliability, and compliance[v].  The framework consists of five interrelated principles[vi]: Governance and culture Strategy and objective-setting Performance Review and revision, and Information, communication, and reporting To support these principles, COSO defines internal controls as consisting of five interrelated components: Control environments, Risk Assessments, Control Activities, Information and Communication, and Monitoring Activities. The third framework is ITIL®, which stands for Information Technology Infrastructure Library. First published in 1989 (the latest update is 2019/2020), ITIL® is managed and maintained by AXELOS, a joint venture between the Government of the United Kingdom and PeopleCert, which acquired AXELOS in 2021. According to their website[vii], "ITIL 4 is an adaptable framework for managing services within the digital era.  Through our best practice modules, ITIL 4 helps to optimize digital technologies to co-create value with consumers, drive business strategy, and embrace digital transformation." (Talk about buzzword compliance).  ITIL® 4 focuses on process and service management through service strategy, service design, service transition, service operation, and continual service improvement.  What is interesting is that there is no third-party assessment of ITIL® compliance in an organization, only individual certification. At the end of the day an organization needs to pick one of these popular control frameworks and show controls are being followed.  This isn't just a best practice; it's also required by Sarbanes Oxley.  SOX has two sections that require control attestations that impact cyber.  Section 302 requires corporate management, executives, and financial officers to perform quarterly assessments which: Evaluate the effectiveness of disclosure controls, Evaluate changes in internal controls over financial reporting, Disclose all known control deficiencies and weaknesses, and Disclose acts of fraud. Since financial services run on IT applications, cybersecurity is generally in scope for showing weaknesses and deficiencies.  SOX Section 404 requires an annual assessment by both management and independent auditors.  This requires organizations to: Evaluate design and operating effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting, Disclose all known controls and significant deficiencies, and disclose acts of fraud. Once we understand the requirements for controls, we need to be Compliant. Compliance is the second C we are discussing today.  Remember the CFO and CEO need to produce annual and quarterly reports to regulators such as the SEC.  So, if you as a CISO can help them obtain a clean bill of health or fix previous audit findings, you help the business. A useful tool to consult in terms of compliance is a concept from the Institute of Internal Auditors known as the three lines model or three lines of defense[viii].  This model has as a foundation six principles: Governance Governing body roles Management and first- and second-line roles Third line roles Third line independence, and Creating and protecting value The first line of defense is the business and process owners who maintain internal controls.  You can think of a software developer who should write secure software because there is an IT Control that says so.  That developer is expected to run application security scans and vulnerability scans to find bugs in their code.  They are also expected to fix these issues before releasing to production.  The second line of defense are elements of an organization that focus on risk management and compliance.  Your cyber team is a perfect example of this.  If the developer doesn't fix the application vulnerabilities before sending code to production, then the company is at risk.  Cyber teams generally track and report vulnerability findings to the business units to ensure better compliance with IT controls. Finally, the third line of defense is internal audit.  Internal audit might assess an IT control on secure software development and say we have an issue.  The developers push out bad code with vulnerabilities.  Cyber tells the developers to fix, yet we are observing trends that the total vulnerabilities are only increasing.  This systemic risk is problematic, and we recommend management comply with the IT controls by making immediate fixes to this risky situation. Now, other than the observation that the ultimate line of defense (internal auditors) is defined by the Institute of Internal Auditors (no conflict of interest there), note that internal auditors can report directly to the board.  Developers and CISOs typically cannot.  One of the most powerful weapons in an auditor's toolbox is the "finding."  The U.S. Code defines what represents a finding[ix] in the context of federal awards, to include: Significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in internal control and significant instances of abuse Material noncompliance with the provisions of Federal statutes or regulations Known questioned costs, specifically identified by the auditor, greater than $25,000 for a type of compliance requirement Internal auditors have both a mandate from and access to the board to ensure that the organization meets compliance requirements.  So, if you've been unsuccessful in getting funding for what you consider a critical security asset, maybe, just maybe, you casually point that out to the auditors so that it ends up in a finding.  After all, findings get funded.  Don't get caught, though, or you'll have some explaining to do to your boss who previously turned you down. Management cares a lot about Continuity. Remember, if the business is down, then it's not making money, and it's probably losing money by the hour.  If the business isn't making money, then they can't pay for the cyber department.  So, among your goals as a cyber executive is to ensure the continuity of revenue-generation services.  To start, you must identify what those activities are and find ways to protect the services by reducing the likelihood of vulnerabilities found in those systems.  You also need to ensure regular backup activities are occurring, disaster recovery exercises are performed, Business Continuity Plans are tested, and tabletops are executed.  Each of these activities has the potential to identify gaps which cause harm to the continuity that executives care about. How do you identify revenue-generating elements of the business?  Ask.  But do your homework first.  If you're a publicly traded company, the annual report will often break out lines of business showing profit and loss for each.  Even if it's losing money today, it still may be vital to the organization.  Think, ahem, about your department -- you're probably not making a profit for the company in the security suite, but your services are definitely important.  Look at the IT systems that support each line of business and assess their criticality to the success of that business component.  In today's digitized workplace, the answer will almost always be "yes," but since you don't have unlimited resources, you need to rack and stack what has to be protected first.  A Business Impact Analysis, or BIA, involves meeting with key executives throughout the organization, assessing the importance and value of IT-supported business processes, ranking them in the order in which they need to be assured, and then acting on that knowledge.  [I thought we had done an episode on BIA, but I checked back and couldn't find one.  So, expect to learn more about that in a future episode.] Backups and disaster recovery exercises are a must in today's world of ransomware and surprise risks, but make sure that you're not just hand-waving and assuming that what you think is working really is working.  Do what I call "core sampling" -- get with your team and dig way down until you reach some individual file from a particular date or can observe all logs collected for some arbitrary 5-minute period.  It's not that that information is critical in and of itself, but your team's ability to get to that information quickly and accurately should increase your confidence that they could do the same thing when a true outage occurs. Lastly, tabletop exercises are a great way to ensure that your team (as well as others from around the organization, up to and including senior leadership) know what to do when certain circumstances occur.  The advantage of tabletops is that they don't require much time and effort from the participants to go through emergency response procedures.  The disadvantage of tabletops is that you risk groupthink when everyone thinks someone else took care of that "assumed" item.  Companies have been caught flat-footed when the emergency diesel generator doesn't kick in because no one in the tabletop tests ever thought to check it for fuel, and the tank was empty.  Things change, and there's nothing like a full-scale test where people have to physically go to or do the things they would in a true emergency.  That's a reason why kids in school don't discuss what to do in a fire drill, they actually do what needs to be done -- get out of the building.  Be careful here you don't have a paper tiger for a continuity plan -- it's too late when things start to come apart to realize you hadn't truly done your homework. Those are the three Cs for executives -- controls, compliance, and continuity.  Now let's move on to developers. If you remember, the three Cs for developers are coverage, complexity, and competency. Developers need to care about Coverage. When we talk about coverage, we want to ensure that we know everything that is in our environment.  That includes having a complete and up-to-date asset inventory, knowing our processes are free from security oversight, as well as ensuring that our security controls are deployed across all of our potential attack surfaces.  "We've got your covered" is usually considered reassuring -- it's a statement that someone has thought of what needs to be protected. Specifically, our technical team members are the only ones who can generally tell if the IT asset inventory is correct.  They are the ones who run the tools, update the agents (assuming we're not agentless), and push the reporting.  If the scanning tools we use are missing hardware or software, then those gaps represent potential landing zones for enemy forces.  The Center for Internet Security's Critical Controls start with these two imperatives.  Essentially, if you don't know what you have, how can you secure it? Knowing our processes is key.  For developers today, it's much more likely that they're using a DevOps continuous integration / continuous delivery, or CI/CD process, rather than the classic waterfall methodology.  Agile is often an important part of what we do, and that continuous feedback loop between developer and customer helps to ensure that we cover requirements correctly (while being careful to avoid scope creep.)  Throughout our development cycle, there are numerous places where security belongs -- the art we call DevSecOps.  By putting all of our security processes into version control -- essentially automating the work and moving away from paper-based processes, we create a toolchain that automates our security functionality from pre-commit to commit to acceptance to production to operations.  Doing this right ensures that security in our development environment is covered. Beyond just the development pipeline, we need to cover our production environment.  Now that we've identified all hardware and software and secured our development pipeline, we need to ensure that our security tools are deployed effectively throughout the enterprise to provide protective coverage.  We may know how many servers we have, but if we don't scan continuously to ensure that the defenses are running and up to date, we are effectively outsourcing that work to bad actors, who fundamentally charge higher billing rates than developers when they take down critical systems via ransomware. In his book Data and Goliath, Bruce Schnier wrote, "Complexity is the worst enemy of security, and our systems are getting more complex all the time.[x]" Complexity is inversely correlated to security. If there are two hundred settings that you need to configure properly to make containers secure, that's a big deal.  It becomes a bigger deal when the team only understands how to apply 150 of those settings.  Essentially, your company is left with fifty opportunities for misconfiguration to be abused by bad actors.  Therefore, when possible, focus your understanding on how to minimize complexity.  For example, instead of running your own containers on premises with Kubernetes, try using Amazon Elastic Container Services.  There's a significant amount of configuration complexity decrease.  In addition, using cloud-based services give us a lot of capabilities -- elastic scaling, load balancers, multiple regions and availability zones, and even resistance to DDoS attacks.  That's a lot of overhead to ensure in a high-availability application running on servers in your data center.  Consider using AWS lambda where all of that is already handled as a service for our company.  Remember that complexity makes security more difficult and generally increases the costs of maintenance.  So only increase complexity when the business benefit exceeds the costs. From a business connectivity perspective, consider the complexity of relationships.  Many years ago, data centers were self-contained with 3270 green screens (or punched card readers if you go back far enough) as input and fan-fold line printer generated paper as output.  Essentially, the only connection that mattered was reliable electrical power. Today, we have to be aware of what's going on in our industry, our customers, our suppliers, consumers, service providers, and if we have them, joint ventures or partners.[xi]  This complex web of competing demands stretches our existing strategies, and sometimes rends holes in our coverage.  I would add to that awareness, complexity in our workforce.  How did COVID-19 affect your coverage of endpoints, for example?  Most work-from-home arrangements lost the benefit of the protection of the enterprise security bubble, with firewalls, scanners, and closely-manage endpoints.  Just issuing a VPN credential to a developer working from home doesn't do much when junior sits down at mom's computer to play some online game and downloads who-knows-what.  Consider standardizing your endpoints for manageability -- remove the complexity.  When I was in the Navy, we had exactly two endpoint configurations from which to choose, even though the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet, or NMCI, was the largest intranet in the world at the time.  Although frustrating when you have to explain to the admiral why his staff can't get fancier computers, the offsetting benefit is that when an emergency patch has to get pushed, you know it's going to "take" everywhere. Number six is Competency -- another crucial skill for developers. If your organization doesn't have competent developers, then more vulnerabilities are going to emerge.  So how do most other industries show competencies?  They use a licensure and certification process.  For example, teenagers in the United States must obtain a driver's license before they are legally approved to drive on their own.  Nearly all of us have been through the process -- get a manual when you get a learner's permit, go to a driving school to learn the basics, practice with your terrified parents, and after you reach the minimum age, try not to terrify the DMV employee in the passenger seat.  In the UK, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency recommends a minimum of 47 hours of lessons before taking the driving test, which still has only a 52% pass rate on the first attempt[xii]. Now ask yourself, is developing and deploying apps riskier than driving a car?  If so, consider creating a Developer Driver's License exam that identifies when developers are competent before your company gives them the SSH keys to your servers.  Before your new developer sits for the exam you also need to provide the training that identifies the Rules of the Road.  For example, ask: When a new application is purchased, what processes should be followed? When are third party vendor assessments needed?  How does one document applications into asset inventory systems and Configuration Management Databases? If you can build the Driver's Education Training equivalent for developer and measure competency via an exam, you can reduce the risk that comes from bad development and create a sense of accomplishment among your team. So, to summarize so far, for executives we have controls, compliance, and continuity, and for developers we have coverage, complexity, and competency.  It's now time to move to the last three for our security operations center:  clarity, context, and community. The seventh C is Communication. Let's learn from a couple quotes on effective communication. Peter Drucker said, “The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn't said.”  When you share an idea do you look at the person you are informing to see if they understand the idea?  What body language are you seeing?  Are they bored and not facing you, are they engaged and leaning in and paying close attention, or are they closed off with arms crossed?  We've probably all heard the term "active listening."  If you want to ensure the other party understands what you're saying (or if you're trying to show them you understand what they are saying), ask the listener to repeat back in their own words what the speaker has just said.  You'd be amazed how few people are needed to play the game of "telegraph" and distort a message to the point it is no longer recognizable. George Bernard Shaw said, “The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”  When you present a technical topic on a new risk to executives, ask questions to ensure they understand what you just shared.  If you don't do so, how do you know when you might be overwhelming them with information that goes right over their heads.  There's always the danger that someone will not want to look stupid and will just nod along like a bobblehead pretending to understand something about which they have absolutely no clue.  Richard Feynman had said, "If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you don't understand it yourself."  Well, let me offer G Mark's corollary to that quote:  "If you can't explain it to a six-year-old, you can't explain it to your board."  And sometimes the big boss.  And sometimes your manager.  And sometimes your co-worker.  Ask for feedback; make sure the message is understood. Earl Wilson said, “Science may never come up with a better office communication system than the coffee break.”  When you want to launch a really important initiative that needs group buy-in, did you first have one-on-ones to solicit feedback?  Did you have an ear at the water cooler to understand when people say yes but really mean no?  Do you know how to connect with people so you can ask for a favor when you really don't have the resources necessary to make something happen?  Unless you are in the military, you can't issue lawful orders to your subordinates and demand that they carry them out.  You have to structure your communication in such a way that expectations are made clear, but also have to allow for some push-back, depending on the maturity of the relationship you've developed with your team.  [War story:  Just this past week, Apple upgraded to iOS 16.  We use iPhones exclusively as corporate-issued handsets, so I sent a single sentence message to my senior IT team member:  "Please prepare and send an email to all who have an iPhone with steps on how to update the OS soonest.  Thank you."  To me, that seemed like clear communication.  The next day I get a response, "People are slowly updating to 16.0 on their own and as the phone prompts them."  After a second request where I point out "slowly" has not been our strategy for responding to exploitable security vulnerabilities, I get a long explanation of how Apple upgrades work, how he's never been questioned in his long career -- essentially the person spent five times as much time explaining why he will NOT do the task rather than just doing it.  And today 80% of the devices are still not updated.  At times like this I'm reminded of Strother Martin in Cool Hand Luke:  "What we have here is failure to communicate."  So, my lesson for everyone is even though you think your communications are crystal clear, they may not be perceived as such.] Our last quote is from Walt Disney who said, “Of all our inventions for mass communication, pictures still speak the most universally understood language.”  If you believe that pictures are more effective than words, think about how you can create the best pictures in your emails and slide decks to communicate effectively.  I remember a British officer who had visited the Pentagon years ago who commented, "PowerPoint is the language of the US military."  I think he's right, at least in that context.  Ask yourself, are pictures part of your language? Convenience is our eighth C that we are going to talk about. How do we make something convenient?  We do it by automating the routine and removing the time wasters.  In terms of a SOC, we see technology in this space emerging with the use of Security Orchestration, Automation, and Response, or SOAR technologies.  Convenience can come in a lot of ways.  Have we created helpful playbooks that identify a process to follow?  If so, we can save time during a crisis when we don't have a minute to spare.  Have we created simple processes that work via forms versus emails?  It's a lot easier to track how many forms have been submitted and filter on field data versus aggregating unstructured emails.  One thing you might consider as a way to improve convenience are Chatbots.  What if someone could ask a Chatbot a Frequently Asked Question and get a quick, automated, and accurate response?  That convenience helps people, and it saves the SOC time.  If you go that route, as new questions get asked, do you have a way to rank them by frequency and add them as new logic to the chatbot?  If you do, your chatbot gets more useful and provides even greater convenience to the workforce.  How great would it be to hear your colleagues saying it was so convenient to report an incident and see that it was handled in such a timely manner.  Find ways to build that experience and you will become the partner the business wants. Last, but not least, is the 9th C of Consistency. Want to know how to create an audit finding?  Try not being consistent.  Auditors hate that and love to point out inconsistencies in systems.  I'm sure there are auditors right now listening to this podcast smiling with joy saying, "yup, that's me."  Want to know how to pass every audit standard?  Try passing the CARE Standard for cyber security.  CARE is a Gartner acronym that means Consistent, Adequate, Reasonable and Effective.  Auditors look at the Consistency of controls by performing tests to determine if the control is working the same way over time across the organization.  Auditors also look for Adequacy to determine if you have satisfactory controls in line with business needs.  Auditors ensure that your practices are Reasonable by identifying if there exist appropriate, fair, and moderate controls.  Finally, auditors look at Effectiveness to ensure the controls are producing the desired or intended outcomes.  So, in a nutshell, show Auditors that you CARE about cyber security. Okay, let's review.  Our nine Cs are for executives, developers, and SOC teams.  Executives should master controls, compliance, and continuity; developers should master coverage, complexity, and competency; and SOC teams should focus on clarity, communications, and consistency.  If you paid careful attention, I think you would find lessons for security leaders in all nine boxes across the model.  Essentially, don't conclude because boxes four through nine are not for executives that you don't need to master them -- all of this is important to being successful in your security leadership career. Well thanks again for listening to the CISO Tradecraft podcast as we discussed the 9 C's.  And for International Talk Like a Pirate Day, I do have a rrr-request:  if you like our show, please take a few seconds to rate us five stars on your favorite podcast provider.  Another CISO pointed out to me this past week that we came up first on Spotify when searching for C-I-S-O, and that's because those rankings are crowd-sourced.  It's a great way to say thank you for the time and effort we put into our show, and I thank you in advance.  This is your host G. Marrrrk Hardy, and please remember to stay safe out there as you continually practice your CISO Trrrradecraft. References https://www.vectra.ai/blogpost/the-9-cs-of-cybersecurity-value https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_technology_controls https://www.isaca.org/resources/cobit https://www.apexgloballearning.com/cobit-vs-itil-governance-framework-company-choose-infographic/ https://www.slideshare.net/alfid/it-control-objectives-framework-a-relationship-between-coso-cobit-and-itil https://internalaudit.olemiss.edu/the-three-lines-of-defense/ https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/15-quotes-effective-communication-jim-dent-lssbb-dtm/ https://www.gartner.com/en/articles/4-metrics-that-prove-your-cybersecurity-program-works?utm_medium=socialandutm_source=facebookandutm_campaign=SM_GB_YOY_GTR_SOC_SF1_SM-SWGandutm_content=andsf249612431=1andfbclid=IwAR1dnx-9BqaO8ahzs1HHcO2KAVWzYmY6FH-PmNoh1P4r0689unQuJ4CeQNk   [i] Hall, James A. (1996).  Accounting Information Systems.  Cengage Learning, 754 [ii] https://www.isaca.org/resources/news-and-trends/industry-news/2020/cobit-2019-and-cobit-5-comparison [iii] https://www.itgovernance.co.uk/cobit [iv] https://www.coso.org/SitePages/Enterprise-Risk-Management-Integrating-with-Strategy-and-Performance-2017.aspx [v] https://www.marquette.edu/riskunit/internalaudit/coso_model.shtml [vi] https://www.coso.org/Shared%20Documents/2017-COSO-ERM-Integrating-with-Strategy-and-Performance-Executive-Summary.pdf [vii] https://www.axelos.com/certifications/itil-service-management/what-is-itil [viii] https://www.theiia.org/globalassets/site/about-us/advocacy/three-lines-model-updated.pdf [ix] https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/2/200.516 [x] https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/7441842-complexity-is-the-worst-enemy-of-security-and-our-systems [xi] https://www.pwc.com/gx/en/issues/reinventing-the-future/take-on-tomorrow/simplifying-cybersecurity.html [xii] https://www.moneyshake.com/shaking-news/car-how-tos/how-to-pass-your-uk-driving-test

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM35: How to Use Other People's Success As Proof You Can Too with Chad Maghielse

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 20:19


Chad Maghielse shares the fundamental mindset for success when things go wrong, and it's simple to understand, but difficult to implement. Do you say, “Okay, I screwed up”? Or, do you say, “Okay, I'm a screw up”?

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM34: How To Write A Book That Has True Impact

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 15:15


Writing from a place of fun, impact and love will create the final product that lives beyond you and your one life. Becky Zingale shares how she did just this.

MorseCast
Chatbot na prática com Sebrae

MorseCast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:17


Num mundo cada vez mais ágil e dinâmico, as plataformas conversacionais já são realidade. Para ter agilidade e manter o engajamento de seu público alvo, as empresas precisam estar preparadas para o atendimento automatizado através das plataformas de mensagens. Para falar na prática sobre como construir sua estratégia e sua plataforma do zero, convidamos o Hugo Lumazzini, responsável pelo desenvolvimento da solução de learn do Sebrae.

Morse Entrevistas
Chatbot na prática com Sebrae

Morse Entrevistas

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:17


Num mundo cada vez mais ágil e dinâmico, as plataformas conversacionais já são realidade. Para ter agilidade e manter o engajamento de seu público alvo, as empresas precisam estar preparadas para o atendimento automatizado através das plataformas de mensagens. Para falar na prática sobre como construir sua estratégia e sua plataforma do zero, convidamos o Hugo Lumazzini, responsável pelo desenvolvimento da solução de learn do Sebrae.

ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network
Legal Chatbots: What can and can't they do?

ABA Journal Podcasts - Legal Talk Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 27:56 Very Popular


Programmed to communicate as if they were living, breathing people, AI chatbots function by asking you a series of questions and providing you with your available options. Lawyers, law firms and courts have even gotten into the act.

Science of CX
Eliav Cohen: Integrating Chatbot Technology For Effective Customer Acquisition

Science of CX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 53:40


Eliav Cohen is a hot air balloon pilot and founder of The Bot Lab. Having Helium and Drift, the top chatbot platforms in the world, Eliav and his company help organizations set up AI chatbots to deliver amazing customer experiences.  Eliav and his team mainly work with enterprise and public companies, (but also frequently work with smaller growing organizations.) As a testament to their powerful AI-powered platform, Eliav's clients typically see a minimum of a 300% increase in conversations in the 1st 30 days. Listen to this episode and get inspired. Key Takeaways Eliav's experience as a hot air balloon pilot, and how it eventually led to him venturing into chatbotsThe various challenges faced by many companies go through when developing chatbot technology; and why most of them are essentially unsuccessfulThe different approaches that companies use to convert leads into prospects, and how digital solutions can be employed in these methodologies cite the infinite scalability of the digital worldHow organizations can use chatbot technology to identify leads, answer questions, and book meetings at moments of high intent Steps that Eliav and his team will take with their potential clients who are interested in integrating chatbots into their websitesThe content side of things when we're dealing with chatbots, who develops it? (Alongside how the different functions can be distributed to the different departments within an organization)The limitations that business owners may encounter when using chatbots Connect with Eliav Website - https://thebotlab.io/  LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/eliav-cohen-5643795/  Twitter - https://twitter.com/Eliavcohen 

ABA Journal: Legal Rebels
Legal Chatbots: What can and can't they do?

ABA Journal: Legal Rebels

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 27:56


Programmed to communicate as if they were living, breathing people, AI chatbots function by asking you a series of questions and providing you with your available options. Lawyers, law firms and courts have even gotten into the act.

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Legal Chatbots: What can and can't they do?

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 27:56


Programmed to communicate as if they were living, breathing people, AI chatbots function by asking you a series of questions and providing you with your available options. Lawyers, law firms and courts have even gotten into the act.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM33: How To Use Your Desire To Impact Others To Create Success

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 17:27


Our guest on the show today, Becky Zingale shows us how our desire to impact one person will help us impact many others, and thereby create success.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM32: How Being Different Is Sometimes Enough with Becky Zingale

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 20:14


Becky Zingale shares how her desire to help her daughter was all she needed to find the mindset required to write, publish and promote her book.

IRL - Online Life Is Real Life
The AI Medicine Cabinet

IRL - Online Life Is Real Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 25:55


Life, death and data. AI's capacity to support research on human health is well documented. But so are the harms of biased datasets and misdiagnoses. How can AI developers build healthier systems? We take a look at a new dataset for Black skin health, a Covid chatbot in Rwanda, AI diagnostics in rural India, and elusive privacy in mental health apps.Avery Smith is a software engineer in Maryland who lost his wife to skin cancer. This inspired him to create the Black Skin Health AI Dataset and the web app, Melalogic.Remy Muhire works on open source speech recognition software in Rwanda, including a Covid-19 chatbot, Mbaza, which 2 million people have used so far.Radhika Radhakrishnan is a feminist scholar who studies how AI diagnostic systems are deployed in rural India by tech companies and hospitals, as well as the limits of consent.Jen Caltrider is the lead investigator on a special edition of Mozilla's “Privacy Not Included” buyer's guide that investigated the privacy and security of mental health apps.IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla, the non-profit behind Firefox. In Season 6, host Bridget Todd shares stories of people who make AI more trustworthy in real life. This season doubles as Mozilla's 2022 Internet Health Report. Go to the report for show notes, transcripts, and more.  

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM31: How to Use Your Identity to Become Elite by Choice with Lauren Johnson

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 14:59


During this episode, Lauren Johnson shares several studies that show how your identity impacts your success. She shows how you can use that knowledge to shift your perception about yourself to create faster, more elite accomplishments.

Snackable CX
Mission Possible: 5 Tools To Keep Your Contact Center From Self-destructing

Snackable CX

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 10:43


 If your contact center is running on outdated tech, you'll quickly lose the race to provide customers with seamless experiences–ultimately tanking your customer retention and costing you revenue.And it's not just me saying that. The stakes are high as studies show that one in five customers will almost immediately abandon a brand after a single poor experience.That should make all of us in the CX space pause and reflect on how well we serve our customers.Your tech stack is a critical piece of the CX puzzle, so today we're reviewing five pieces of CX tech that will help you keep your edge and expand your influence through personalized, customer-centric pathways.Still hungry?Let us know what you think on Linkedin or by emailing snack@getmindful.com.Hear more at getmindful.com/podcasts.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM30: Lauren Johnson Uncovers How to Innovate Your Perspective to Maximize Your Results

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 19:17


Our own mental performance coach, Lauren Johnson shows us how a shift in our perspective can actually prepare us for difficulties and failures we may face so we can quickly shift our response, and keep increasing our success.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM29: How to Put Your Mind in the Best Position for the Best Outcome with Lauren Johnson

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 22:48


Lauren Johnson, a mental performance coach, knows a lot about using mindset shifts to reach goals. She says mindset isn't everything, but it impacts everything.

Nerdland maandoverzicht wetenschap en technologie
Nerdland maandoverzicht september 2022

Nerdland maandoverzicht wetenschap en technologie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 137:10


Met deze maand: Artemis-1! Gehackte Starlink-dish! Dromende spinnen! Anusloze zakken met monden! Tasmaanse tijgers! Janet Jackson! En veel meer... Shownotes: https://maandoverzicht.nerdland.be/nerdland-maandoverzicht-september-2022/ Gepresenteerd door Lieven Scheire met Hetty Helsmoortel, Els Aerts, Marian Verhelst, Natha Kerkhofs en Peter Berx. Montage: Els Aerts. Mixing: Jens Paeyeneers. (00:00:48) Synthetische embryo's (00:07:35) Krantenadvertenties Meta en RayBan slimme brillen (00:11:25) Spinnen hebben dromen (00:13:49) REM (00:18:16) De term Publication Bias (00:25:07) Voelen insecten toch pijn? (00:32:05) Foto James Webb was iets anders (00:34:24) Magellaan telescoop wordt krachtiger dan Webb (00:37:59) Tasmaanse tijger gekloond? (00:49:38) Lancering Artemis I (00:54:03) NASA zoekt ideetjes voor ertsenontginning op maan (00:56:00) Shaun the Sheep gaat mee op Artemis I (01:00:19) Botten Waterloo-soldaten waarschijnlijk in gebruikt in suikerindustrie (01:07:01) Anusloze zak met mond toch niet vroegste voorouder (01:11:16) Musk Nieuws (01:11:27) Onderzoeker KULeuven hackt Starlink dish (01:21:22) Tesla's en kinderen aanrijden (01:26:16) Toont Tesla zijn eerste humanoid robot? (01:28:29) Chatbot van Meta heeft meningen over Meta (01:31:09) Varkensharten (01:34:47) Janet Jackson doet computers crashen (01:40:34) De maan drijft sneller van ons weg (01:44:56) De aarde draait sneller (01:46:56) Cassiman overleden (01:51:50) Computerpoort kan minimale energie verbruiken (01:55:52) Youtuber geeft slangen poten terug (01:57:48) Dinosporen in droge rivierbedding Texas (01:59:19) Callbacks (01:59:33) Kompas van Tomorrowland (02:02:21) Vrienden en familie glossy van Frone Vandewiele (02:04:37) Veiling vzw Stappen (02:05:28) 26 november Lotto Arena Nerdland voor Kleine Nerds (02:06:09) SPONSOR Space Applications Services

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM28: The Exact Tools to Remove the Shame, Fear and Overwhelm and Fix Your Finances

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 14:38


Pam Prior shares two specific tactics that will finally help you achieve the most important outcomes you are striving for in your business.

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM27: How Your Core Values Can Impact Your Business Finances with Pam Prior

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 18:46


See how Pam Prior helps her clients use their purpose and values just as much as their revenue and expenses to grow their profit.

Tech Gumbo
Better Google Searches, iOS Update, Streaming Milestone, Twitter Whistleblower, Starlink Update, Another Racist Chatbot

Tech Gumbo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 21:57


News & Updates: Google Announces Better Search Results Apple has critical iOS Security Patch More Streaming than Cable Viewing Twitter Whistleblower Discloses Security Coverups Starlink puts up more satellites Another AI Chatbot becomes creepy and racist very quickly

High Volume Hiring Podcast
Chatbots CRMs and Other Recruitment Automation Systems with Max Armbruster of Talkpush

High Volume Hiring Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 24:25


Max Armbruster, CEO of chatbot company Talkpush and host of the Recruitment Hackers Podcast joins the High Volume Hiring Podcast to help our listeners better understand what a chatbot is, what kinds of employers can best use them, and why an employer would want to add one to their recruitment tech stack. In today's episode, host Steven Rothberg of College Recruiter and Max agree that the use of good recruitment automation systems enable employers to expand their talent pools, increase their click-to-apply and apply-to-hire conversion rates, shorten their time-to-hire and other response times, and massively lower their costs-per-hire. Yet as promising as these systems are for some employers and beneficial for many who are already using them, they exist in the middle-of-the-funnel, meaning that the employer first has to get candidates into the hiring funnel, perhaps through sourcing efforts or advertising their job openings on niche or general job boards. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker
CMM26: The One Shift That allowed Pam Prior to Go From Young Thief to CFO for Entrepreneurs

CEO M.I.S.C.H.I.E.F. Maker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 18:47


Pam Prior joins the conversation to share the non-bookkeeping and accounting services she offers her entrepreneur clients that contribute to 50% of their profitability.

Calling All Lovers
CALLING ABOUT GHOSTING AND DATING AI CHATBOTS Season 3 Ep 5

Calling All Lovers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 33:58


Caity calls one of her best friends Sean to chat about the latest news in love, sex, and dating this week. They analyse what it would look like if ghosting became illegal and talk about their own ghosting experiences. They also discuss a new article about people dating AI chatbots and if this is the future of dating. Article about dating AI here Follow Calling All Lovers @calling.all.lovers and host Caity @whatcaityfound Music by @simonkb_ Please also subscribe, rate and review the podcast!

eCommerce Evolution
Episode 202 - The $30 Million Instagram DM Funnel

eCommerce Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 48:02


What if you could cut your lead costs in half? What if you could shorten your sales cycle from several weeks to just a few hours? What if you could leverage organic and paid traffic for better connections, delightful customer interactions, and more sales?   That is what Chatbots can create for you.   I heard Natasha Willis speak at Blue Ribbon Miami a few months ago, and I loved her presentation so much that I invited her to be on the show!   In this episode, we unpack her $30 million Instagram DM funnel.   Here's a look at what we cover: How to use IG DMs to run quiz funnels. How to combine bots and human creativity for outstanding results. How Natasha helped cut lead costs in half for companies like Foundr. Top mistakes people make with Chat marketing. Misconceptions about Chat marketing.

App Masters - App Marketing & App Store Optimization with Steve P. Young
Chatbot Marketing to Decrease Complaints & Improve Product

App Masters - App Marketing & App Store Optimization with Steve P. Young

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 17:57


Discover the best practices for chatbot marketing and automation and the Modern Support Journey philosophy. Rapid scale can make it tough for an app publisher to keep up with user support. Without automation, you need to choose between overloading your support agents with an influx of tickets or hiring new support agents. With the former, this influx can lead to long wat times, poor customer satisfaction, and burnt-out agents On the other hand, hiring additional support agents can be expensive and you'll also have to hope that the user count stays high enough to be able to avoid layoffs down the road. With automation, however, you can have the best of all the worlds. A well-thought-out automation strategy can help your users to self-serve and quickly resolve their own issues for cents on the dollar, allowing your agents to focus their time on more complex challenges and on your VIP users. Looking at the big picture, automation not only saves you money but also... - Improves retention rates - Speeds up time to resolution - Decreases complaints and bad reviews in the app stores due to a poor customer support experience or long wait times - Can increase CSAT scores Helpshift Feedback+ https://www.helpshift.com/products/feedback-sdk/ Connect with Samantha: https://www.linkedin.com/in/samantha-pang/ Get our greatest growth hacks to increase downloads & revenue: http://www.appmasters.com/training --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/app-marketing-podcast/message

The Tech Jawn
Chatbots Make College Better: The Tech Jawn 49

The Tech Jawn

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 67:31


Apple wants employees back in the office for a hybrid work week, but, some employees want to remain remote. Something has got to give, but, we don't think it's going to be Apple.A husband of a slain wife is sentenced to 65 years in prison after her Fitbit data told a different story about how and when she was murdered.We thought facial recognition policy was bad in the United States but, New Delhi police say hold my beer. It uses data with an only 80% match threshold as evidence for potential prosecution.And Big Data and AI-powered chatbots are enhancing the college experience helping with everything from admissions to recognizing signs of depression.Link to Show Notes Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Fluency TV Francês
La sécheresse en Europe fait émerger des « pierres de la faim », la mort et d'Olivia Newton-John et de Jô et le nouveau chatbot de Meta partage son opinion sur Zuckerberg - Fluency News Francês #82

Fluency TV Francês

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 10:01


Lista de Espera | Instagram Fluency TV Francês | Playlist Fluency News Francês Neste episódio, vamos falar das “Pedras de Fome”, pedras reveladas pela seca na Europa que carregam mensagens misteriosas de mau presságio. Você também vai ouvir sobre a morte e o legado do nosso querido Jô Soares e da estrela Olivia Newton-John. Para finalizar, ainda vamos te contar as opiniões do robô da Meta sobre seu próprio chefe. C'est parti ? Material de Apoio

The Chad & Cheese Podcast
Chatbot Evolution w/ Sumit Gupta

The Chad & Cheese Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 31:26


Your life really isn't complete until you've gotten a complete breakdown of the past, present, and future of recruiting chatbots. That's why we asked PandoLogic CTO Sumit Gupta on the podcast to get a breakdown. Turns out, that chatbot may not be the correct label, considering job seekers have interviews with virtual Brad Pitt and Darth Vader to look forward to. Yeah, really. You gotta listen to this episode if you want a real taste of the future of recruiting. Or at least one company's vision of it.

Digitiv. The Podcast.
Maximizing your WordPress Site

Digitiv. The Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 19:25


How to maximize the use of your WordPress Website. (ChatBots, Plug-Ins, Video, Voice)

Le rendez-vous Tech
RDV Tech 472 – Fold & Flip, Ethereum Merge, pénurie… La rentrée de Patrick

Le rendez-vous Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 71:19


Au programme :Samsung annonce les Galaxy Fold 4 & Flip 4Ethereum passe au Proof of Stake en septembreBientôt la fin de pénurie de CPU ?#DeleteFacebook & le Chatbot de FacebookApp Tracking Transparency vs Apple AdsLa téléréalité d'Amazon avec le RingEt le reste de l'actualité !Liens :

Data Driven
*LIveStream* Virtual Personalities, Ethics, and Elon Musk Talks to His Chatbot Replica

Data Driven

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 53:25


In this live stream, Frank and Andy reflect on their conversation with Justin Harrison.

Business Pants
FRIDAY WRAP: Facebook's AI chatbot hates Facebook, Canada is ahead of the luxury tax game, and Elon wants to turn a $44 billion lawsuit into a high school senior class president debate

Business Pants

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 64:21