Podcasts about Public policy

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Principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues

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Public policy

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Best podcasts about Public policy

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Latest podcast episodes about Public policy

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: The IRS Wants To Monitor Your Bank Account: Watch Out!

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 3:22


The White House and congressional Democratic leaders are pushing a chilling proposal that would destroy all vestiges of your financial privacy. Watch out! Steve Forbes on the IRS' plans to monitor and track every bank account and on why, if this assault is not stopped immediately, everyone will be a target.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Harkin Institute with Joseph Jones

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 20:21


Senator Tom Harkin served in congress for a total of forty years. Ten in the House of Representatives and thirty as a United States Senator. During that time he amassed a great deal of public policy. Prior to his retirement in 2015 Sen. Harkin announced the creation of the Harkin Institute for Public Policy and Citizen Engagement. Today that organization, under the direction of Dr. Joseph Jones, engages in four core areas of public policy research and development.  The reason it exists is to inform, inspire and "catalyze change on issues of social justice, fairness and opportunity".  Meet Joseph Jones... Thanks for listening! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour.  

New Books Network
How to Write a Better Book: The Minority-Serving Institution Virtual Book Workshop Project

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 26:25


Book workshops produce great books, but too few scholars have access to the resources needed to organize and execute one, especially scholars at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Asian American and Pacific Islander Serving Institutions, and Tribal Colleges and Universities. The 2021 American Political Science Association Annual Meeting in Seattle, launched a new initiative, The Minority-Serving Institution Virtual Book Workshop Project, to provide book workshops for scholars (tenured, untenured, VAP, term appointments) at Minority-Serving Institutions. In the podcast, the co-directors of the Project discuss the importance of supporting MSI faculty, how to successfully apply, and what other authors, editors, and administrators can do to make this project a success. Niambi M. Carter, Associate Professor of Political Science at Howard University, published American While Black: African Americans, Immigration, and the Limits of Citizenship (Oxford 2019) and listeners may remember her New Books in Political Science podcast. Heath Brown, Associate Professor of Public Policy at John Jay College of Criminal Justice City University of New York (and former host of New Books Political Science), published Homeschooling the Right: How Conservative Education Activism Erodes the State (Columbia 2021) and Lilly Goren interviewed him for NBPS. Minority-Serving Institution Virtual Book Workshop | Deadline: January 14, 2022 | Apply Now! Susan Liebell is Dirk Warren '50 Professor of Political Science at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New England Weekend
Supply Chain Chaos 101, and "Abel Bodied" Highlights a Piece of Malden History

New England Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 31:43


Are you struggling to find your favorite foods, appliances, furniture, or anything else you need at the store? There's one major factor driving all these shortages - problems in the global supply chain. Professor Michael Goodman teaches Public Policy at UMass Dartmouth, and he joins Nichole to break down these troubles in the chain. He also has some insight on how this might be playing out in your day-to-day life in the coming weeks and months. Michael Cloherty talks with Nichole about his new book, "Abel Bodied". It focuses on a piece of American history that unfolded in Malden - the first murder during a bank robbery! Michael has details on how he came up with the idea, and teaches us a bit about the story behind the book.

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
Disaggregating China Inc., with Yeling Tan

Harvard Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 74:14


Speaker: Yeiling Tan, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Oregon Professor Yeling Tan discusses her book, Disaggregating China, Inc: State Strategies in the Liberal Economic Order. China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001 represented an historic opportunity to peacefully integrate a rising economic power into the international order based on market-liberal rules. Yet current economic tensions between the US and China indicate that this integration process has run into trouble. To what extent has the liberal internationalist promise of the WTO been fulfilled? To answer this question, this study breaks open the black box of the massive Chinese state and unpacks the economic strategies that central economic agencies as well as subnational authorities adopted in response to WTO rules demanding far-reaching modifications to China's domestic institutions. The study explains why, rather than imposing constraints, WTO entry provoked divergent policy responses from different actors within the Chinese state, in ways neither expected nor desired by the architects of the WTO. Yeiling Tan is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Oregon, and a non-resident scholar at the opens in a new windowUC San Diego 21st Century China Center. From 2017-2020, she was a fellow of the World Economic Forum's Council on the Future of International Trade and Investment. From 2017-2019, she was a member of the opens in a new windowGeorgetown University Initiative for U.S.-China Dialogue on Global Issues. In 2017-18, she was a post-doctoral fellow at the opens in a new windowPrinceton-Harvard China and the World Program in Princeton University. ​Her research interests lie at the intersection of international and comparative political economy, with an emphasis on China and the developing world. Two broad questions define her research agenda. First: how do the rules of globalization affect politics within authoritarian regimes such as China, given that these rules require increasingly far-reaching modifications to domestic institutions? Second, how do authoritarian regimes affect rule-making at the international level? She holds a PhD in Public Policy from opens in a new windowHarvard University (2017), an MPA in International Development from the opens in a new windowJohn F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (2011) and a BA (Honors, Distinction) in International Relations and Economics from opens in a new windowStanford University (2002). Apart from research on globalization and China, she has also worked in the public and non-governmental sectors on a range of issues including economic development, international security policy, global governance and governance innovations.

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas
The Poverty Line Is Too Damn Low

OFF-KILTER with Rebecca Vallas

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 59:54


Last month, the U.S. Census Bureau put out its annual snapshot of income, poverty, and health insurance in the United States—which serves as something of an annual report card on the economic well-being of America's families.  One of the most significant takeaways was the effectiveness of government relief at keeping people above the federal poverty line last year at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic: according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 53 million more Americans would have been officially poor in 2020 if not for a critical assembly of pandemic-related economic relief measures, from stimulus payments to boosts in jobless benefits, food assistance, medical coverage, and more. But while it's always good news to see the enactment of public policies that measurably move the needle on poverty and hardship, a growing number of antipoverty researchers and advocates are raising a fundamental question: What good are these kinds of data if the way the United States defines poverty doesn't bear any resemblance to the cost of a basic standard of living in the nation today? Likewise, when policymakers and elected officials commit to cutting poverty—or better, ending poverty—what are our leaders accountable to if the nation's official definition of poverty amounts to just a fraction of what human dignity and economic stability require? So, to pull back the curtain on how the United States measures poverty, the problems with the official poverty measure, and the push to reform U.S. poverty measurement, Rebecca sat down with three colleagues and friends who know a ton about measuring poverty to talk about how we can do better and why it matters so much:  Shawn Fremstad, senior fellow at the Center for Economic Policy Research, CEPR, and author of a recent report for TCF, “The Defining Down of Economic Deprivation: Why We Need to Reset the Poverty Line”; Shailly Gupta Barnes, policy director for the Poor People's Campaign and the Kairos Center for Religions, Rights, and Social Justice, which is committed to building a movement to end poverty, led by the poor; and  David Brady, professor, School of Public Policy, University of California-Riverside and a research professor at the WZB Berlin Sociadmvl Science Center—and author of another report in the same TCF series, “American Poverty Should Be Measured Relative to the Prevailing Standards of Our Time.” For more on all this: Dig into Shawn's report on why the U.S. poverty line is too damn low: “The Defining Down of Economic Deprivation: Why We Need to Reset the Poverty Line.” For more on the case for shifting to a relative poverty measure, check out David's report: “American Poverty Should Be Measured Relative to the Prevailing Standards of Our Time.” And here's lots more about the Poor People's Campaign's demands and why they're challenging the OPM.  

Stats + Stories
Wealth Inequality Escalation | Stats + Stories Episode 204

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:43


The issue of income inequality is one Americans continually wrestle with the COVID 19 pandemic bringing to light how housing, health, and general wellbeing are impacted by the unequal distribution of wealth. Income inequality in the United States is the focus of this episode of Stats and Stories with guest Joseph Gastwirth. Dr. Gastwirth is a Professor of Statistics and Economics at George Washington University. Over the course of his career he has written over 300 peer-reviewed articles, which have appeared in the Annals of Statistics, Journal of the American Statistical Association, Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Econometrica, Review of Economics and Statistics, Statistical Science, Annals of Human Genetics, Human Heredity, Jurimetrics and Statistics and Public Policy. His research has covered a variety of topics in statistical methodology and applications. Of special note are: his early work on order and non-parametric statistics, his research on estimating measures of economic inequality, fairness and discrimination and on the role of statistical evidence in jury discriminations, equal employment and other types of legal cases. The American Statistical Association awarded him Noether Award for his contributions to nonparametric statistics in 2012 and the Karl E. Peace Award for outstanding statistical contributions for the betterment of society in 2019.

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton
Ep. 43: How Panic Shaped Public Policy ft. Dr. Jay Bhattacharya

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 50:53


Steve and Kristen sit down with Dr. Jay Bhattacharya for an in-depth conversation about COVID, its effects on children, and how panic is clouding our judgment.

Eminent Domain
76. Professor Lee Fennell on Implicit Takings After Cedar Point Nursery

Eminent Domain

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 38:05


Today, we're joined by Professor Lee Fennell, the Max Pam Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School. Professor Fennell has recently written an article for an upcoming publication of the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law and Public Policy entitled Escape Room: Implicit Takings After Cedar Point Nursery. In today's interview, we have a great discussion of her article, which gives a creative and detailed analysis of the Supreme Court's Cedar Point opinion. In particular, the article dissects the many exceptions the Court has enumerated to the newly expanded definition of a per se physical taking. We also discuss the potential practical consequences of this ruling for various intrusions of government onto and burdens upon private property. Professor Fennell's paper: The Escape Room: Implicit Takings After Cedar Point Nursery The Supreme Court Opinion: Cedar Point Nursery vs. Hassid Professor Fennell's book recommendation: Lakefront: Public Trust and Private Rights in Chicago by Joseph D. Kearney and Thomas W. Merrill Please share your thoughts on the show or this episode with me.  I'm on Twitter @J_Clint.  If you have thoughts about future show guests or ideas for episodes, please let me know.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Free Speech Rights At Risk: Why The DOJ Is Targeting School Board Meetings

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 3:00


The Biden Administration has launched a major attack on our free speech liberties. Are your rights to free speech at risk? Steve Forbes on who the DOJ is targeting and on why federal law enforcement is coming for parents who challenge the policies and practices of local school boards.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
Biden and Dems Continue to Press Massive Spending Plan as Public Support Erodes

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 41:52


Townhall Review - October 16, 2021 Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Economist Stephen Moore about inflation of the sort we haven't seen in well over a decade. Mark Davis talks with Texas Congressmen Van Taylor about his recent trip to the border to witness the crisis there first hand. Seth Leibsohn and Pete Peterson, of the Pepperdine Graduate School of Public Policy, talk about U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland threatening the use of the FBI and the Patriot Act against parents who dare challenge local school boards. Hugh Hewitt talks with Retired Admiral James Stavridis about the dangers we face from China and how Russia seems most pleased to lend them a hand. Mark Davis and Seth Jones talk about Seth's book, “Three Dangerous Men: Russia, China, Iran and the Rise of Irregular Warfare.” Hugh Hewitt talks with John Bursch, of Alliance Defending Freedom, about the U.S. Supreme Court hearing cases that could overturn Roe v Wade. Sebastian Gorka turns to California Congressman Devin Nunes to examine the media establishment that seems intent on helping the left transform America. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Out Of The Clouds
Dr Tim Lomas on finding happiness through untranslatable words, and men, meditation, and mental health

Out Of The Clouds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 94:43


Dr Tim Lomas (@drtimlomas) is one of Europe's leading experts on positive psychology and the programme leader at the University of East London's MSc in Applied Positive Psychology (one of the most highly respected post-graduate courses in Europe). He has written for the Guardian, the Times, Psychology Today and has published numerous academic papers in high-profile journals, including Psychology, Public Policy and Law, Mindfulness, Psychology and Health and the Journal of Happiness Studies. His first book The Positive Power of Negative Emotions was published in 2016.In this episode Dr. Tim Lomas discusses his formative experiences travelling around China and Tibet that led him into his specialism in meditation and Buddhism. He also reveals his other passion of performing as part of a Ska band, which eventually had to give way to his PHd on Men, meditation and mental health. Tim went on to undertake research into untranslatable words that he describes as “portals into another landscape” that led him to create his Happiness Dictionary, a compilation of words from all over the world that have no translation in other languages. Discovering that concepts within psychology are western-centric and incomplete due to English being the dominant language, where it is unable to give exact equivalents to ideas from other languages. Leading to the idea that cultures that don't have words or concepts for certain feelings or emotions mean their knowledge of them can be incomplete. Therefore there is huge potential to develop the world of psychology outside of the English language.Also covered by Anne and Tim is the idea that the more language we have at our disposal to convey experiences or emotions, the more conducive it is to improved well-being and behaviour. Tim suggests that we need to strike a balance in many areas of our lives; from work-life balance to emotions and exercise. From this, harmony and integrity can be reached in our lives if a balance can be achieved within all of these areas as a whole.  Selected Links from Episode: Watch Dr Tim Lomas at TEDxZurich: https://www.ted.com/talks/tim_lomas_expanding_our_experiential_horizons_through_untranslatable_wordsYou can also find Dr. Tim Lomas at: Dr. Tim Lomas' Website - https://www.drtimlomas.com/Dr. Tim Lomas on Twitter - https://twitter.com/drtimlomas?lang=enDr. Tim Lomas on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/drtimlomas/?originalSubdomain=ukRead Dr. Tim Lomas' Books - https://www.drtimlomas.com/booksRead Dr. Tim Lomas' Papers - https://www.drtimlomas.com/papersFind Tim Lomas' Happiness Dictionary on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/happywordsproject/?hl=enDiscover Tim's Positive Lexicography, an interactive hub - https://hifisamurai.github.io/lexicography/Discover the Pema Chödrön  - https://pemachodronfoundation.org/Read Lisa Feldman Barrett's Book – How Emotions Are Made - https://lisafeldmanbarrett.com/books/how-emotions-are-made/Read Emotional Intelligence by The Dalai Lama and Paul Ekman - https://tinyurl.com/r59y75ptThe global Wellbeing Initiative - https://www.globalwellbeinginitiative.org/READ John Koenig's - The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows - https://tinyurl.com/28nxa8cs Yancey Strickler & The Bento Society - https://www.ystrickler.com/Arvo Pärt- Spiegel im Spiegel - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TJ6Mzvh3XCcThe Kermode and Mayo Film Review Podcast - https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/kermode-and-mayos-film-review/id73802698Sam Harris' Waking Up App - https://wakingup.com/ *** If you enjoyed this episode, click subscribe for more, and consider writing a review of the show on Apple Podcasts, it helps people find us and also helps to secure future guests. Thank you  so much for listening! For all notes and transcripts, please visit Out Of The Clouds on Simplecast - https://out-of-the-clouds.simplecast.com/  Sign up for Anne's email newsletter for more from Out of the Clouds at https://annevmuhlethaler.com. Follow Anne: Twitter: @annvi  IG: @_outoftheclouds  

Show-Me Institute Podcast
A Nation Still at Risk with Checker E. Finn Jr.

Show-Me Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:03


Chester "Checker" E. Finn, Jr., scholar, educator and public servant, has devoted his career to improving education in the United States. At Fordham, he is now Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus. He's also a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. Finn served as Fordham's President from 1997 to 2014, after many earlier roles in education, academe and government. From 1999 until 2002, he was John M. Olin Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and previously at Hudson Institute. In 1992-94, he served as founding partner and senior scholar with the Edison Project. He was Professor of Education and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University from 1981 until 2002. From 1985 to 1988, he served as Assistant Secretary for Research and Improvement and Counselor to the Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education. Earlier positions include Staff Assistant to the President of the United States; Special Assistant to the Governor of Massachusetts; Counsel to the U.S. Ambassador to India; Research Associate at the Brookings Institution; and Legislative Director for Senator Daniel P. Moynihan.

The Joe Piscopo Show
7 AM Hour The Joe Piscopo Show 10-14-21

The Joe Piscopo Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 53:09


Janice Dean, Fox News Channel Senior Meteorologist, whose in-laws passed away from COVID-19, and the author of “Make Your Own Sunshine: Inspiring Stories of People Who Find Light in Dark Times”. Topic: Meeting with Gov. Kathy Hochul Dr. Ben Dworkin, Founding Director of the Rowan Institute for Public Policy & Citizenship at Rowan University in Glassboro, NJ. Topic: Moderating the Ciattarelli/Murphy gubernatorial debate Adriana Trigiani,  New York Times bestselling author of twenty books in fiction and nonfiction,  an award-winning playwright, television writer and producer, and filmmaker. Topic: Italian Heritage Month See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Jarrett Skorup, Director of Marketing and Communications at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:34


Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: What The Fed Can Learn From The History of Inflation

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 3:31


As the Federal Reserve, the White House and Congress play with fire regarding future inflation and economic stagnation, there's a lot they can learn from the history of inflation. Steve Forbes on the seemingly forgotten past of former President Ulysses S. Grant and the crucial role he played in enabling the U.S. to become the most significant economic colossus in history. Can the ghost of Ulysses S. Grant save us from an economic catastrophe?Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

New Hampshire Journal
'We Are the Majority:' Anti-Vax Protesters Speak Out As Sununu Loses Exec Council Fight

New Hampshire Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:00


New Hampshire Journal's Damien Fisher was on the scene of Wednesday's 4-1 vote rejecting federal funding for COVID-19 vaccine distribution. He talks about what he saw and shares audio of protesters in their own words.One idea vaccine mandate opponents are pushing: Having the government order businesses not to mandate the shot. Drew Cline from the free-market think tank The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy talks about it. He also lays out the findings from a new JBC study on how restrictive land use rules are killing communities in New Hampshire.Hosted by Michael Graham

That's Total Mom Sense
ERAM SIDDIQUI: Embracing Her Roots and Paying it Forward

That's Total Mom Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:39


As you all know, I am an organization aficionado. I am a minimalist and believe in buying things of good quality and store them in a way that's functional and aesthetic. That's why I am LOVING the brand Hudson+Bleecker. They provide storage solutions for your daily needs from cosmetic bags to suitcase storage to garment bags. I became fast friends with the founder Eram Siddiqui and am excited to have her on this IG PODCAST LIVE today. Eram Siddiqui brings over 10 years of entrepreneurial experience as Founder and CEO of Hudson+Bleecker, the premier travel and lifestyle accessories brand focused on thoughtfully designed and functional accessories for women on-the-go. Launched in 2011, Hudson+Bleecker is one of the fastest growing travel accessories brands for women in the country, with over 500 global retailers including Nordstrom and REVOLVE. Hudson+Bleecker has also been featured on QVC, Forbes, Fast Company, The New York Times, The Today Show, Newsweek and has a following of notable beauty, travel and style influencers. Eram started her career in Public Policy advising two female United States Senators on banking, finance and international trade and then moved on to providing legislative guidance to financial institutions. She loves to travel, hike, cook and spend time with her family as well as support not-for-profit and philanthropic causes. Eram is a Board Member of the Sundara Fund, is Founding Member of Imapct100NYC and supports The Floating Hospital with annual donations of hygiene kits to survivors of domestic violence and women living in NYC shelters. Eram received her B.A. at the University of California, Irvine in Political Science and International Studies. She lives in NYC with her husband, Anees (pronounced Uh-nees), her son Raif (pronounced Rayf) and daughter, Inara (In-ara) Meet My Guest: WEBSITE: HudsonandBleecker.com Promo Code Receive 20% off at HUDSON + BLEECKER using promo code MOMSENSE20 Mom Haul: WANDER BEAUTY: Anything from Wander Beauty!

Security Nation
Michael Daniel on the Cyber Threat Alliance

Security Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:06


Interview linksFollow Michael on Twitter @CyAlliancePrezLearn more about the Cyber Threat AllianceCheck out the Ransomware Task Force, which Michael co-chairsRead Jen's position piece on hack backRapid Rundown linksRead the full text of the Cyber Incident Reporting ActRefresh your memory on the SolarWinds data breachSee who's on the House Homeland Security Committee 

Be Well, Be Keto: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Results!
#185 Dr Joseph Antoun - Fasting Mimicking Diet

Be Well, Be Keto: Ordinary People, Extraordinary Results!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:09


Dr. Joseph Antoun is CEO & Chairman of the Board of L-Nutra and a Member of the Forbes Business Development Council. He's the former CEO of Health Systems Reform, a boutique consultancy aimed at improving public health by reforming health systems, management, and delivery. Prior to that, he was Director of Health Policy at the University of Chicago, Editor in Chief of the Journal of Health Systems and Reform, and head of Business Development for Eli Lilly & Co. He completed his studies in Public Policy at Harvard University, in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, and his Doctorate in Medicine and Masters' in Medical and Biological Sciences at Saint Joseph University. L-Nutra is the first nutra-tech company to focus on providing people the knowledge and products to live to 110 and beyond. A culmination of 25 years of research at the University of Southern California (USC) and 12 other partner universities, L-Nutra is pioneering Nutri-technologies that mimic and enhance the effects of fasting to unleash the body's natural ability to fuel and rejuvenate itself. L-Nutra's team of researchers and collaborators are leaders in the field of nutrition related to longevity and healthspan.

Policy 360
Ep. 129 (Un)certainty: On Journalism, Education and Social Discourse

Policy 360

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:24


If you've ever opened the New York Times, it's likely that you've read something by Frank Bruni. He worked at the paper for 25 years as metro reporter, White House correspondent, Rome bureau chief, and even the chief restaurant critic for a time. He was also the first openly gay op-ed columnist at the Times. Bruni is now a faculty member at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University and he joins Dean Judith Kelley to talk about polarization, ambivalence and ambiguity in the media. Here's the article they discuss.

Forgotten America
Ep. 030: Property Rights Can Save the Environment

Forgotten America

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 48:57


Peter J. Hill is Professor of Economics Emeritus at Wheaton College and a Senior Fellow at the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, Montana, where he currently resides. He joins Garrett on Forgotten America to discuss free-market environmentalism (FME) and the property rights framework he uses to evaluate conservation issues. P.J. also gives us a look back into the truth about the Wild West and whether or not it was really all that wild.    Follow P.J.'s work and the work of PERC at https://www.perc.org/    Rachel Carson's Silent Spring: http://www.rachelcarson.org/SilentSpring.aspx   Learn more about the economist Ronald Coase: https://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/bios/Coase.html    Read about Terry Anderson at PERC: https://www.perc.org/people/terry-anderson-2/     You can buy the book Free Market Environmentalism for the Next Generation on Amazon.    Edward Abbey was originally discussed in Ep. 021.    The Not So Wild, Wild West by Terry Anderson & P.J. Hill    The Foundation for Economic Education teaches about the Knowledge Problem.  ------------------------------------------------------------------------   You can support the Cardinal Institute by donating or following us on social media:    Donate: www.cardinalinstitute.com/donate Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/cardinalinstitute Newsletter: www.cardinalinstitute.com/contact YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCosCMp86mjLbf8ZWfE5yS7Q Twitter: @CardinalWV Facebook: /CardinalInstitute/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cardinal-institute-for-wv-policy/ Instagram: @teamcardinalwv  

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: The Public Pension Crisis: Are Your Taxes Going To Go Up?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 3:32


Government pension funds are in bad shape, and taxpayers could take the hit to make good on the financial shortfalls. Could your taxes be going up? Steve Forbes on the public pension crisis and the fundamental problem with payouts defined by unrealistic political promises, and on what states and municipalities should do differently before the lack of money forces a crisis.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Savage Minds Podcast
Michael Hudson

Savage Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 64:18


Michael Hudson, American economist and author of Super Imperialism: The Economic Strategy of American Empire (1972) discusses the rentier economy that accounts for the growing disparity in wealth due to finance capitalism. Giving a history of the the polarisation of the US economy since the 1960s through the present, Hudson discusses how the high costs of education and housing have led to a growing problem of student debt, higher costs of living and increasing austerity. Noting how 80% of bank loans are made for real estate in the US, Hudson expounds upon how loans and exponentially growing debts outstrip profits from the economy proving disastrous for both the government and the people who are paying increasing amounts on housing with little to no money left to spend on goods and services. Hudson contends that finance capitalism is a “self-terminating” oligarchical system leaving workers traumatised, afraid to strike or react to working conditions, while they are pushed towards serfdom as US and Europe are heading towards a debt crisis on par with that of Argentina and Greece.TranscriptIntroduction: Welcome to Savage Minds. I'm your host, Julian Vigo. Today's show marks the launch of our second season with a very special guest: Michael Hudson. Michael Hudson is a financial analyst and president of the Institute for the Study of long term economic trends. He is a distinguished research professor of economics at the University of Missouri Kansas City, and the professor at the School of Marx studies, Peking University in China. He's also a research fellow at the Levy Institute of Bard College, and he has served as an economic adviser to the US Canadian, Mexican, and Latvian governments. He's also been a consultant to UNITAR, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Canadian Science Council, among other organisations. He holds a BA from the University of Chicago and an MA and PhD in economics from New York University. Professor Hudson is the author of Killing the Host: How Financial Parasites and Debt Bondage Destroy the Global Economy (2015), and most recently, J is for junk economics, a guide to reality in an age of deception. His super imperialism, the economic strategy of the American Empire has just been translated into German after its appearance in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish. He sits on the editorial board of lap times quarterly and has written for the Journal of International Affairs, Commonweal, International Economy, Financial Times, and Harper's, and he's a regular contributor to CounterPunch. I welcome Michael Hudson, to Savage Minds.Julian Vigo: Class analysis in the United States is rather subterfuge amidst all these other narratives of the American dream as it's framed—that being the right to own one's home. In the UK, that became part of the Trojan horse, that Thatcher built to win her election. It was a very smart move. She won that election—she won her elections—by the reforms in the “right to buy” scheme as I'm sure you know. I t was really clever and disastrous for human rights in the country. I've spent quite a bit of my life in the UK and to see that in 1979 was, I believe, 49% of all residential housing was council housing. And when I wrote a piece on this for the Morning Star about eight, nine years ago, that rate was reduced to under 11%. So we're seeing the haves- and have-nots. And this is where your work really struck a chord for me. And let's kick into the show at this point. I have written over the years, about rentier capitalism, a term that is increasingly used to describe economies dominated by rentier, rents and rent-generating assets. And you discuss this quite a bit in your work, more recently, your article from July, “Finance Capitalism versus Industrial Capitalism: The Rentier Resurgence and Takeover.” And in this article, you discuss how today the finance, insurance and real estate sectors have regained control of government creating a “neo-rentier” economy as you put it, while you note—and I quote you: “The aim of this postindustrial finance capitalism is the opposite of industrial capitalism as known to nineteenth-century economists: it seeks wealth primarily through the extraction of economic rent, not industrial capital formation.” Unquote. I was wondering if we might begin our talk by branching out from this piece you wrote in July. And if you could explain for our listeners why discerning rentier capitalism is essential for understanding the global push to privatise and financialise those sectors that formerly existed in the public domain such as—and we see this everywhere, including in the EU—transportation, health care, prisons, policing, education, the post office, etc.Michael Hudson: Well, most textbooks depict a sort of happy world that almost seems to exist in the 1950s. And this “happy world” is when wealthy people get money, they build factories and buy machinery and hire workers to produce more goods and services. But that's not what the credits created for today, it's the textbooks that pick the banks that take in people's deposits and lend them out to people who build industrial production, and you'll have a picture of workers with lunchboxes working in. But actually, banks only lend money against assets. And the main assets do not make a profit by employing people to produce things there. They simply are opportunities to extract rent, like real estate 80% of bank loans are made for real estate. And that means they're made against primarily buildings that are in land that are already there. And the effective more and more bank credit is to raise the price of real estate. And in the United States, in the last year, housing prices have gone up 20%. And typically, in America, if you go to a bank and take out a loan, the government is going to guarantee the bank that you will pay the loan up to the point where it absorbs 43% of your income.So here's a big chunk of American income going to pay simply for housing, those price increases, not because there's more housing, or better housing. But in fact, the housing is built worse and worse every year, by lowering the standards, but simply inflation. There are other forms of rent, other people pay, for instance, 18% of America's GDP is healthcare, much higher than the percentage in any other country for much lower quality of service. So you know, that's sort of taken out of people's budgets. If you're a worker in the United States, right away, you get your paycheque 15%—a little more, maybe 16% now—is deducted for Social Security and medical care for when you're older. They also need up to maybe 30%, for income tax, federal, state and local income tax before you have anything to spend. And then you have to spend for housing, you have to pay for transportation, you have to pay for your own medical insurance contributions, your own pension contributions. So there's very, very little that is left over in people's budgets to buy goods and services. Not only have real wages in the United States, gone down now for three decades, but the disposable income that people and families get after they meet their sort of monthly “nut,” what they can spend on goods and services is shrunk even more. So while they're getting squeezed, all this money is paid to rentiers as at the top. And because of the miracle of compound interest, the amount that the 1% of the economy has grows exponentially. Any rate of interest is a doubling time. And even though people know that there's only a 0.1% rate of interest, now for the banks, and for large wall firms, it's about 3% if you want to buy a mortgage. and so this, the 0.1% is lent out to large companies like Blackstone that are now buying up almost all of the housing that comes onto the market in the United States. So in 2008, 69% of homeowners of Americans own their own homes. Now it's fallen by more than 10%. It's fallen to about 51%. All this difference has been basically the financial sector funding a transformation away from home ownership into landlordship—into absentee ownership. And so the if you're part of the 1%, the way that you make money is by buying stocks or bonds, or corporate takeovers, or buying real estate and not building factories. And that's why the factories and the industry have been shifting outside of the United States over to China, and other countries. So, what we're having is a kind of…I won’t say its post-industrial capitalism, because people thought that the what was going to follow industrial capitalism was going to be socialism. They thought that there will be more and more government spending on providing basic needs that people had. And instead of socialism, and a more, egalitarian distribution of wealth and income, you've had a polarization of wealth and income, you've had the wealthy people making money financially, and by real estate, and by rent seeking, and by creating monopolies, but not by building factories, not by producing goods and services. And that is why the economy's polarizing, and so many people are unhappy with their conditions. Now, they're going further and further into debt and their student debt. Instead of education here being a public utility that's provided freely, it's become privatised at NYU, it's now $50,000 or $60,000 a year. There is no way in which the United States can compete industrially with other countries when they've loaded down new entrants into the labor force with huge housing costs, student debt, huge taxes have been shifted off the 1% onto the 99%. So in the United States, finance capitalism basically is self-terminating. It leads to a polarised economy, it leads to austerity. And it leaves countries looking like Greece looked after 2015, after its debt crisis, it looks like Argentina is trying to struggle to pay its foreign debts. And that seems to be the future in which the US and Europe are moving towards.Julian Vigo: I posted on my Facebook wall about this about maybe five weeks ago, that the rentier class, I'm not just including the likes of Blackstone, but the middle class that are multiple home dwellers. I noted that during the lockdown, I was reading through accounts on social media of people who were being threatened by landlords, landlords, who actually had no mortgage to pay. And I had to wonder at that point, what is the input of the rentier class by the landowning class who are not necessarily part of the 1%. These are people who, as some of these people came on my wall and said, “I worked hard to buy my second and third houses!” And I thought, “Well, let me pull out my violins.” One thing that really alerted me during lockdown was the lack of sympathy for renters. And I don't just mean in the US, in fact, I think the US had a kinder response to renting in some sectors such as New York state where there has been—and still—is a massive pushback against any form of relaxation of rent forgiveness, since lockdown in the EU and Italy and France. It's appalling the kind of treatment that renters received here. I spoke to people in Bologna, who were doing a rent strike, but fearful of having their name mentioned. I ended up not being able to run the piece because of that. And there are so many people who don't have money to pay their rent in the EU, in the UK, and yet, we're somehow focusing oftentimes on these meta-critical analyses of the bigger corporations, the 1%. But where does the middle class fit into this, Michael, because I do have to wonder if maybe we should be heading towards the model I hold in my mind and heart is St. Ives in Cornwall, which about eight years ago set a moratorium saying no second homes in this city. Now, they didn't do it because of any allegiance to Marxism or socialism. They did it in part because of that, and because of a left-leaning politics, but mostly because they didn't want to have a ghost town that when the summer was over, you had very few people living in town. What are the answers to the rentier class that is also composed of people who consider themselves hard-working people who just want someone else to pay for their house, as one person on Twitter, put it.Michael Hudson: This is exactly the problem that is plaguing left wing politics, from Europe to America in the last fifty years.Julian Vigo: Exactly. It's astounding because there was a lot of debate on Twitter around last summer, when one woman wrote, I just did the math, I'm almost 29 years old, and I paid and she listed the amount in rent, I have just bought my landlord a second house. And people are adding it up that we are back to understanding. And I think in terms of the medieval period, remember in high school in the US when you study history, and you learn about feudalism, and the serfs coming in from far afield having to tend to the Masters terrain. And I think, are we heading back to a kind of feudalism under a new name? Because what's dividing those who can afford rents and those who can, it's not only your eligibility to receive a bank loan in this climate, which is quite toxic in London. I know many architects, lawyers, physicians who cannot get bank loans. Ironically, the bar is being raised so high that more and more people in London are moving on to the canal system—they're renting or buying narrowboats. The same is happening in other parts of the world where people are being barred out of home ownership for one reason or another and at the same time, there's a class of people often who got loans in a period when it was quite easy in the 80s and early 90s, let's say and they hold a certain control over who's paying—43% of income of Americans goes on housing. And as you know, in New York City that can be even higher. How can we arrive at a society where there's more equality between these haves and have-nots? Because it seems that the middle class is playing a role in this. They're trying to come off as being the hard-working schmoes, who have just earned their right to own their second or third homes, and then the others who will never have a foot on that ladder, especially given the crash?Michael Hudson: Well, I think you've put your finger on it. Most people think of economies being all about industry. But as you've just pointed out, for most people, the economy is real estate. And if you want to understand how modern economies work, you really should begin by looking at real estate, which is symbiotic with with banking, because as you pointed out that in a house is worth whatever a bank will lend. And in order to buy a house, unless you have an enormous amount of savings, which hardly anyone has, you'll borrow from a bank and buy the house. And the idea is to use the rent to pay the interest to the bank. And then you end up hoping late hoping with a capital gain, which is really land price gain. You borrow from the bank hoping that the Federal Reserve and the central bank or the Bank of England is going to inflate the economy and inflate asset prices and bank credit is going to push prices further and further up. As the rich get richer, they recycle the money in the banks and banks lend it to real estate. So, the more the economy is polarised between the 1% and the 99%, the more expensive houses get the more absentee landlords are able to buy the houses and outbid the homebuyers, who as you pointed out, can't get loans because they're already loaned up. If they can't get loans in England to buy a house, it's because they already owe so much money for other things. In America, it would be because they own student debt or because they own other bank loans, and they're all loaned up. So the key is people are being squeezed more than anywhere else on housing. In America, it rents care too and on related sort of monopoly goods that yield rent. Now the problem is why isn't this at the centre of politics?Is it because— and it's ironic that although most people in every country, Europe and America are still homeowners, or so they only own their own home—they would like to be rocky as a miniature? They would like to live like the billionaires live off the rents. They would like to be able to have enough money without working to get a free lunch and the economy of getting a free lunch. And so somehow, they don't vote for what's good for the wage earners. They vote for well, if I were to get richer, then I would want to own a house and I would want to get rent. So I'm going to vote in favour of the landlord class. I'm going to vote in favour of banks lending money to increase housing prices. Because I'd like to borrow money from a bank to get on this treadmill, that's going to be an automatic free lunch. Now, I not only get rent, but I'll get the rising price of the houses that prices continue to rise. So somehow, the idea of class interest, they don't think of themselves as wave generators, they think of themselves as somehow wouldn't be rentiers in miniature without reaising that you can't do it in miniature. You really have to have an enormous amount of money to be successful rentier.So no class consciousness means that the large real estate owners, the big corporations like Blackstone, that own huge amounts can sort of trot out a strapped, homeowner and individual, and they will sort of hide behind it and say, “Look at this, poor family, they use their money to buy a house, the sort of rise in the world, and now the tenants have COVID, and they can't pay the rent. Let's not bail out these, these landlords.” So even though they're not getting rent, we have to aid them. And think of them as little people, but they're not little people. They're a trillion dollar, money managers. They're huge companies that are taking over. And people somehow personify the billionaires and the trillion dollar real estate management companies as being small people just like themselves. There's a confusion about the economic identity.Julian Vigo: Well, certainly in the United States, we are known to have what's called the “American dream.” And it's, it's quite interesting when you start to analyse what that dream has morphed into, from the 1960s to the present, and I even think through popular culture. Remember Alexis, in Dynasty, this was the go-to model for success. So we've got this idea that the super rich are Dallas and Dynasty in the 80s. But 20 years after that, we were facing economic downfalls. We had American graduates having to go to graduate school because they couldn't get a job as anything but a barista. And the model of getting scholarships or fellowships, any kind of bursary to do the Masters and PhD. When I was doing my graduate work, I was lucky enough to have this, but that was quickly disappearing. A lot of my colleagues didn't have it. And I imagine when you went to school, most of your colleagues had it. And today, and in recent years, when I was teaching in academia, most of my students doing advanced degrees had zero funding. So, we've got on the one hand, the student debt, hamster wheel rolling, we have what is, to me one of the biggest human rights issues of the domestic sphere in countries like the US or Great Britain, frankly, everywhere is the ability to live without having to be exploited for the payment of rent. And then we have this class of people, whether they're Blackstone, and huge corporations, making billions, or the middle class saying, “But I'm just living out the American dream.” How do we square the “American dream,” and an era where class consciousness is more invisible than ever has it been?Michael Hudson: I think the only way you can explain that is to show how different life was back in the 1960s, 1950s. When I went to school, and the college, NYU cost $500 a semester, instead of 50,000, that the price of college has gone up 100 times since I went to college—100 times. I rented a house in a block from NYU at $35 a month on Sullivan Street. And now that same small apartment would go for 100 times that much, $3,500 a month, which is a little below the average rent in Manhattan these days. So, you've had these enormous increases in the cost of getting an education, they cost of rent, and in a society where housing was a public utility, and education was a public utility, education would be provided freely. If the economy wanted to keep down housing prices, as they do in China for instance, then you would be able to work if the kind of wages that Americans are paid today and be able to save. The ideal of China or countries that want to compete industrially is to lower the cost of living so that you don't have to pay a very high wages to cover the inflated cost of housing, the cost of education.If you privatise education in America, and if you increase the housing prices, then either you're going to have to pay labor, much higher rates that will price it out of world markets, at least for industrial goods, or you'll have to squeeze budgets. So yes, people can pay for housing, and education, but they're not going to buy the goods and services they produce. And so and that's one of the reasons why America is not producing industrial manufacturers. It's importing it all abroad. So the result of this finance capitalism that we have the result of the rent squeeze, that you depict, and the result of voters not realising that this is economic suicide for them is that the economy is shrinking and leaving people basically out in the street. And of course, all of this is exacerbated by the COVID crisis right now. Where, right now you have, especially in New York City, many people are laid off, as in Europe, they're not getting an income. Well, if your job has been closed down as a result of COVID, in Germany, for instance, you're still given something like 80% of your normal salary, because they realise that they have to keep you solvent and living. In the United States, there's been a moratorium on rents, they realise that, well, if you've lost your job, you can't pay the rent. There's a moratorium on evictions, there's a moratorium on bank foreclosures on landlords that can't pay their mortgage to the bank, because their tenants are not paying rent. All of that is going to expire in February, that’s just in a few months.  So they're saying, “OK, in New York City, 50,000 tenants are going to be thrown out onto the street, thousands of homes are going to be foreclosed on.” All over the country, millions of Americans are going to be subject now to be evicted. You can see all of the Wall Street companies are raising private capital funds to say, “We're going to be waiting for all this housing to come onto the market. We're going to be waiting for all of these renovations to take place. We're going to swoop in and pick it up.” This is going to be the big grab bag that is going to shape the whole coming generation and do to America really what Margaret Thatcher did to England when she got rid of—when she shifted from housing, the council housing that you mentioned, was about half the population now dow to about 1/10 of the population today.Julian Vigo: This is what I wonder is not being circulated within the media more frequently. We know that major media is not...[laughts] They like to call themselves left-of-centre but they're neoliberal which I don't look at anything in the liberal, the neoliberal sphere, as “left.” I look at it as a sort of strain of conservatism, frankly. But when you were speaking about paying $35 a month for an apartment on Sullivan Street, get me a time machine! What year was that? Michael?Michael Hudson: That was 1962.Julian Vigo: 1962 And roughly, the minimum wage in New York was just over $1 an hour if I'm not mistaken.Michael Hudson: I don't remember. I was making I think my first job on Wall Street was 50 to $100. A year $100 a week.Julian Vigo: So yes, I looked it up because I was curious when you said 100 times certainly we see that. If the tuition at New York when and New York University when I left was $50,000 a year you were paying $500 a semester. This is incredible inflation.Michael Hudson: And I took out a student loan from the state because I wanted to buy economic books. I was studying the history of economic thought and so I borrowed, you know, I was able to take out a loan that I repaid in three years as I sort of moved up the ladder and got better paying jobs. But that was the Golden Age, the 1960s because in that generation there was the baby boom that just came online. There were jobs for everybody. There was a labor shortage. And everybody was trying to hire—anyone could get a job. I got to New York and I had $15 in my pocket in 1960. I'd shared a ride with someone, [I] didn't know what to do. We stayed in a sort of fleabag hotel on Bleecker Street that was torn down by the time you got there. But I,  took a walk around and who should I run into that Gerde's Folk City, but a friend of mine had stayed at my house in Chicago once and he let me stay at his apartment for a few weeks till I can look around, find a place to live and got the place for $35 a month,Julian Vigo: When there was that debate on Twitter—there were many debates actually about renting on Twitter—and there were a few landlords who took to Twitter angry that they learned that their renters had received subsidies in various countries to pay their rent. And instead of paying their rent, the people use this to up and buy a downpayment on a home. And they got very upset. And there was a bit of shadow on Friday there with people saying, “Well, it's exactly what you've done.” And I find this quite fascinating, because I've always said that the age of COVID has made a huge Xray of our society economically speaking. And it's also telling to me that in countries that I would assume to be more socialist leaning, if not socialist absolutely, in the EU, we saw very few movements against rent. Very few people or groups were calling for a moratorium on rent. It's ironic, but it was in the US where we saw more moratoria happen. What is happening where—and this reaches to larger issues, even outside of your specialty of economics and finance—but why on earth has it come to be that the left is looking a lot more like the right? And, don't shoot me, but you know, I've been watching some of Tucker Carlson over the past few years, someone who I could not stand after 9/11. And he has had more concern and more investigations of the poor and the working class than MSBC or Rachel Maddow in the biggest of hissy fits. What is going on politically that the valences of economic concern are shifting—and radically so?Michael Hudson: Well, the political situation in America is very different from every other country. In the Democratic Party, in order to run for a position, you have to spend most of your time raising money, and the party will support whatever candidates can raise the most money. And whoever raises the largest amount of money gets to be head of a congressional committee dealing with whatever it is their campaign donors give. So basically, the nomination of candidates in the United States, certainly in the Democratic Party, is based on how much money you can raise to finance your election campaign, because you're supposed to turn half of what you raised over to the party apparatus. Well, if you have to run for an office, and someone explained to me in in the sixties, if I wanted to go into politics, I had to find someone to back up my campaign. And they said, “Well, you have to go to the oil industry or the tobacco industry.”And you go to these people and say, “Will you back my campaign?” And they say, Well, sure, what's your position going to be on on smoking on oil and the the tax position on oil, go to the real estate interest, because all local politics and basically real estate promotion projects run by the local landlords and you go to the real estate people and you say, “Okay, I'm going to make sure that we have public improvements that will make your land more valuable, but you won't have to pay taxes on them.” So, if you have people running for office, proportional to the money they can make by the special interests, that means that all the politicians here are representing the special interests that pay them and their job as politicians is to deliver a constituency to their campaign contributors. And so the campaign contributors are going to say, “Well, here's somebody who could make it appear as if they're supporting their particular constituency.” And so ever since the 60s, certainly in America, the parties divided Americans into Irish Americans, Italian Americans, black Americans, Hispanic Americans. They will have all sorts of identity politics that they will run politicians on. But there's one identity that they don't have—and that's the identity of being a wage earner. That's the common identity that all these hyphenated Americans have in common. They all have to work for a living and get wages, they're all subject to, they have to get housing, they have to get more and more bank credit, if they want to buy housing so that all of the added income they get is paid to the banks as mortgage interest to get a home that used to be much less expensive for them. So basically, all of the increase in national income ends up being paid to the campaign contributors, the real estate contributors, the oil industry, the tobacco industry, the pharmaceuticals industry, that back the politicians. And essentially, you have politics for sale in the United States. So we're really not in a democracy anymore—we're in an oligarchy. And people don't realise that without changing this, this consciousness, you're not going to have anything like the left-wing party.And so you have most Americans out wanting to be friendly with other Americans, you know, why can't everybody just compromise and be in the centre? Well, there's no such thing as a centrist. Because you'll have an economy that's polarising, you have the 1% getting richer and richer and richer by getting the 99% further and further in debt. So the 99% are getting poorer and poor after paying their debts. And to be in the centre to say, and to be say, only changes should be marginal, that means—a centrist is someone who lets this continue. With that we're not going to make a structural change, that's radical, we're not going to change the dynamic that is polarising the economy, between creditors at the top and debtors is at the bottom, between landlords at the top and renters at the bottom between monopolists and the top and the consumers who have to pay monopoly prices for pharmaceuticals, for cable TV, for almost everything they get. And none of this is taught in the economics courses. Because you take an  economics course, they say, “There's no such thing as unearned income. Everybody earns whatever they can get.” And the American consciousness is shaped by this failure to distinguish between earned income and unearned income and a failure to see that dynamic is impoverishing them. It's like the proverbial frog that's been boiled slowly in water. So, with this false consciousness people have—if only they can save enough and borrow from a bank—they can become a rentier in Miniature. They're just tricked into a false dream.Intermission: You're listening to savage minds, and we hope you're enjoying the show. Please consider subscribing. We don't accept any money from corporate or commercial sponsors. And we depend upon listeners and readers just like you. Now back to our show.Julian Vigo: I don't know if you saw the movie called Queen of Versailles. It was about this very bizarre effort to construct a very ugly Las Vegas-style type of Versailles by a couple that was economically failing. And it spoke to me a lot about the failings of the quote unquote, “American dream.” And I don't mean that dream, per se. I mean, the aspiration to have the dream, because that is, as you just pointed out, unearned income, that is the elephant in the room. And it almost seems to be the elephant maybe to keep using that metaphor, that the blind Sufi tale: everyone's feeling a different part of it, but no one is naming it. And I find this really shocking, that we can't speak of unearned income and look at the differences as to which country's tax inheritance and which do not—this idea that one is entitled to wealth. Meanwhile, a lot of US institutions are academically, now formally, being captured by the identity lobbies and there are many lobbies out there—it's a gift to them. They don't have to work on the minimum wage, they don't have to work on public housing, they don't have to work on housing.They can just worry about, “Do we have enough pronoun badges printed out?” And I find this really daunting as someone who is firmly of the left and who has seen some kind of recognition have this problem bizarrely, from the right. We seem to have a blind spot where we're more caught up in how people see us, rather than the material reality upon which unearned and earned income is based. Why is it that today people are living far worse than their grandparents and parents especially?Michael Hudson: Well, I think we've been talking about that, because they have to pay expenses as their parents and grandparents didn't have to pay, they have to pay much higher rent. Everybody used to be able to afford to buy a house, that was the definition of “middle class” in America was to be a homeowner. And when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s, everybody on the salary they were getting could afford to buy their house. And that's why so many people bought the houses with working class sell rates. As I told you, I was getting $100 a week. At least if you were quiet you could do it. If you were black, you couldn't do it. The blacks were redlined. But the white people could buy the houses. And that's why today, the white population has so much more wealth than the black population, because the white families would leave the house to the children and housing prices have gone up 100 times. And because they've gone up 100 times, this is endowed with a whole white hereditary class of kids whose family own their own homes, send them to schools. But America was redlined. Now Chicago was redlined, blacks were redlined. In New York City, the banks would not lend money to black neighbourhoods or to black borrowers. I was at Chase Manhattan and they made it very clear: they will not make a loan to a mortgage if they're black people living in my block. And they told me that when I was on Second Street and Avenue B. I won't repeat the epithet racist epithets they used. But what has caused the racial disparity today is what we've been talking about: the fact that whites could buy their own homes, blacks could not.And the reason I'm bringing this up is that if—we're working toward a society where white people are now going to be reduced to the position that black people are in today: of not having their own homes, of not being able to get bank credit. One friend of mine at the Hudson Institute, a black economist, wanted to—we were thinking of cowriting a book, The Blackening of America. The state of, well, the future of the whites, is to become blacks if you don't solve this situation. And I've been unable to convince many black leaders about reparations—that the reparations, very hard to get reparations for slavery, which was to their grandparents, their reparations are due to the blacks today who do not have housing, their own homes, because of the redlining that they have been experiencing right down to today.So, you have this, you do have a separation in this country. But this is not the kind of hyphenated politics that the politicians talk about. Not even the black politicians, the fact that if you're going to hyphenated American, how did this hyphenisation affect the real opportunities for real estate, for homeownership, for education, and all of these other things. I think maybe if people begin to think as to how there is a convergence of what was diverging before—now you're having the middle class pushed down into its real identity which was a dependent wage-earning class all along—you're going to have a change of consciousness. But we're still not to that. People don't realise this difference.And at the top of the pyramid, at New York University, for instance, where we both went to school, I have professor friends there and there was recently an argument about getting more salaries for professors, because they're hiring adjunct professors at very low prices instead of appointing them full time. And one professor turned to my friend and said, “They’re treating us like wage earners.” And my friend said, “Yes, you are a wage earner. You’re dependent on the wage you get from New York University.” And he said, “But I’m a professor,” as if somehow being a professor doesn't mean that you're not a wage earner, you're not dependent on salary, you're not being exploited by your employer who's in it to make money at your expense.Julian Vigo: Oh, absolutely. We've got the push from NYU in the 1990s by adjunct professors to get health insurance, and to have a certain modicum of earnings that would allow them to pay rent in an extremely expensive city. I find it amazing how many of my students at the time had no idea how much I was being exploited at the time, I was at lunch after the graduation of two of my students, they invited me to lunch, and they were having a discussion about how well we must be paid. And I laughed. I didn't go into the details of my salary. But later in later years, they came to understand from other sources, how exploitation functions within the university where they were paying almost quarter of a million to go to school, and graduate school, and so forth. So it's quite shocking that even though we have the internet and all the information is there, anyone can see precisely how much NYU or Columbia cost today, or how much the cost of living is, as opposed to 1961, for instance, that people are still not putting together that when you have housing, that is like income. For most of us, if housing is affordable, the way one lives, the efficiency to live, the ease, the mental health, and physical health improves. And it's fascinating to me that during lockdown, people were told, just to bite the bullet, stay inside, and how many publications, how much of the media went out to discover the many people being locked down in extremely small hovels? Multiple families living in three bedroom houses, even smaller. And I just kept thinking throughout these past 20 months or so that the media has become complicit in everything you've discussed, we've seen an extra tack added on where the media is another arm of industry and the 1% they are able sell lockdown stories: stars singing, Spaniards singing, accordionists from Neapolitan balconies, everyone's happy. But that was a lie. And that was a lie being sold conveniently.I regularly post stories from CNN, where their recent yacht story—they love yachts—their recent yacht story from about five or six days ago was how the super-rich are “saving” the world's ecology. And it was a paid advertisement of a very expensive yacht that uses nuclear power, what you and I hope: that all the rich people are running around with little mini nuclear reactors on the seas. And I keep thinking: what has happened that you mentioned campaign financing? Remember what happened to Hillary Clinton when she suggested campaign finance reform? That went over like a lead balloon. And then we've got CNN, Forbes, all these major publications that run paid sponsored news articles as news. It's all paid for, they legally have to see it as but you have to find the fine print. And we're being sold the 1% as the class that's going to save the planet with this very bizarre looking yacht with a big ball on it. And another another CNN article about yacht owners was about how it's hard for them to pay for maintenance or something and  we're pulling out our tiny violins.And I keep wondering, why is the media pushing on this? We can see where MSNBC and CNN and USA today are heading in a lot of their coverage over class issues. They would much rather cover Felicity Huffman, and all those other stars’ children's cheating to get into a California University scandal which is itself its own scandal, of course. That gets so covered, but you rarely see class issues in any of these publications unless it refers to the favelas of Brazil or the shanty towns of Delhi. So, we're sold: poverty isn't here, it's over there. And over here, mask mandates, lock up, shut your doors stay inside do your part clap for the cares and class has been cleared. Cut out. Even in the UK, where class consciousness has a much more deeply ingrained fermentation, let's say within the culture, it's gone. Now the BBC. Similarly, nightly videos at the initial part of lockdown with people clapping for the cares. Little was said about the salaries that some of these carriers were getting, I don't mean just junior doctors there, but the people who are cleaning the hallways. So, our attention has been pushed by the media away from class, not just the politicians doing the dirty work, or not just the nasty finance campaign funding that is well known in the US. What are some of the responses to this, Michael, that we might advance some solutions here? Because my worry, as a person living on this planet is enough is enough: Why can't we just try a new system? Is it that the fall of the Berlin Wall left a permanent divide in terms of what we can experiment with? Or is there something else at play?Michael Hudson: Well, recently, Ukraine passed a law about oligarchs, and they define an oligarchy as not only owning a big company, but also owning one of the big media outlets. And the oligarchy in every country owns the media. So, of course, CNN, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, are owned by the billionaire class representing the real estate interests and the rentier interests. They're essentially the indoctrination agencies. And so of course, in the media, what you get is a combination of a fantasy world and Schadenfreude—Schadenfreude, when something goes wrong with people you don't like, like the scandal. But apart from that, it's promoting a fantasy, about a kind of parallel universe about how a nice world would work, if everybody earned the money that they had, and the wealth they had by being productive and helping society. All of a sudden, that's reversed and [they] say, “Well, they made a lot of fortune, they must have made it by being productive and helping society.” So, everybody deserves the celebrity, deserves the wealth they have. And if you don't have wealth, you're undeserving and you haven't made a productivity contribution. And all you need is to be more educated, managerial and intelligent, and you can do it. And it doesn't have anything to do with intelligence. As soon as you inherit a lot of money, your intelligence, your IQ drops 10%. As soon as you don't have to work for a living and just clip coupons, you write us down another 30%. The stupidest people I've met in my life are millionaires who don't want to think about how they get their money. They just, they're just greedy. And I was told 50 years ago, “You don't need to go to business school to learn how to do business. All you need is greed.” So what are all these business schools for? All they're doing is saying greed is good and giving you a patter talk to say, “Well, yeah, sure, I'm greedy. But that's why I'm productive.” And somehow they conflate all of these ideas.So, you have the media, and the educational system, all sort of combined into a fantasy, a fantasy world that is to displace your own consciousness about what's happening right around you. The idea of the media is that you don't look at your own position, you imagine other people's position in another world and see that you're somehow left out. So, you can say that the working class in America are very much like the teenage girls using Facebook, who use it and they have a bad self image once they use Facebook and think everybody else is doing better. That's the story in Congress this week. Well, you can say that the whole wage earning class once they actually see how awful the situation is they think, “Well, gee, other people are getting rich. Other people have yard spots, why don't I have my own house? Why am I struggling?” And they think that they're only struggling alone, and that everybody else is somehow surviving when other people are struggling just the way they are. That's what we call losing class consciousness.Julian Vigo: Yes, well, we're back to Crystal and Alexis wrestling and Dynasty’s fountain. Everyone wants to be like them. Everyone wants a car. You know, I'll never forget when I lived in Mexico City. One of the first things I learned when you jumped into one of those taxis were Volkswagen beetles,  Mexicans would call their driver “Jaime.” And I said to them, why are you guys calling the taxi drivers here “Jaime”? And they said, “We get it from you.” And I said, “What do you mean you get it from us? We don't call our taxi drivers Jaime.”And then I thought and I paused, I said,  “James!” Remember the Grey Poupon commercials? That's what we do—we have James as the driver in a lot of these films that we produced in the 1970s and 80s. And the idea became co-opted within Mexico as if everyone has a British driver named James.Now, what we have turned into from this serialised, filmic version of ourselves to the present is dystopic. Again, you talked about the percentage of rent that people are paying in the US, the way in which people are living quite worse than their parents. And this is related to student debt, bank debt, credit card debt, we've had scandals directly related to the housing market. We saw that when there were people to be bailed out, they had to be of the wealthy class and companies to be bailed out. There was no bailout for the poor, of course. I was in London during the Occupy Wall Street. In London, it was “occupy the London Stock Exchange” (Occupy LSX) right outside of not even the London Stock Exchange. It was outside of St. Paul's Cathedral. And there was a tent city, and people were fighting ideological warfare from within their tents. There wasn't much organising on the ground. It was disassembled months later. But I wonder why Americans, even with what is called Obamacare, are still not pushing for further measures, why Hillary Clinton's push for or suggestion merely of finance reform within the campaigning system, all of this has sort of been pushed aside.Are there actors who are able to advance these issues within our current political system in the United States? Or will it take people getting on the streets protesting, to get housing lowered to maybe have national rent controls, not just of the form that we have in New York, which, before I got to New York in the late 80s, everyone was telling me how great rent control was. Now it's all but disappeared? What is the answer? Is it the expropriation of houses? Is it the Cornwall style, no owning more than one house type of moratorium on homeownership? What are the solutions to this, Michael?Michael Hudson: There is no practical solution that I can suggest. Because the, you're not going to have universal medical care, as long as you have the pharmaceuticals. funding the campaign's of the leading politicians, as long as you have a political system that is funded by campaign contributors, you're going to have the wealthiest classes, and decide who gets nominated and who gets promoted. So, I don't see any line of reform, given the dysfunctional political system that the United States is in. If this were Europe, we could have a third party. And if we had an actual third party, the democratic party would sort of be like the social democratic parties in Europe, it would fall about 8% of the electorate, and a third party would completely take over. But in America, it's a two-party system, which is really one party with different constituencies for each wing of that party, and that one party, the same campaign contributors funds, both the Republicans and the Democrats. So it's possible that you can think of America as a failed state, as a failed economy. I don't see any means of practical going forward, just as you're seeing in the Congress today, when they're unwilling to pass an infrastructure act, there's a paralysis of change. I don't see any way in which a structural change can take place. And if you're having the dynamics that are polarising, only a structural change can reverse this trend. And nobody that I know, no politician that I know, sees any way of the trends being reversed.Julian Vigo: The funny thing is that scandal, quote-unquote, scandal over Ocasio Cortez's dress at the Met Gala was quite performative to me. It's typical that the media does. “Tax the rich,” as she sits at a function that I believe cost $35,000 to enter. And she socialised the entire night even if she allegedly did not pay either for her dress nor for the entrance. And I'm thinking, isn't this part of the problem: that we have so much of our socio-cultural discourse wrapped up in politics in the same way that Clinton's suggestion that campaign finance reform disappeared quite quickly? Is there any hope of getting campaign finance reform passed in the States?Michael Hudson: No. Because if you had campaign finance reform, that's how the wealthy people control politics. If you didn't, if you didn't have the wealthy, wealthy people deciding who gets nominated, you would have people get nominated by who wanted to do what the public ones, Bernie Sanders says, “Look, most of them are all the polls show that what democracy, if this were a democracy, we would have socialised medicine, we'd have public health care, we would have free education, we would have progressive taxation.” And yet no party is representing what the bulk of people have. So by definition, we're not a democracy. We're an oligarchy, and the oligarchy controls. I mean, you could say that the media play the role today that the church and religion played in the past to divert attention away from worldly issues towards other worldly issues. That's part of the problem.But not only the pharmaceutical industries are against public health care, but the whole corporate sector, the employer sector, are against socialised medicine, because right now workers are dependent for their health insurance on their employers. That means Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Chairman said, this is causing a traumatised workers syndrome, the workers are afraid to quit, they're afraid to go on strike. They're afraid of getting fired because if they get fired, first of all, if they're a homeowner they lose their home because they can't pay their mortgage, but most importantly, they lose their health care. And if they get sick, it wipes them out. And they go broke and they lose their home and all the assets.Making workers depend on the employer, instead of on the government means you're locked into their job. They have to work for a living for an employer, just in order to survive in terms of health care alone. So the idea of the system is to degrade a dependent, wage-earning class and keeping privatising health care, privatising education, and moving towards absentee landlordship is the way to traumatise and keep a population on the road to serfdom. Get full access to Savage Minds at savageminds.substack.com/subscribe

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News
This Is Not What Democracy Looks Like: Seth Leibsohn with Pete Peterson

Townhall Review | Conservative Commentary On Today's News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 28:28


Seth Leibsohn talks with Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, about powerful lobbies making request of the Federal Government on behalf of teachers, and the chilling effect of the Attorney General's threats towards parents. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Texas Impact's Weekly Witness
Ep. 165 Weekly Witness: Border Update with Sid Earnheart, Legislative Update with Josh Houston

Texas Impact's Weekly Witness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 51:22


Weekly Witness: Sid Earnheart joins us to discuss the current issues along the Texas-Mexico Border, and Josh Houston joins us to give a Legislative Update on the Third Called Special Session.

The Great Battlefield
Politics on Social Media with Katie Harbath of Anchor Change, formerly of Facebook

The Great Battlefield

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 65:53


Katie Harbath joins The Great Battlefield podcast to talk about running Public Policy at Facebook after joining them from the NRSC, starting Anchor Change and how she's working to solve the problems in the intersection of technology and democracy.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Peter Hotez and Historian Kenneth C. Davis Episode 451

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 102:04


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more 40 mins Peter J. Hotez, M.D., Ph.D. is Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics and Molecular Virology & Microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine where he is also the Director of the Texas Children's Center for Vaccine Development (CVD) and Texas Children's Hospital Endowed Chair of Tropical Pediatrics.  He is also University Professor at Baylor University, Fellow in Disease and Poverty at the James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy,  Senior Fellow at the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at Texas A&M University, Faculty Fellow with the Hagler Institute for Advanced Studies at Texas A&M University, and Health Policy Scholar in the Baylor Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy. He is the author of Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel's Autism: My Journey as a Vaccine Scientist, Pediatrician, and Autism Dad Poverty and the Impact of COVID-19: The Blue-Marble Health Approach and most recently Preventing the Next Pandemic: Vaccine Diplomacy in a Time of Anti-science Most recently as both a vaccine scientist and autism parent, he has led national efforts to defend vaccines and to serve as an ardent champion of vaccines going up against a growing national “antivax” threat. In 2019, he received the Award for Leadership in Advocacy for Vaccines from the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.  Dr. Hotez appears frequently on television (including BBC, CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC), radio, and in newspaper interviews (including the New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal). 1:05 Kenneth C. Davis is the bestselling author of Don't Know Much About® History and other books in the Don't Know Much About® series. He also wrote the acclaimed In the Shadow of Liberty. For 30 years, Kenneth C. Davis has proven that Americans don't hate history — just the dull version they slept through in class. Davis's approach is to refresh us on the subjects we should have learned in school. He does it by busting myths, setting the record straight, and making history human. If your school, library or learning community would like to speak with Kenneth C. Davis about American history, click on   Classroom Skypes or Custom Virtual Visits to learn more.   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page   Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

Be Brave at Work
Episode 154: Jim Detert

Be Brave at Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:34


Join us on Be Brave at Work as we speak with Jim Detert. Jim is the John L. Colley Professor of Business Administration in the Leadership and Organizational Behavior area at the University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business Administration and a Professor of Public Policy at the Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy. Jim's research focuses on workplace courage, improvement-oriented voice (why people speak up or stay silent at work), ethical decision-making and behavior, and other leadership-related topics. This research, as well as his consulting experiences, has been conducted across a variety of global high-technology and service-oriented industries as well as public sector institutions. His research has won several academic best paper awards and is regularly featured in various online and print media outlets. Detert has also written many teaching cases and other curriculum materials and designed leadership and ethics classes taught to thousands of students of all ages around the world in degree and non-degree formats. He has received numerous awards for his teaching and curriculum development in both MBA and Executive MBA settings at Cornell and the University of Virginia. Jim is a frequent contributor to Harvard Business Review, and the author of the book Choosing Courage: The Everyday Guide to Being Brave at Work, published by Harvard Business Review Press. Jim received his M.A. in sociology and Ph.D. in organizational behavior from Harvard University. He also holds an MBA from the University of Minnesota and a BBA from the University of Wisconsin. Links of Interest LinkedIn Website Choosing Courage: The Everyday Guide to Being Brave at Work Please click the like button above and leave a review if your favorite podcast app has that ability. Thank you! More information about Ed, visit Excellius.com © 2021 Ed Evarts

At a Distance
Penny Abeywardena on How Local Actions Can Have Global Impacts

At a Distance

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 37:57


Penny Abeywardena, New York City's Commissioner for International Affairs, speaks with us about how the Trump era provided an opportunity for community leadership to harness its governing power, why an entrepreneurial spirit can aid in developing public policy, and how the city is navigating various pandemic-related issues, including vaccination requirements, keeping schools open, and a recent uptick in violence.

The Seth Leibsohn Show
October 8, 2021 - Hour 3

The Seth Leibsohn Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 34:33


Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, on powerful lobbies making request of the Federal Government on behalf of teachers, and the chilling effect of the Attorney General's threats towards parents. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Douglas Coleman Show
The Douglas Coleman Show w_ Seth David Radwell

The Douglas Coleman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 53:10


Seth David Radwell, author of American Schism: How the Two Enlightenments Hold the Secret to Healing Our Nation, is an internationally-known business executive and thought leader in consumer marketing. Earning a Master's degree in Public Policy, from Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, Mr. Radwell believes our democracy is in crisis today—and will remain so as long as we allow the extreme ends of the partisan spectrum to dominate our political debate. Instead, Radwell proposes a dialogue between those Americans who make up the exhausted majority, dedicated to a new threefold mission: to educate the public about our country's political history in the hopes of recommitting to our shared democratic values; to re-establish a civil and rational discussion to replace our divisive contemporary political discourse; and, to commence the long process of healing our nation for future generations.In the book, Radwell offers caring Americans from every red and blue state—and those who question the system in which our country is built on—the opportunity to connect our history with the current events that have tested our freedom.Prior to devoting his full-time to writing American Schism, Mr. Radwell served as President of e-Scholastic, the digital arm of the global children's publishing and education conglomerate. In earlier roles he was President, Bookspan/Bertelsmann, where he was responsible for all editorial, marketing, media and digital functions for such iconic brands as Book of the Month Club, Doubleday Book Club, and Literary Guild—transforming the paper-based direct marketing business to multi-channel platforms. Under this sector, Radwell also conceived and developed the Black Expressions, and Mosaico Clubs, dedicated to expanding this retail channel to a diverse readership.Seth David Radwell received a Master's degree in Public Policy, from Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree summa cum laude from Columbia College, Columbia University. He currently divides his time in New York, Los Angeles and Paris with his family.https://sethdavidradwell.com/The Douglas Coleman Show now offers audio and video promotional packages for music artists as well as video promotional packages for authors. Please see our website for complete details. http://douglascolemanshow.comIf you have a comment about this episode or any other, please click the link below.https://ratethispodcast.com/douglascolemanshow

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
In the Tank: 315. Energy Crises at Home and Around the Globe

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


The Heartland Institute’s Donald Kendal is joined by Isaac Orr (Center of the American Experiment) and Jason Hayes (Mackinac Center for Public Policy) for episode #315 of the In The Tank Podcast. From Michigan to California and the United States to Europe, we are seeing energy crises brought on by terrible public policy. The ITT crew […]

Berkeley Talks
Berkeley experts on how to fight disinformation

Berkeley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 92:10


A panel of leading Berkeley experts describe the harms of disinformation and potential solutions to its spread, from measures to strengthen old-school local news media to government regulation of tech titans like Facebook and Twitter. But there's a critical obstacle: Efforts to directly block disinformation could challenge core American values, such as free speech and freedom of the press. Scholars in the panel: Geeta Anand, dean of Berkeley Journalism; Erwin Chemerinsky, dean of Berkeley Law; Hany Farid, associate dean and head of the School of Information; Susan D. Hyde, chair of the Department of Political Science; john powell, director of the Othering & Belonging Institute; and moderator Henry Brady, former dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy. Listen to the episode and read a transcript on Berkeley News. (Photo: Joe Flood via Flickr; Music: "Silver Lanyard" by Blue Dot Sessions) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: U.S. Debt-Ceiling Crisis: Why It's Nothing To Lose Sleep Over

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 2:55


There's a lot of noise about the calamity the nation will face if Republicans don't go along with raising the debt ceiling. Don't fall for it. Steve Forbes on the hysteria surrounding the U.S. debt ceiling and why it's nothing to lose sleep over.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Global Tennessee
TNWAC Conversation with Colombian Ambassador Pinzón | Oct 7

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 43:31


On October 7, 2021, TNWAC President Patrick Ryan talked with Ambassador of Colombia to the United States Juan Carlos Pinzón in Nashville for the Global Dialogue + Webinar/"Global Tennessee" series Podcast, about: U.S.-Colombian relations, regional issues, developments in Colombia, commercial relations with the U.S. and Tennessee, and the people to people connections between the countries. Join the Tennessee World Affairs Council (TNWAC.org/join) and support with your gift (TNWAC.org/donate) to ensure these quality programs continue. Thanks! Ambassador Juan Carlos Pinzón On July 26, 2021, President Iván Duque swore in Juan Carlos Pinzón as Ambassador of Colombia to the United States. ​Pinzón previously served as Colombia's Ambassador to Washington from 2015 to 2017. During his tenure, he oversaw the approval of “Peace Colombia or Plan Colombia II” ($450 million per year) that increased the U.S. funding package for security and development. Additionally, he helped establish the “CEO U.S.-Colombia Business Council” at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Atlantic Council's "Colombia Task Force" with the report on the future of the U.S.-Colombia relationship. The accession of the avocado Hass to the U.S. market was an important highlight. While in office, the Colombian Embassy was recognized as the best diplomatic delegation in Washington by the World Affairs Council in Washington, DC. Prior to that, Ambassador Pinzón served as Minister of Defense of Colombia for nearly four years. Under his leadership, the Colombian Armed Forces dealt the most severe blows in history to terrorist organizations – FARC and ELN – and Criminal Bands, highly degrading their logistics, structure and leadership. Pinzón also strengthened all capabilities of the Colombian armed forces and established Colombia as a regional cooperation leader. By the end of his period, he left the Armed Forces at its historical peak in manpower, capabilities, welfare, technology and budget. ​ Throughout his career, Pinzón has been a leader in both the public and private sectors. Between 2018 and 2021, Pinzón was appointed President of the Foundation for the Progress of the Capital Region – ProBogotá, a private non-profit for the promotion of common good, public policy and long-term strategic projects for the capital region of Colombia. He is currently a member of several corporate advisory boards and NGOs. In July 2017, Ambassador Pinzón launched a bid for president with the support of the civic citizens' movement “Colombia Above All.” In March 2018, he became vice presidential candidate. ​ Additional previous positions include Chief of Staff to the President of Colombia; Deputy Minister of Defense; Senior Advisor to the Executive Director at the Board of the World Bank; Vice President of the Colombian Banking Association; Assistant Vice President of Investment Banking at Citigroup; Private Secretary and Chief of Staff for the Finance and Public Credit Ministry; and Economist for Colombia at Citigroup. Pinzón received an honorable mention for his outstanding academic performance while earning his Bachelor of Science degree in Economics from the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá. He also holds three Master degrees. A Master of Science in Economics from the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. A Master in Public Policy from Princeton University (scholarship awarded). And a Master's degree (honoris causa) in Defense and National Security from Colombia's National War College. Pinzón also completed advanced courses in international relations and strategic studies at Johns Hopkins University, in science and technology policy at Harvard University, and smart cities at Nanyang Technological University-Singapore. Ambassador Pinzón was born in Bogotá on December 22, 1971. He is married to Pilar Lozano and has two children, Natalia and Juan Pablo.

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast
OTC Inside the Beltway: Reconciliation, Vaccine Mandates, and More

NASFAA's Off the Cuff Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:38


“Off The Cuff” is back and excited to bring listeners new aspects to the podcast. In this week's “Inside the Beltway'' episode, Justin is joined by the association's new Vice President of Public Policy and Federal Relations Karen McCarthy and the American Council on Education's Assistant Vice President for Government Relations Jon Fansmith. The group breaks down the state of play of the budget reconciliation package and where things stand on Capitol Hill. Jon gives an update on the reconciliation process and discusses hangups between Democrats over the $3.5 trillion price tag and what, if any, higher education policies could get cut from the legislation. Also in this episode: what President Joe Biden's vaccine mandate could mean for higher ed and aid offices, ED's recent announcement regarding PSLF, and the latest on the negotiated rulemaking sessions currently underway. As a reminder, our website will be undergoing system maintenance starting this afternoon, but you can listen to this episode on Spotify or Apple podcasts.

New Hampshire Journal
Sen. Tim Scott: The GOP's Problem Isn't Policy -- It's Marketing

New Hampshire Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 39:45


South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott joins the New Hampshire Journal podcast in advance of his swing through the state to help raise money for the NHGOP.  He talks COVID, crime and Gamecocks football (Go Cocks!) with fellow Palmetto Stater Michael Graham, managing editor of NHJournal.And Drew Cline of the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy is on board to talk about the housing crisis facing Granite State businesses and workers, and an upcoming JBC conference on ideas to address those challenges.DISCLAIMER: NHJournal cannot be held responsible for the content of this podcast due to the 5G tower outside the studio which may or may not be used by the "Grey Pope" to control our thoughts via the tentacled creatures in our most recent vaccine shot.You've been warned.

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Diane Coyle on Cogs and Monsters: What Economics Is, and What It Should Be

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 54:52


(10/7/21) Digital technology, big data, big tech, machine learning and AI are revolutionizing both the tools of economics and the phenomena it seeks to measure. In her book Cogs and Monsters: What Economics Is, and What It Should Be former advisor to the UK Treasury and the Bennett Professor of Public Policy at the University of Cambridge Diane Coyle explores the enormous problems facing economics today. Join us for a look at how economics can provide a positive road map in the 21st century in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment
Build Entrepreneurial Skills That Matter With Peter Linneman

Wheelbarrow Profits Podcast: Multifamily Real Estate Investment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 66:57


In this episode, Jake and Gino interview Peter Linneman. Peter is an American academic who is the principal of Linneman Associates, the CEO and founder of American Land Fund and of KL Realty. He previously served as the Albert Sussman Professor of Real Estate, Finance, and Public Policy at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, retiring in December 2010.   Linneman served as the founding chairman of Wharton's Real Estate Department, and was the Director of Wharton's Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center for 13 years. He is also the founding co-editor of the Wharton Real Estate Review. Linneman has also been named one of the 100 Most Powerful People in New York real estate according to The New York Observer and one of the 25 most influential people in commercial real estate by Realtor Magazine.   Key insights: 00:00 Building entrepreneurial capacities 06:00 Good work always gets noticed 10:17 Asset pricing today 16:53 Navigating different real estate market  20:24 Finding right employees and retaining them too 29:27 Pros and cons of homeschooling 31:50 Impact of economic downturn 36:57 How inflation impacts real estate market 43:56 Investments to avoid 48:05 Parameters to identify a good asset 51:11 Why to invest in apartments 56:56 Near-term US economic outlook 1:01:38 Taking care of your health 1:04:08 Live a smarter life 1:05:37 100 year investor mindset Listen to the podcast to learn more from Luke.   Check out Peter's website: https://www.linnemanassociates.com/peter-linneman   Curious about Multifamily Investing? Register for this complimentary training now and check out whether Multifamily Investing can help you create the life you desire: https://bityl.co/6v71

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
Michael LaFaive, Director of Fiscal Policy for The Mackinac Center for Public Policy

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 9:02


Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Biden's Radical Budget Bill: Can Manchin And Sinema Rescue Their Party From Political Suicide?

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:23


President Biden and congressional Democratic leaders ended last week without a vote on two colossal spending bills, recognizing that they had overplayed their hand. So is Biden's radical budget bill in trouble? Steve Forbes on whether Senators Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema can rescue their party from political suicide.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

Two Broads Talking Politics
Sol Flores & Alex Sims (#VoteHerIn, Episode 76)

Two Broads Talking Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:09


Special #MakeHerstory edition of #VoteHerIn, a collaboration of Two Broads Talking Politics & author Rebecca SiveWith Illinois Deputy Gov Sol A. Flores and strategist Alex Sims.Sol Flores serves as deputy governor in Illinois Governor JB Pritzker's administration overseeing Health and Human Services since February 2019. As Deputy Governor, she helped oversee the administration's response to COVID-19, including housing relief and vaccination efforts. Additionally, Flores spearheads the administration's efforts around poverty alleviation, hunger relief, expanding healthcare access to all, and strengthening the state's safety nets for its most vulnerable residents. She was the founding executive director of La Casa Norte, a non-profit organization established in 2002 that has served more than 30,000 youth and families confronting homelessness. Flores built La Casa Norte from two employees to a multi-million-dollar organization delivering inspiration, hope, and critical services. She is a tireless advocate, having served on numerous working groups, commissions, and nonprofit boards. Flores was raised by a single mother who came to Chicago from Puerto Rico, who was recognized as a national Champion of Change by President Barack Obama.Alexandra (Alex) P. Sims believes that one's birthplace and economic status shouldn't negatively affect one's life journey, and her career has taught her that real change is brought about when there is synergy, empathy, and aligned purposes among all public affairs sectors: business, government, philanthropy, and grassroots organizing. Alex came to Chicago from metro Detroit to attend Northwestern University. Awarded the prestigious CORO Fellowship, Alex was assigned by the CORO program to serve in the St. Louis, Missouri area. Motivated by President Barack Obama's education and social policies, Alex was appointed to head his 2012 Presidential campaign for the St. Louis region. Following Obama's victory, Alex continued as a State Coordinator with Organizing for Action (OFA), relocating to Chicago. It was in Chicago there that she founded Every Vote Counts, where she directed the registration of over 120,000 voters in 4 four months - the largest voter registration campaign in the country that year. While Senior Advisor to the City of Chicago Treasurer, she launched an aggressive and strategic agenda of financial equity and access. Now, founder and CEO of APS and Associates, she counsels numerous clients, including The Obama Foundation and Illinois Governor JB Pritzker.Both Sol and Alex are graduates of the women in public leadership initiative created by Rebecca Sive for the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy.

Coffee with Cascade
Oregon's "Excess Revenue": Refund or Reinvest?

Coffee with Cascade

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 59:14


In Oregon, when the actual tax revenue for a biennium exceeds the forecasted revenue by 2% or more, taxpayers get a rebate, which Oregonians call a “Kicker.” Debate about the Kicker has grown in recent years–with advocates on both sides of the issues taking out markedly different positions. In this forum hosted by the City Club of Eugene, Dr. Eric Fruits of Cascade Policy Institute and Daniel Hauser of the Oregon Center for Public Policy debate the merits and effectiveness of the Kicker. Cascade Policy Institute would like to thank the City Club of Eugene for allowing it to republish this recording. More information about the City Club of Eugene can be found at https://cityclubofeugene.org/. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coffeewithcascade/message

Texas Impact's Weekly Witness
Ep. 164 Weekly Witness: PUC Sunset Update with Adrian Shelley, Public Citizen and Texas Legislative Update

Texas Impact's Weekly Witness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 67:42


Weekly Witness: PUC Sunset Update with Adrian Shelley, Public Citizen, joins us this week to discuss the latest news about the Public Utilities Commission in the Sunset Committee and Josh Houston, Texas Impact, provides us with an update on the Texas Legislature.

America's Heroes Group
Ep. 183 - Public Policy Affairs Pro-democracy movement and the dangers we face as a Nation

America's Heroes Group

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 26:59


Fred Wellman - US Army Westpoint Aviation Veteran and Senior Advisor at The Lincoln Project CNN Clip - Trump brought Marine on stage who claimed he's someone he's not 

GovExec Daily
The Post-COVID Civil Service

GovExec Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 20:15


The novel coronavirus crisis has brought to light many systemic problems in American governance and the civil service. Like other major disasters, the pandemic presents an opportunity to reshape the future of work in the federal service. Dr. Donald F. Kettl is professor emeritus at the University of Maryland and former dean of its School of Public Policy. He is the author of many books, including Escaping Jurassic Government: How to Recover America's Lost Commitment to Competence, The Politics of the Administrative Process, System Under Stress and The Next Government of the United States. His latest piece on our site is headlined “The Failure of Government's Post-COVID Imagination” He joined the show to talk about the post-pandemic civil service and potential for reform.

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Congress' Meddling With Your Credit Card Fees Could Cost You

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 3:24


Congress is mulling over an idea to control what credit card issuers can charge merchants when you use your plastic to buy something. This move will empower retailers—not you! Steve Forbes on how Congress' meddling with your credit card fees could cost you and on where instead Congress should direct its attention.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.

The Other Side of Weight Loss
The Fasting Mimicking Diet with Dr. Joseph Antoun

The Other Side of Weight Loss

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 65:28


Dr. Joseph Antoun is CEO & Chairman of the Board of L-Nutra and Member of the Forbes Business Development Council. He's the former CEO of Health Systems Reform. He completed his studies in Public Policy at Harvard University, in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, and his Doctorate in Medicine and Masters' in Medical and Biological Sciences at Saint Joseph University. In this episode  why the company was established and what they discovered in their studies. why should we fast and is it a fad? how your brain reacts to fasting how long you should be intermittent fasting for depending on your health? what is autophagy and do we actually know when it hits during fasting?  fasting versus caloric restriction what damage is being done to our organs in water fasting what is the fasting mimicking diet  how does it work? why animal protein is NOT in the mimicking diet? why you shouldn't eat too much protein but just enough what are the ideal macro amounts for health and longevity and more! Todays podcast is sponsored by Prolon The Fasting Mimicking Diet. Purchase your Prolon Kit today and get 10% off with coupon code KARENM10! Purchase your at home Hormone Test Kits here.  Start your membership to the OnTrack group coaching program to help you balance your hormones and lose weight.   Take the Hormone Quiz and find out what is stopping you from losing weight. Karen Martel, Certified Hormone Specialist & Transformational Nutrition Coach and weight loss expert.  Visit https://karenmartel.com/  Karen's Facebook Karen's Instagram    

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead
Spotlight: Cryptocurrencies: Watch Out! Stablecoins Are Coming Under Attack

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 3:16


With the rapid growth of stablecoins, regulators are waking up to its real threat in the crypto world. Cryptocurrencies, watch out! Steve Forbes on the existential challenge to the current ways of banking and facilitating payments and on how the crypto world had better gear up for a long, epic struggle ahead.Steve Forbes shares his What's Ahead Spotlights each Tuesday, Thursday and Friday.