Podcasts about adhd

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Neurodevelopmental disorder marked by difficulty focusing, or excessive activity and impulsive behavior

  • 7,140PODCASTS
  • 19,986EPISODES
  • 41mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 23, 2021LATEST
adhd

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Best podcasts about adhd

Show all podcasts related to adhd

Latest podcast episodes about adhd

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell
Ableism, Labelism, and What Happens After Being Diagnosed with ADHD

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 32:35


René Brooks, our guest host of Distraction for ADHD Awareness month, is joined by John Hazelwood, an ADHD advocate and mentor for men's health. The pair share a ton of insights about what they've learned since being diagnosed with ADHD including how to surround yourself with people who respect you, the importance of self-reflection, recognizing your strengths and the positives that exist within you, and why now is the time to share your story with others.  John on Twitter: @j0n_j0n John on Instagram: @adhd_j0nj0n John's ADHD Mens Support Group on Instagram We want to hear from you! CLICK HERE TO TAKE OUR LISTENER SURVEY. Or write an email or record a voice memo and send it to connect@distractionpodcast.com.   Distraction is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont.  It's the college for students who learn differently! Landmark offers comprehensive supports for students with ADHD and other learning differences, both on campus and online. Learn more HERE! Distraction welcomes Black Girl, Lost Keys blog creator, René Brooks, as our guest host for ADHD Awareness Month! René is an ADHD coach, writer and advocate who also has ADHD herself. From Black Girl, Lost Keys website: René Brooks is a late-life ADHD success story. After being diagnosed 3 times as a child (7, 11 and 25) she was finally able to get the treatment she deserved. René decided that her passion for helping others should be put toward people with this disorder who are struggling in silence or shame. She started Black Girl, Lost Keys to empower Black women with ADHD and show them how to live well with the condition. 

JJ Virgin Lifestyle Show
Cleaning up Your Mental Mess With Dr. Caroline Leaf

JJ Virgin Lifestyle Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 52:56


Dr. Caroline Leaf is a communication pathologist and cognitive neuroscientist, specializing in cognitive and metacognitive neuropsychology. She has written numerous bestselling books on mental cognition and well-being, including her newest, Cleaning Up Your Mental Mess. So when it comes to understanding what we can do with our brains and how to do it, Dr. Leaf is our go-to person! Dr. Leaf listens to and relates to JJ's story of her son's Traumatic Brain Injury and how many others worldwide are experiencing similar situations. And she reinforces one important notion: all hope is not lost. Dr. Leaf discusses her theory called the Geodesic Information Processing theory, which covers topics like how we think, build memory, and learn, and how we can transform that information into tools and processes that have helped the lives of hundreds of thousands of individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), learning disabilities (ADD, ADHD), autism, dementia, and mental health issues like anxiety and depression. She also touches on the important roles of supportive family and friends. You won't want to miss this episode. Tune in now. Get Dr. Leaf's Free Workbook: Cleaning Up Your Mental Mess https://jjvirgin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Cleaning-Up-Your-Mental-Mess-workbook-1.pdf

Rewired Fitness Podcast: Fitness for the ADHD community
ADHD And Blue Light Or Red Light? The Surprising Effects Of Light Color!

Rewired Fitness Podcast: Fitness for the ADHD community

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 16:44


Every day we hear about "Blue Light", all of our media devices, and what it can do. Blue light keeps people awake. We are constantly on our media devices and so we get plenty of blue light! Is there an alternative to blue light that can help? This episode discusses the surprising effects of "Red Light" and other colors in relation to "Blue Light". A change of light color in your environment can affect so many things! Find out in this episode! Today's sponsor for the episode is Stello Mints! To find out more visit: https://www.stellomints.com/ (https://www.stellomints.com/). You can get 15% off your order of https://www.stellomints.com/ (Stello Mints) by using the code "REWIRED" You can watch the podcast on YouTube too! Watch videos, listen to more episodes, or request the additional services offered by visiting: https://www.rewiredfit.com/ (https://www.rewiredfit.com.) https://www.rewiredfit.com/ (Need a Podcast Editor?) I offer audio engineering services, https://www.rewiredfit.com/ (Need a social media post designer?) I offer social media design services Stay in touch with us on all of our Social Media! Click the link to the one you want to visit. Podcast Website: https://www.rewiredfit.com/ (https://www.rewiredfit.com) https://the-rewired-fitness-podcast.captivate.fm/youtube (YouTube) https://my.captivate.fm/www.facebook.com/rewired.adhd.fitness (Facebook) https://www.instagram.com/rewired.fitness (Instagram): https://www.instagram.com/rewired.fitness (@rewired.fitness) Support the Podcast Through https://www.patreon.com/rewiredfitness?fan_landing=true (Patreon) Support this podcast

The Jamie Grace Podcast
5 Ways Your First Date Could Be Awkward

The Jamie Grace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 29:50


if you're planning or hoping for a first date in the near future -- this episode is for you! :) Make sure you subscribe to hear episodes like this one and if you want to support this podcast you can… leave a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-jamie-grace-podcast/id1310458364 (https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-jamie-grace-podcast/id1310458364) sponsor the show on Patreon http://patreon.com/jamiegrace (by clicking here).  Thanks! You can also buy my book “Finding Quiet” if you want to know more about my journey navigating young adulthood and being a “teen star” with Anxiety and Tourette. Amazon: https://amzn.to/2Ml8FPO (https://amzn.to/2Ml8FPO) --------------------------------------------------------- SOCIALS http://instagram.com/jamiegraceh (http://instagram.com/jamiegraceh) http://instagram.com/ninety1co (http://instagram.com/ninety1co) http://facebook.com/jamiegraceh (http://facebook.com/jamiegraceh) http://youtube.com/jgracepro (http://youtube.com/jgracepro) http://patreon.com/jamiegrace (http://patreon.com/jamiegrace) [Support the Show!] --------------------------------------------------------- Online Therapy - http://faithfulcounseling.com/jamiegrace (http://faithfulcounseling.com/jamiegrace)  Use the link above to learn more about Faithful Counseling and get 10% OFF of your first month. It's where I personally go for therapy and I genuinely benefit from what they have to offer. #sponsor --------------------------------------------------------- Thank you for listening :) Love, Jamie Grace B.S. Child & Youth Development Diagnosis: Tourette Syndrome, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, OCD, ADHD Support this podcast

MacVoices Video
MacVoices #21201: MacVoices Live - More 1080p Camera Debate, HomePod mini Colors (3)

MacVoices Video

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 36:31


David Ginsburg, Mark Fuccio, Jeff Gamet, Guy Serle, Jim Rea, Brittany Smith, and Kelly Guimont wrap up our coverage of the “Unleashed event with a discussion of why it took so long for 1080p cameras to be included in Apple laptops, questions over the color matching between Apple product lines, and the new colors of the HomePod mini. We finish up discussing why there were no updated iMac minis or iMacs, and where we stand in the M1 transition. (Part 3)  This edition of MacVoices is supported by MacVoices After Dark, our newest benefit for all Patreon supporters. Uncensored, off-topic, and always off the wall. Show Notes: Guests: Jeff Gamet is a technology blogger, podcaster, author, and public speaker. Previously, he was The Mac Observer's Managing Editor, and the TextExpander Evangelist for Smile. He has presented at Macworld Expo, RSA Conference, several WordCamp events, along with many other conferences. You can find him on several podcasts such as The Mac Show, The Big Show, MacVoices, Mac OS Ken, This Week in iOS, and more. Jeff is easy to find on social media as @jgamet on Twitter and Instagram, and jeffgamet on LinkedIn., and on his YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/jgamet. David Ginsburg is the host of the weekly podcast In Touch With iOS where he discusses all things iOS, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Apple Watch, and related technologies. He is an IT professional supporting Mac, iOS and Windows users. Visit his YouTube channel at https://youtube.com/daveg65 and find and follow him on Twitter @daveg65. Kelly Guimont is a podcaster and friend of the Rebel Alliance. She hosts the Daily Observations Podcast at MacObserver.com, and appears on The Incomparable network as well as hosts I Want My M(CU) TV. You can also hear her on The Aftershow with Mike Rose, and she still has more to say which she saves for Twitter. Jim Rea has been an independent Mac developer continuously since 1984. He is the founder of ProVUE Development, and the author of Panorama X, ProVUE's ultra fast RAM based database software for the macOS platform. Follow Jim at provue.com and via @provuejim on Twitter. Guy Serle, best known for being one of the co-hosts of the MyMac Podcast, sincerely apologizes for anything he has done or caused to have happened while in possession of dangerous podcasting equipment. He should know better but being a blonde from Florida means he's probably incapable of understanding the damage he has wrought. Guy is also the author of the novel, The Maltese Cube. You can follow his exploits on Twitter, catch him on Mac to the Future on Facebook, and find everything at VertShark.com. Brittany Smith is a cognitive neuroscientist who provides a variety of consulting services through her business, Devise and Conquer that includes ADD/ADHD coaching, technology coaching, productivity consulting, and more. She is a self-designated “well-rounded geek”, and holds a M.S. degree in Cognitive Neuroscience. She can be found on Twitter as @addliberator. Check out her latest project, a YouTube channel of tech tips. Links: Bartender SetApp 2021 Virtual International Conference on ADHD10% Discount code: ADHDAWARNESS(You're not reading it wrong, that's spelled wrong. It's an ADHD joke.) Virtual ADHD Conference PDF   Support:      Become a MacVoices Patron on Patreon     http://patreon.com/macvoices      Enjoy this episode? Make a one-time donation with PayPal Connect:      Web:     http://macvoices.com      Twitter:     http://www.twitter.com/chuckjoiner     http://www.twitter.com/macvoices      Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/chuck.joiner      MacVoices Page on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/macvoices/      MacVoices Group on Facebook:     http://www.facebook.com/groups/macvoice      LinkedIn:     https://www.linkedin.com/in/chuckjoiner/      Instagram:     https://www.instagram.com/chuckjoiner/ Subscribe:      Audio in iTunes     Video in iTunes      Subscribe manually via iTunes or any podcatcher:      Audio: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesrss      Video: http://www.macvoices.com/rss/macvoicesvideorss

This Creative Life with Sara Zarr
Ep 77: Dave Holmes

This Creative Life with Sara Zarr

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 76:45


Writer, podcaster, radio host, and VJ emeritus Dave Holmes joins me to talk about his long and winding road to writing his wonderful 2016 memoir, Party of One, his writing at Esquire, and how it all connects to his current podcast project, Waiting for Impact. We talk ADHD, burnout, the longing to be understood, and the obsessions that drive us. And a whole lot more.  Waiting for Impact Party of One: A Memoir in 21 Songs Dave at Esquire Homophilia Theme music by Dave Connis. This podcast is ad-free and free-free. Find out how to support it here. Thank you!

The Twelfth House
Your Q's Answered — Jealousy, Marketing Without IG, ADHD, Money and Skincare!

The Twelfth House

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 51:12


Welcome to our 100th episode! Today we're answering community questions. We wouldn't be here without you. Thank you for supporting us. We're crying! We love you! Q's answered: What is the best way to market without social media? How do I grow my business outside of IG and FB? How do you deal with comparison, jealousy, while networking and in your career? How do you get started on a big project with a squiggly ADHD brain? What are your best practices for collaborating on a workshop with a fellow witch? How do you trust yourself? What is your skin like? Oily? Combo? Dry? Any anxiety/ADHD resources that you've found helpful? Learn more and sign up for Notion for Magical Baddies: Systems Spells here! Grab your FREE Monday Hour One template here! FREE! Digital altars for your phone for protection, abundance, cleansing, and more Join us in The Cusp here and the free Holisticism Hub here

TonioTimeDaily
Hayley Jade says that she is an Autistic sex worker

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 66:40


Hayley Jade: "I came out as autistic during the pandemic. Being isolated for so long finally revealed that I had been “masking,” or performing social behaviors that are considered neurotypical, my entire life. And the less I masked, the happier I became. I have this theory that autistic people know they're autistic just like gay people know they're gay. As a bisexual woman, I didn't have to go to the psychologist to take a test and have an old white man tell me whether or not I'm into women. But for some reason, this is what society requires of autistic people. Without a diagnosis on paper, we're not recognized ― even though a diagnosis still rarely helps us in society. But for much of my life, I knew I was different, even though I didn't know why. After hours of telling my psychologist my life story, doing multiple-choice personality tests and emailing him traits I identified with, I was devastated when he told me he didn't think I was autistic. I tried to keep eye contact and look calm while I dissociated. I asked him why he didn't think I was autistic when I had been so certain. I had stayed up until 3 a.m. watching TikTok videos of other people around the world who made me feel less alone ― and suddenly my whole life made sense. Suddenly I knew why being diagnosed late with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) didn't feel like the complete answer. I had suspected I was autistic for years ― but now I knew I was. “Oh, I just don't think someone who's autistic would be able to do your job,” he said, like it made perfect sense. I had told my psychologist that I had been working as an escort for the last few years. Unable to keep a job in my 20s, I went on disability and started escorting to make some extra money. I found it incredible that men would pay hundreds of dollars an hour to spend time with me and that the more I was myself, the more they wanted to see me." "There are lots of reasons someone might see an escort. I've had a man come to me because his girlfriend had pain during sex and she gave him the go-ahead to seek out a professional. Another sex worker told me someone's wife messaged her because she wanted her husband to learn stamina in bed. Many clients are too busy with work to settle down but are lonely, crave intimacy and are even depressed. A lot are unhappy with their sex lives and don't want to leave their marriages. But after a little over a year, I've begun to see a trend. Often the clients who contact me are older cisgender white men. This is probably the group of people you think of as johns: married professionals who travel a lot. While I'm a fan of salt-and-pepper gentlemen, seeking out a sex worker isn't just for older white men who are lacking intimacy in their marriage and are rich enough to do something about it discreetly. In fact, about 50 percent of my clients are people of color, and many are around my age. But I want to see more variety — people with mental illness, people with disabilities, women, people who are LGBTQIA+ (yes, asexuals, because intimacy is about more than just sex)." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

Awaken Beauty Podcast
Think Like a Girl with Dr. Tracy Alloway

Awaken Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 38:42


Do you find it challenging to claim your strengths?Do you diminish yourself to make others comfortable?If you're a woman, you know your brain works differently than your husband, male friends or even the masculine “hustle n' grind” ecosystem that in my mind, is shifting. You also may have a brain that tends to lean on ADHD tendencies…. And your executive function sharpness is a bit rusty... which is the ability to restrain impulsivity, have a great working memory, time management, and organization skills. Or perhaps you are a bit energetically sensitive or have high levels of empathy….  so you make your decisions through a combination of some rational decision-making and your intuition.Well, our beautiful, brilliant and buzzworthy guest Dr. Tracy Alloway, who is an award-winning psychologist, professor, author, and TEDx speaker is here to show the dynamic ways that women's brains ARE different, and how she dispels the myths so women can STOP undermining, downplaying and apologizing.Whether it's related to decision-making, leadership or relationships, I love how she breaks it all down in her new book, Think Like a Girl: 10 Unique Strengths of a Woman's Brain  Buckle in ladies…. Tracy has profound knowledge and is the author of 14 books and today we'll tap into how simply changing the words we speak, how to claim your individual strengths, and how we can connect in a meaningful way - even through social media.What You'll Discover: The difference in men and women's brains and how men's amygdalas tend to be larger than women'sWomen tend to care much more about avoiding harm therefore likely to avoid “rational” decisions in favor of more “emotional” ones.Research shows that women tend to want to avoid harm, so we are more likely to favor an “emotional” decisionThe 3 to 1 Ratio and reframingDiscover strategies for making sound decisions under stress, and learn how women uniquely evaluate risk.The Love BrainThe Intelligent BrainThe Feeling BrainThe Leader BrainWomen have 3 times more receptors in the brain attached to stress. Tend and befriend - and how it disables us from helping other women rise The relationship big five : consciousnessnous, neuroticism, extroversion, agreeability, and openness.    Social media in the female brain - the power of empathy and connection in a positive view by engaging versus passive scrolling  We learn to become empathic Oxytocin binding hormone and the rumination tendencies in women Culturally creating Heterarchy versus Hierarchy in our words Power of language and optimism: Instead of saying “yes, but…” say “yes, and…” “Yes, but…” is often associated with a negative outlook. Practice positive reframing by thinking of positive things related to the situation. Using phrases like “Yes, and…” helps us consciously reframe situations. Stress and Trolley Research : a physical stressor (ice water) can flip a switch in the  brain which changes the initial emotional response to a more rational one. Share the Love:If you like The Awakened Beauty Podcast….Subscribe, Rate & Review via iTunesVisit us at awakenedbeautyhq.com for updates.Rich Beauty & Health Offerings: www.evoqbeauty.com | www.beautyecology.comInstagram @kassandra_kuehlWatch on Youtube at my channel: Awaken Beauty PodcastShop natural health and beauty products with EVOQP.S! Your review is not only paramount in helping others discover the show, but we also read each and every submission personally…and they mean the world to us.Love and Light! - KassandraIn the Meantime, STAY IN THE CONVERSATION! @kassandra_kuehl About Tracy Packiam Alloway:Tracy Packiam Alloway, PhD, is an award-winning psychologist, professor, author, and TEDx speaker. She has published fifteen books and over one hundred scientific articles on the brain and memory. Dr. Alloway shares her insights about the brain with Fortune 500 companies, and her research has been used in the New York Times,the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and Bloomberg. As a teaching professor and in her private psychology practice based in Jacksonville, Florida, Dr. Alloway helps many women learn how to use their uniquely female brains to live their best lives.You can find her book here: https://www.tracyalloway.com/books

Rover's Morning Glory
Who is the most morbid on the show, Alec Baldwin shot and killed a person, & more

Rover's Morning Glory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 181:54


Alec Baldwin accidentally shoots and kills cinematographer with prop gun. Dental records show remains found at Carlton Reserve are those of Brian Laundrie. Survey finds men actually weep more than women. Who is the most morbid on the show? You can now buy Razer's futuristic Zephyr face mask. Does B2 have ADHD?

The Nacho Kids Podcast: Blended Family Lifesaver
125: Stepmom On The Crazy Train

The Nacho Kids Podcast: Blended Family Lifesaver

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 73:32


In this episode of the Nacho Kids Podcast, Lori, co-founder of Nacho Kids, interviews “Stepmom on the crazy train in southwest Missouri”. She's been blending for 7 years, has a 13-year-old stepson, and a 12-year-old bio son. Her stepson has been diagnosed with ADHD, ODD, OCD, anxiety, and PTSD. She and her husband dated briefly 20 years ago and found their way back to each other. She joined the Nacho Kids Academy to help with her blended struggles and has even taught her son how to Nacho! In this episode, we discuss: Desiring to be a nuclear family Wanting to be “Super Stepmom” Dealing with a high conflict bio mom Having a stepkid with mental health challenges Your significant other becoming less attractive because of his lack of parenting

New Books in Psychology
Jacki Edry, "Moving Forward: Reflections on Autism, Neurodiversity, Brain Surgery, and Faith" (2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 63:10


Jacki Edry's Moving Forward: Reflections on Autism, Neurodiversity, Brain Surgery, and Faith (2021) is a journey between the worlds of autism, neurodiversity, brain surgery recovery, and faith. It provides a rare glimpse into how sensory and neurological processing affect functioning and thought, through the eyes of a professional, parent, and woman who has experienced them firsthand.This book presents an informative, emotional, and empowering account of the challenges and struggles on the road to recovery ‒ as well as the search for understanding, meaning, and faith. It enables you to step into the shoes of someone who has endured the types of sensory irregularities common in people with neurodiversity; including autism, ADHD, dyslexia, Irlen Syndrome, Auditory Processing Disorder, and more, and to gain understanding as to how to cope with these challenges and to compensate for them.Moving forward will enlighten parents, professionals, and family members to better understand and assist the neurodivergent people whom they work with and love. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

New Books in Medicine
Jacki Edry, "Moving Forward: Reflections on Autism, Neurodiversity, Brain Surgery, and Faith" (2021)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 63:10


Jacki Edry's Moving Forward: Reflections on Autism, Neurodiversity, Brain Surgery, and Faith (2021) is a journey between the worlds of autism, neurodiversity, brain surgery recovery, and faith. It provides a rare glimpse into how sensory and neurological processing affect functioning and thought, through the eyes of a professional, parent, and woman who has experienced them firsthand.This book presents an informative, emotional, and empowering account of the challenges and struggles on the road to recovery ‒ as well as the search for understanding, meaning, and faith. It enables you to step into the shoes of someone who has endured the types of sensory irregularities common in people with neurodiversity; including autism, ADHD, dyslexia, Irlen Syndrome, Auditory Processing Disorder, and more, and to gain understanding as to how to cope with these challenges and to compensate for them.Moving forward will enlighten parents, professionals, and family members to better understand and assist the neurodivergent people whom they work with and love. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books Network
Jacki Edry, "Moving Forward: Reflections on Autism, Neurodiversity, Brain Surgery, and Faith" (2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 63:10


Jacki Edry's Moving Forward: Reflections on Autism, Neurodiversity, Brain Surgery, and Faith (2021) is a journey between the worlds of autism, neurodiversity, brain surgery recovery, and faith. It provides a rare glimpse into how sensory and neurological processing affect functioning and thought, through the eyes of a professional, parent, and woman who has experienced them firsthand.This book presents an informative, emotional, and empowering account of the challenges and struggles on the road to recovery ‒ as well as the search for understanding, meaning, and faith. It enables you to step into the shoes of someone who has endured the types of sensory irregularities common in people with neurodiversity; including autism, ADHD, dyslexia, Irlen Syndrome, Auditory Processing Disorder, and more, and to gain understanding as to how to cope with these challenges and to compensate for them.Moving forward will enlighten parents, professionals, and family members to better understand and assist the neurodivergent people whom they work with and love. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

ADHD
Adhd Reviews: Hereditary and Paranormal Activity

ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 79:22


Chet is in Miami looking for a good time and we review Hereditary and Paranormal Activity. For next week: Evil Dead 2 (HBO Max) and Train To Busan (VOD) --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/adhdcast/support

維尼老師 英文聽我說
【生活英文】這世界上能信的人不多了,請好好珍惜這些人 The Only Few People I Trust My Life With in This World

維尼老師 英文聽我說

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 32:29


這集維尼要來介紹每一個他信任的人、醫生跟服務,歡迎在大台北地區的大家有服務的需求可以去找他們!這集認真沒有業配,都是維尼自己很喜歡覺得很有幫助所以才分享給大家的! 延伸學習,不容錯過:【生活英文】饒了我吧!求你放過我!Give Me a Big Fat Break! 感謝收聽,喜歡別忘了要到各大平台上給本節目評論喔! 維尼本週六10/23 在桃園的兒童劇演出,桃園的朋友可以取免費取票喔: https://tyenews.com/2021/10/148781/ 錯過也沒關係,之後會有線上版的,維尼會再分享連結給大家!

Catie and Erik's Infinite Quest: An ADHD Adventure
Announcing QuestCraft*: An ADHD Minecraft Adventure

Catie and Erik's Infinite Quest: An ADHD Adventure

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:45


Cate and Erik are on the road in Madison, Wisconsin at GameHoleCon, and we figured this is as good of time as any to announce Infinite Quest's newest adventure: QuestCraft! We're starting a Minecraft server for neurodivergent people (and friends) to play minecraft together and where we'll be creating content. Erik and Cate also talk about minecraft and their experiences playing and the lessons they've learned along the way. Cate shares some FUN SCIENCE and Erik gets vulnerable about just how much precisely Minecraft means to him. Visit Join QuestCraft (infinitequestpodcast.com) Find us on TikTok and Instagram at: @catieosaurus @heygude We also stream daily on Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/catieosaurus https://ww.twitch.tv/heygude Media/Business Email: infinitequestpodcast@gmail.com Find all of our links and cool stuff at: www.infinitequestpodcast.com Start your own cool podcast by signing up at anchor.fm --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/infinitequest/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/infinitequest/support

Truth About Dyslexia
Following Your Dreams

Truth About Dyslexia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 15:04


I wanted to do an episode talking about my journey through work, self employment and business ownership. I hear from many dyslexics, those with ADHD and/or very visual minds - how much they get stuck in place. I think my journey touches on a few key points. I have kept it as a brief overview - to hope to hold you attention :)  Get On The Waiting List For Our January Course >> https://tcd.truthaboutdyslexia.com/The-Confident-Dyslexic Join our Private Facebook Community Here >> https://www.facebook.com/groups/adultdyslexia Support the Pod on Patreon and get some cool videos along the way! >> https://www.patreon.com/adultdyslexia Subscribe to watch 'My Dyslexic Life' on Youtube here >> https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6eO96kabO3y66aUeaEKbIg

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast
Pet expert Steve Dale: Here's how smart your dog is

WGN - The John Williams Full Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021


Steve Dale joins John Williams to address “dumbest dogs” rankings. What prompted John to ask about this was a study revealing that dogs can have ADHD.

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC182 - Dr. Judith Grisel Author of Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:26


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!  Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Link to Judy's Book:  https://amzn.to/3DTeXet     Hello Loves, Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and that just goes to show, if I can do it, you can too.   Today I'm talking with Judith Grisel. She holds a PhD in Neuroscience, she's a professor at Bucknell University and author of the highly impactful book “Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction”   What is so interesting about her is that once she got sober, like a lot of us, she wanted to help others suffering from addiction, but she took it to a whole other level! She got her Phd in neuroscience to try to cure addiction! I'm so in awe of her.    This book is full of the mechanics and mechanisms of addiction which really takes the shame out of having mental illness because it demonstrates that anyone could fall prey to addiction. I listened to the audio version of the book, which, btw, I loved  because her voice is so soothing, but I also got the paperback because I wanted to really study some of the concepts she goes into. Plus there's a few pictures in it so there's that.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! With that, please enjoy this episode with Judy.   Transcript: Arlina Allen  0:08   Let's see. Judy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. I'm really happy to be here. Arlina is it okay to call you, Judy? Oh, yes. Dr. Chris. No, please. Thank you. Well, listen, I am so excited to talk to you. I have your book. I posted on social media, I was like, I have a big announcement. And I'm talking to the author of never enough the neuroscience and experience of addiction. those that know me know that I'm completely obsessed with the mind the brain. I know sometimes people think of those as two different things, but we can kind of get into it. But what I thought was so good about this book, right? And what I love about science in general, is that it has a way when we you understand sort of the mechanics of it, it kind of depersonalized us and helps us to answer or resolve the things like guilt and shame which she which seemed to me to be a block or a barrier to healing. So I thought maybe we could start first with your a little bit of your story. Like what is I know you've been sober for 35 years? Congratulations.   Unknown Speaker  1:29   It is long time. Yeah. really grateful. Yeah, I it's funny that you mentioned guilt and shame, because I, I could see in my own life, how initially, drugs end up including alcohol were sort of the self or guilt and shame that was just it is still sort of deep in my bones. I'm not sure if it's genetic, or environmental or what, but I am, well acquainted with self criticism, and just, I guess, feelings of unworthiness. And I almost didn't realize that until I had my first drink, which was right about the time of my 13th birthday. And I was a good drink. I mean, I had little sips here and there, but I got loaded for the first time at that age. And more than anything else, it was this great relief, because I suddenly either didn't care or was made, you know, kind of transiently whole in a way that was so profound, so people talk about it all the time. But it did literally feel as if that absence was running over and you know, with fullness, I guess and so, I because I was off to the races pretty pretty dramatically. I grew up in a I guess there's no such thing as a typical home, but I was certainly fairly advantaged and you know, had no big traumas. I guess that's also kind of a funny thing to say. But you know, in light of how hard it is to grow up, I think I was fairly on the easy half anyway. And, but I got this alcohol, I spent 10 years taking as much of every single mind altering drug I could find. I remember one time I found some pills and I just, you know, took them, I was kind of, and I still am, I guess a little bit all or none so I, I was definitely I went from none to all. And as a result, I was kicked out of my first school in 10th grade. It was a, you know, girls Catholic school, so they didn't go for the kind of thing I was up to. And then to colleges I was expelled from and I was homeless intermittently, often, I contracted hepatitis C sharing dirty needles. And I hated myself really, I did hate myself that was probably my bottom was as kind of self loathing, so that I was just a teeny bit unwilling even though at the time, right around the time my 23rd birthday, I thought, drugs and alcohol were the solution to my problems of the cause. I was sort of willing to go to what I thought was going to be like a spa, an educational spa, which they was treatment. This was in the 80s so I had no idea about drug treatment at all. I just heard the word treatment and it seemed to be something I deserved. So anyhow, I ended up in what was more like a hospital for crazy adolescence and, and there without drugs in my body for a few weeks, I got kind of scared at the disaster of my life. And, and I guess I wasn't you know, it's an interesting thing as we talk about how we have to sort of see it and be willing to change. I was barely willing, I feel like I was kind of plucked out of my situation. And I had just enough grace or openness. I am sort of an experimentalist at heart. And I, I think I figured they were all saying to me from going on too much, by the way. Arlina But anyway, I was saying, you know, if you want to live, you're gonna have to quit using and I thought, No way. There's got to be another way work around. Yeah, work around, there's a backdoor somewhere. So I figured I would cure my addiction was going to take me seven years, I was going to stay clean for that seven years. Well, I solved the disease of addiction, which is what everybody was saying. And then I would use and so I was open minded and totally, you know, arrogant ignorance, naive, I don't know. But I, I was willing to do seven years, I guess,   Arlina Allen  6:26   what was the seven years to get your degree? You know,   Unknown Speaker  6:28   no, I think I wasn't thinking that clearly. I figured that I started when I was 13, I was 23, I decided I wasn't really in terrible shape, you know. So it was like seven years of intense addiction. Somehow it seemed balanced to me, if I could clear it up in seven years, and then there was just no way you were gonna tell me, I was going to spend the rest of my life without drugs, which is what my life is completely about by that time. So yeah, I was scared enough to be willing enough to be open enough to try a different way temporarily. And I remember when seven years came, by the way, and went and I looked around my life was a zillion times better. It wasn't, you know, easy, by any means. But it was definitely better. And my curiosity had kind of come back. And so I, you know, kind of a data time is, you know, stuck it out. And so here I am, 35 years clean and sober, still have not cured addiction, still very interested in the role of science in understanding and treating and preventing addiction, but also recognize that there's a lot that science doesn't know. And so, yeah, I think, yeah, it's been a it's been a fun, rich trip.   Arlina Allen  8:07   It's fun. That's, that's awesome. I mean, we were people who insist on having a time that's for sure. I think that's so amazing that so so you became abstinent at 23. From then on, he became abstinent.   Unknown Speaker  8:22   I mean, I smoked a few cigarettes and I'm completely addicted to coffee, but I don't think that his account had other than nicotine, any mind altering chemicals, and I've been tempted many times, so it's not like I just said, you know, that's it for me, I guess. Yeah, just a long, long time.   Arlina Allen  8:46   You know, I knew that you and I were going to be friends when you talked in your book about like, the your love of weed. Oh, my gosh, if I there was a period of time that if I was awake, I was high. Right? I grew up in the church and the preacher's daughter. The pastor's daughter once told me she's like, I'm high. So often that not being high was as my altered reality. And I was like, Oh, my God, you're my hero. I want to be just like you. And I was. But in your book, you talk about how I see after I got sober. It took me a little over a year to go a single day without wishing for a drink. That is rough. But it was more than nine years before my craving to get high abated during that, and I think I'm so glad that you've mentioned that because I think a lot of people especially those who are 12, step oriented, are you know, they hear stories about like, the obsession to use is lifted, or they're on this pink cloud. And I think for people who don't have that experience, they feel They're doing something wrong. Right. But   Unknown Speaker  10:02   I think for Bill Wilson, right, it was just an overnight thing. And for many of us, it's sometimes slowly and for I was definitely have a slow variety. I, I really, and when I say, you know, for the craving to abate, I really seriously wish to get high for most days, those nine years. Yeah. And I, you know, the more time that went by the more, I could see what was at risk. So when I first got clean, you know, there's nothing to lose, because you're at rock bottom. But, you know, as a result of putting one foot in front of the other things got much better. So, you know, then I could kind of see that, and then I remember so well, I can almost taste it the experience of not wanting to smoke, and I can remember how all the sudden, I was okay to be in concerts that were indoors with good weed around me. Or, you know, I was sort of indifferent. Like I was like, I had been to alcohol. You know, I'm, I have served alcohol to friends. And I was kind of in that position, like, I don't care if you smoke or not. And then it got I had the craving come back. I was, I was joke about this, but right around menopause. I just knew that, for me, an antidote to the anxiety and just sort of the brittle angst of hormonal changes, I guess was going, you know, could be smoking. And, you know, anxiety is so epidemic, and I hadn't really had a ton of it until, and there was other things going on in the world, we can just say at that. But, anyhow, oh my gosh, and I think I say this in the book, too. But I, I, at the time, I was thinking maybe I'll get cancer and my doctors make me smoke. And then little I do you know, I mean, I was wishing for, you know, some kind of serious illness. So   Arlina Allen  12:23   our minds play funny tricks on us, it doesn't matter how long you're sober. It's just weird layer. If that was ever a solution in your mind. I've heard that dopamine is like the Save button. Right? I don't know if you've ever heard of Dr. Andrew Haberman, he talks about how in nature like a deer that will find water, they get like dopamine is released. And that's how they remember where the water is. And it's almost similar for us. Like when we do something that makes us feel good. Dopamine is then released. And it helps us to remember what made us feel good. And I feel like it's burned in my psyche that if I take a bomb hat that I'm going to feel good. And I have other solutions, but it's all it's I don't think that idea is ever gonna leave me, you know, 27 years sober. I was telling you earlier that my younger son went to rehab. And this all was predicated because we found a Bag of Weed in his room and duty, I had not held a bag of marijuana for almost 30 years. And when it was in my hand, this plastic baggie, it was like I was a teenager again. And my inner drug addict was like, well, maybe we should, maybe we could maybe maybe. And I was like, I was actually a little alarmed almost a little bit of shame. Like seriously, after all this time, after all the work I've done. It's still there. I mean, it's just so engrained in my brain, I guess.   Unknown Speaker  14:00   Absolutely. And I think the one of the interesting things about the story, you just told us that the ability of a drug to make to release dopamine is different across the population. So for some people, that marijuana let's say, or alcohol doesn't do much to that for me, and for other people. It's really a potent signal. And I think that is part of the reason some of us are more at risk than others and and also the reason why it's not a really reasonable argument to say, you know, why don't they just put it down because it is like a thirsty person finding water as opposed to somebody who's completely satisfied finding water, you know, you can take it or leave it. So I think that's true. And also the brain. You know, learning is absolutely persistent. So Pretty sure we will both be I guess subject to those kinds of, you know, triggers through our until we die.   Arlina Allen  15:11   Yeah, maybe, maybe this is a good time to ask you, you know, what is what's different in that? So you're you have your PhD in neuroscience. And you know, he got sober and went on this quest to cure addiction. What have you found that's different about the brain of people who get addicted so quickly?   Unknown Speaker  15:34   Mm hmm. Well, I guess the, what I want to say first is that it's not simple, I thought I was gonna be a little switch that we were going to discover, and I wasn't alone in this, I think this was scientific understanding in the 80s, we'll find that, you know, broken switch or molecule or circuit and fix it. It's definitely not that way. So the causes of addiction are very complex and intersectional. They involve differences in dopamine and other genetic liabilities, or protective factors that make the the initial sensitivity to a drug, different across different people. So some try a drug for the first time and absolutely love it. About a third of people, for instance, try opiates and don't like them at all. And they usually try them in the doctor's office, but they find them aversive. So obviously, that's a good protective,   Arlina Allen  16:40   meaning, meaning they don't like the way they feel. Yeah, so weird to me,   Unknown Speaker  16:45   largely genetic. I know. Right? So very big individual differences. And then there are sex differences. So women tend to appreciate drugs that provide relief. And then justice is overgeneralizing a little bit Sure, overall, tend to appreciate drugs that make them feel good. And so women don't want to feel bad, and drugs help with that, certainly, especially and men like to feel good. Another big factor, and probably the largest factor more than genetic liability is adolescent exposure. So kids, like your son and my daughter are tuned into Well, they have, they have a particular kind of brain that is the adolescent brain that is really prone to trying new things, really prone to not worrying is certainly abstractly worrying about consequences. So they're less cautious. And they, they want to buck against whatever they're told, they shouldn't do. And those three traits like novelty seeking, and risk taking, and not really caring about consequences are ones that help them to become adults, if they just listened to their parents until they were 35. No one would really like that. So they they're designed to kind of say, not this, you know, I'm making my own way, which would be good if there wasn't so many high potency, dangerous ways of escaping at their fingertips. So I think through most of our evolutionary history, these you know, kids having that tendency is is no problem. The other thing that kids have in their brains are different about is that, and we all know this, they are terrific at learning. I'm teacher, and it's crazy, because and you probably noticed this with your own children, but they don't seem to even be paying attention. yet. They are like sponges information really goes in. And if they were learning French, or if they're learning addiction, both ways, their brain is really quick to take the experience and build it into the structures so that it's lasting, and I can learn French, or addiction, but your chances are so much lower. So if you start using any addictive drug, before you're 18 you have about a 25% chance of developing a substance use disorder. And the earlier you start using, the higher the chance, I started 13 so you know it was basically more likely than not. And that's because 13 year olds are great at picking up new information, much better than 33 year olds. So they if you if you Wait, on the other hand till you're 21, your chances are one in 25.   Arlina Allen  20:06   Wow, I told   Unknown Speaker  20:07   my kids that and I tell my students that and they all ignore me. Why? Because they're high novelty seeking high risk taking, and they don't really want to listen to the, you know, concerns or worries. I mean, that's not how they're designed. So we're in a kind of a perfect storm for them. And that, that is the best predictor of developing a problem starting early is starting or like,   Arlina Allen  20:30   you know what terrifies me nowadays I have a nephew who's 26 years old. And he's had four friends died from accidental fentanyl overdose, because for whatever reason, drug dealers are putting fentanyl and everything. And you know, these are pretty well adjusted kids. I don't think it's I know that there's a certain percentage of the population who indulge a little bit who don't have a disorder. Or maybe that's Yeah, is that is that true?   Unknown Speaker  21:02   Well, it's, it's more true if you start at 26. And if you start at 16, as I just said, but I think the reason that nose and everything is because it is so is it a traffic, it's so so potent, that a tiny bit can get the whole town high. So it's really advantageous to traffickers. And also, because people are having access to more and more chemicals. And when they start early, especially their reward pathway, the dopamine pathway we've been talking about is kind of desensitized, so they can't, you know, have a cup of wine coolers that doesn't do the trick at all anymore, they need something a little more, because they're sort of immune to the that dopamine, squirt? So yeah, unfortunately, I think that's another reason it's not gonna. We, I think focus, we've also noticed lately that there's more and more overdoses from methamphetamine, and then from somebody who's been looking at the trends for a long time, it's always be something and there's always going to be more potent, whatever. So it's not the drug itself, as much as this very narrow ledge that more and more of us are on trying to, I guess, medicate reality. And and so, you know, I think, I don't know how that is for your nephew. But it's a terrible lesson to have to learn for all of us.   Arlina Allen  22:51   It's just, it just makes me sick. I mean, I think there was a report that was released, I think it was at the end of March, there was a 12 year period that they were measuring overdoses that ended in March, and I think they track like 80,000 deaths. And, and I just think about all the families like all the mothers, all the all the fathers and siblings, and just everybody that's affected by so many deaths, and   Unknown Speaker  23:19   and I think a 40% increase in those deaths over the last year with COVID. So the isolation as Alicia is, has made, and also the the higher, you know, the more likely you are to find fentanyl, and whatever it is you're taking at, which is just hard to prepare for I think, biologically. Yeah. Yeah, I think it's, it's tragic. It's so tragic.   Arlina Allen  23:50   And then and then so my mind naturally goes, Well, what can we do about it? You know, it's like, we can understand, I love how, you know, science will sort of break down the mechanics. And once we understand, you know, alcohol is addictive drugs are addictive. I mean, there's a reason why they're illegal, right? It's because they're so harmful. But, you know, and then we can get into the causes, right? Like you mentioned, it's a very complex issue, you know, we you mentioned, do you that you didn't have any big trauma growing up, but I feel like, you know, we were sort of in that generation where we were not like things like ADHD and anxiety and depression weren't really talked about a whole lot. And we really didn't know how to treat those. And so our parents handled us with a lot of tough love. I got a lot of tough love and you know, from reading your book and listening to your interviews, it sounds like you were raised with that as well. And then your Can we just talk a little bit about your dad, like I wonder what it was. We talk a lot about science and it sort of leaves God out a little bit. But in my experience, it feels like there are things that are sort of serendipitous or magical about the unusual things that happen that lead us to a life of recovery. Like, what was your dad's role and your recovery?   Unknown Speaker  25:23   Um, yeah. So, so much in that question, especially, I guess I want to start by saying that I agree that we did not recognize trauma, and anxiety and all mental illnesses, wait, their response was, was so different, I think. And in my house, it was to push through both my father's parents were immigrants. And he dealt with life by controlling everything he could. And that worked great until he, you know, met 13 year old me. And I was absolutely out of control, by definition, and   Arlina Allen  26:11   he would have been terrifying to me.   Unknown Speaker  26:13   I was terrified. And I was I was, like, determinately, out of control. I mean, that was my goal to be absolutely out of control. And the more both my parents tried to kind of constrain me, the less manageable I was, and I guess I, I don't think I'm unique in this. I mean, I've raised three children. And so it's something built into the teenage neurobiology. And I had it probably in spades. So his way of life because   Arlina Allen  26:45   you're smart, smart kids are harder to race.   Unknown Speaker  26:48   I don't know. I'm also, one thing I like about myself more than if I have any smartness is, is that I'm, I guess, strong willed. And so I don't know if that actually goes with intelligence or not, but I'm not the one who's following so much. And so I wasn't named, I wasn't influenced really by too much of what people, you know, just like you said, you know, you try to get the information out. Drugs are dangerous, but it doesn't really have an impact my kids have grown up with man, they've been sort of forced to look at graphs and things. And, you know, they'll say to me, my daughter said to me the other day, you know, I know all this. But and that is sort of how I was, and I didn't know that much. My mother was giving me a reader's digest reprints you know, of how lead would damage your ovaries and stuff. But anyway, you're like,   Arlina Allen  27:49   Oh, good, I will get pregnant.   Unknown Speaker  27:51   No, I didn't. Yeah, wasn't on my radar at all. But anyhow, my father, because I think it was so painful to be around me. And to watch me his strategy, which is kind of in our family, I guess, was just denial that he even had a daughter. So during a period, after they kicked me out of the house, right about my 10th birthday. He, he would, and he would say that he had two sons. It was just too much for him. And this is kind of the way he is. So it's, and I think it's fragile. That's what he was. And he was raised to be fragile, because it was a lot to worry about, because they were poor immigrants and you know, a million ways to not make it and I think that's common for a lot of people today. So my father was just able to block it out. And we have a family friend who I dedicated the book to father, Marty Devereaux, who is this kind of an unbelievable, interesting person. He's in his 80s. Now, we're still good friends, but he is a psychologist, and has a lot of experience with addiction and also a Catholic priest. And he told my father, and don't my father's not really Catholic. I mean, he was raised Catholic, but that doesn't mean too much these days. So anyway, he   Arlina Allen  29:19   Where was he from? Marty Devereaux?   No, I'm sorry. Your said Your father was an immigrant. Oh,   Unknown Speaker  29:24   he was born in Atlantic City. But his mother was from Slovenia, and his father from Switzerland. And they met in Central Park. They were both, you know, one was a baker one was a housecleaner. And they sent two sons to college and wow. Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it's a pretty typical American story. Yeah, yeah. But um, anyway, Marty said take her out to dinner and bring her flowers like on a date. Well, I have No idea what how my father did this because he's, he's just not the type to waste any money on flowers, or two. And I was when I say I think I tried to convey this in the book. But when I imagined myself now at that moment, I was pretty deplorable. I was probably quite smelly and dirty. I was, at this point, sort of living in a one bedroom apartment with many people. And I was pretty gross. So anyway, this is when you were 23. I was not quite 23. So his takeaway? Yeah, so we he picked me up and you know, so not only was I gross, I was completely belligerent. I, I thought that my parents were terrible. And I didn't want any part of their fascist, you know, existence. And yet, I deserved a nice dinner, of course. So my big dilemma, I will not I really can still almost feel this was how we were going for early bird dinner, because it's my dad. And I'm very frugal. Yeah, he is wealthy and frugal. And   Arlina Allen  31:27   that's how I get wealthy.   Unknown Speaker  31:28   Yeah, I mean, this is sort of the first thing I guess. But anyway,   Arlina Allen  31:32   and that was a dad begged my dad, maybe it is a dead   Unknown Speaker  31:35   thing. He was also an airline pilot, so just not extremely cautious. He still is. And he's, he's in his 80s today, and we have a great relationship. But anyway, I was so stuck, because when he was picking me up, maybe quarter to five, but I had to figure out between 11 when I woke up and six hours later, how to be not too high when he came, you know, high enough, but not too high. And of course, this is harder and harder to achieve at this point in my life, because I could either be passed out or getting ready to be I mean, it was just hard to find that place. So anyway, he picks me up, he takes me out. And he said, and we talked about this still. Dude, I just wanting you to be happy. And I guess I should say, he doesn't remember saying that. But I know he said it. Because it was the most unlikely words that could ever come. And this is sort of what you were getting at, I guess where did those words come from? They're not my dad. My dad was worried about my teeth and the way you know, a lot of things but not my happiness ever. No, probably it's hard for him. And I had of course, no. No adequate response to that because I was absolutely miserable. And it went right into my heart. I fell apart. Yeah, it was a funny like tears   Arlina Allen  33:10   in my eyes. Just to think that the hard ass dad was so sweet, right? When you needed it the most. I know,   Unknown Speaker  33:17   you know what he tells me now it's funny. He, I was so out of it. I guess I don't remember the flowers. But he took me in his very clean car and my friends I guess to the beach to go for a swim that same day, that same after dinner. And we got to fill the sand. And that's what he remembers as his biggest stretch. And what I remember as his biggest stretch is him reaching across the table with his heart and saying, I want you to live basically. I mean, he sent me how I think he he met a lot by that. And my mother was not invited to the dinner. I hadn't spoken with her in a long time either. But she had been researching treatment centers for years she had had a court order actually in Florida, there's an act where you can commit somebody because of their addictions. And they thought over that a lot. But anyway, next thing I knew they flew me to a treatment center, which of course I had no idea what I was getting into and saved my life really. That place did. So I feel really fortunate that I had that opportunity to wake up a little bit as I think for the chances are that my father wouldn't have said that my mother wouldn't have had the resources to know what to do and I would have died on the streets probably not too much longer.   Arlina Allen  34:52   I feel like that really speaks to you know, people just didn't have solutions, right and they get so far straighted that their only choice is to disown right. Like I had that same experience with my mom, she disowned me on a regular basis, like she was an immigrant from Mexico. And although my father was, you know, his, his people have been here a long time. Like, they didn't know what to do with me either. And, you know, my dad was always the sweet and nurturing one, but he was, you know, he's former Marine, he was a government guy, he was kind of a hard ass, and in a lot of respects, but, you know, our parents, you know, just, it's just speaks to the love of a parent, you know, you want to save your kids. You know, you see your kids are suffering and like, my mother just didn't know how she was so frustrated that she would disown me on a regular basis. But I think when I think it's the contrast between like, a little bit of sweetness goes a long way, because it's not what we're used to. It's so shocking. Like, shocking to the system,   Unknown Speaker  36:00   let's thought about it a lot, because I do think there's a, I had a boyfriend at the time who died. Oh, overdose. And his parents were extremely sweet. So it's hard. And you could say they sweeted him into his last big use, but um, I don't know that there's a recipe I think if if there was one thing that, that I tried to do with is to show up and be honest, and I think it was so painful for my parents, both of my parents to just grapple with what happened to their little girl, that their tendency was to not show up. And I don't blame them. I mean, it's it's tough. It's tough raising teenagers sometimes because they're not that it's almost unrecognizable, you know, from the sweet nine year olds, or the 99 might become, but I think what we're called to do for each other is to tell the truth, not their truth. You know, I don't you know, you're speaking from him first himself. He said, Yeah, I was. I mean, I think this was true for him, I think, really at the core, and somehow he had the grace to find it. What all he really wants and all, probably any parent wants their kid to be well, and whatever well looks like for us. And I think the fact that he could say that was kind of miraculous.   Arlina Allen  37:42   Very, yeah, that was absolutely. sneak up for Marty, right?   Unknown Speaker  37:47   Yeah, yeah. Exactly. No, I   Arlina Allen  37:50   think yeah, it's, it's just, yeah, my mom was, she was really tough. And I remember growing up, she's going through her second divorce. And all my hair started falling out, like a lot I was under, and nobody knew what was going on. And you know, when it ended is one day, she let me curl up in her lap and cry. I had a good cry. And then my hair stopped falling out after that. Wow. Yeah. And I think it was like, there needs to be this balance. Like I feel like as a parent I attend like we tell our kids that we love them all the time. And I almost feel like maybe we maybe it's a little too much sweetness. You know, I have I have the the hard ass edge me because I think I inherited that from my mom. But you know it when you get something different from your parent, it is kind of jolting. It is kind of healing, it can be life changing, if it's different. So if you're sweet all the time, when you show up with boundaries that can be jolting. When you're a hard ass your whole life and you show up with a little bit of sweetness. It can be start, it's like a pattern interrupt, you know that. It's just kind of interesting. And I wanted to ask you a little bit   Unknown Speaker  39:09   of a story, by the way. But your mother obviously was disappointed, you know, and her own struggles, but that she was able to be with you. And warning I think that is really a bridge.   Arlina Allen  39:28   That was it made me feel you know, like the talk about original wounds, like I don't matter, or I'm unlovable because I'm either too much or not good enough. Right. Or maybe that I'm alone, you know, those original wounds, and I feel like I had all those but my mom, you know, in that moment, it's like those, like that moment that your dad had like they were willing to do something different. Like they had a glimmer of hope, like somebody gave them hope and they decided to do something different. And that's kind of what But you said your dad reached across the table with his heart, you know, and it was like, there is something that's transmitted, like when people are really vulnerable and honest and coming from their heart. That's so healing. Right? And I feel like that's a lot of what recovery has been about for me is that just that willing to be vulnerable and have a degree of humility, it's a lot of times kind of, like forced humility. It's like, like, I have to get honest about what what's really going on, so that I can get the solution. But you know, as a parent, you know, we're talking about our kids, and how do we reach our kids, because I think that's, you know, in this day and age, a lot of us that have had addiction issues, you know, we're worried about passing it down to our kids. And we thought we were talking earlier about leading by example, right, we need to lead by example for our kids, and it's so hard to know, I felt like we're walking this fine line. Because, you know, kids commit suicide all the time, like, you know, and the, there's all these ideas, like kids are like, a very aware of anxiety and depression, and being socially awkward, and there seems to be, you know, and as a parent, it's like, you want to encourage them to get help and take responsibility for their feelings at the same time, you don't want to push them too hard, because that is the ultimate threat is that they will commit suicide. Right. And it's, and I know that they're taking drugs to medicate, I took drugs to medicate. And I used to say that, you know, drugs, drugs, were my savior for a long time. If, if I had to feel, you know, especially those young years 1415 if I had to feel all the feelings, because I didn't have any coping skills, I don't know that I would have survived. So, you know, I know you've been trying to cure addiction, and what are some of the things that, you know, besides leading by example, for our kids, how can we, how do we, how do we fix this duty? How do we,   Unknown Speaker  42:08   I think we show up for each other is to start I don't know. But I, I do feel, and everybody says this, I guess every generation notices this, but I do think it is an inordinately challenging time to be growing up. I was saying to a student in my office, not too long ago, you know, if you're not anxious, you're crazy. Because and crazy is probably not the right word for Psychology at it. You know, and here I am a psychologist, I'm not all that correct times. But I think that you at least if you're not anxious, and you're growing up right now, you're somehow blind and deaf, or in denial, yeah, or in a massive denial, which I don't even know, I think that I think what's different, and what shifted for my dad, and what continues to be something that I work on, is to respond to all this pain, the natural response is to sort of curl up and close in, and to hide, and to take ourselves away. And as addicts you know, I still have a great capacity for denial that I have to check all the time. But I also found many tools to use. And that's why drugs are so compelling, because it was like, boom, you know, you've got a 10 foot wall now, between you and any realities, are safe and cozy, and delightful. And I think kids find drugs, you know, to do the same thing, but they also are stuck in a way because face it, that it's a tear, it's a hard time for any of us to be on the planet. And there's not a lot of great models of going through that awake and an honest and I guess, you know, I just try to put myself in the position of a nine year old, knowing, you know, probably on Instagram and every other thing, you know, how much suffering there is or is about to be. And then seeing the many ways, drugs and other ways that adults around are medicating and escaping. And even though you and I have been able to put down drugs, I think, at least for me, I guess I can still do want I naturally want to distance myself. And I don't I think that is a way to kind of abandon the nine year olds. I don't know how old you were when you're here was five out but I think as about maybe than nine or 10 Yeah, the metaphor is put our heads on each other's laps and, and just cry, you know, cry or or whimper or hope or try or touch each other I think in touch each other in the in the true spot where there is anxiety and depression and fear because if we can't do that and there's so many opportunities to escape I you know we're in a kind of a vortex going down the drain here because the more we escaped the worst things grow around us because we don't have to deal with them. And then the young people see oh my gosh, it's, you know, this is a crazy house. This being Earth. So I, I think or your family, I suppose but I, I guess we're both your mother and my father were able to do was recognize, you know, the truest piece of themselves and their children and respond honestly. Yeah. And that sometimes that might be kindness, sometimes that might not be kindness. But I think it's honesty, that's the, the, the thing we're really lacking or, or, you know, maybe the, the lifesaver would be Yeah,   Arlina Allen  46:44   I think in that moment, there was, you know, a high degree of empathy. Bernie Brown is a shame researcher, she talks about empathy is the antidote to shame. Right? I've heard people say that, you know, this is a disease of isolation and connection is the cure. And you know, I really feel like connection is one of those one of those solutions to all this, like, we need to connect with each other. We're, you know, as human beings, we actually really need each other.   Unknown Speaker  47:15   Oh, my goodness, yeah.   Arlina Allen  47:17   Yeah, I need to be around easily cope with stress   Unknown Speaker  47:20   is by social support. And there's tons of evidence that social support, not only mitigates, but also reverses the effects of stress. And it is, you know, surely a big part of, of getting better as individuals and also as communities and families, I think, recognizing that and it's tough because my parents kicked me out your your mother disowned you. And partly for me that facing the consequences of my decisions was helpful. But I do think that's harder because fentanyl wasn't around. You know, you you don't want to face them in the ultimate, you know, right, way too early. So I guess as parents we, we try to block a very tough line these weird. Yeah, it is hard.   Arlina Allen  48:23   Yeah. But I'm glad to hear that there's evidence that shows that social support mitigates and reverses stress, that's amazing. It kind of confirms everything that we knew, right? Like, we got sober we got social support, we, you know, had lots of people who had done it before us so learning by example, I hear that hope I've heard hope is hearing other people's experiences, which is why I do the podcast right? You know, people that listen, go Okay, you know, we can talk about the mechanics how, how the brain works, and all that and how it's affected by alcohol. And you know why it's a bad idea. But then hearing about like the turning point, like when your dad reached out to you, and you were at that place where I'm sure you had you were sick and tired of being sick and tired. Ready, just ready enough, you talk about just having just a tiny bit of willingness. It's a little chink in the armor. How long were you in that? That rehab in the 80s   Unknown Speaker  49:29   I was in for 20 days, which seemed like nine years and then I was in a halfway house for three months, which I calculated at the time so I know this is true was 1/27 of my life or something. I forget how I did that or something like that. I had some kind of crazy mula totally a rip off. I was so furious. But I, I was, like I say at the turning point, and there's been so many times, you know, I know where things are. Lena, we're talking about openness. And I think one way I could be honest, is to say, even after setting addiction for 35 years, and having all this personal and scientific experience, I still need to be open to all I don't know. And certainty is a lie, you know, certainty is the biggest illusion. And so here we are kind of trying to get through. And I think that is what I first had in my I was very certain until I'm in the treatment center. And I'm asked to try a different way. And I was troubled, because on one way I went, and I could see my way was not going great. Like it was really not going well. And I could see that without the drugs, you know, for a few weeks. But to do an another way that was extremely vague and chancy, and, you know, just seemed really crazy. To me. I was just stuck. And that, like you say this, just a tiny bit willing to say, I don't know. And, okay, you know, and this is a still, I think where I am I one of the things I love about recovery the most is that it is always different. And, you know, I thought that drugs were gonna give me this great, you know, every day is a big surprise, you know, who knows if it's the cops or that whatever. It just turned out to be adrenaline, but it was a grind, it was not really novel or interesting. And in fact, 35 years later, I'm I'm just astounded by how much mystery there is, in any day. It's just breathtaking. So I guess that I have to show up for that, you know, I have to not buy into the lie that I know exactly what I'm doing. Right?   Arlina Allen  52:20   I think the more we learn, the more we realize we don't know, a lot. You know, yeah, that is a I do love that about recovery is that every day is kind of new again, you know, and that we don't have to, and there's so much interesting research going on. Now I know that, you know, and I didn't I feel like we're running out of time, but that there is so much research now on helping people with chronic addiction through things like psychedelics. It's just like, you know, I I practice abstinence. So that's, let's face it, my life is fine. Like I don't, you know, need that. But for the chronic alcoholic who meets some criteria of like, you know, post traumatic stress disorder, and things like that. I know, Johns Hopkins is doing some interesting studies about that. That Yeah, there's still so much to learn about, about the brain and addiction and how to help people. Where do you see the focus of your work in the next, I don't know, five to 10 years?   Unknown Speaker  53:28   Well, can I just respond to this thing about the psychedelic so   Arlina Allen  53:33   Oh, sure. Yeah, cuz Yeah, you wrote a lot about it, and you're But well, I read some about   Unknown Speaker  53:36   And I think it's congruent with what other people are writing to that it may be those drugs may be a useful tool. But it reminds me that they go back to what you were saying earlier, the the benefit of those drugs is in their ability to help us connect with something bigger than ourselves, you know, which could be the love of other people. And I think that it reminds me that every drug is only doing nothing new, it's a total we have the capacity to do ourselves. So the way the pharmacology goes is that drugs work by exploiting pathways we already have. So in a way, this opportunity for transcending ourselves to connection with others, maybe helped by psychedelics, but those are not the answer. The answer is transcending ourselves by connecting with ourselves in something bigger than ourselves. So I would say that what I'm working on now Well, I there's so much that I am excited to do I wish I could stay up later, but I've got my research lab going. I'm studying sex differences in addiction. I'm also studying initial responses. to drugs and I'm interested in the genetic difference, individual differences that are mediated by an interaction of genes and say stress or other kinds of environmental influences. But I'm also hoping to write another book and I have this is funny because I'm, I don't really consider myself the book writing type, I'm kind of like the short, quick, get it done thing. And the first book took 10 years. So I don't have that a 10 years. I know so sad. Because I was busy, I was raising children and I was trying to get grants and we're, you know, grade papers and all that. So I can't do that, again, I don't, I have three books, so I'm probably not going to live long enough. So three books I want to write and I have a sabbatical coming up. And I'm hoping that I will have an opportunity to spend the year getting at least one of those out either on the adolescent vulnerability to addiction or on sex differences in the causes and consequences of addictive drugs, or just a kind of more philosophical take on. Because so a response to the opportunity that everybody alive on the planet has today to take substances and just as you were saying, sometimes for some people, those and some substances might be beneficial, and sometimes not. And I think that understanding and sort of finding your way to a personal ethic of how, what drugs in my life requires and appreciation of science, but also of you know, our honest assessment of who and where we are our development and what drugs are doing for instance, I this is just a little thing, but I read the other day that the marijuana industry is really exacerbating the droughts on the west coast. And that is a sort of a dilemma for this idea. And I mean, I I think there may be benefits also, but you know, it's not that our choices, if we know anything in October of 2021, we realize that our individual choices have impact on others, and so and on ourselves. So I guess I want to just consider that and not in a you know, there's a lot that can be said about it. So anyway, I'm excited about all those things. Who knows what tomorrow will bring, but I'm hoping to take a break from teaching it's been a tough year and a half with COVID Yeah, routines and yeah, yeah, I think we're all kind of hobbling through   Arlina Allen  58:03   Yeah, my heart goes out to all the teachers I know it's just been it's we're living in through unprecedented time so I really so grateful to all the teachers who've been able to hack it out and help our kids right it's it's really important work. You know, they I think they need as many people in their corner as they can get. So thank you for hanging it out and being available to all these kids. But I am so excited about your your book projects. I will personally be rooting for the one about adolescence.   Unknown Speaker  58:38   Me too, that one almost could write itself the data, you know, in the last 1520 years are overwhelming. And so it's really a good time to get that out. And, and adolescents are like sitting ducks today. And that is not their problem. That's all of our problem.   Arlina Allen  59:00   Oh yeah, they're our future. Right? I remember people saying that about us. Listen, thank you so much for your time today. When you get done with that book. You come on back and we'll talk about that one too.   Unknown Speaker  59:13   Okay. Arlina Thank you for having me. It's been really nice. Yeah, such   Arlina Allen  59:16   a pleasure. We'll talk soon thanks. Bye bye.

CBJectively Speaking
69. Not So Nice

CBJectively Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 52:48


In this episode, we discuss the Blue Jackets' 4-1 loss to the Detroit Red Wings and praise Joonas Korpisalo for keeping the team in the game with 41 saves. We discuss other top performers such as Boone Jenner, who tallied the only CBJ goal in the loss, and give our three stars of the game. We preview the CBJ's upcoming matchups against the New York Islanders and the Carolina Hurricanes - a not so common and a common opponent! Can the Jackets get back to their winning ways against their Metro foes? Who will start in goal? Will there be a shake up on the blue line? Finally, we go off on tangents about ADHD, having bloodwork done, and our Fantasy Hockey League - this one is off the walls! You can follow us on Twitter and Instagram @CBJectivelyPod, find us on Facebook by searching "CBJectively Speaking", and check out our website cbjectivelyspeaking.com. You can also access our merch store by heading to cbjectivelyspeaking.threadless.com. Be sure to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen! Keep up with the other shows on The Hockey Podcast Network by following @Hockeypodnet. Support for this podcast is brought to you by DraftKings, use promo code "THPN" for your chance to win cold hard cash this season!

Motherhood Later in Life: Celebrating Our Joy!
215: ADHD: Lack of Support in Our Communities

Motherhood Later in Life: Celebrating Our Joy!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 23:20


After getting our child diagnosed with ADHD, the experts didn't really provide any directions for us. We find the support we expected from the school system, the community, or our pediatrician. Getting the resources to meet my child's needs was very difficult, so we learned to advocate for her. And the challenges didn't get easier with time—they were just different with time. But in spite of all these, I can't picture my life without my ADHD, OCD, Tourette's superhero!

Dermot & Dave
'It's Not A Label, It's A Lens': Living With Adult ADHD

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 22:27


ADHD is a diagnosis that we usually associate with children, and is usually characterised by the 'hyper' one, the disruptive one in the class. However, in recent times, more understanding and research has seen an increasing amount of adults being diagnosed in later life. [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/10/21112859/ADHD_MaireadKen_2110.mp3"][/audio] Máiread Deevy is one of those people. At the age of 28, having spent most of her adult life being misdiagnosed with anxiety, Máiread felt a sense of relief to learn that she was neurologically diverse and living with ADHD. Speaking to Dermot and Dave, Máiread explained how ADHD had impacted on her life before she was diagnosed, why the words 'deficit' and 'disorder' do very little for understanding the way her brain works and how she is working with others to improve their lives. Ken Kilbride from ADHD Ireland explained to Dermot and Dave what the typical signs of ADHD are, how a diagnosis can be reached and what supports are available. You can catch the chat by clicking play above and for more information, visit ADHD Ireland's website and Máiread's email can be found here.  

Teaching in Higher Ed
Supporting ADHD Learners

Teaching in Higher Ed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:01


Karen Costa discusses how to support ADHD learners on episode 384 of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast.

Powerhouse Women
272: Entrepreneurship & ADHD with Angie Lee

Powerhouse Women

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:53


Angie Lee is on the podcast today. Need I say more. It's really my gift to you to share our conversation. Kidding, kind of, but in all seriousness this is the best job to be able to have conversations with people that I love and people that I want to learn from and Angie is one of my favorite people. Today we talk about how to know which idea to pursue if you're multi-passionate, being self-aware about whether to continue with a business idea and why ADHD is a superpower and how to use it to your advantage. This conversation was packed with so much value I know you'll love it. If you enjoyed listening as much as we loved having this conversation please tag Powerhouse Women and Angie Lee with your takeaways!   If you don't know Angie yet, she is a marketing genius who teaches women how to make friends with fear & make money doing what they love. What began as a little blog in her college dorm room blossomed into an international brand & podcast that inspires thousands of women to take messy action towards their dreams.   She is the upcoming author of Ready Is A Lie, Co Founder of Soul CBD & Creator of one of the largest female personal development events, Pays To Be Brave. In this episode we talk about: Knowing which idea to go all in on first Identifying why you want to create something and if it aligns with the season you're in  When it's time to transition in your brand or business  ADHD as a superpower Text the word LAUNCH to (602) 536-7829 to be the first to know when the Organic Launch Blueprint course is available!   Click HERE to text the word MENTOR to (602) 536-7829 for weekly business + mindset tips delivered straight to your phone!   Not part of the Girl Gang Community yet? Join HERE: Girl Gang Membership || CONNECT WITH ANGIE LEE || instagram.com/angieleeshow www.angielee.com Soul CBD  The Angie Lee Show podcast  || CONNECT WITH POWERHOUSE WOMEN || instagram.com/powerhouse_women instagram.com/llindseyschwartz facebook.com/groups/powerhousewomencommunity www.powerhousewomen.co

Self Kindness with Pete
Gozi Halima - Setting Intentions in Your Life

Self Kindness with Pete

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:20


Gozi Halima, Life Coach to Neuro Diverse Biz Owners & Creatives, is a self described ex-people pleaser, perfectionism, who struggled with massive negative self talk.  So how did she go from being so hard on herself to changing her life and begin being kind to herself?  By setting intentions in her life.   Listen how she operates from her "pillars" of life: intentionality, integrity, accountability and responsibility.  This is how she is able to give herself the grace of inner kindness and serve others so deeply!Listen as we talk about why do we step away from these pillars in our lives.  And how to get back there to live from that level of awareness!Gozi Halima on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gozphilosophy/Gozi's website: https://gozphilosophy.com/What if you lived this way, each day?  What if you saw everything in your life as THE thing to help you grow, deepenPete's Self kindness Coaching, click here or DM to connect with me about coachingI coach one-on-one, for 6 months or 1 year.We change your internal narrative intentionally from one that hurts to one that heals!What's also included : Connecting with other self kindness clients,  accessing to the client portal loaded with resources to keep you going strong in your practice!!It's 1:1 coaching, with monthly group sessions, AND an online interface to with resources, worksheets, videos and more!click here or DM to connect with me about coaching@selfkindnesswithpete-  Instagramsign up  for the email list at petesibley.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Navigating the Morass of the Internet with Chloe Condon

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 42:32


About ChloeChloe is a Bay Area based Cloud Advocate for Microsoft. Previously, she worked at Sentry.io where she created the award winning Sentry Scouts program (a camp themed meet-up ft. patches, s'mores, giant squirrel costumes, and hot chocolate), and was featured in the Grace Hopper Conference 2018 gallery featuring 15 influential women in STEM by AnitaB.org. Her projects and work with Azure have ranged from fake boyfriend alerts to Mario Kart 'astrology', and have been featured in VICE, The New York Times, as well as SmashMouth's Twitter account. Chloe holds a BA in Drama from San Francisco State University and is a graduate of Hackbright Academy. She prides herself on being a non-traditional background engineer, and is likely one of the only engineers who has played an ogre, crayon, and the back-end of a cow on a professional stage. She hopes to bring more artists into tech, and more engineers into the arts.Links: Twitter: https://twitter.com/ChloeCondon Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gitforked/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/ChloeCondonVideos TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Somehow in the years this show has been running, I've only had Chloe Condon on once. In that time, she's over for dinner at my house way more frequently than that, but somehow the stars never align to get us together in front of microphones and have a conversation. First, welcome back to the show, Chloe. You're a senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team. It is great to have you here.Chloe: I'm back, baby. I'm so excited. This is one of my favorite shows to listen to, and it feels great to be a repeat guest, a friend of the pod. [laugh].Corey: Oh, yes indeed. So, something-something cloud, something-something Microsoft, something-something Azure, I don't particularly care, in light of what it is you have going on that you have just clued me in on, and we're going to talk about that to start. You're launching something new called Master Creep Theatre and I have a whole bunch of questions. First and foremost, is it theater or theatre? How is that spelled? Which—the E and the R, what direction does that go in?Chloe: Ohh, I feel like it's going to be the R-E because that makes it very fancy and almost British, you know?Corey: Oh, yes. And the Harlequin mask direction it goes in, that entire aesthetic, I love it. Please tell me what it is. I want to know the story of how it came to be, the sheer joy I get from playing games with language alone guarantee I'm going to listen to whatever this is, but please tell me more.Chloe: Oh, my goodness. Okay, so this is one of those creative projects that's been on my back burner forever where I'm like, someday when I have time, I'm going to put all my time [laugh] and energy into this. So, this originally stemmed from—if you don't follow me on Twitter, oftentimes when I'm not tweeting about '90s nostalgia, or Clippy puns, or Microsoft silly throwback things to Windows 95, I get a lot of weird DMs. On every app, not just Twitter. On Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, oh my gosh, what else is there?Corey: And I don't want to be clear here just to make this absolutely crystal clear, “Hey, Chloe, do you want to come back on Screaming in the Cloud again?” Is not one of those weird DMs to which you're referring?Chloe: No, that is a good DM. So, people always ask me, “Why don't you just close your DMs?” Because a lot of high profile people on the internet just won't even have their DMs open.Corey: Oh, I understand that, but I'm the same boat. I would have a lot less nonsense, but at the same time, I want—at least in my case—I want people to be able to reach out to me because the only reason I am what I am is that a bunch of people who had no reason to do it did favors for me—Chloe: Yes.Corey: —and I can't ever repay it, I can only ever pay it forward and that is the cost of doing favors. If I can help someone, I will, and that's hard to do with, “My DMs are closed so hunt down my email address and send me an email,” and I'm bad at email.Chloe: Right. I'm terrible at email as well, and I'm also terrible at DMs [laugh]. So, I think a lot of folks don't understand the volume at which I get messages, which if you're a good friend of mine, if you're someone like Corey or a dear friend like Emily, I will tell you, “Hey, if you actually need to get ahold of me, text me.” And text me a couple times because I probably see it and then I have ADHD, so I won't immediately respond. I think I respond in my head but I don't.But I get anywhere from, I would say, ohh, like, 30 on a low day to 100 on a day where I have a viral tweet about getting into tech with a non-traditional background or something like that. And these DMs that I get are really lovely messages like, “Thank you for the work you do,” or, “I decided to do a cute manicure because the [laugh] manicure you posted,” too, “How do I get into tech? How do I get a job at Microsoft?” All kinds of things. It runs the gamut between, “Where's your shirt from?” Where—[laugh]—“What's your mother's maiden name?”But a lot of the messages that I get—and if you're a woman on the internet with any sort of presence, you know how there's that, like—what's it called in Twitter—the Other Messages feature that's like, “Here's the people you know. Here's the people”—the message requests. For the longest time were just, “Hey,” “Hi,” “Hey dear,” “Hi pretty,” “Hi ma'am,” “Hello,” “Love you,” just really weird stuff. And of course, everyone gets these; these are bots or scammers or whatever they may be—or just creeps, like weird—and always the bio—not always but I [laugh] would say, like, these accounts range from either obviously a bot where it's a million different numbers, an account that says, “Father, husband, lover of Jesus Christ and God.” Which is so [laugh] ironic… I'm like, “Why are you in my DMs?”Corey: A man of God, which is why I'm in your DMs being creepy.Chloe: Exactly. Or—Corey: Just like Christ might have.Chloe: And you would be shocked, Corey, at how many. The thing that I love to say is Twitter is not a dating site. Neither is LinkedIn. Neither is Instagram. I post about my boyfriend all the time, who you've met, and we adore Ty Smith, but I've never received any unsolicited images, knock on wood, but I'm always getting these very bait-y messages like, “Hey, beautiful. I want to take you out.” And you would be shocked at how many of these people are doing it from their professional business account. [laugh]. Like, works at AWS, works at Google; it's like, oh my God. [laugh].Corey: You get this under your name, right? It ties back to it. Meanwhile—again, this is one of those invisible areas of privilege that folks who look like me don't have to deal with. My DM graveyard is usually things like random bot accounts, always starting with, “Hi,” or, “Hey.” If you want to guarantee I never respond to you, that is what you say. I just delete those out of hand because I don't notice or care. It is either a bot, or a scam, or someone who can't articulate what they're actually trying to get from me—Chloe: Exactly.Corey: —and I don't have the time for it. Make your request upfront. Don't ask to ask; just ask.Chloe: I think it's important to note, also, that I get a lot of… different kinds of these messages and they try to respond to everyone. I cannot. If I responded to everybody's messages that I got, I just wouldn't have any time to do my job. But the thing that I always say to people—you know, and managers have told me in the past, my boyfriend has encouraged me to do this, is when people say things like, “Close your DMs,” or, “Just ignore them,” I want to have the same experience that everybody else has on the internet. Now, it's going to be a little different, of course, because I look and act and sound like I do, and of course, podcasts are historically a visual medium, so I'm a five-foot-two, white, bright orange-haired girl; I'm a very quirky individual.Corey: Yes, if you look up ‘quirky,' you're right there under the dictionary definition. And every time—like, when we were first hanging out and you mentioned, “Oh yeah, I used to be in theater.” And it's like, “You know, you didn't even have to tell me that, on some level.” Which is not intended to be an insult. It's just theater folks are a bit of a type, and you are more or less the archetype of what a theatre person is, at least to my frame of reference.Chloe: And not only that, but I did musicals, so you can't see the jazz hands now, but–yeah, my degree is in drama. I come from that space and I just, you know, whenever people say, “Just ignore it,” or, “Close your DMs,” I'm like, I want people to be able to reach out to me; I want to be able to message one-on-one with Corey and whoever, when—as needed, and—Corey: Why should I close my DMs?Chloe: Yeah.Corey: They're the ones who suck. Yeah.Chloe: [laugh]. But over the years, to give people a little bit of context, I've been working in tech a long time—I've been working professionally in the DevRel space for about five or six years now—but I've worked in tech a long time, I worked as a recruiter, an office admin, executive assistant, like, I did all of the other areas of tech, but it wasn't until I got a presence on Twitter—which I've only been on Twitter for I think five years; I haven't been on there that long, actively. And to give some context on that, Twitter is not a social media platform used in the theater space. We just use Instagram and Facebook, really, back in the day, I'm not on Facebook at all these days. So, when I discovered Twitter was cool—and I should also mention my boyfriend, Ty, was working at Twitter at the time and I was like, “Twitter's stupid. Who would go on this—[laugh] who uses this app?”Fast-forward to now, I'm like—Ty's like, “Can you please get off Twitter?” But yeah, I think I've just been saving these screenshots over the last five or so years from everything from my LinkedIn, from all the crazy stuff that I dealt with when people thought I was a Bitcoin influencer to people being creepy. One of the highlights that I recently found when I was going back and trying to find these for this series that I'm doing is there was a guy from Australia, DMed me something like, “Hey, beautiful,” or, “Hey, sexy,” something like that. And I called him out. And I started doing this thing where I would post it on Twitter.I would usually hide their image with a clown emoji or something to make it anonymous, or not to call them out, but in this one I didn't, and this guy was defending himself in the comments, and to me in my DM's saying, “Oh, actually, this was a social experiment and I have all the screenshots of this,” right? So, imagine if you will—so I have conversations ranging from things like that where it's like, “Actually I messaged a bunch of people about that because I'm doing a social experiment on how people respond to, ‘Hey beautiful. I'd love to take you out some time in Silicon Valley.'” just the weirdest stuff right? So, me being the professional performer that I am, was like, these are hilarious.And I kept thinking to myself, anytime I would get these messages, I was like, “Does this work?” If you just go up to someone and say, “Hey”—do people meet this way? And of course, you get people on Twitter who when you tweet something like that, they're like, “Actually, I met my boyfriend in Twitter DMs,” or like, “I met my boyfriend because he slid into my DMs on Instagram,” or whatever. But that's not me. I have a boyfriend. I'm not interested. This is not the time or the place.So, it's been one of those things on the back burner for three or four years that I've just always been saving these images to a folder, thinking, “Okay, when I have the time when I have the space, the creative energy and the bandwidth to do this,” and thankfully for everyone I do now, I'm going to do dramatic readings of these DMs with other people in tech, and show—not even just to make fun of these people, but just to show, like, how would this work? What do you expect the [laugh] outcome to be? So Corey, for example, if you were to come on, like, here's a great example. A year ago—this is 2018; we're in 2021 right now—this guy messaged me in December of 2018, and was like, “Hey,” and then was like, “I would love to be your friend.” And I was like, “Nope,” and I responded, “Nope, nope, nope, nope.” There's a thread of this on Twitter. And then randomly, three weeks ago, just sent me this video to the tune of Enrique Iglesias' “Rhythm Divine” of just images of himself. [laugh]. So like, this comedy [crosstalk 00:10:45]—Corey: Was at least wearing pants?Chloe: He is wearing pants. It's very confusing. It's a picture—a lot of group photos, so I didn't know who he was. But in my mind because, you know, I'm an engineer, I'm trying to think through the end-user experience. I'm like, “What was your plan here?”With all these people I'm like, “So, your plan is just to slide into my DMs and woo me with ‘Hey'?” [laugh]. So, I think it'll be really fun to not only just show and call out this behavior but also take submissions from other people in the industry, even beyond tech, really, because I know anytime I tweet an example of this, I get 20 different women going, “Oh, my gosh, you get these weird messages, too?” And I really want to show, like, A, to men how often this happens because like you said, I think a lot of men say, “Just ignore it.” Or, “I don't get anything like that. You must be asking for it.”And I'm like, “No. This comes to me. These people find us and me and whoever else out there gets these messages,” and I'm just really ready to have a laugh at their expense because I've been laughing for years. [laugh].Corey: Back when I was a teenager, I was working in some fast food style job, and one of my co-workers saw customer, walked over to her, and said, “You're beautiful.” And she smiled and blushed. He leaned in and kissed her.Chloe: Ugh.Corey: And I'm sitting there going what on earth? And my other co-worker leaned over and is like, “You do know that's his girlfriend, right?” And I have to feel like, on some level, that is what happened to an awful lot of these broken men out on the internet, only they didn't have a co-worker to lean over and say, “Yeah, they actually know each other.” Which is why we see all this [unintelligible 00:12:16] behavior of yelling at people on the street as they walk past, or from a passing car. Because they saw someone do a stunt like that once and thought, “If it worked for them, it could work for me. It only has to work once.”And they're trying to turn this into a one day telling the grandkids how they met their grandmother. And, “Yeah, I yelled at her from a construction site, and it was love at first ‘Hey, baby.'” That is what I feel is what's going on. I have never understood it. I look back at my dating history in my early 20s, I look back now I'm like, “Ohh, I was not a great person,” but compared to these stories, I was a goddamn prince.Chloe: Yeah.Corey: It's awful.Chloe: It's really wild. And actually, I have a very vivid memory, this was right bef—uh, not right before the pandemic, but probably in 2019. I was speaking on a lot of conferences and events, and I was at this event in San Jose, and there were not a lot of women there. And somehow this other lovely woman—I can't remember her name right now—found me afterwards, and we were talking and she said, “Oh, my God. I had—this is such a weird event, right?”And I was like, “Yeah, it is kind of a weird vibe here.” And she said, “Ugh, so the weirdest thing happened to me. This guy”—it was her first tech conference ever, first of all, so you know—or I think it was her first tech conference in the Bay Area—and she was like, “Yeah, this guy came to my booth. I've been working this booth over here for this startup that I work at, and he told me he wanted to talk business. And then I ended up meeting him, stupidly, in my hotel lobby bar, and it's a date. Like, this guy is taking me out on a date all of a sudden,” and she was like, “And it took me about two minutes to just to be like, you know what? This is inappropriate. I thought this is going to be a business meeting. I want to go.”And then she shows me her hands, Corey, and she has a wedding ring. And she goes, “I'm not married. I have bought five or six different types of rings on Wish App”—or wish.com, which if you've never purchased from Wish before, it's very, kind of, low priced jewelry and toys and stuff of that nature. And she said, “I have a different wedding ring for every occasion. I've got my beach fake wedding ring. I've got my, we-got-married-with-a-bunch-of-mason-jars-in-the-woods fake wedding ring.”And she said she started wearing these because when she did, she got less creepy guys coming up to her at these events. And I think it's important to note, also, I'm not putting it out there at all that I'm interested in men. If anything, you know, I've been [laugh] with my boyfriend for six years never putting out these signals, and time and time again, when I would travel, I was very, very careful about sharing my location because oftentimes I would be on stage giving a keynote and getting messages while I delivered a technical keynote saying, “I'd love to take you out to dinner later. How long are you in town?” Just really weird, yucky, nasty stuff that—you know, and everyone's like, “You should be flattered.”And I'm like, “No. You don't have to deal with this. It's not like a bunch of women are wolf-whistling you during your keynote and asking what your boob size is.” But that's happening to me, and that's an extra layer that a lot of folks in this industry don't talk about but is happening and it adds up. And as my boyfriend loves to remind me, he's like, “I mean, you could stop tweeting at any time,” which I'm not going to do. But the more followers you get, the more inbound you get. So—Corey: Right. And the hell of it is, it's not a great answer because it's closing off paths of opportunity. Twitter has—Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: —introduced me to clients, introduced me to friends, introduced me to certainly an awful lot of podcast guests, and it informs and shapes a lot of the opinions that I hold on these things. And this is an example of what people mean when they talk about privilege. Where, yeah, “Look at Corey”—I've heard someone say once, and, “Nothing was handed to him.” And you're right, to be clear, I did not—like, no one handed me a microphone and said, “We're going to give you a podcast, now.” I had to build this myself.But let's be clear, I had no headwinds of working against me while I did it. There's the, you still have to do things, but you don't have an entire cacophony of shit heels telling you that you're not good enough in a variety of different ways, to subtly reinforcing your only value is the way that you look. There isn't this whole, whenever you get something wrong and it's a, “Oh, well, that's okay. We all get things wrong.” It's not the, “Girls suck at computers,” trope that we see so often.There's a litany of things that are either supportive that work in my favor, or are absent working against me that is privilege that is invisible until you start looking around and seeing it, and then it becomes impossible not to. I know I've talked about this before on the show, but no one listens to everything and I just want to subtly reinforce that if you're one of those folks who will say things like, “Oh, privilege isn't real,” or, “You can have bigotry against white people, too.” I want to be clear, we are not the same. You are not on my side on any of this, and to be very direct, I don't really care what you have to say.Chloe: Yeah. And I mean, this even comes into play in office culture and dynamics as well because I am always the squeaky wheel in the room on these kind of things, but a great example that I'll give is I know several women in this industry who have had issues when they used to travel for conferences of being stalked, people showing up at their hotel rooms, just really inappropriate stuff, and for that reason, a lot of folks—including myself—wouldn't pick the conference event—like, typically they'll be like, “This is the hotel everyone's staying at.” I would very intentionally stay at a different hotel because I didn't want people knowing where I was staying. But I started to notice once a friend of mine, who had an issue with this [unintelligible 00:17:26], I really like to be private about where I'm staying, and sometimes if you're working at a startup or larger company, they'll say, “Hey, everyone put in this Excel spreadsheet or this Google Doc where everyone's staying and how to contact them, and all this stuff.” And I think it's really important to be mindful of these things.I always say to my friends—I'm not going out too much these days because it's a pandemic—and I've done Twitter threads on this before where I never post my location; you will never see me. I got rid of Swarm a couple [laugh] years ago because people started showing up where I was. I posted photos before, you know, “Hey, at the lake right now.” And people have shown up. Dinners, people have recognized me when I've been out.So, I have an espresso machine right over here that my lovely boyfriend got me for my birthday, and someone commented, “Oh, we're just going to act like we don't see someone's reflection in the”—like, people Zoom in on images. I've read stories from cosplayers online who, they look into the reflection of a woman's glasses and can figure out where they are. So, I think there's this whole level. I'm constantly on alert, especially as a woman in tech. And I have friends here in the Bay Area, who have tweeted a photo at a barbecue, and then someone was like, “Hey, I live in the neighborhood, and I recognize the tree.”First of all, don't do that. Don't ever do that. Even if you think you're a nice, unassuming guy or girl or whatever, don't ever [laugh] do that. But I very intentionally—people get really confused, my friends specifically. They're like, “Wait a second, you're in Hawaii right now? I thought you were in Hawaii three weeks ago.” And I'm like, “I was. I don't want anyone even knowing what island or continent I'm on.”And that's something that I think about a lot. When I post photo—I never post any photos from my window. I don't want people knowing what my view is. People have figured out what neighborhood I live in based on, like, “I know where that graffiti is.” I'm very strategic about all this stuff, and I think there's a lot of stuff that I want to share that I don't share because of privacy issues and concerns about my safety. And also want to say and this is in my thread on online safety as well is, don't call out people's locations if you do recognize the image because then you're doxxing them to everyone like, “Oh”—Corey: I've had a few people do that in response to pictures I've posted before on a house, like, “Oh, I can look at this and see this other thing and then intuit where you are.” And first, I don't have that sense of heightened awareness on this because I still have this perception of myself as no one cares enough to bother, and on the other side, by calling that out in public. It's like, you do not present yourself well at all. In fact, you make yourself look an awful lot like the people that we're warned about. And I just don't get that.I have some of these concerns, especially as my audience has grown, and let's be very clear here, I antagonize trillion-dollar companies for a living. So, first if someone's going to have me killed, they can find where I am. That's pretty easy. It turns out that having me whacked is not even a rounding error on most of these companies' budgets, unfortunately. But also I don't have that level of, I guess, deranged superfan. Yet.But it happens in the fullness of time, as people's audiences continue to grow. It just seems an awful lot like it happens at much lower audience scale for folks who don't look like me. I want to be clear, this is not a request for anyone listening to this, to try and become that person for me, you will get hosed, at minimum. And yes, we press charges here.Chloe: AWSfan89, sliding into your DMs right after this. Yeah, it's also just like—I mean, I don't want to necessarily call out what company this was at, but personally, I've been in situations where I've thrown an event, like a meetup, and I'm like, “Hey, everyone. I'm going to be doing ‘Intro to blah, blah, blah' at this time, at this place.” And three or four guys would show up, none of them with computers. It was a freaking workshop on how to do or deploy something, or work with an API.And when I said, “Great, so why'd you guys come to this session today?” And maybe two have iPads, one just has a notepad, they're like, “Oh, I just wanted to meet you from Twitter.” And it's like, okay, that's a little disrespectful to me because I am taking time out to do this workshop on a very technical thing that I thought people were coming here to learn. And this isn't the Q&A. This is not your meet-and-greet opportunity to meet Chloe Condon, and I don't know why you would, like, I put so much of my life online [laugh] anyway.But yeah, it's very unsettling, and it's happened to me enough. Guys have shown up to my events and given me gifts. I mean, I'm always down for a free shirt or something, but it's one of those things that I'm constantly aware of and I hate that I have to be constantly aware of, but at the end of the day, my safety is the number one priority, and I don't want to get murdered. And I've tweeted this out before, our friend Emily, who's similarly a lady on the internet, who works with my boyfriend Ty over at Uber, we have this joke that's not a joke, where we say, “Hey if I'm murdered, this is who it was.” And we'll just send each other screenshots of creepy things that people either tag us in, or give us feedback on, or people asking what size shirt we are. Just, wiki feed stuff, just really some of the yucky of the yuck out there.And I do think that unless you have a partner, or a family member, or someone close enough to you to let you know about these things—because I don't talk about these things a lot other than my close friends, and maybe calling out a weirdo here and there in public, but I don't share the really yucky stuff. I don't share the people who are asking what neighborhood I live in. I'm not sharing the people who are tagging me, like, [unintelligible 00:22:33], really tagging me in some nasty TikToks, along with some other women out there. There are some really bad actors in this community and it is to the point where Emily and I will be like, “Hey, when you inevitably have to solve my murder, here's the [laugh] five prime suspects.” And that sucks. That's [unintelligible 00:22:48] joke; that isn't a joke, right? I suspect I will either die in an elevator accident or one of my stalkers will find me. [laugh].Corey: It's easy for folks to think, oh, well, this is a Chloe problem because she's loud, she's visible, she's quirky, she's different than most folks, and she brings it all on herself, and this is provably not true. Because if you talk to, effectively, any woman in the world in-depth about this, they all have stories that look awfully similar to this. And let me forestall some of the awful responses I know I'm going to get. And, “Well, none of the women I know have had experiences like this,” let me be very clear, they absolutely have, but for one reason or another, they either don't see the need, or don't see the value, or don't feel safe talking to you about it.Chloe: Yeah, absolutely. And I feel a lot of privilege, I'm very lucky that my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber, and I have lots of friends in high places at some of these companies like Reddit that work with safety and security and stuff, but oftentimes, a lot of the stories or insights or even just anecdotes that I will give people on their products are invaluable insights to a lot of these security and safety teams. Like, who amongst us, you know, [laugh] has used a feature and been like, “Wait a second. This is really, really bad, and I don't want to tweet about this because I don't want people to know that they can abuse this feature to stalk or harass or whatever that may be,” but I think a lot about the people who don't have the platform that I have because I have 50k-something followers on Twitter, I have a pretty big online following in general, and I have the platform that I do working at Microsoft, and I can tweet and scream and be loud as I can about this. But I think about the folks who don't have my audience, the people who are constantly getting harassed and bombarded, and I get these DMs all the time from women who say, “Thank you so much for doing a thread on this,” or, “Thank you for talking about this,” because people don't believe them.They're just like, “Oh, just ignore it,” or just, “Oh, it's just one weirdo in his basement, like, in his mom's basement.” And I'm like, “Yeah, but imagine that but times 40 in a week, and think about how that would make you rethink your place and your position in tech and even outside of tech.” Let's think of the people who don't know how this technology works. If you're on Instagram at all, you may notice that literally not only every post, but every Instagram story that has the word COVID in it, has the word vaccine, has anything, and they must be using some sort of cognitive scanning type thing or scanning the images themselves because this is a feature that basically says, hey, this post mentioned COVID in some way. I think if you even use the word mask, it alerts this.And while this is a great feature because we all want accurate information coming out about the pandemic, I'm like, “Wait a minute. So, you're telling me this whole time you could have been doing this for all the weird things that I get into my DMs, and people post?” And, like, it just shows you, yes, this is a global pandemic. Yes, this is something that affects everyone. Yes, it's important we get information out about this, but we can be using these features in much [laugh] more impactful ways that protects people's safety, that protects people's ability to feel safe on a platform.And I think the biggest one for me, and I make a lot of bots; I make a lot of Twitter bots and chatbots, and I've done entire series on this about ethical bot creation, but it's so easy—and I know this firsthand—to make a Twitter account. You can have more than one number, you can do with different emails. And with Instagram, they have this really lovely new feature that if you block someone, it instantly says, “You just blocked so and so. Would you like to block any other future accounts they make?” I mean, seems simple enough, right?Like, anything related—maybe they're doing it by email, or phone number, or maybe it's by IP, but like, that's not being done on a lot of these platforms, and it should be. I think someone mentioned in one of my threads on safety recently that Peloton doesn't have a block user feature. [laugh]. They're probably like, “Well, who's going to harass someone on Peloton?” It would happen to me. If I had a Peloton, [laugh] I assure you someone would find a way to harass me on there.So, I always tell people, if you're working at a company and you're not thinking about safety and harassment tools, you probably don't have anybody LGBTQ+ women, non-binary on your team, first of all, and you need to be thinking about these things, and you need to be making them a priority because if users can interact in some way, they will stalk, harass, they will find some way to misuse it. It seems like one of those weird edge cases where it's like, “Oh, we don't need to put a test in for that feature because no one's ever going to submit, like, just 25 emojis.” But it's the same thing with safety. You're like, who would harass someone on an app about bubblegum? One of my followers were. [laugh].Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The biggest question that doesn't get asked that needs to be in almost every case is, “Okay. We're building a thing, and it's awesome. And I know it's hard to think like this, but pivot around. Theoretically, what could a jerk do with it?”Chloe: Yes.Corey: When you're designing it, it's all right, how do you account for people that are complete jerks?Chloe: Absolutely.Corey: Even the cloud providers, all of them, when the whole Parler thing hit, everyone's like, “Oh, Amazon is censoring people for freedom of speech.” No, they're actually not. What they're doing is enforcing their terms of service, the same terms of service that every provider that is not trash has. It is not a problem that one company decided they didn't want hate speech on their platform. It was all the companies decided that, except for some very fringe elements. And that's the sort of thing you have to figure out is, it's easy in theory to figure out, oh, anything goes; freedom of speech. Great, well, some forms of speech violate federal law.Chloe: Right.Corey: So, what do you do then? Where do you draw the line? And it's always nuanced and it's always tricky, and the worst people are the folks that love to rules-lawyer around these things. It gets worse than that where these are the same people that will then sit there and make bad faith arguments all the time. And lawyers have a saying that hard cases make bad law.When you have these very nuanced thing, and, “Well, we can't just do it off the cuff. We have to build a policy around this.” This is the problem with most corporate policies across the board. It's like, you don't need a policy that says you're not allowed to harass your colleagues with a stick. What you need to do is fire the jackwagon that made you think you might need a policy that said that.But at scale, that becomes a super-hard thing to do when every enforcement action appears to be bespoke. Because there are elements on the gray areas and the margins where reasonable people can disagree. And that is what sets the policy and that's where the precedent hits, and then you have these giant loopholes where people can basically be given free rein to be the worst humanity has to offer to some of the most vulnerable members of our society.Chloe: And I used to give this talk, I gave it at DockerCon one year and I gave it a couple other places, that was literally called “Diversity is not Equal to Stock Images of Hands.” And the reason I say this is if you Google image search ‘diversity' it's like all of those clip arts of, like, Rainbow hands, things that you would see at Kaiser Permanente where it's like, “We're all in this together,” like, the pandemic, it's all just hands on hands, hands as a Earth, hands as trees, hands as different colors. And people get really annoyed with people like me who are like, “Let's shut up about diversity. Let's just hire who's best for the role.” Here's the thing.My favorite example of this—RIP—is Fleets—remember Fleets? [laugh]—on Twitter, so if they had one gay man in the room for that marketing, engineering—anything—decision, one of them I know would have piped up and said, “Hey, did you know ‘fleets' is a commonly used term for douching enima in the gay community?” Now, I know that because I watch a lot of Ru Paul's Drag Race, and I have worked with the gay community quite a bit in my time in theater. But this is what I mean about making sure. My friend Becca who works in security at safety and things, as well as Andy Tuba over at Reddit, I have a lot of conversations with my friend Becca Rosenthal about this, and that, not to quote Hamilton, but if I must, “We need people in the room where it happens.”So, if you don't have these people in the room if you're a white man being like, “How will our products be abused?” Your guesses may be a little bit accurate but it was probably best to, at minimum, get some test case people in there from different genders, races, backgrounds, like, oh my goodness, get people in that room because what I tend to see is building safety tools, building even product features, or naming things, or designing things that could either be offensive, misused, whatever. So, when people have these arguments about like, “Diversity doesn't matter. We're hiring the best people.” I'm like, “Yeah, but your product's going to be better, and more inclusive, and represent the people who use it at the end of the day because not everybody is you.”And great examples of this include so many apps out there that exists that have one work location, one home location. How many people in the world have more than one job? That's such a privileged view for us, as people in tech, that we can afford to just have one job. Or divorced parents or whatever that may be, for home location, and thinking through these edge cases and thinking through ways that your product can support everyone, if anything, by making your staff or the people that you work with more diverse, you're going to be opening up your product to a much bigger marketable audience. So, I think people will look at me and be like, “Oh, Chloe's a social justice warrior, she's this feminist whatever,” but truly, I'm here saying, “You're missing out on money, dude.” It would behoove you to do this at the end of the day because your users aren't just a copy-paste of some dude in a Patagonia jacket with big headphones on. [laugh]. There are people beyond one demographic using your products and applications.Corey: A consistent drag against Clubhouse since its inception was that it's not an accessible app for a variety of reasons that were—Chloe: It's not an Android. [laugh].Corey: Well, even ignoring the platform stuff, which I get—technical reasons, et cetera, yadda, yadda, great—there is no captioning option. And a lot of their abuse stuff in the early days was horrific, where you would get notifications that a lot of people had this person blocked, but… that's not a helpful dynamic. “Did you talk to anyone? No, of course not. You Hacker News'ed it from first principles and thought this might be a good direction to go in.” This stuff is hard.People specialize in this stuff, and I've always been an advocate of when you're not sure what to do in an area, pay an expert for advice. All these stories about how people reach out to, “Their black friend”—and yes, it's a singular person in many cases—and their black friend gets very tired of doing all the unpaid emotional labor of all of this stuff. Suddenly, it's not that at all if you reach out to someone who is an expert in this and pay them for their expertise. I don't sit here complaining that my clients pay me to solve AWS billing problems. In fact, I actively encourage that behavior. Same model.There are businesses that specialize in this, they know the area, they know the risks, they know the ins and outs of this, and consults with these folks are not break the bank expensive compared to building the damn thing in the first place.Chloe: And here's a great example that literally drove me bananas a couple weeks ago. So, I don't know if you've participated in Twitter Spaces before, but I've done a couple of my first ones recently. Have you done one yet—Corey: Oh yes—Chloe: —Corey?Corey: —extensively. I love that. And again, that's a better answer for me than Clubhouse because I already have the Twitter audience. I don't have to build one from scratch on another platform.Chloe: So, I learned something really fascinating through my boyfriend. And remember, I mentioned earlier, my boyfriend is a staff engineer at Uber. He's been coding since he's been out of the womb, much more experienced than me. And I like to think a lot about, this is accessible to me but how is this accessible to a non-technical person? So, Ty finished up the Twitter Space that he did and he wanted to export the file.Now currently, as the time of this podcast is being recorded, the process to export a Twitter Spaces audio file is a nightmare. And remember, staff engineer at Uber. He had to export his entire Twitter profile, navigate through a file structure that wasn't clearly marked, find the recording out of the multiple Spaces that he had hosted—and I don't think you get these for ones that you've participated in, only ones that you've hosted—download the file, but the file was not a normal WAV file or anything; he had to download an open-source converter to play the file. And in total, it took him about an hour to just get that file for the purposes of having that recording. Now, where my mind goes to is what about some woman who runs a nonprofit in the middle of, you know, Sacramento, and she does a community Twitter Spaces about her flower shop and she wants a recording of that.What's she going to do, hire some third-party? And she wouldn't even know where to go; before I was in tech, I certainly would have just given up and been like, “Well, this is a nightmare. What do I do with this GitHub repo of information?” But these are the kinds of problems that you need to think about. And I think a lot of us and folks who listen to this show probably build APIs or developer tools, but a lot of us do work on products that muggles, non-technical people, work on.And I see these issues happen constantly. I come from this space of being an admin, being someone who wasn't quote-unquote, “A techie,” and a lot of products are just not being thought through from the perspective—like, there would be so much value gained if just one person came in and tested your product who wasn't you. So yeah, there's all of these things that I think we have a very privileged view of, as technical folks, that we don't realize are huge. Not even just barrier to entry; you should just be able to download—and maybe this is a feature that's coming down the pipeline soon, who knows, but the fact that in order for someone to get a recording of their Twitter Spaces is like a multi-hour process for a very, very senior engineer, that's the problem. I'm not really sure how we solve this.I think we just call it out when we see it and try to help different companies make change, which of course, myself and my boyfriend did. We reached out to people at Twitter, and we're like, “This is really difficult and it shouldn't be.” But I have that privilege. I know people at these companies; most people do not.Corey: And in some cases, even when you do, it doesn't move the needle as much as you might wish that it would.Chloe: If it did, I wouldn't be getting DMs anymore from creeps right? [laugh].Corey: Right. Chloe, thank you so much for coming back and talk to me about your latest project. If people want to pay attention to it and see what you're up to. Where can they go? Where can they find you? Where can they learn more? And where can they pointedly not audition to be featured on one of the episodes of Master Creep Theatre?Chloe: [laugh]. So, that's the one caveat, right? I have to kind of close submissions of my own DMs now because now people are just going to be trolling me and sending me weird stuff. You can find me on Twitter—my name—at @chloecondon, C-H-L-O-E-C-O-N-D-O-N. I am on Instagram as @getforked, G-I-T-F-O-R-K-E-D. That's a Good Placepun if you're non-technical; it is an engineering pun if you are. And yeah, I've been doing a lot of fun series with Microsoft Reactor, lots of how to get a career in tech stuff for students, building a lot of really fun AI/ML stuff on there. So, come say hi on one of my many platforms. YouTube, too. That's probably where—Master Creep Theatre is going to be, on YouTube, so definitely follow me on YouTube. And yeah.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:37:57]. Chloe, thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I really appreciate it, as always.Chloe: Thank you. I'll be back for episode three soon, I'm sure. [laugh].Corey: Let's not make it another couple of years until then. Chloe Condon, senior cloud advocate at Microsoft on the Next Generation Experiences Team, also chlo-host of the Master Creep Theatre podcast. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment saying simply, “Hey.”Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Thriving in the Midst of Chaos: Parenting With Special Needs Kids
Lia McCabe's Experience Raising Two Daughters With Autism

Thriving in the Midst of Chaos: Parenting With Special Needs Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:46


Episode 112: Lia McCabe's Experience Raising Two Daughters With Autism   In this episode, guest Lia McCabe discusses her experience raising two children with autism, as well as giving back to the autism community. She noticed signs right away in her first daughter that something was amiss. However, the signs in her other daughter were totally different. She noted that it was hard to get the diagnosis of autism with her first daughter, because she didn't know much about autism at the time. They had had all sorts of expectation for their children's futures, all of which now had to change. The diagnosis didn't hit as hard when they got the diagnosis for the second child, as the systems for helping were already in place. Both children have done speech therapy and occupational therapy and her oldest daughter did physical therapy as well, due to hypotonia. They are currently both in a preschool speech and language/social skills program.   Links: Embracing Neurodivergency with Jessica Eccles, MD AutismWish Embracing Autism Podcast Parents Place of Maryland Floor Time Therapy LISS Funds Facebook Page       Email us if you have any questions or ideas! We are now on instagram! Check out updates on our website. Follow Thriving on Twitter. Check us out on Facebook! We are also on Pinterest!     Please subscribe to our podcast in the iTunes store, or wherever you find your podcasts, Leave us a 5-star review, to help us know what you like and what you don't like, and to make sure other like-minded people find support through this podcast. Show Music: Intro Outro: Intro Outro 2 by Mattias Lahoud under CC-BY 3.0 License (www.freesound.org) Theme Song: 90s rock style by monkeyman535 under CC-BY 3.0 License (www.freesound.org) Self Care Song: Green and Orange No Water by Duncan Alex under CC-BY 3.0 License (www.freesound.org)   Hosted by: Jessica Temple and Lewis Temple   Disclaimer: Our show is not designed to provide listeners with specific or personal legal, medical, or professional services or advice. Parents of children with health issues should always consult their health care provider for medical advice, medication, or treatment. Copyright 2021 Jessica Temple

Social Media Therapy
How Childhood Trauma Effects Your Life as an Adult With Expert Vanessa Rosage

Social Media Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 57:27


If you've been following me on TikTok, you know very well what could have caused your childhood trauma. But, how does it affect us later in life–as adults? In far-reaching scary ways is my initial thought, but what if we're neurodivergent? How does trauma as a whole affect kids with ADHD, who are autistic, have other issues that could affect their ability to cope? Also, what the hell is happening to our bodies physically when we have prolonged exposure to trauma? Tune in this week to find out with our special guest–Vanessa Rosage! This week we're speaking with Vanessa Rosage, LPC. Vanessa has been a therapist for 14 years. Currently, she runs a private practice and works primarily with children, parents, families, couples, adolescents and young adults. During her time with her patients, she uses several tools to help each patient and has a foundational theoretical orientation that is rooted in interpersonal neurobiology, which aims to heal trauma, anxiety, fear and shame through the connection and relationship between people. As a trained DEEP specialist, Vanessa understands how to create safe and healing environments in the therapeutic relationship. Follow Vanessa https:www/instagram.com/elemental_liberationLearn more about Vanessa and her practicehttps://www,vanessarosage.com 

Motherhood in ADHD
E115: Does your menstrual cycle affect your ADHD? Hormones, periods, and ADHD symptoms

Motherhood in ADHD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 24:50


All right, today we're talking about the elephant in the room: MENSTRUAL CYCLES. I know, I know - not everyone's favorite subject! But it's something we all deal with so we might as well discuss how our hormones and our periods affect us as mamas with ADHD. When you think about hormones, think about HOW MUCH your body has evolved through your life. Adolescence, puberty, pregnancy, postpartum...there's no denying everything's in flux pretty much all the time. So, the question is what do we REALLY need to know and how can we navigate our ADHD symptoms while our bodies are on a constant hormonal roller coaster? Sadly, there isn't a lot of research on the topic but there are a few really great resources that I'm excited to share in today's episode! Don't worry mama...I got you! I did a looooot of digging and I think you'll love the tools and resources I'm sharing. They'll shed some light on how our bodies work and what to do to be even MORE successful and gracious with ourselves as a woman with ADHD. Plus a big thank you to my friend and mentor, ADHD Coach Elizabeth Brink, for the research help! @coachelizabethbrink Want to dive in more? This topic comes up sometimes during our weekly group support calls for Daily Planning for ADHD Moms course. It's currently open for enrollment! Let's get your calendar crap and to-do list organized one step at a time, so you feel confident + capable in your day, even when your ADHD hijacks your plan. Click here to sign up --> bit.ly/adhdplan Join us in the Motherhood in ADHD Community Support Group on Facebook!  Next week we're diving into cycle syncing! When I first understood how cycle syncing worked and started implementing it into my life...it was a GAME CHANGER! Links to things we talked about on today's show: The ADHD Enclave Glowing Period Tracking App Hormones for Life Article PubMed Article - Prevalence of hormone-related mood disorder symptoms in women with ADHD Healthline Article - How to Work with Your Period, Not Against It YouTube Video - Your Menstrual Cycle Is More Than Just Your Period OurBodies Ourselves Article Medical News Today Article - How can your period affect bowel movements? Links Use these links to save on products I mentioned today: $10 Toward your purchase of Thinx Period Panties $5 Off Flex Click here for transcription.

Journey With Me Through ADHD: A Podcast for Kids
Nature Is a Gift to Your ADHD Brain

Journey With Me Through ADHD: A Podcast for Kids

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:56


Did you know that the simple act of entering into nature can give your brain the gift of Dopamine and Serotonin, just to name a few neurotransmitter chemicals that our ADHD brain can benefit from!  In this episode, I talk about these gifts that nature so graciously gives us and the benefits that come with entering into that gift! You will also be invited to play a sound game with me! Are your moods swinging, unmotivated, lack attention, have a hard time learning, and experience emotional dysregulation!? I have good news for you! The dopamine neurotransmitter that nature releases will help you regulate those things! What does the Serotonin do? This joy chemical releases and also helps with our mood, cognitive processing, overall learning, working memory, anxiety, and even lessens the symptoms of depression.  These are just two of the many benefits of exploring nature!  I would love for you to send me your nature stories and how it becomes armor for you to combat those ADHD battles! Go to www.katelynmabry.com or email me at katelynmabry4@gmail.com  Are you wanting to learn more about how to parent your child's ADHD brain? Contact me for a free coaching consultation. I look forward to hearing from you! Have a blessed day! 

Creative Ways Podcast
Reconciling Art and Motherhood - Denise Gasser

Creative Ways Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 65:42


Denise Gasser is a mixed media artist, born and raised near the mountains of Utah. After years of over whelming guilt for wanting to still be an artist mixed with anxiety to try be the perfect mum and helper in her community, Denise decided to hold her hands up and embrace it all, the distractions, imperfections, the messiness around trying to paint and mother 4 young children!­­ Denise founded the ‘Art After' project. Reconciling art and motherhood. A series of small paintings that occur in one sitting and must be finished once interrupted. When that happens, Denise writes on the back the date the time she started the time she finished and what the interruption was. As you can imagine this project has had global reach after her exhibition! Denise gives talks and workshops in the US and Canada and is owned in private collections in several countries around the world. Denise shares honestly about her journey as a young Mum and artist, her thoughts on balance, boundaries and guilt. Look at her stunning work www.denisegasser.com Denise's Takeaways  1.Having honest conversation with other women is vital  2.Being a mum is lonely, being an artist is lonely! Make sure you reach out to creative communities online. 3.Finding time to create is vital to being a better Mum, because you're being the better you! 4.Feeling burnt out isn't ok! We are told its path and we need to juggle, spin those plates. Talk to your family and work out scheduling times for you! 5.We don't have an adult telling us to take care of ourselves! It's our job to think about what patterns and examples we are setting to our kids. 6.It's ok to say being at home with the kids isn't working out for us all. That doesn't make you a bad parent! You're an honest human.  7.Giving yourself permission is vital, not just for yourself but for others.  8.Take a good look at where your time is spent each day, which chunks are being spent on what areas and write it all down so you can see in detail how many people and jobs are taking you away from what you really want. 9.Stop asking why you should do it. What's the reason? Sometimes our bodies want to move and dance just because! 11.Chipping away is such a powerful mantra. Start telling yourself this each day.  12.If alarm bells are ringing for you or a family member regarding ADHD take an online test and have a look at the show notes for some of our favourite books.    Denise's Book Recommendations: Driven to Distraction ADHD 2.0 The  ADDitude Website has tons of great articles Anything by Russel Barkley. I learned a lot from this talk I listened to on YouTube : https://youtu.be/YSfCdBBqNXY  

MTMV Sports Podcast Network
Chiefs vs Bills Game Analysis, God is Where Your Help Comes From, Baller of the Week Teenage Astronaut Taylor Denise Richardson Reinvents ADHD

MTMV Sports Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 12:43


The Bills dominate the Chiefs this past Sunday! This is my take on how the Bills defeated the Chiefs and put them in last place of the AFC North! Quiet Time with God-Where does my help come from? Baller of the Week is Astronaut StarBright Taylor Denise Richardson! according to steamsquad.org, Taylor Denise Richardson, is now 18 years old and is from Jacksonville, FL. She has aspirations of becoming a scientist, engineer, and an astronaut one day. She is an advocate, activist, speaker, and philanthropist. She has attended several NASA Space Centers including attending the US Space Rocket and Center, aka Space Camp, in Huntsville, AL when she was 9 years old. She is a member of The Mars Generation as a Student Space Ambassador, Boys and Girls Club of Northeast Florida, Nelson Mandela Resources Journey into Womanhood, Generation WOW girl ambassador, and the Delores weaver Foundation See the Girls which are the girls' empowerment clubs. Taylor is not only known as the girl who wants to bring other girls to the STEM table but also for her literacy efforts to ensure all kids have books to read. To date Taylor has read to over 500 kids and collected over 5000 books. Through her book drives entitled "Taylor's Take Flight with a Book" she hopes that every kid in Jacksonville will have books to allow them to take flight towards their own dreams and aspirations. For Mental Health Check In, find out what ADHD is and how young astronaut Taylor Denise Richardson reinvents it. My name is Keisha Swafford and I am a sports freelancer in Louisiana who is on my own spiritual and mental health journey. I started this podcast to hone my skills as a sports journalist, share my love for God, and fall in love with myself. I love talking sports with people in the industry, and I love helping people with their mental, physical, and spiritual health through sports podcasting, connecting with others, and networking. Join me for sports talk and self-discovery! I drop episodes every Monday at 7 am! Stay brave, stay bold, and stay ballin! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mtmv/support

Woody & Wilcox
The Woody and Wilcox Show for 10-20-2021

Woody & Wilcox

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 74:38


Today on the Woody and Wilcox Show: Free breakfast burritos at Taco Bell tomorrow; It Happened in Flori-duh; Award-winning picture of a Brazilian wandering spider; Woody Game Wednesday; Kate Beckinsale injures herself putting on leggings; Noodle the dog predicts the day; Woman sues Pop-Tarts; Science Minute-dogs can get ADHD; And so much more!

Organize 365 Podcast
Friday Workbox with Jennifer Butler

Organize 365 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:03


Welcome to our new Wednesday series of transformational stories from our new Friday Workbox Certified Organizers! Organize 365® recently upgraded all of the Business Friday Workbox Systems and we are so excited to share the stories of the certified organizers who helped us make these improvements! On Wednesdays, I normally get to talk with members of the Organize 365 community as they share the challenges, progress, missteps, and triumphs along their organizing journey. You can see and hear transformation in action.  Today, I am sharing my conversation with Jennifer Butler. Jennifer is one of our newest Friday Workbox Certified Organizers. Jennifer brings experience as a parent of a child with a serious medical illness, and as an entrepreneur. She also has experience with autism, ADHD, and living internationally with her family. She brings all of this life experience and knowledge to her services. You can find Jennifer at House of Order, on Instagram, and Facebook. I am grateful that you are reaching out to share your stories and progress with me and with the Organize 365 community. If you are ready to share with us, please apply at https://organize365.com/wednesday For more information about the programs and products mentioned in this podcast please check out these links: Organize 365 The Sunday Basket® All AccessCCESS Friday Workboxes Paper Organizing Retreats Organize 365® Certified Organizers

ADHD for Smart Ass Women with Tracy Otsuka
EP. 146: Simple Strategies For Being on Time and Planning Better

ADHD for Smart Ass Women with Tracy Otsuka

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 50:46


In our last episode we discovered why our ADHD brains struggle with time so much. Understanding this ‘why' provides us with a foundation for building long-lasting time management skills, so make sure to listen to Episode #145 first if you haven't already!  Now that we have our ‘why,' the next step is to figure out how to develop a more effective and less stressful relationship with time. In this episode I'll give you some concrete strategies to help you work with your brain's natural flow rather than struggling against it. When we learn how to pause, check in with our bodies, stare down our discomfort, create a plan based on history, and celebrate our accomplishments, we can stop waiting for the perfect time to feel inspired and instead we can start creating it ourselves.

The Grave Talks | Haunted, Paranormal & Supernatural

How many spirits does James believe haunt the center?  What was once a vacation retreat for the wealthy, would later find itself the setting for the troubled youth of the area. A building filled with well-meaning councilors and adults helping children and families finds a positive path. What do you do when the structure being used for these meetings, seems to want a different outcome for everyone, a very dark outcome? That is what we discuss today with James Koppert on the Grave Talks. PART 2 - AVAILABLE TO GRAVE KEEPERS ONLY - LISTEN HERE In part two of our interview, available only to Grave Keepers, we discuss: How do you think the energy of the kids with ADHD and other conditions played a part in bringing out the spirits in the building? How many spirits does James believe haunt the center? Who do you believe was haunting the building? What was the intent of the spirits haunting the youth center? Why does James believe that the dark forces there, were restricted to that building alone? As a Grave Keeper, for $5 per month you will get: Access to every episode of our show, AD-FREE – MONTHS BEFORE THEY GO PUBLIC. Access to every EXCLUSIVE PART 2 episode of our show for Grave Keeper Only! Access to submit questions to upcoming guests of our show. The “good feeling” knowing that you are keeping this show alive (It really does feel good!) Listen to part two of this interview and get exclusive access to HUNDREDS of bonus episodes at http://www.patreon.com/thegravetalks

Inside the Lion's Den: A Business and Leadership Podcast
Ep 61: Success From Bringing Others Joy with Angie Lee

Inside the Lion's Den: A Business and Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 48:21


How do you get comfortable with taking risks? Develop a healthy relationship with uncertainty and regret. My guest today is the outgoing entrepreneur, community builder and podcaster: Angie Lee. She talks about where her fearlessness comes from when it comes to investing time and money into business ventures and ideas. We also chat about the importance of self-awareness for entrepreneurs and authenticity in personal brands. For the podcasters out there, Angie goes on to speak about podcast monetization and how to approach sponsors for your show.  Angie Lee is a multi-passionate person with a lot on the go. Turning her ADHD into an advantage, she has been able to channel her energy into several successful business ventures. Angie is an entrepreneur and the host of the personal development podcast, The Angie Lee Show. She is also a product developer, public speaker, blogger, course creator, and more. Self-described as "unemployable", Angie has been creating new and interesting jobs for herself for the past 10 years.  In this episode, we'll cover: - Being successful with ADHD - Finding your strengths and focusing on them - How to build courage and take chances - Important aspects to consider when building a community - Being raw and authentic with your audience - Two methods of podcast monetization: product funneling and sponsorship - How to pitch a podcast sponsor - The difference between Audience and Influence SHOW NOTES: https://insidethelionsdenpodcast.com/podcast/episode61  

Prickly and Blooming
Texas Women: Kenna

Prickly and Blooming

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


In this episode of Prickly and Blooming, Kenna speaks with host Jessie Browning about going through two life-changing moments: the end of her first marriage and getting diagnosed with (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) ADHD. She talks about the events that led to her divorce, what she did to move on and how she met her now-husband. She shares what she's learned through her ADHD diagnosis and how eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has led her to process her trauma. Episode Timeline: [00:01] Intro [06:37] What does a fox say? [08:44] Meet Kenna [10:36] The end of her first marriage [24:29] Nothing left and the aftermath [32:04] Moving on and dating [41:02] A fight with Mom [43:26] Back to the workforce [51:49] Diagnosed with ADHD [1:01:54] EMDR therapy [1:08:22] The craft beer industry and #MeToo [1:19:17] Jessie's rapid fire questions [1:26:25] Contacting Kenna Resources Mentioned: Canon IVY Mini Photo Printer Cool Hand Luke - Shaking The Bush, Boss Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead - I'm Right On Top Of That, Rose Ylvis - The Fox (what does the fox say?) Mercer Black on Prickly and Blooming Big Bend Brewing Company

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
Sally Willbanks, Founder of ND Renegade Contemporary Apparel Brand Shines Light on Neurodiversity

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:46


Sally Willbanks, Founder of ND Renegade, a contemporary apparel brand that shines a light on neurodiversity. She is an award-winning Australian artist who made a career change when she decided to start this clothing brand, with the intention of instilling pride in the neurodivergent population, including her two children.  Sally is the creator of all of ND Renegade's designs. Sally is also a neurodiversity advocate and speaker, presenting at schools in NSW with to educate faculty in ways to help neurodivergent students. Today we learn her story. This is awesome- enjoy! In this episode Peter and Sally Willbanks discuss:     1:47 - Intro and welcome Sally!   2:42 - So what prompted the start of your fashion brand ND Renegade? 3:42 - The concept of starting a company is not foreign to those of us with ADHD. Did this seem natural and usual to you and your children? 5:08 - These are so smart and AWESOME!!! Ref:  Designs at https://www.ndrenegade.com 5:37 - What have your reactions been to the messaging?  7:26 - When and with what were your children diagnosed? 8:00 - What are the conversations you are having with your young children about it all? 8:56 - How are you children involved in the business? 9:92 - What makes an item “sensory friendly” -what goes into making those? 10:15 - Pardon my American-ness, what is “Takiwatanga” and what does it mean? 11:28 - How old is the company now? 11:45 - What do you want people to know about the reasons you've done this and what are your goals? 12:56 - How can people find you? https://www.ndrenegade.com and @ndrenegade on INSTA and @ @NDRneurotribe on Facebook 13:25 - Thank you Sally Willbanks! Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love the responses and the notes that we get from you; so please continue to do that! Tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all; we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you ever need our help I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  14:00 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits TRANSCRIPT:  — I want to thank you for listening and for subscribing to Faster Than Normal! I also want to tell you that if you're listening to this one, you probably listened to other episodes as well. Because of you all, we are the number one ADHD podcast on the internet!! And if you like us, you can sponsor an episode! Head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ It is a lot cheaper than you think. You'll reach... about 25k to 30,000 people in an episode and get your name out there, get your brand out there, your company out there, or just say thanks for all the interviews! We've brought you over 230 interviews of CEOs, celebrities, musicians, all kinds of rock stars all around the world from Tony Robbins, Seth Godin, Keith Krach from DocuSign, Danny Meyer, we've had Rachel Cotton, we've had  the band Shinedown, right? Tons and tons of interviews, and we keep bringing in new ones every week so head over to https://rally.io/creator/SHANK/ make it yours, we'd love to have you, thanks so much for listening!  Now to this week's episode, we hope you enjoy it! — What's up guys, Peter Shankman at Faster Than Normal. We've got an extra special 10 minute episode this morning with Sally Willbanks. So most people, when they have ADHD this, you know, at ADHD and. Maybe I'll I'll I'll get some help, but I'll figure out what I'm doing. I'll I'll adjust some things. No. Sally decides to start a renegade contemporary apparel company called ND Renegade because that's what people with ADHD do. So we write books, we start clothing companies, we started other companies it's just who we are. So she's the founder. She's an award winning Australian artist who made a career change, which she decided to start this clothing brand with the intention of instilling pride into the neurodivergent population, including her two children. So there's the creator of all of the ND renegades designs. She's a neurodiversity new university advocate and speaker. She presents at schools in New South Wales with the ability and the desire to educate faculty in ways to help neuro diversion students. I love everything about that. Sally, welcome to Faster Than Normal. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me.  So you decided out of the blue, I mean, it wasn't as much out of the blue, but what made you make that change? You said, okay. I have two children who are neurodivergent; I'm just going to start a fashion.  Yeah. Um, well, I'm a, I'm an artist, I'm a painter and that requires long, long hours in the studio And, uh, I was just not spending too much time with my family and we homeschool and I wanted to show the kids how to run a business, but I needed them to be more involved. So. Um, I put down my brushes cause that's, it's really solitary. It didn't involve them very much. Um, I had the thought of doing a clothing brand that just for neurodivergent people, just to bring pride to themselves And once I had the idea, I couldn't let it go. So I literally wrapped up my show, uh, within a couple of weeks and designed a website, uh, designed the logo, got the name and, uh, we'd sold a first item within a month of me having the idea.  I love it. And, you know, the concept of, um, uh, sort of starting a company, or doing something like that it's not that foreign to people with ADHD because that's what sort of we do. We sit there and we say, okay, I have this idea. And 30 minutes later, you know, we've sketched it out and we have a website up. All right. We don't, we don't do focus groups. We don't do a panel testing. We just sort of go for it. So did you find that it was sort of the same thing? Like, okay, we're just going to go for this and, and, you know, you're teaching your kids sort of, sort of, this is how we do things and it's a faster sort of lifestyle as it were. Yeah. You know, basically if I, if I'd known how big it was going to get. And I, I, I wouldn't have done it like a, like if I'd seen the big picture, I don't know how I would've gotten there, but just taking one step at a time is what made it work. So I just thought, okay, I've got to get a logo, got to get a name, got to get a website, got to start designing. And it just kind of grew. So if I had, if I had seen what it was going to be and all the steps that took, I D I think I would have backed out to be honest. Um, so it was really about. Not thinking too far in advance and breaking it down into small doable steps. And, um, yeah, it just, it just clicked. It just worked. There was nothing else out there with this idea. There's other, there are other clothing lines out there that do, neurodiversity stuff, but it's more like to let people know that there, their kids are autistic but it's nothing about pride. So I wanted to change that.  I love what I'm seeing here on the spectrum and off the hook. Um, these are, these are, these are amazing. I love it. The nerd, my favorite is a neurodiversity, uh, shirt with like 15 different, uh, different types of, um, uh, chords, accessory chords, the Aux cord, the USB cord, the,, this is so smart. I mean, this stuff is, I think that what I, what I like about this is the premise that, that.  You know, we're in a time right now where, you know, 50 years ago, obviously no one talked to well forger about neurodivergency, we didn't talk about anything having to do with mental health. Mental health was a secret. We didn't share it. We didn't talk about it. If you remember, I'm always affected that, that scene in madman where, um, where Don sends Betty to a psychiatrist and, you know, she. The psychiatrist sends him the bills and the updates and the status reports. And doesn't share it with her know, even though she's the one in treatment. It doesn't share it with her. And that's changed the point where today we actually, you know, we, we represent this as pride. I mean, I have my t-shirts, I have countless ADHD t-shirts and, and, and I wear a wristband that says faster than normal and, and all of these things. And, you know, so you're in a, sort of a good place at the right time. Right. Um, we're trying to change that conversation from one of shame to one of pride. And what has been sort of the reaction that, that you've received have, have you had, I'm assuming it's mostly positive. Have there been any negative reactions? Have people told you this is something we shouldn't talk about or how, how, what what's talk about that?  Um, it's actually been really positive reaction. There were a few designs that I had, I've had a few issues with, um, as far as like, like an asby design, um, we've been asked to take that down, but then I got. So many people are asking me to keep it up. So I've got a disclaimer on the website and, um, you know, an educate yourself page as to why some people don't like the term Asperger's. Um, but other than that, it has been overwhelmingly fantastic. I get emails from people thanking me. I get emails from people telling me that they're using their clothing to come out to their family as neurodivergent. Um, it's just been, it's been overwhelmingly positive and it keeps me going. So, I mean, pretty much every other day I'd have something in my inbox. Saying, you know, thank you so much for doing what you're doing. Which is great.  This really is good stuff. And, and I think that, that, so, so when your children were diagnosed with, it goes to the ADHD or? Ok, so my son was diagnosed first as autistic, and then my daughter was diagnosed as ADHD, and then she was diagnosed as autistic and my son has since been diagnosed with ADHD. Um, so it's just that. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I mean, there's,??you know what I mean?  How are old are they? My son is eight and my daughter is 10. Tell us about what you tell them. Tell us about how, I mean, obviously they, they, they understand that there are benefits to this as well. Um, what are the conversations you're having with them? Are they having, you know, do they, they, they ever look at it as, as a, as a, as a curse, as opposed to a gift or how.  Right. Um, my son does, sometimes, he is a tough cookie. He's got anxiety disorder as well. So he gets quite angry a lot and he feels shame, uh, with his anger, but he still tells me he loves his brain because he wouldn't get to do the things that he can do. Like he can spell any word, he's been reading fluently since he was three, he can type like you would not believe on a computer. Um, and my daughter is nothing but positive. She is so stoked to be neurodivergent. She loves being Autistic. She loves being ADHD, and I just hope it stays that way. You know, she seems invincible at the moment and I know she'll have some setbacks, but I just, I love that she's so positive and she's becoming a great role model for other kids in the community as well. Um, How are your children involved in the business? Sure. They both have a couple of designs, believe it or not, on the store. Yeah, it is. I'm really thrilled with it actually. Uh, so I just took the drawings and turned them into t-shirts and they sell really well, which is great. And they actually partake in the giveaway videos that we do. And my son doesn't love being interviewed, so he hasn't yet, but my daughter and I do interviews with her about the different diagnoses and we do Instagram Live's and things like that. So she's really quite involved in the advocating side of things on Instagram.  Um, I'm looking on the website. I see sensory friendly hoodies. Talk about what makes an item sensory friendly? Uh, basically the tag fray and as soft as we could find. So, um, the tag is the big issue. You know, people, people with ADHD and autism have sensory issues and particularly that scratch irritating tag. And even if you cut the tag off, you still have that little nub of, you know, the seem where the tag is. So we've made sure that our clothes, um, uh, tag fray and a soft and comfortable as we could find. So we just did a lot of testing on products and found the best one. So I have a whole slew of my own clothes because they're the most comfortable ones that I own. So I'm always walking around with brand and branded clothing on.  I can tell there's definitely the artist's flare in here because the website is just stunningly beautiful. It's just so, so simple. And so, so clearly designed, um, tell me, uh, you know, this is, I think the American in me, what is “Takiwatanga” and what does it mean? Uh, that is one that we've actually come under a bit of fire with lately. That is, um, it's the Maori word for Autism and it means “in his home, my own space and time”, and it was coined by a man called a PI who basically wrote the, the mental health, like medical dictionary for the Maori language. And, um, I'm actually, I've got Maori ancestry, so my great-grandparents were Maori. Um, And I just think it's a really, really beautiful word. And I, I think that it is a way of looking at Autism that needs to be shared. So I've got that on a t-shirt so that people ask, what does it mean? Um, because the definition is just amazing. I mean, how, how, um, perfect. As it, in, in his, her my own space and time, it kind of encapsulates everything may, that autism is.  Oh, it really does. I love that. Oh, it obviously works. Cause I asked, you know, these are, these are really, really beautiful there. The website is ND renegade.com.  [[https://www.ndrenegade.com ]]And how old is the company now?  It is, it started in January of last year. So what's that about? 20 18, 20 months old, something like that.  Phenomenal. It's great to see. It's great to see that that taking sort of your, your talent and your putting it to such a use like this. Um, what do you want people to know about the reasons you've done this and what do you want people to know about, you know, what you're goals are?  Yeah, well, our goals are to spread neurodiversity pride into every part of the world. So we want people who have these differences to stand tall and know that that people are proud of them and that they don't need to hide because the more these people kind of hide and feel shame and mask their differences, they're going to, they're going to just disappear. Their lives are going to be, you know, spend at home, not, not being in society, not making the changes that they can make because they've got amazing brains. They have fantastic ideas that neurotypical people don't have. Um, the innovation that they can, that they can create in the workspace is incredible. And we need these brains. And if we don't show them that they, that they should feel pride and that they are loved and respected, they won't be using those incredible brains to help our planet. So we just want them to, we want me to know that they should stand tall. Differences are awesome.  I love it. Talking to [Sally] Willbanks NDRenegade is the website.[https://www.ndrenegade.com] I love it. I just signed up for your Instagram. I'm on the whole thing. Um, yes, we'll definitely have you back. Definitely keep in touch. And when you do new, new, um, items, you have dropped your drop notifications and you let people know and everything? Yup. Yup. I do. I usually, uh, run a few test, uh, stories on Instagram first and, you know, make sure people like what I'm doing and give them a couple of options and, uh, yeah, drop em on Instagram.  Very cool. Well, we'll definitely have you back.  Thank you so much for taking the time you thank you for having me.  Of course, you're listening to Faster Than Normal. If you're wondering why my voice is a little lower today. It's cause it's just about four in the morning here. And her being in a, uh, on the other hemisphere, I decided to get up even earlier than normal to get my workout in before or right after we interviewed. So this is me before my workout. If I'm a little calmer now, you know why guys as always you've been listening to Faster Than Normal. We love you for being here and we will see you next week. ADHD is a gift, not a curse. As is all neurodiversity. Stay tuned. See you again soon. — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week. 

Moon Harbor Heroes
Cataclysm Crew Issue 102: What to Expect When You are Expecting Your Soul to be Ripped From Your Body

Moon Harbor Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 35:46


CW: discussion of death, demonsCataclysm Crew is GMed by T. Huth. T. is the host of Inkubator On Air, a new play podcast available on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and Google Play. She can be found at thuthplaywright on Twitter or @tphuth94 on Instagram.The Wild Thing is played by Rose Hahn. Rose is an actor, content creaTor, and mental health advocate. Her podcast, What Was I Saying?: Living with ADHD can be found on Spotify, iTunes, and Google Play Music or on Twitter at @What_WasISaying? She can be found on Twitter or Instagram @smileyroseyyyy.Flyby is played by Jane Behre. You can find her @janeminustarzan on Twitter. The Blade of Sorrows was played by Jason Patrick Galit. Jason Patrick Galit, widely known in pop culture circles as JPG, is a pop culture critic and "geek educator". His public speaking work with private businesses and outlets like Comic-Con International aims to enhance how people interact with media on an educational and inclusive level. You can find his voice on the podcasts like In Quest of Geek, "Providing Your Next Pop Culture Journey," and Nerds on a Roll, an actual-play tabletop RPG "bringing stories that matter to the table." @inquestofgeek @noar_podcastMusic from https://filmmusic.io "Mistake the Getaway" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)

AwesomeCast: Tech and Gadget Talk
It's Smaller on the Inside | AwesomeCast 567

AwesomeCast: Tech and Gadget Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 56:43


This week's episode brought to you by Slice on Broadway, and Sidekick Media Services and listeners like you at www.patreon.com/awesomecast Brian Crawford and THE Rizz join Sorg and Chilla to talk new Macbook Pros, video games and more! Apple updates Final Cut and Logic to take advantage of new M1 Pro and Max chips XBox Mini-Fridge Sells Out In FIFTEEN MINUTESPoly (Plantronics + Polycom) Sync20 USB-A Personal Smart -Speakerphone to help Chilla on his calls. AFFILIATE LINK: https://amzn.to/3vAPG68 Brian brings us an app called Speechify to help with reading with ADHDG4 will return to TV on November 16th There's now an official 'Minecraft' gaming chair Stadia's Direct Touch input system comes to iPhone and iPad — no controller required Apple Music's new $5 plan only works with Siri The $19 Apple Polishing Cloth 2TB of storage should be enough for your Macbook Pro, right? https://youtu.be/nTIuraHMeT8 After the show remember to: Subscribe to the Podcast: awesomecast.fireside.fm Sorgatron Media Podcast Network Feed: sorgatronmedia.fireside.fm Join our AwesomeCast Facebook Group to see what we're sharing and to join the discussion! You can support the show at Patreon.com/awesomecast! Join our live show Tuesdays around 7:00 PM EST on AwesomeCast Facebook and Youtube!

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell
You Think Outside the Box Because You Were Born Outside the Box

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 27:03


René Brooks continues as our guest host of Distraction for ADHD Awareness Month with an in-depth conversation about neurodiversity and Black men. René is joined by John Hazelwood, a mental health advocate and awesome human who is using his voice and experiences to help others. In this conversation John shares some intimate details about his personal mental health journey and speaks about the importance of finding a safe space with people you can relate to. John also stresses the necessity of expressing, not suppressing, your emotions as the pair talk about some of the intricacies of being a Black man with ADHD.  John on Twitter: @j0n_j0n John on Instagram: @adhd_j0nj0n ADHD Mens Support Group on Instagram We want to hear from you! CLICK HERE TO TAKE OUR LISTENER SURVEY. Or write an email or record a voice memo and send it to connect@distractionpodcast.com.   Distraction is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont.  It's the college for students who learn differently! Landmark offers comprehensive supports for students with ADHD and other learning differences, both on campus and online. Learn more HERE! Distraction welcomes Black Girl, Lost Keys blog creator, René Brooks, as our guest host for ADHD Awareness Month! René is an ADHD coach, writer and advocate who also has ADHD herself. From Black Girl, Lost Keys website: René Brooks is a late-life ADHD success story. After being diagnosed 3 times as a child (7, 11 and 25) she was finally able to get the treatment she deserved. René decided that her passion for helping others should be put toward people with this disorder who are struggling in silence or shame. She started Black Girl, Lost Keys to empower Black women with ADHD and show them how to live well with the condition. 

CHECK YOUR HEAD: Mental Help for Musicians
Sal Rodriguez (WAR): Obsessive Compulsive Behavior & Addiction Recovery w/ Jeff Duke (Christ Powered Recovery)

CHECK YOUR HEAD: Mental Help for Musicians

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 55:31


Mari Fong interviews Sal Rodriguez of WAR and Jeff Duke, Founder of Christ Powered Recovery.  Sal Rodriguez share how music, drinking alcohol and parties were part of his lifestyle growing up, and continued to addictions to cocaine and selling LSD as a teen. His obsessive compulsive behaviors made it hard to stop using but eventually found his solutions through Christ Powered Recovery and the 12 steps. Multi-platinum selling band WAR celebrates their 52nd anniversary in 2021.  Next, we have Sal Rodriguez's mentor and founder of Christ Powered Recovery, Jeff Duke, who  shares his knowledge on why the program worked for Sal and how to prevent relapse with our mood disorders and addictions. With 26 years of sobriety, Jeff shares common trials and tribulations with recovery and how a better life is waiting for you on the other side. “Be brave, ask for help, and be persistent in finding the mental help that you need.” For free and affordable solutions for mental health and addiction recovery, visit: http://checkyourheadpodcast.com/* Donate to our mission at checkyourheadpodcast.com or on our patreon.com page. Every dollar is appreciated, every listener is appreciated.THANK YOU for following us on social media @checkyourheadpodcastWatch and subscribe to our YouTube Channel:  checkyourheadpodcast.youtubeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/checkyourheadpodcast)

Revolution Health Radio
RHR: Community Q&A: Cholesterol, ADHD, Paleo for Children, and Long COVID

Revolution Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 53:04


In this episode of Revolution Health Radio, I answer frequently asked questions from our listeners, including topics such as LDL particle count and cardiovascular disease, a Functional Medicine approach to ADD/ADHD and long COVID, and the best diet for children. The post RHR: Community Q&A: Cholesterol, ADHD, Paleo for Children, and Long COVID appeared first on Chris Kresser.

Coffee & Kettlebells
Raising Children With Learning Disabilities: A Conversation With Longtime Burn Family Member Tricia Wanish

Coffee & Kettlebells

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 28:11


Morgan is joined by Trcia Wanish, one of our Franchise Partners of our Frisco and McKinney, TX locations! She has been with Burn since what feels like day one. Tricia is a mother and business owner who once rocked the mic on the floating floor. She is breaking down some hard things she has faced in her motherhood journey and how she, and her family, have come out on the other side even stronger.There are no topics off the table today. A few things Morgan and Tricia cover are children with learning disabilities, underlying blessings in the toughest of times, the benefits of mental and physical health as a result of Burn, how she stays motivated every day, and ways she fills up her cup!Are you interested in learning more about parenting children with learning disabilities?  Learn more here.

I Have ADHD Podcast
How to Stop Procrastinating

I Have ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 56:45


Every ADHDer wants to learn the skill of overcoming procrastination. In this episode I give you my top 4 tips on how to stop procrastinating and get sh*t done.  Visit www.ihaveadhd.com for more resources. Hang out with me on Instagram @i.have.adhd.podcast  

Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast
ADHD in a Fluid World with Jude Parker Koski

Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:50


Jude Parker Koski has dedicated his career to serving marginalized communities through work in the nonprofit sector since 1996. He has helped youth experiencing homelessness access education, advocated for LGBTQIA+ youth and families, worked to reform foster care policy, and helped preserve urban open space and community gardens. He's also a transgender professional, and he joins us today to talk about his experience supporting his communities while living with ADHD. OK, this isn't one of our shorter episodes. We get that. And it's just fine if you want to skip around. But here's why we thought it was important to have this conversation and share it in full: because Jude's experience overcoming internal and external questions of gender identity sit right at the intersection of the same journey with his ADHD. What he has learned as he continues to live through both experiences can teach us quite a bit about our own journeys. We hope you find the same and perhaps learn a few new lessons about the fluidity of your own lived experience. About Jude Parker Koski Jude has dedicated his career to serving marginalized communities through work in the nonprofit sector since 1996. He has helped youth experiencing homelessness access education, advocated for LGBTQIA+ youth and families, worked to reform foster care policy, and helped preserve urban open space and community gardens. Before joining the NTEN staff, he served on the NTEN Board of Directors and participated as a member of NTEN since 2011. Jude holds an MBA in Sustainable Management from Presidio Graduate School in San Francisco. As a transgender professional, he has experienced the NTEN community as particularly welcoming and supportive. As the Membership and Community Director, he is deeply committed to ensuring everyone experiences solidarity within this important and unique community. Outside of work, Jude volunteers for the San Francisco SPCA Community Cat Program as Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) practitioner and advocate for feral/community cats. He lives in San Francisco with his partner and four rescued kitties. Jude enjoys designing and woodworking with repurposed materials, gardening, and adventures in nature.

The Talent Development Hot Seat
Neurodiversity and Learning with Jessica Michaels from Adobe

The Talent Development Hot Seat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:47


In this episode of THE TALENT DEVELOPMENT HOT SEAT, Andy's guest is Jessica Michaels. She spent 20 years of her career hearing, “You're meeting your goals, but you're still failing.” At 39, she got the diagnosis that explained everything. She is now a neurodiversity coach, consultant, and educator offering support for neurodiverse adults with workplace and career challenges. She also helps employers create neurodiversity programs within their organizations. Jessica Michaels is currently serving as the Talent Development Partner at Adobe. She is an expert in the neurodiversity space. In this interview, you'll hear: How Jessica Michaels made the transition from a sales career to becoming a neurodiversity coach and talent development partner. What led her to pursue an autism and ADHD diagnosis and why it explained so much about her career difficulties. The definition of neurodiversity, how it affects 30% of the world's population, and how it can affect your communication abilities. How she took her own career experience and learning differences to change how she conducted her own workplace training. Why changing the way you train people in your organization in a neurodiversity-friendly way can also assist in training the introverts in your company. How neurodiverse learners can drive innovation and see unique solutions others in your organization may not recognize. The reason Jessica Michaels says we need to change the interview process and job listings to include neurodiverse people and how it can positively affect your workplace. The effect autism has on operating in society and in the workplace and what it can look like to others. Why changing your interview process and job descriptions can attract neurodiverse candidates who perform well. How you can successfully implement changes to support and recruit neurodiverse employees in your organization. What you can do to better account for people with ADHD in your company. Connect with Andy Storch here: https://andystorch.com/ (andystorch.com) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andystorch/ (linkedin.com/in/andystorch) https://tdtt.us/ (tdtt.us/) Connect with Jessica Michaels: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jessica-michaels-6a647153/ (linkedin.com/in/jessica-michaels-6a647153/) https://www.ndworkcoach.com/ (ndworkcoach.com) ndworkcoach@gmail.com

Batch Bitch
Ep 106 - In Conversation with Abbie Chatfield (GAY LIAR??)

Batch Bitch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 72:23


We are finally joined by Abbie Chatfield on the podcast! We talk about her season of the Bachelor, all of us probably having ADHD, her plethora of sex toys and reminisce on our trauma bonding. Queen, villain, normal hot girl, we stan See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.