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Latest podcast episodes about Ai

TGIF, Today God Is First by Os Hillman
What is the future of banking?

TGIF, Today God Is First by Os Hillman

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:45


The Bible says that we are to understand the signs of the times. I fear many in the body of Christ are sleeping. The world is quickly changing and you will be left behind if you don't take notice. In this particular case, I am speaking about what is taking place in the cryptocurrency universe. It's a fast-moving train that many have simply resigned themselves to not understanding so they check out. As a believer, you cannot do that and be relevant in the world. This past December Brett King gave an amazing talk on the Future of Banking at the 2021 Cryptocurrency International Conference in Abi Dahbi. Believe me, this was an eye-opening presentation! Every person should watch this presentation. I've watched it several times. At the conclusion of every year the Apostolic Council of Prophetic Elders gather at end of each year. They pray the New Year in and share what they sense the Lord is saying to the body of Christ. I found some of what they said confirming what I believe is going on in the financial markets. “The Technology Revolution – We are in the midst of one of the greatest revolutions since the industrial revolution. This revolution will be in the “unseen spaces” of the Metaverse and Web 3. Over the next few decades, the use of AI (artificial intelligence) and AR (augmented reality), using at this point technology such as Oculus, will drastically change the world as we know it. The introduction of robotics into our everyday lives will take place. God will give His people new ideas on how to create jobs and be on the cutting edge of developing jobs that will result in the promised transfer of wealth. Generation Z will experience a movement of holiness. They will be so fervent before God that it will provoke the generations before them to join in with their consecration. New waves of technology will be used that will result in hundreds of thousands of genuine conversions through the use of social media, such as Tik Tok and other new innovative tools. There are many new technological breakthroughs coming that will involve the Metaverse and Web 3, as well as crypto currency. Believers will become students of such things, and God will begin to put Christians on the fore-running edge of these technologies. There was an admonition not to demonize these new technologies. They are neutral in and of themselves. Even though there is potential to use them for evil, we need to understand how to use them for good for the Gospel's sake. The possibilities of using AR for things such as training for surgery, etc., are many. This technology revolution will produce a great decentralization of the way we have done things in the past. Many structures will experience a decentralization. It will be important to discern when God is causing the structures to decentralize as opposed to Satan trying to break up and scatter structures. This will involve the economies of nations as well. The way we buy and sell will dramatically change over the next few years on an even larger scale than it already has. God will raise up a young generation who are “futurists”, or are very prophetic in their abilities to function in the world of crypto-currency, and great wealth will be created for the Kingdom of God. It's time for the Daniels and Josephs – We have released words about God raising up Daniels and Josephs who will prosper in whatever political climates, as well as financial climates, may come in the future.”

Lore Watch
The story and lore of Cyberpunk 2077 Part 2

Lore Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 61:26


This week, we continue our exploration of the story and lore behind CD Projekt's Cyberpunk 2077 including the themes of transhumanism, ascendancy through technology, corporate abuse, emergent AI, and the concepts of self-identity and mortality. SPOILER WARING: This podcast includes spoilers of the main story. TRIGGER WARNING: This podcast discusses body gore, psychosis, and various forms of physical and mental abuse that are part of the game's story.

Leadership and Loyalty™
2/2 Life as The Demonstration of Values: Dr John Demartini

Leadership and Loyalty™

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 31:07


As leaders we are confronted with many issues. Some are old, others appear to be more contemporary. There are advantages and potential threats of AI, Technology, Supply chain and any number of other things. However, there is one constant, people. What has become an increasingly important question is what drives those people? How do you and I, as leaders, find out what drives us and them, and moreover, what do they genuinely value? Let's find out together. Our guest is Dr. John Demartini. Dr. Demartini is a researcher, author and global educator who is considered to be one of the world's leading authorities on human behaviour, leadership and entrepreneurialism. He has researched and studied over 30,000 books across all the defined academic disciplines. He is the founder of the Demartini Institute and has been teaching for multiple decades. Dr. Demartini is the author of more than 40 books that have been published in over 29 languages. One of these books is, The Values Factor. More: Website https://drdemartini.com Social Media https://www.facebook.com/drjohndemartini https://www.instagram.com/drjohndemartini Part 2) Life as The Demonstration of Values Do You Really Need a Break? Which Brain are You Working With? Disengagement Lies We Tell Ourselves Getting People to Quit How to Know When You Are in The Wrong Career The Cost of Keeping the Wrong People Reading the Feedback Accurately . . . Curious about how to tap into what drives meaning in your life and create meaningful transformation in the lives you touch? Take a look at DovBaron.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Star Codex Podcast
Practically-A-Book Review: Yudkowsky Contra Ngo On Agents

Slate Star Codex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 36:48


https://astralcodexten.substack.com/p/practically-a-book-review-yudkowsky   I. The story thus far: AI safety, which started as the hobbyhorse of a few weird transhumanists in the early 2000s, has grown into a medium-sized respectable field. OpenAI, the people responsible for GPT-3 and other marvels, have a safety team. So do DeepMind, the people responsible for AlphaGo, AlphaFold, and AlphaWorldConquest (last one as yet unreleased). So do Stanford, Cambridge, UC Berkeley, etc, etc. Thanks to donations from people like Elon Musk and Dustin Moskowitz, everyone involved is contentedly flush with cash. They all report making slow but encouraging progress. Eliezer Yudkowsky, one of the original weird transhumanists, is having none of this. He says the problem is harder than everyone else thinks. Their clever solutions will fail. He's been flitting around for the past few years, Cassandra-like, insisting that their plans will explode and they are doomed.

Rebuilding The Renaissance
Episode 157 - Answers to Open Questions XI

Rebuilding The Renaissance

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 27:13


From Botticelli and the Bonfires of the Vanities, to the extraordinary collection of artists' portraits and self-portraits in the Uffizi Gallleries, to the use of AI in art authentication, to Botticelli's $92M "Portrait of a Young Man with a Medal," to the Virgin Mary's thoughts in Michelangelo's Pietà, this episode answers the very questions that you ask me about the great art, artists and history of the Italian Renaissance.

Screaming in the Cloud
Find, Fix and Eliminate Cloud Vulnerabilities with Shir Tamari and Company

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:53


About ShirShir Tamari is the Head of Research of Wiz, the cloud security company. He is an experienced security and technology researcher specializing in vulnerability research and practical hacking. In the past, he served as a consultant to a variety of security companies in the fields of research, development and product.About SagiSagi Tzadik is a security researcher in the Wiz Research Team. Sagi specializes in research and exploitation of web applications vulnerabilities, as well as network security and protocols. He is also a Game-Hacking and Reverse-Engineering enthusiast.About NirNir Ohfeld is a security researcher from Israel. Nir currently does cloud-related security research at Wiz. Nir specializes in the exploitation of web applications, application security and in finding vulnerabilities in complex high-level systems.Links: Wiz: https://www.wiz.io Cloud CVE Slack channel: https://cloud-cve-db.slack.com/join/shared_invite/zt-y38smqmo-V~d4hEr_stQErVCNx1OkMA Wiz Blog: https://wiz.io/blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/wiz_io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. One of the joyful parts of working with cloud computing is that you get to put a whole lot of things you don't want to deal with onto the shoulders of the cloud provider you're doing business with—or cloud providers as the case may be, if you fallen down the multi-cloud well. One of those things is often significant aspects of security. And that's great, right, until it isn't. Today, I'm joined by not one guest, but rather three coming to us from Wiz, which I originally started off believing was, oh, it's a small cybersecurity research group. But they're far more than that. Thank you for joining me, and could you please introduce yourself?Shir: Yes, thank you, Corey. My name is Shir, Shir Tamari. I lead the security research team at Wiz. I working in the company for the past year. I'm working with these two nice teammates.Nir: Hi, my name is Nir Ohfield,. I'm a security researcher at the Wiz research team. I've also been working for the Wiz research team for the last year. And yeah.Sagi: I'm Sagi, Sagi Tzadik. I also work for the Wiz research team for the last six months.Corey: I want to thank you for joining me. You folks really burst onto the scene earlier this year, when I suddenly started seeing your name come up an awful lot. And it brought me back to my childhood where there was an electronics store called Nobody Beats the Wiz. It was more or less a version of Fry's on a different coast, and they went out of business and oh, good. We're going back in time. And suddenly it felt like I was going back in time in a different light because you had a number of high profile vulnerabilities that you had discovered, specifically in the realm of Microsoft Azure. The two that leap to mind the most readily for me are ChaosDB and the OMIGOD exploits. There was a third as well, but why don't you tell me, in your own words, what it is that you discovered and how that played out?Shir: We, sort of, found the vulnerabilities in Microsoft Azure. We did report multiple vulnerabilities also in GCP, and AWS. We had multiple vulnerabilities in AWS [unintelligible 00:02:42] cross-account. It was a cross-account access to other tenants; it just was much less severe than the ChaosDB vulnerability that we will speak on more later. And a both we've present in Blackhat in Vegas in [unintelligible 00:02:56]. So, we do a lot of research. You mentioned that we have a third one. Which one did you refer to?Corey: That's a good question because you had the I want to say it was called as Azurescape, and you're doing a fantastic job with branding a number of your different vulnerabilities, but there's also, once you started reporting this, a lot of other research started coming out as well from other folks. And I confess, a lot of it sort of flowed together and been very hard to disambiguate, is this a systemic problem; is this, effectively, a whole bunch of people piling on now that their attention is being drawn somewhere; or something else? Because you've come out with an awful lot of research in a short period of time.Shir: Yeah, we had a lot of good research in the past year. It's a [unintelligible 00:03:36] mention Azurecape was actually found by a very good researcher in Palo Also. And… do you remember his name?Sagi: No, I can't recall his name is.Corey: Yeah, they came out of unit 42 as I recall, their cybersecurity division. Every tech company out there seems to have some sort of security research division these days. What I think is, sort of, interesting is that to my understanding, you were founded, first and foremost, as a security company. You're not doing this as an ancillary to selling something else like a firewall, or, effectively, you're an ad comp—an ad tech company like Google, we you're launching Project Zero. You are first and foremost aimed at this type of problem.Shir: Yes. Wiz is not just a small research company. It's actually pretty big company with over 200 employees. And the purpose of this product is a cloud security suite that provides [unintelligible 00:04:26] scanning capabilities in order to find risks in cloud environments. And the research team is a very small group. We are [unintelligible 00:04:35] researchers.We have multiple responsibilities. Our first responsibility is to find risks in cloud environments: It could be misconfigurations, it could be vulnerabilities in libraries, in software, and we add those findings and the patterns we discover to the product in order to protect our customers, and to allow them for new risks. Our second responsibility is also to do a community research where we research everyone vulnerabilities in public products and cloud providers, and we share our findings with the cloud providers, then also with the community to make the cloud more secure.Corey: I can't shake the feeling that if there weren't folks doing this sort of research and shining a light on what it is that the cloud providers are doing, if they were to discover these things at all, they would very quietly, effectively, fix it in the background and never breathe a word of it in public. I like the approach that you're taking as far as dragging it, kicking and screaming, into the daylight, but I also have to imagine that probably doesn't win you a whole lot of friends at the company that you're focusing on at any given point in time. Because whenever you talk to a company about a security issue, it seems like the first thing they're concerned about is, “Okay, how do we wind up spinning this or making sure that we minimize the reputational damage?” And then there's a secondary reaction of, “Oh, and how do we protect our customers? But mostly, how do we avoid looking bad as a result?” And I feel like that's an artifact of corporate culture these days. But it feels like the relationship has got to be somewhat interesting to navigate from your perspective.Shir: So, once we found a vulnerability and we discuss it with the vendor, okay, first, I will mention that most cloud providers have a bug bounty program where they encourage researchers to find vulnerabilities and to discover new security threats. And all of them, as a public disclosure, [unintelligible 00:06:29] program will researchers are welcome and get safe harbor, you know, where the disclosure vulnerabilities. And I think it's, like, common interest, both for customers, but for researchers, and the cloud providers to know about those vulnerabilities, to mitigate it down. And we do believe that sometimes cloud providors does resolve and mitigate vulnerabilities behind the scenes, and we know—we don't know for sure, but—I don't know about everything, but just by the vulnerabilities that we find, we assume that there is much more of them that we never heard about. And this is something that we believe needs to be changed in the industry.Cloud providers should be more transparent, they should show more information about the result vulnerabilities. Definitely when a customer data was accessible, or where it was at risk, or at possible risk. And this is actually—it's something that we actually trying to change in the industry. We have a community and, like, innovative community. It's like an initiative that we try to collect, we opened a Slack channel called the Cloud CVE, and we try to invite as much people as we can that concern about cloud's vulnerabilities, in order to make a change in the industry, and to assist cloud providers, or to convince cloud providers to be more transparent, to enumerate cloud vulnerabilities so they have an identifier just, like cloud CVE, like a CVE, and to make the cloud more protected and more transparent customers.Corey: The thing that really took me aback by so much of what you found is that we've become relatively accustomed to a few patterns over the past 15 to 20 years. For example, we're used to, “Oh, this piece of software you run on your desktop has a horrible flaw. Great.” Or this thing you run in your data center, same story; patch, patch, patch, patch patch. That's great.But there was always the sense that these were the sorts of things that were sort of normal, but the cloud providers were on top of things, where they were effectively living up to their side of the shared responsibility bargain. And that whenever you wound up getting breached, for whatever reason—like in the AWS world, where oh, you wound up losing a bunch of customer data because you had an open S3 bucket? Well, yeah, that's not really something you can hang super effectively around the neck of the cloud provider, given that you're the one that misconfigured that. But what was so striking about what you found with both of the vulnerabilities that we're talking about today, the customer could have done everything absolutely correctly from the beginning and still had their data exposed. And that feels like it's something relatively new in the world of cloud service providers.Is this something that's been going on for a while and we're just now shining a light on it? Have I just missed a bunch of interesting news stories where the clouds have—“Oh, yeah, by the way, people, we periodically have to go in and drag people out of our cloud control plane because oops-a-doozy, someone got in there again with the squirrels,” or is this something that is new?Shir: So, we do see an history other cases where probability [unintelligible 00:09:31] has disclosed vulnerabilities in the cloud infrastructure itself. There was only few, and usually, it was—the research was conducted by independent researchers. And I don't think it had such an impact, like ChaosDB, which allowed [cross-system 00:09:51] access to databases of other customers, which was a huge case. And so if it wasn't a big story, so most people will not hear about it. And also, independent researchers usually don't have the back that we have here in Wiz.We have a funding, we have the marketing division that help us to get coverage with reporters, who make sure to make—if it's a big story, we make sure that other people will hear about it. And I believe that in most bug bounty programs where independent researchers find vulnerabilities, usually they more care about the bounty than the aftereffect of stopping the vulnerability, sharing it with the community. Usually also, independent [unintelligible 00:10:32] usually share the findings with the research community. And the research community is relatively small to the IT community. So, it is new, but it's not that new.There was some events back in history, [unintelligible 00:10:46] similar vulnerabilities. So, I think that one of the points here is that everyone makes a mistake. You can find bugs which affected mostly, as you mentioned previously, this software that you installed on your desktop has bugs and you need to patch it, but in the case of cloud providers, when they make mistakes, when they introduce bugs to the service, it affects all of their customers. And this is something that we should think about. So, mistakes that are being made by cloud providers have a lot of impact regarding their customers.Corey: Yeah. It's not a story of you misconfigured, your company's SAN, so you're the one that was responsible for a data breach. It's suddenly, you're misconfiguring everyone's SAN simultaneously. It's the sheer scale and scope of what it is that they've done. And—Shir: Yeah, exactly.Corey: —I'm definitely on board with that. But the stuff I've seen in the past, from cloud providers—AWS, primarily, since that is admittedly where I tend to focus most of my time and energy—has been privilege escalation style stuff, where, okay, if you assign some users at your company—or wherever—access to this managed IAM policy, well, they'll have suddenly have access to things that go beyond the scope of that. And that's not good, let's be very clear on that, but it is a bit different between that and oh, by the way, suddenly, someone in another company that has no relationship established with you at all can suddenly rummage through your data that you're storing in Cosmos DB, their managed database offering. That's the thing to me that I think was the big head-turning aspect of this, not just for me, but for a number of folks I've spoken to, in financial services, in government, in a bunch of environments where data privacy is not optional in the same way that it is when, you know, you're running a social media for pets app.Nir: [laugh]. Yeah, but the thing is, that until the publication of ChaosDB, no one ever heard about the [unintelligible 00:12:40] data tampering in any cloud providers. Meaning maybe in six months, you can see a similar vulnerabilities in other cloud providers that maybe other security research groups find. So yeah, so Azure was maybe the first, but we don't think they will be the last.Shir: Yes. And also, when we do the community research, it is very important to us to take big targets. We enjoy the research. One day, the research will be challenging and we want to do something that it was new and great, so we always put a very big targets. To actually find vulnerability in the infrastructure of the cloud provider, it was very challenging for us.When didn't came ChaosDB by that; we actually found it by mistake. But now we think actively that this is our next goal is to find vulnerabilities in the infrastructure and not just vulnerabilities that affect only the—vulnerabilities within the account itself, like [unintelligible 00:13:32] or bad scoped policies that affects only one account.Corey: That seems to be the transformative angle that you don't see nearly as much in existing studies around vulnerabilities in this space. It's always the, “Oh, no. We could have gotten breached by those people across the hallway from us in our company,” as opposed to folks on the other side of the planet. And that is, I guess, sort of the scary thing. What has also been interesting to me, and you obviously have more experience with this than I do, but I have a hard time envisioning that, for example, AWS, having a vulnerability like this and not immediately swinging into disaster firefighting mode, sending their security execs on a six month speaking tour to explain what happened, how it got there, all of the steps that they're taking to remediate this, but Azure published a blog post explaining this in relatively minor detail: Here are the mitigations you need to take, and as far as I can tell, then they sort of washed their hands of the whole thing and have enthusiastically begun saying absolutely nothing since.And that I have learned is sort of fairly typical for Microsoft, and has been for a while, where they just don't talk about these things when it arises. Does that match your experience? Is this something that you find that is common when a large company winds up being, effectively, embarrassed about their security architecture, or is this something that is unique to Microsoft tends to approach these things?Shir: I would say in general, we really like the Microsoft MSRC team. The group in Microsoft that's responsible for handling vulnerabilities, and I think it's like the security division inside Microsoft, MSRC. So, we have a really good relationship and we had really good time working with them. They're real professionals, they take our findings very seriously. I can tell that in the ChaosDB incident, they didn't plan to publish a blog post, and they did that after the story got a lot of attention.So, I'm looking at a PR team, and I have no idea out there decide stuff and what is their strategy, but as I mentioned earlier, we believe that there is much more cloud vulnerabilities that we never heard of, and it should change; they should publish more.Nir: It's also worth mentioning that Microsoft acted really quick on this vulnerability and took it very seriously. They issued the fix in less than 48 hours. They were very transparent in the entire procedure, and we had multiple teams meeting with them. The entire experience was pretty positive with each of the vulnerability we've ever reported to Microsoft.Sagi: So, it's really nice working with the guys that are responsible for security, but regarding PR, I agree that they should have posted more information regarding this incident.Corey: The thing that I found interesting about this, and I've seen aspects of it before, but never this strongly is, I was watching for, I guess, what I would call just general shittiness, for lack of a better term, from the other providers doing a happy dance of, “Aha, we're better than you are,” and I saw none of that. Because when I started talking to people in some depth at this at other companies, the immediate response—not just AWS, to be clear—has been no, no, you have to understand, this is not good for anyone because this effectively winds up giving fuel to the slow-burning fire of folks who are pulling the, “See, I told you the cloud wasn't secure.” And now the enterprise groundhog sees that shadow and we get six more years of building data centers instead of going to the cloud. So, there's no one in the cloud space who's happy with this kind of revelation and this type of vulnerability. My question for you is given that you are security researchers, which means you are generally cynical and pessimistic about almost everything technological, if you're like most of the folks in that space that I've spent time with, is going with cloud the wrong answer? Should people be building their own data centers out? Should they continue to be going on this full cloud direction? I mean, what can they do if everything's on fire and terrible all the time?Shir: So, I think that there is a trade-off when you embrace the cloud. On one hand, you get the fastest deployment times, and a good scalability regarding your infrastructure, but on the other end, when there is a security vulnerability in the cloud provider, you are immediately affected. But it is worth mentioning that the security teams or the cloud providers are doing extremely good job. Most likely, they are going to patch the vulnerability faster than it would have been patched in on-premise environment. And it's good that you have them working for you.And once the vulnerability is mitigated—depends on the vulnerability but in the case of ChaosDB—when the vulnerability was mitigated on Microsoft's end, and it was mitigated completely. No one else could have exploited after the mitigated it once. Yes, it's also good to mention that the cloud provides organization and companies a lot of security features, [unintelligible 00:18:34] I want to say security features, I would say, it provides a lot of tooling that helps security. The option to have one interface, like one API to control all of my devices, to get visibility to all of my servers, to enforce policies very easily, it's much more secure than on-premise environments, where there is usually a big mess, a lot of vendors.Because the power was in the on-prem, the power was on the user, so the user had a lot of options. Usually used many types of software, many types of hardware, it's really hard to mitigate the software vulnerability in on-prem environments. It's really helped to get the visibility. And the cloud provides a lot of security, like, a good aspects, and in my opinion, moving to the cloud for most organization would be a more secure choice than remain on-premise, unless you have a very, very small on-prem environment.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The challenge I keep running into is that—and this is sort of probably the worst of all possible reasons to go with cloud, but let's face it, when us-east-1 recently took an outage and basically broke a decent swath of the internet, a lot of companies were impacted, but they didn't see their names in the headlines; it was all about Amazon's outage. There's a certain value when a cloud provider takes an outage or a security breach, that the headlines screaming about it are about the provider, not about you and your company as a customer of that provider. Is that something that you're seeing manifest across the industry? Is that an unhealthy way to think about it? Because it feels almost like it's cheating in a way. It's, “Yeah, we had a security problem, but so did the entire internet, so it's okay.”Nir: So, I think that if there would be evidence that these kind of vulnerabilities were exploited while disclosure, then you wouldn't see headlines of companies, shouting in the headlines. But in the case of the us reporting the vulnerabilities prior to anyone exploiting them, results in nowhere a company showing up in the headlines. I think it's a slightly different situation than an outage.Shir: Yeah, but also, when one big provider have an outage or a breach, so usually, the customers will think it's out of my responsibility. I mean, it's bad; my data has been leaked, but what can I do? I think it's very easy for most people to forgive companies [unintelligible 00:21:11]. I mean, you know what, it's just not my area. So, maybe I'm not answer that into that. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's very fair. The challenge I have, as a customer of all of these providers, to be honest, is that a lot of the ways that the breach investigations are worded of, “We have seen no evidence that this has been exploited.” Okay, that simultaneously covers the two very different use cases of, “We have pored through our exhaustive audit logs and validated that no one has done this particular thing in this particular way,” but it also covers the use case, “Of, hey, we learned we should probably be logging things, but we have no evidence that anything was exploited.” Having worked with these providers at scale, my gut impression is that they do in fact, have fairly detailed logs of who's doing what and where. Would you agree with that assessment, or do you find that you tend to encounter logging and analysis gaps as you find these exploits?Shir: We don't really know. Usually when—I mean, ChaosDB scenario, we got access to a Jupyter Notebook. And from the Jupyter Notebook, we continued to another internal services. And we—nobody stopped us. Nobody—we expected an email, like—Corey: “Whatcha doing over there, buddy?”Shir: Yeah. “Please stop doing that, and we're investigating you.” And we didn't get any. And also, we don't really know if they monitor it or not. I can tell from my technical background that logging so many environments, it's hard.And when you do decide to log all these events, you need to decide what to log. For example, if I have a database, a managed database, do I log all the queries that customers run? It's too much. If I have an HTTP application—a managed HTTP application—do I save all the access logs, like all the requests? And if so, what will be the retention time? For how long?We believe that it's very challenging on the cloud provider side, but it just an assumption. And doing the discussion with Microsoft, the didn't disclose any, like, scenarios they had with logging. They do mention that they're [unintelligible 00:23:26] viewing the logs and searching to see if someone exploited this vulnerability before we disclosed it. Maybe someone discovered before we did. But they told us they didn't find anything.Corey: One last area I'd love to discuss with you before we call it an episode is that it's easy to view Wiz through the lens of, “Oh, we just go out and find vulnerabilities here and there, and we make companies feel embarrassed—rightfully so—for the things that they do.” But a little digging shows that you've been around for a little over a year as a publicly known entity, and during that time, you've raised $600 million in funding, which is basically like what in the world is your pitch deck where you show up to investors and your slides are just, like, copies of their emails, and you read them to them?[laugh]I mean, on some level, it seems like that is a… as-, astounding amount of money to raise in a short period of time. But I've also done a little bit of digging, and to be clear, I do not believe that you have an extortion-based business model, which is a good thing. You're building something very interesting that does in-depth analysis of cloud workloads, and I think it's got an awful lot of promise. How does the vulnerability research that you do tie into that larger platform, other than, let's be honest, some spectacularly effective marketing.Sagi: Specifically in the ChaosDB vulnerability, we were actually not looking for a vulnerability in the cloud service providers. We were originally looking for common misconfigurations that our customers can make when they set up their Cosmos DB accounts, so that our product will be able to alert our customers regarding such misconfigurations. And then we went to the Azure portal and started to enable all of the features that Cosmos DB has to offer, and when we enabled enough features, we noticed some feature that could be vulnerable, and we started digging into it. And we ended up finding ChaosDB.But our original work was to try and find misconfigurations that our customers can make in order to protect them and not to find a vulnerability in the [CSP 00:25:31]. This was just, like, a byproduct of this research.Shir: Yes. There is, as I mentioned earlier, our main responsibility is to add a little security rist content to the product, to help customers to find new security risks in their environment. As you mentioned, like, the escalation possibilities within cloud accounts, and bad scoped policies, and many other security risks that are in the cloud area. And also, we are a very small team inside a big company, so most of the company, they are doing heavy [unintelligible 00:26:06] and talk with customers, they understand the risks, they understand the market, what the needs for tomorrow, and maybe we are well known for our vulnerabilities, but it just a very small part of the company.Corey: On some level, it says wonderful things about your product, and also terrifying things from different perspectives of, “Oh, yeah, we found one of the worst cloud breaches in years by accident,” as opposed to actively going in trying to find the thing that has basically put you on the global map of awareness around these things. Because there a lot of security companies out there doing different things. In fact, go to RSA, and you'll see basically 12 companies that just repeated over and over and over with different names and different brandings, and they're all selling some kind of firewall. This is something actively different because everyone can tell beautiful pictures with slides and whatnot, and the corporate buzzwords. You're one of those companies that actually did something meaningful, and it felt almost like a proof of concept. On some level, the fact that you weren't actively looking for it is kind of an amazing testament for the product itself.Shir: Yeah. We actually used the product in the beginning, in order to overview our own environment, and what is the most common services we use. In order—and we usually we mix this information with our product managers, know to understand what customers use and what products and services we need to research in order to bring value to the product.Sagi: Yeah, so the reason we chose to research Cosmos DB was that, we found that a lot of our Azure customers are using Cosmos DB on their production environments, and we wanted to add mitigations for common misconfigurations to our product in order to protect our customers.Nir: Yeah, the same goes with our other research, like OMIGOD, where we've seen that there is a excessive amount of [unintelligible 00:27:56] installations in an Azure environment, and it raised our [laugh] it raised our attention, and then found this vulnerability. It's mostly, like, popularity-guided research. [laugh].Shir: Yeah. And also [unintelligible 00:28:11] mention that maybe we find vulnerabilities by accident, but the service, we are doing vulnerability itself for the past ten years, and even more. So, we are very professional and this is what we do, and this is what we like to do. And we came skilled to the [crosstalk 00:28:25].Corey: It really is neat to see, just because every other security tool that I've looked at in recent memory tells you the same stuff. It's the same problem you see in the AWS billing space that I live in. Everyone says, “Oh, we can find these inactive instances that could be right-sized.” Great, because everyone's dealing with the same data. It's the security stuff is no different. “Hey, this S3 bucket is open.” Yes, it's a public web server. Please stop waking me up at two in the morning about it. It's there by design.But it goes back and forth with the same stuff just presented differently. This is one of the first truly novel things I've seen in ages. If nothing else, you convince me to kick the tires on it, and see what kind of horrifying things I can learn about my own environments with it.Shir: Yeah, you should. [laugh]. Let's poke [unintelligible 00:29:13].[laugh].Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about the research you're up to and the things that you find interesting, where can they find you all?Shir: Most of our publication—I mean, all of our publications are under the Wiz, which is wiz.io/blog, and people can read all of our research. Just today we are announcing a new one, so feel free to go and read there. And they also feel free to approach us on Twitter, the service, we have a Twitter account. We are open for, like, messages. Just send us a message.Corey: And we will certainly put links to all of that in the [show notes 00:29:49]. Shir, Sagi, Nir, thank you so much for joining me today. I really appreciate your time.Shir: Thank you.Sagi: Thank you.Nir: Thank you much.Shir: It was very fun. Yeah.Corey: This has been Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and thank you for listening. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry insulting comment from someone else's account.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Robot Brains Podcast
David Rolnick on how machine learning can help tackle climate change

The Robot Brains Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:27


While the world's temperature rises, there are scores of scientists working around the globe to study causes and solutions. One scientist in particular, David Rolnick, has stood out as a pioneer of machine-learning in the fight against climate change.This scientist has been successful in building a broader movement including others like Andrew Ng, Yoshua Bengio, Demis Hassabis, and Jennifer Chayes to champion the amazing possibilities that exist at the intersection of AI and the climate. He organized the first-ever ever AI event at the United Nations Climate Change Conference. He was named a top innovator by the MIT Technology Review -- all before the age of 30.He sits down with Pieter to discuss his landmark paper on the applications of ML to climate change looking at use cases like weather simulations, ecological monitoring, and predicting natural resource depletion.| SUBSCRIBE TO THE ROBOT BRAINS PODCAST TODAY | Visit therobotbrains.ai and follow us on YouTube TheRobotBrainsPodcast, Twitter @therobotbrains, and Instagram @therobotbrains.| Host: Pieter Abbeel | Executive Producers: Alice Patel & Henry Tobias Jones | Audio Production: Kieron Matthew Banerji | Title Music: Alejandro Del Pozo See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cyrus Says
Mudit Dandwate | CEO & Co-founder at Dozee | Health-Tech Entrepreneur And A Crocodile Attack Survivor

Cyrus Says

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:58


On Cyrus Says, we are joined by Mudit Dandwate, CEO & Co-founder at Dozee, inventor and a crocodile attack survivor. They talk about Mudit joining us from Barcelona, what he is upto there, and then get into Dozee - what Dooze is, building an innovative AI-powered triaging system that converts any bed into a step-down ICU in under 2 minutes and enables remote monitoring of patients outside of the ICU. They also discuss how the idea of doing such a thing came to him and what were the reasons for it were. Mudit also talks about joining IIT Bombay to learn how to build cars, how his father persuaded him to join the institute, building electric racing cars and racing at the Silverstone Circuit in the UK, and lots more. Further, Mudit tells us his story of how he lost his arm in a freak accident when he was saving his dog in a crocodile attack, how he made a Controlled Bionic Arm which is fully functional and regularly using it in all his chores. Tune in for this and much more. Follow Dozee on website and social media: Website: https://www.dozee.health LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/dozee-health/ You can follow Mudit Dandwate on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/MuditDandwate and on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/mudit_dandwate/ Subscribe to our new YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmY4iMGgEa49b7-NH94p1BQ Also, subscribe to Cyrus' YouTube channel: https://youtube.com/channel/UCHAb9jLYk0TwkWsCxom4q8A You can follow Amit on Instagram & Twitter @DoshiAmit: https://twitter.com/doshiamit and https://instagram.com/doshiamit You can follow Antariksh on Instagram @antariksht: https://instagram.com/antariksht Do send in AMA questions for Cyrus by tweeting them to @cyrussaysin or e-mailing them at whatcyrussays@gmail.com Don't forget to follow Cyrus Broacha on Instagram @BoredBroacha (https://www.instagram.com/boredbroacha) In case you're late to the party and want to catch up on previous episodes of Cyrus Says you can do so at: www.ivmpodcasts.com/cyrussays You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the new and improved IVM Podcasts App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios

How'd It Happen Podcast
Donna Loughlin, Five Dollars and Half a Tank of Gas (#239)

How'd It Happen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 67:55


Not everyone can set and achieve one goal to another tirelessly all their life since childhood. That goes to show that today's guest is indeed one of a kind. With me today is Founder and President of Loughlin/Michaels Group PR, Donna Loughlin, to talk about her journey from being shy to being the class president and taking on school paper leadership roles, and winning the title of “Most Likely to Succeed.” We also talk about her long career as a journalist, typing 150 words per minute her way up the ranks until finally starting her firm PR with five dollars and half a tank of gas. Donna Loughlin is the Founder of LMGPR and known for her work with futurists and innovators. Donna excels in the realm of storytelling and uses those skills to propel new companies into the mainstream. Inspired every day by the forward-thinkers, she works with, Donna has a deep fascination with advancements in AI, automotive, consumer electronics, and more. She is also the host of BeforeItHappened, a leading narrative podcast featuring visionaries and the moments, events, and realizations that inspired them to change our lives for the better.Reach out to Donna at:Website: https://lmgpr.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/donnal2/Twitter: https://twitter.com/dlmichaelsListen to her podcast, Before It Happened: https://www.beforeithappened.com/Show notes:[3:17] How'd it happen for Donna?[9:14] The Valley as a fertile soil of ideas[11:58] The land of heart's delight[13:33] Her penny books[17:27] How she describes using smells when writing[23:09] On personal experience[28:03] When she decided what she wanted to do[36:36] PR and Marketing[41:38] Her magic weapon[44:21] Her thoughts on journalism and reporting now compared to before[49:28] What made her start her firm?[57:43] On doing racing and getting out of her comfort zone[1:06:59] OutroCheck the accompanying blog post of this episode at: https://mikemalatesta.com/podcast/donna-loughlin-five-dollars-and-half-a-tank-of-gas-239/If you like this episode and want to be the first to know when new ones are released? Make sure you subscribe! Also, a review will be much appreciated, so make sure you give us a 5-star (or whatever one makes the most sense to you).Connect with Mike:Website: https://mikemalatesta.com/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikemalatesta/

Planet MicroCap Podcast | MicroCap Investing Strategies
Ep. 210 - Simplify with William Green, Author of ”Richer, Wiser, Happier”

Planet MicroCap Podcast | MicroCap Investing Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 90:06


For this episode of the Planet MicroCap Podcast, I spoke with William Green, Author of "Richer, Wiser, Happier." I didn't really know what to expect prior to our chat - I read William's book, and was excited to chat but you know, chat about the book, his background, the usual. But, wow. I don't really know the best way to preface this conversation other than it has been one of my favorite interviews I've done for this show. William has an encyclopedic recall, professor-like ability to distill important lessons from his resources, and conveyed in an incredibly humble way. I'm still processing everything we discussed and so thankful to have the opportunity. And if there's nothing else you take away from this, just one word: simplify. For more information about William Green and "Richer, Wiser, Happier", please visit: https://www.williamgreenwrites.com/ You can Follow William Green on Twitter @williamgreen72: https://twitter.com/williamgreen72 Today's episode is sponsored by: Stream by Mosaic, an expert interview transcript library that integrates AI-generated call summaries and NLP search technology so their clients can quickly pinpoint the most critical insights. Start your FREE Two-Week trial on their website at https://www.streamrg.com/stream-trial1620164741610 using the promo code 'MICROCAP' Quartr, their mission is to change the way people look at Investor Relations, and create a completely new bridge between companies and stakeholders. Visit your app store of choice to try it out, and that's Q-U-A-R-T-R. For more information, please visit: https://quartr.com/ Planet MicroCap Podcast is on YouTube! All archived episodes and each new episode will be posted on the SNN Network YouTube channel. I've provided the link in the description if you'd like to subscribe. You'll also get the chance to watch all our Video Interviews with management teams, educational panels from the conference, as well as expert commentary from some familiar guests on the podcast. Subscribe here: http://bit.ly/1Q5Yfym Click here to rate and review the Planet MicroCap Podcast The Planet MicroCap Podcast is brought to you by SNN Incorporated, publishers of StockNewsNow.com, The Official MicroCap News Source, and the MicroCap Review Magazine, the leading magazine in the MicroCap market. You can Follow the Planet MicroCap Podcast on Twitter @BobbyKKraft

The Voicebot Podcast
Voice Shopping Data Deep Dive - Voicebot Podcast Ep 241

The Voicebot Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 29:15


Today's episode breaks down some of the key findings from the Voice Shopping Consumer Adoption Report for 2021. Data presented goes back to 2018 and shows a rising trend in adoption. Learn about total users, total consumer interest, product categories, average voice shopping order size, demographic data around users and much more.  This episode features Bret Kinsella breaking down the data and discussing the implications for the voice and retail industries. There is a companion to this episode release on YouTube where you can view the charts referenced in the show. 

Disruptive CEO Nation
EP 128: Eliane Luggasy, CEO & Co-founder Witco, Paris, France

Disruptive CEO Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 24:33


Show Notes Disruptive CEO Nation Podcast with Allison K. Summers Episode 128 Eliane Luggasy, CEO & Co-founder Witco, Paris, France Eliane Lugassy is CEO and co-founder of Witco. The company, based in Paris, offers a customizable web and mobile app enabling interactions between tenants and building managers, real-time data, and analytics to improve building maintenance and management, and user metrics to improve tenant satisfaction. The app is proving to be essential, especially with hybrid work expansion. Wito clients and partners include multi-tenants, coworking spaces and managed residential buildings such as Amundi, Swiss Life, IPSEN, Guerlain, AXA IM, Covivio, BNP Paribas Real Estate, Union Investments and Unibail URW. Witco is finalist of the PropTech Europe Awards 2020, winner of the Bouygues Viva Tech Award and has featured on the Wavestone Smart Building Startups since 2019. In our conversation, Eliane shares her journey from studying business law and working in mergers and acquisitions to entering the entrepreneurial tech space. Highlights include: Lessons shared from self-financing to raising $14 million in Series A. Starting in France, now in Spain, Germany, UK and moving to the U.S. Company expansion starts with five team members in each country responsible for sales and marketing. A key to success-hire people with skill sets that are better than yourself. Continuing with self-improvements-networking, having a coach, and listening to podcasts. The importance of having a team and running it properly to be successful. Enjoy the show! Connect with Eliane: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/elianelugassy Website: www.witco.io Connect with Allison: Website: allisonksummers.com #CEO #business #businessstrategy #growthstrategy #entreprenuer #entrepreneurship #entreprenuerlife #tech #technology #startups #startupstory #AI #machinelearning #founder #femalefounder   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Moontower Business
Episode 106: Kenneth Sutton Co-Founder & CEO of Yobe Inc.

Moontower Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 32:35


Episode 106 features a great conversation with Kenneth Sutton, Co-Founder & CEO of Yobe Inc. Yobe Inc. is using AI to revolutionize voice technology. Learn more at https://yobeinc.com podcast music by www.bensound.com

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom
The Hyper Personalised Ad Experience With Eric Frankel

Sales and Marketing Built Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 38:08


Prior to founding AdGreetz, Eric Frankel was President of Warner Bros. Domestic Cable Distribution. While running a $1 billion a year division he created advancements in new technologies such as on-demand video, high definition quality and online distribution. He also created and successfully launched the first-ever broadband Internet network, In2TV. In this week's show, Ryan and Eric look very closely at the constantly evolving world and benefits of targeted advertising.   KEY TAKEAWAYS The formal education system is lacking in terms of training the next generation of business leaders. The best way to grow and develop these people is through practical experience. Target the relevent channels for your product – hyperpersonalisation. Know what the world wants before the rest of the world wants nefore your competitors and then getting the best team together to sell that idea. Building the right team is the most important thing. Mentorship is one key to success.   BEST MOMENTS 'Rather than looking for that skip ad button or delete, you're going to pay attention' 'I've embraced things in my career thet no-one embraced or understood for a long time' 'My favourite tool is our CTO -  he's actually worth a dozen or two dozen people' 'I don't want you to work for free because the sandwhiches are fifteen bucks'   VALUABLE RESOURCES The Scale Up Show - https://omny.fm/shows/the-scale-up-show   Apply for a Revenue Growth Consulting Session With Ryan Staley - https://www.scalerevenue.io/4-schedule-page1611678914248     ABOUT THE GUEST Eric Frankel is the CEO and founder of AdGreetz, the industry's leading video personalization tech platform that is disrupting the $628b advertising marketplace by empowering brands worldwide to build stronger relationships with customers and to easily increase engagement 5X-7X and activation 2X-3X by producing and deploying thousands (or millions) of smart, hyper-personalized, data-driven, relevant, video and display ads and messages (versus a generic, much less-activating version) on 26 channels, optimized by AI/machine learning in real time. Eric's official website: https://www.adgreetz.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stargreetz/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/eric-frankel-bb79666   ABOUT THE SHOW How do you grow like a VC backed company without taking on investors? Do you want to create a lifestyle business, a performance business or an empire? How do you scale to an exit without losing your freedom? Join the host Ryan Staley every Monday and Wednesday for conversations with the brightest and best Founders, CEO's and Entrepreneurs to crack the code on repeatable revenue growth, leadership, lifestyle freedom and mindset. This show has featured Startup and Billion Dollar Founders, Best Selling Authors, and the World's Top Sales and Marketing Experts like Terry Jones (Founder of Travelocity and Chairman of Kayak), Andrew Gazdecki (Founder of Microacquire), Harpaul Sambhi (Founder of Magical with a previous exit to Linkedin) and many more. This is where Scaling and Sales are made simple in 25 minutes or less.   ABOUT THE HOST Ryan is a Founder, Podcast Host, Speaker, Loving Father, Husband and Dog Dad. He is a 18x award winner and grew a business unit from 0-$30M in Annual Recurring Revenue while he adding $30M in capital revenue in less than 6 years.  He did this all with only 4 sales people and without demand generation.   Whether you are a new Founder,  VP or CEO who is already generating  6, 7 or even multiple 8 figures annually, you are going to gain knowledge about sales you didn't know existed.   CONTACT METHOD Ryan Staley - https://ryanstaley.io/podcast/ LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/ryanstaleysales Support the show: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryan-staley/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kottke Ride Home
Tue. 01/18 - tl;dr idk (and that's ok)

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 21:21


Choosing to remain in the dark; on the power of “deliberate ignorance.” Plus, AI that can make academic articles more comprehensible, and one site in particular that took off last week. And a new browser-based history game that I at least can't stop playing.Sponsors:Munk Pack, Use code KRH at Munkpack.com for 20% off your first purchaseJenni Kayne, Use code KRH at jennikayne.com for 15% off your first orderLinks:What We Don't Want to Know (Vice)"Deliberate ignorance can be understood as a cultural skill" (Max Planck Society)Jon Hamm Narrates Plato's Allegory of the Cave, Updated for the Timeline Era (Kottke.org)A New Use For Ai: Summarizing Scientific Research For Seven-Year-Olds (The Verge)tl;dr papers tl;dr papers twitter examples This AI model will help you summarise a research paper in seconds (Study International)Wikitrivia is a web game that challenges your knowledge of historical dates (The Verge)Wiki History Game “Weird Al” Yankovic Biopic to Star Daniel Radcliffe (Pitchfork)Daniel Radcliffe to Play 'Weird Al' Yankovic in Roku Movie (Variety)Daniel Radcliffe tweet (Aliza Weinberger, Twitter)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Super Entrepreneurs Podcast
Effective Field Work Technology with Guillermo Salazar

Super Entrepreneurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 25:46


Have you ever requested a service that required technical personnel, only for them to show up 48 hours later and use just a few minutes to solve the problem? Well, worry no more! Since with us today is one of the great brains that have created a model that creates an enabling environment for field teams to deliver services more modern and effective. Guillermo Salazar, the co-founder of Raven Hockey and CEO of ICwhatUC, elaborates on the extensive use of augmented reality, artificial intelligence, and on-video demand for field teams in the quest for better service delivery. Sounds crazy, right? For instance, if you have water leaks that require plumbing services, all the plumber has to do is use ICwhatUC to respond to your emergency with an SMS, followed by an instant video call on how you can resolve or mitigate the situation. Listen in as Guillermo shares the AI roadmap in identifying data and transcribing the data. A technician is in the loop on the best action they need to undertake, given the circumstances of the call. How does the Model Work? The use of artificial intelligence, augmented reality and on-video demand allows you to experience immediate transparency and immediate action on urgent matters to solve three things that customers hate most, namely: Waiting- customers hate waiting Having downtime Waiting a second time when a technician shows up and they don't have the right tools. A virtual look at things in some situations really speeds up processes which in return saves everybody a lot of money, speeds up the processes, reduces emissions since unnecessary use of vans and trucks is eliminated, and the risk of showing up at a site without the right tools nearly impossible, thus saving on time. When customers choose ICwhatUC, we save lots of money as trucks are not rolling as much, which reduces costs such as regular truck maintenance and environmental control through reduced emissions.  Secondly, a lot of time is saved since customer downtime is solved instantly, which leads to increased customer satisfaction and mitigates the risk of any of the three things that customers hate most from happening. Listen in to learn more.   Guillermo's Superpower   Guillermo strongly believes in working with teams to collaborate and bash ideas around, eventually ending up with the best idea. He is also good at finding whitespace opportunities and explaining them to other people through his partners.   Timestamps [00:29] Getting to know Guillermo [01:22] Understanding the fieldwork concept about artificial intelligence [05:43] Three things that customers hate [09:02] What happens when customers choose ICwhatUC [13:51] Guillermo's backstory and career [23:23] The inner power that keeps Guillermo going Quotes: “The person who is least informed is the person that has the most amount of information.” “The key component to entrepreneurship is making people's lives easier.” “Enabling visuals in some situations can really speed up a lot of processes, and save everybody a lot of money, time, and make it safer for the environment”. “The importance of AI in fieldwork is that it enables people of the world to serve one another, which in turn enables those that receive services to be served by anyone.”  Connect with Guillermo: Website: http://solesto.com/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/guillermosalazaryyc/?originalSubdomain=ca Twitter:  https://twitter.com/gsalazar100

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%
#394. The #1 Approach That Attracts The Right Buyers

Sales Secrets From The Top 1%

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 4:05


SUBSCRIBE TO SALES SECRETS PODCASTITUNES ► https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/s...​SPOTIFY ► https://open.spotify.com/show/1BKYsQo...​YOUTUBE ► https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVUh...​THIS EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY SEAMLESS.AI - THE WORLD'S BEST SALES LEADSWEBSITE ► https://www.seamless.ai/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/seamlessai/JOIN FOR FREE TODAY ► https://login.seamless.ai/invite/podcastSHOW DESCRIPTIONBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson, entrepreneur and founder of Seamless.AI. Twice a week, Brandon interviews the world's top sales experts like Jill Konrath, Aaron Ross, John Barrows, Trish Bertuzzi, Mark Hunter, Anthony Iannarino and many more -- to uncover actionable strategies, playbooks, tips and insights you can use to generate more revenue and close more business. If you want to learn the most powerful sales secrets from the top sales experts in the world, Sales Secrets From The Top 1% is the place to find them.SALES SECRET FROM THE TOP 1%WEBSITE ► https://www.secretsalesbook.com/LINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/sales-secret-book/ABOUT BRANDONBrandon Bornancin is a serial salesperson (over $100M in sales deals), multi-million dollar sales tech entrepreneur, motivational sales speaker, international sales DJ (DJ NoQ5) and sales author who is obsessed with helping you maximize your sales success.Mr. Bornancin is currently the CEO & Founder at Seamless.ai delivering the world's best sales leads. Over 10,000+ companies use Seamless.ai to generate millions in sales at companies like Google, Amazon, Facebook, Slack, Dell, Oracle & many others.Mr. Bornancin is also the author of "Sales Secrets From The Top 1%" where the world's best sales experts share their secrets to sales success and author of “The Ultimate Guide To Overcoming Sales Objections.”FOLLOW BRANDONLINKEDIN ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/brandonbornancin/INSTAGRAM ► https://www.instagram.com/brandonbornancinofficial/FACEBOOK ► https://www.facebook.com/SeamlessAITWITTER ► https://twitter.com/BBornancin

Ableton Live Music Producers

Artist and musician Greg Debicki (aka Woulg) challenges the status quo through glitch music and audiovisual manipulation using generative algorithms. One of his recent projects includes programming AI bots to play Cello instruments synced with visuals. Greg is currently based in Montréal. After studying Fine Arts in Alberta and Musical Composition in the United Kingdom, he set out to design generative software, custom hacks and interactive projections. Greg has collaborated with artists including Tipper and Friends, Mr. Bill, and others. He also sells a Max4Live devices and offers 1on1 classes in composition, sound design and programming. Follow Greg Below: bandcamp - woulg.bandcamp.com instagram - @woulg youtube - youtube.com/woulg devices - gumroad.com/woulg lessons - tinyurl.com/woulg Save money purchasing the latest version of Ableton Live: liveproducersonline.com/buyableton Join Discord and connect with the Ableton community discord.gg/ceb9CgAFFj Join the newsletter and be the first to receive new podcast episodes, as well as Ableton Live downloads, special events, and more: liveproducersonline.com/newsletter

Growth Mindset Podcast
200 - From sheep-farming as a kid to named Best Business Woman 2017 - Rachel Carrell, CEO of Koru Kids

Growth Mindset Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 40:20


Rachel Carrell Rachel Carrell is the CEO of KoruKids, building the world's best childcare service. She was the former CEO of DrThom, a healthcare company which she grew to 1.3 million paying users in 3 countries. She has a DPhil in Development from the University of Oxford, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and was elected as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2014. She was named 'Best Business Woman in Technology' at the 2017 Best Business Women awards, and also won the 'Inspirational Mother' award at the 2017 Inspiration awards. Takeaways Building trust as a foundation with your people will bring more positive consequences. Having an emotional check-in within your team will help you understand each other and boost productivity at work. Who: The A Method for Hiring (https://www.amazon.co.uk/Who-Geoff-Smart/dp/0345504194) by Geoff Smart and Randy Street - (book recommended when hiring) 01:20 - Who is Rachel? 02:00 - Childhood Competitions and Entrepreneurial Experience 04:16 - Common Things About Founders 05:14 - Other Business Experience 06:24 - Management Consulting Experience 07:28 - People Management Tip 12:51 - Hiring People 16:43 - Interview Sample Questions 20:38 - Feedback Received by Rachel 23:35 - How did Rachel start Koru Kids 28:22 - The Koru Kids Team 33:55 - Rachel's Childhood Memories 36:01 - Kindest Thing Done for Rachel 38:34 - Rachel's advice CONNECT WITH RACHEL Koru Kids (https://www.korukids.co.uk/) LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/rachcarrell) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/rach.of.koru.kids) Twitter (https://twitter.com/rachcarrell) ABOUT THE HOST My name is Sam Harris. I am a British entrepreneur, investor and explorer. From hitchhiking across Kazakstan to programming AI doctors I am always pushing myself in the spirit of curiosity and Growth. My background is in Biology and Psychology with a passion for improving the world and human behaviour. I have built and sold companies from an early age and love coming up with unique ways to make life more enjoyable and meaningful. Connect with Sam: LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharris48/) Instagram (https://www.instagram.com/samjamharris/) Twitter (https://twitter.com/samjamharris) Wiser than Yesterday (https://www.wiserpod.com) ReasonFM (https://reason.fm/podcast/growth-mindset-podcast) Support the Show - Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/growthmindset) Subscribe! If you enjoyed the podcast please subscribe and rate it. And of course, share with your friends! Special Guest: Rachel Carrell.

The One Away Show
Kate O'Neill: One Recruitment Away From Being an Innovator

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 48:53


Kate O'Neill is the author of “A Future So Bright,” a book that argues that the best way to confront challenges and build a better tomorrow is to allow ourselves to envision the brightest future possible, while at the same time acknowledging the ways the future could go dark and working to prevent them from happening. Widely known as the “Tech Humanist,” Kate is helping humanity prepare for an increasingly tech-driven future with her signature strategic optimism. Kate is also the founder and CEO of KO Insights, a strategic advisory firm committed to improving human experience at scale. As a professional global keynote speaker, Kate regularly speaks with leadership audiences around the world, exploring how data and emerging technologies like AI are shaping the future of human experiences, and advocating with her signature strategic optimism for humanity's future in an increasingly tech-driven and exponentially-changing world. Her clients and audiences include many Fortune 500 and World's Most Admired companies and brands, including tech giants like Google and IBM, household-name brands like Coca Cola and Colgate, future-forward cities like Amsterdam and Austin, top universities like Cambridge and Yale, and even the United Nations. Read the show notes here: https://bwmissions.com/one-away-podcast/

MoneyBall Medicine
What Exponential Change Really Means in Healthcare, with Azeem Azhar

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 57:25


As we say here on The Harry Glorikian Show, technology is changing everything about healthcare works—and the reason we keep talking about it month after month is that the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road. Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential. And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View. And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society. He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it. Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change—so we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble. If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.Full TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian. Welcome to The Harry Glorikian Show, the interview podcast that explores how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Artificial intelligence. Big data. Predictive analytics. In fields like these, breakthroughs are happening way faster than most people realize. If you want to be proactive about your own health and the health of your loved ones, you'll need to learn everything you can about how medicine is changing and how you can take advantage of all the new options.Explaining this approaching world is the mission of my new book, The Future You. And it's also our theme here on the show, where we bring you conversations with the innovators, caregivers, and patient advocates who are transforming the healthcare system and working to push it in positive directions.So, when you step back and think about it, why is it that people like me write books or make podcasts about technology and healthcare?Well, like I just said, it's because tech is changing everything about healthcare works—and the changes are coming much faster than they ever did in the past.In fact, the change feels like it's accelerating. Each leap in innovation enables an even bigger leap just one step down the road.Another way of saying this is that technological change today feels exponential.And there's nobody who can explain exponential change better than today's guest, Azeem Azhar.Azeem produces a widely followed newsletter about technology called Exponential View.And last year he published a book called The Exponential Age: How Accelerating Technology is Transforming Business, Politics, and Society.He has spent his whole career as an entrepreneur, investor, and writer trying to help people understand what's driving the acceleration of technology — and how we can get better at adapting to it.Azeem argues that most of our social, business, and political institutions evolved for a period of much slower change. So we need to think about how to adapt these institutions to be more nimble.If we do that right, then maybe we can apply the enormous potential of all these new technologies, from computing to genomics, in ways that improve life for everyone.Azeem and I focus on different corners of the innovation world. But our ideas about things like the power of data are very much in sync. So this was a really fun conversation. Here's Azeem Azhar.Harry Glorikian: Azeem, welcome to the show.Azeem Azhar: Harry, what a pleasure to be here.Harry Glorikian: I definitely want to give you a chance to sort of talk about your work and your background, so we really get a sense of who you are. But I'd first like to ask a couple of, you know, big picture questions to set the stage for everybody who's listening. You like this, your word and you use it, "exponential," in your branding and almost everything you're doing across your platform, which is what we're going to talk about. But just for people who don't, aren't maybe familiar with that word exponential. What does that word mean to you? Why do you think that that's the right word, word to explain how technology and markets are evolving today?Azeem Azhar: Such a great question. I love the way you started with the easy questions. I'm just kidding because it's it's hard. It's hard to summarize short, but in a brief brief statement. So, you know, exponential is this idea that comes out of math. It is the idea that something grows by a fixed proportion in any given time period. An interest-bearing savings account, 3 percent growth or in the old days, we'd get 3 percent per annum, three percent compounded. And compound interest is really powerful. It's what your mom and your dad told you. Start saving early so that when you're a bit older, you'll have a huge nest egg, and it never made sense to us. And the idea behind an exponential is that these are processes which, you know, grow by that certain fixed percentage every year. And so the amount they grow grows every time. It's not like going from the age of 12 to 13 to 14 to 15 were actually proportionately—you get less older every year because when you go from 15 to 16, you get older by one fifteenth of your previous age. And when you go from 50 to fifty one, it's by one 50th, which is a smaller proportion. Someone who is growing in age exponentially would be growing by, say, 10 percent every year. So you go from 10 to 11 and that's by one year. From 20, you go to 22, two years. From 30 to 33. So that's the idea of an exponential process. It's kind of compound interest. But why I use the phrase today to describe what's going on in the economy and in the technologies that drive the economy, is that many of the key technologies that we currently rely on and will rely on as they replace old industrial processes are improving at exponential rates on a price-performance basis.Azeem Azhar: That means that every year you get more of them for less, or every year what you got for the the same dollar you get much more. And I specifically use a threshold, and that threshold is to say essentially it's an exponential technology if it's improving by double digits, 10 percent or more every year on a compounding basis for decades. And many of the technologies that I look at increased by improve by 30, 40, 50, 60 percent or more every year, which is pretty remarkable. The reverse of that, of course, is deflation, right? These capabilities are getting much cheaper. And I think the reason that's important and the reason it describes the heartbeat of our economies is that we're at a point in development of, you know, sort of economic and technological development where these improvements can be felt. They're viscerally felt across a business cycle. Across a few years, in fact. And that isn't something that we have reliably and regularly seen in any previous point in history. The idea that this pace of change can be as fast as it as it is. And on the cover of my book The Exponential Age, which I'm holding up to you, Harry. The thing about the curve is is that it starts off really flat and a little bit boring, and you would trade that curve for a nice, straight, sharp line at 45 degrees. And then there's an inflection point when it goes suddenly goes kind of crazy and out of control. And my argument is that we are now past that inflection point and we are in that that sort of vertical moment and we're going to have to contend with it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, we are mentally aligned. And I try to talk to people about this. I mean, when we were doing the genome project that Applied Biosystems, you know, when we had finished, I think it was 2 percent or 4 percent of the genome, everybody's like, Oh, you have like ninety something [to go], and they couldn't see the exponential curve. And then we were done like five years later. And so it's it's this inability of the human mind. You know, it's really not designed to do that, but we're not designed to see exponential shift. We're sort of looking around that corner from an evolutionary perspective to see what's happening. But, you know? Exponential growth is not a new concept, if you think about, you know, really, I think the person that brought it to the forefront was Gordon Moore, right? With, you know, how semiconductor chips were going to keep doubling every two years and cost was going to stay flat. And you know, how do you see it playing out? Today, what is so different right now, or say, in the past two, three, four, five years. What you can see going forward that. May not have been as obvious 10 or 15 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, it is an idea that's been around with us for a long time. You know, arguably Thomas Malthus, the British scholar in the 18th century who worried about the exponential growth of the population destroying the land's carrying capacity and ability to produce crops. And of course, we have the sort of ancient Persian and Hindu stories about the vizier and the chessboard, who, you know, puts a grain of rice and doubles on each square and doubles at each time. So it's an idea that's been around for a while. The thing that I think has happened is that it's back to its back to that point, the kink, the inflection in the curve. The point at which in the story of the chess, the king gets so angry with his vizier that he chops off his head. The point with the semiconductors, where the chips get so powerful and so cheap that computing is everything, and then every way in which we live our lives is mediated through these devices. And that wasn't always the way. I mean, you and I, Harry, are men of a certain age, and we remember posting letters and receiving mail through the letterbox in the morning. And there was then, some 15 years later, there were, or 20 years later, there was a fax, right? I mean, that's what it looked like.Azeem Azhar: And the thing that's different now from the time of Gordon Moore is that that what he predicted and sort of saw out as his clock speed, turns out to be a process that occurs in many, many different technology fields, not just in computing. And the one that you talked about as well, genome sequencing. And in other areas like renewable energy. And so it becomes a little bit like...the clock speed of this modern economy. But the second thing that is really important is to ask that question: Where is the bend in the curve? And the math purists amongst your listeners will know that an exponential curve has no bend. It depends on where you zoom in. Whatever however you zoom, when you're really close up, you're really far away. You'll always see a band and it will always be in a different place. But the bend that we see today is the moment where we feel there is a new world now. Not an old world. There are things that generally behave differently, that what happens to these things that are connected to exponential processes are not kind of geeks and computer enthusiasts are in Silicon Valley building. They're happening all over the world. And for me, that turning point happens some point between 2011, 2012 and 2015, 2016. Because in 2009, America's largest companies wereAzeem Azhar: not in this order, Exxon, Phillips, Wal-Mart, Conoco... Sorry, Exxon Mobil, Wal-Mart, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, General Motors, General Electric, Ford, AT&T, Valero. What do all of them have in common? They are all old companies are all built on three technologies that emerged in the late 19th century. The car or the internal combustion engine, the telephone and electricity. And with the exception of Wal-Mart, every one of those big companies was founded between about 1870 and sort of 1915. And Wal-Mart is dependent on the car because you needed suburbs and you needed large cars with big trunks to haul away 40 rolls of toilet paper. So, so and that was a century long shift. And then if you look out four years after 2009, America's largest firms, in fact, the world's largest firms are all Exponential Age firms like the Tencent and the Facebooks of this world. But it's not just that at that period of time. That's the moment where solar power became for generating electricity became cheaper than generating electricity from oil or gas in in most of the world. It's the point at which the price to sequence the human genome, which you know is so much better than I do, diminished below $1000 per sequence. So all these things came together and they presented a new way of doing things, which I call the Exponential Age.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, in my last book. I, you know, I do state that the difference between evolution and revolution is time, right? If you wait long enough, things happen evolutionarily, but at the speed that things are changing, it feels revolutionary and in how it's affecting everybody. So let's rewind and talk about your background. You've been active as a business columnist, as a journalist, a startup founder, a CEO, a leader of corporate innovation, incubators at Reuters and a venture capital partner. Lately you've built what eems like a very busy career around books and talks and podcasts and all around this theme of accelerating technologies, I'd love to hear how you how you first got interested in all these themes about technological change. You know, how society can manage this change? I know you were in Oxford. You got your master's degree in the famous PPE program. The politics, philosophy and economics. You know, was it soon after that that you went down this road? Or is Oxford where it all started?Azeem Azhar: It started well before then in, in a weird way. So, so you know, my interest really is between sits between technology and an economic institutions and society. And I, I was born, like most of us are, to two parents, and my parents were working in in Zambia in the early 70s, and my dad was working on helping this newly independent country develop economic institutions. It didn't have them and it needed them to go through that sort of good institutions, make for healthy economies, make for social welfare and sort of civil politics. That's the argument. So he was out there doing all of that. And I was born the year after Intel released its 4004 chip, which is widely regarded as the sort of the chip that kicked off the personal computing revolution. And so, so in the backdrop of people talking about development and development economics and being curious about my own personal story, I was exposed to these ideas. I mean, you don't understand them when you're eight or 10 and you know, but you're exposed to them and you have an affiliation to them and so on. And at the same time, computers were entering into the popular consciousness.Azeem Azhar: You know, you had C-3PO, the robot and computers in Star Trek, and I saw a computer in 1979 and I had one from 1981. And so my interest in these things, these two tracks was start set off quite early on and I really, really loved the computing. And I did, you did notice, but you don't necessarily understand that, why computers are getting more and more powerful. My first computer only had one color. Well, it had two, white and black. And my second could manage 16 at some time, probably not 16. Eight out of a palette of 16 at any given time. And they get better and better. And so alongside my life were computers getting faster. I'm learning to program them and discovering the internet and that, I think, has always sat alongside me against this kind of family curiosity. I suspect if my parents had been, I don't know, doctors, I would have been in your field in the field of bioinformatics and applying exponential technologies to health care. And if my parents had been engineers, I would have been doing something that intersected engineering and computing.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, no, it's you know, it's interesting, I remember when we got our first chip, when I was first learning about, you know, computers like it was, you know, eight bits, right? And then 16 bits and oh my god, what can we do with them? And we were building them, and I actually have to get you a copy of my new book because I think if you read the first chapter and what you just said, you'll be like, Oh my God, we have more in common than we may think, even though you know you're where you are and I'm in the health care field to. But you were co-founder and CEO of a company, I believe that was called PeerIndex, which was a startup in the late 2000s. And even back then, you were trying to quantify people's influence on different social media platforms. And I'm trying to remember like, do I even know what the social media platform was back in 2000? It seems like so long ago, and you successfully sold it to Brandwatch in, like, 2014. What did that experience sort of teach you about, you know, the bigger issues and how technology impacts society and vice versa? Because I have to believe that you know your hands on experience and what you were seeing has to have changed the way that you thought about how fast this was going and what it was going to do.Azeem Azhar: Oh, that is an absolutely fantastic, fantastic question. And. You know, you really get to the heart of all of the different things that you learn as a founder. When we when I started PeerIndex, the idea was really that people were going on to the internet with profiles that they maintained for themselves. So up until that point, apart from people who had been really early on the internet, like you and I who used Usenet and then early web pages for ourselves, no one really had a presence. And these social apps like MySpace and Twitter and LinkedIn and Facebook show up and they start to give people a presence. And we felt that initially there would be a clear problem around trying to discover people because at the time the internet was an open network. You could look at anyone's page on Facebook. There weren't these walled gardens. And we looked down on them. So we thought initially that there would be a an opportunity to build some kind of expertise system where I could say, "Listen, find me something that someone who knows something about, you know, sushi restaurants in Berlin." And it would help me find that person. I could connect their profile and talk to them because it was the really early, naive days before Facebook or LinkedIn had advertising on them. And we could we kind of got the technology to work, but actually the market was moving and we couldn't land that.Azeem Azhar: And so we had to kind of pivot, as you do several times, ultimately, until we became this kind of influence analytics for marketers. But the few things that I learned. So the first one was how quickly new players in a market will go from being open to being closed. So it was 2011 when Facebook started to put the shutters down on its data and become a closed garden. And they realized that the network effect and data is what drove them forward. And the second thing was the speed with which what we did changed. So when we were getting going and doing all of this kind of analytics on Twitter and Facebook. They didn't really have data science teams. In fact, Twitter's first data scientists couldn't get a US visa and ended up helping, working with us for several months. And I think back to the fact that we used five or six different core technologies for our data stores in a seven-year period. And in that time, what we did became so much more powerful. So when we started, we had maybe like 50,000 people in this thing, it was really hard to get it to work. The entire company's resources went on it. At one point we were we had about 100 million people in the data in our dataset, or 100 million profiles in the data.Azeem Azhar: They were all public, by the way. I should say this is all public data and it was just like a search engine in a way. And in order to update the index, we would need to run processes on thousands of computers and it would take a big, big, big servers, right? And it would take a day. Yeah. By the time we sold the company, a couple more iterations of Moore's Law, some improvements in software architecture, we were updating 400 million user profiles in real time on a couple of computers. Yep, so not only do we quadrupled the dataset, we had increased its, sort of decreased its latency. It was pretty much real time and we had reduced the amount of computers we needed by a factor of about 400. And it was a really remarkable evolution. And that gets me to the third lesson. So the second lesson is really all about that pace of change in the power of Moore's law. And then the third lesson was really that my engineers learned by doing. They figured out how to do this themselves. And whereas I was sort of roughly involved in the first design, by the time we got to the fifth iteration this was something of a process that was entirely run by some brilliant young members of the team.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, you've got to actually cook something to understand how to do it and taste it and understand how it's going to come out. So your new book, The Exponential Age, came out this fall. You know, in the first chapter, you sort of identify two main problems, right? One is how do we perceive technology and then or the way we relate to technology and. Can you describe the two problems as you see them and maybe, maybe even hint a little? I don't want I don't want if people want to buy the book, I want them to buy it, but maybe hint that the solution?Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Well, I mean, there are there are a couple of issues here, right, in the Exponential Age. The first is that technology creates all sorts of new potentials and we live them. We're doing this over Zoom, for example. Right. And there are. But the arrival of new potentials always means that there's an old system that is going to be partially or entirely replaced. And so I describe that process as the exponential gap. It is the gap between the potentials of the new and the way in which most of us live our lives. And the thing is, the reason I say "the way most of us live our lives" is because our lives, even in America, which doesn't like its sort of government, are governed by institutions and by regulations. You know, when you when you start to cook, you wash your hands, right? There's no law. That's just an institution, its common habit. If you have teenage kids like I do, you're battling with the fact that people are meant to talk over dinner, not stare at their phones. In the UK there is an institution that says on a red light traffic signal, you never turn. You wait. It's not like the US where you can do that. Now some of these institutions are codified like our traffic laws, and some are not.Azeem Azhar: There are then more formal institutions of different types like, you know, the Fed or NATO or the Supreme Court. And the purpose of institutions, social, formal, legal, informal is to make life easier to live, right? Right, you don't have to remember to put our pants on. I will read a rule that says, put your pants on before you leave the house. It's like you just put them on and everybody kind of knows it. And there's no law that says you should or shouldn't, right. So they become very valuable. But the thing is that the institutions in general, by their nature, don't adapt to at the speed with which these new technologies do adapt. And even slower moving technologies like the printing press really upended institutions. I mean, Europe went into centuries of war just after the printing press emerged. So, so the central heart of the challenge is, on the one hand, we have these slightly magical technologies that do amazing things, but they somewhat break our institutions and we have to figure out how we get our institutions to adapt better. But there's a second complication to all of this, which is that which is, I think, more one that's about historical context. And that complication is that the way we have talked about technology, especially in the West in the last 40 or 50 years, has been to suggest that technology is deterministic.Azeem Azhar: We're a bit like people in a pre-med, pre-science era who just say the child got the pox and the child died. We say the technology arrived and now we must use it. The iPhone arrived and we must use it. TheFacebook arrived, and we must use it. We've gotten into this worldview that technology is this sort of unceasing deterministic force that arrives from nowhere and that a few men and women in Silicon Valley control, can harness it. We've lost sight of the fact that technology is something that we as members of society, as business people, as innovators, as academics, as parents get to shape because it is something that we build ourselves. And that for me was a second challenge. And what I sought to do in the book, as I was describing, the Exponential Age is not only persuade people that we are in the Exponential Age, but also describe how it confuses our institutions broadly defined and also explain why our response has sometimes been a bit poor. Some a large part of which I think is connected to putting technology on a particular pedestal where we don't ask questions of it. And then hopefully at the end of this, I do give some suggestions.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's interesting, right, I've had the pleasure of giving talks to different policy makers, and I always tell them like, you need to move faster, you need to implement policy. It's good to be a little wrong and then fix it. But don't be so far behind the curve that you, you know, some of these things need corralling otherwise, they do get a lot of, you know, get out of hand. Now in health care, we have almost the opposite. We're trying to break the silos of data so that we can improve health care, improve diagnosis, improve outcomes for patients, find new drugs. Harry Glorikian: So I'm going to, I'm going to pivot there a little bit and sort of dive a little deeper into life sciences and health care, right, which is the focus of the show, right? And in the book, you you say that our age is defined by the emergence of several general-purpose technologies, which I'm totally aligned with, and that they are all advancing exponentially. And you actually say biology is one of them. So first, what are the most dramatic examples in your mind of exponential change in life sciences? And how do you believe they're affecting people's health?Azeem Azhar: Well, I mean, if you got the Moderna or BioNTech vaccination, you're a lucky recipient of that technology and it's affecting people's health because it's putting a little nanobots controlled by Bill Gates in your bloodstream to get you to hand over all your bitcoin to him, is the other side of the problem. But I mean, you know, I mean, more seriously, the Moderna vaccine is an example that I give at the at the end of the book comes about so remarkably quickly by a combination of these exponential technologies. I'm just going to look up the dates. So on the 6th of January 2020, there's a release of the sequence of a coronavirus genome from from a respiratory disease in Wuhan. Yeah, and the the genome is just a string of letters, and it's put on GenBank, which is a bit like an open-source story storage for gene sequences. People started to download it, and synthetic genes were rapidly led to more than 200 different vaccines being developed. Moderna, by February the 7th, had its first vials of its vaccine. That was 31 days after the initial release of the sequence and another six days they finalized the sequence of the vaccine and 25 more days to manufacture it. And within a year of the virus sequence being made public, 24 million people had had one dose of it.Azeem Azhar: Now that's really remarkable because in the old days, by which I mean February 2020, experts were telling us it would take at least 18 months to figure out what a vaccine might even look like, let alone tested and in place. So you see this dramatic time compression. Now what were the aspects at play? So one aspect at play was a declining cost of genome sequencing, which the machines are much cheaper. It's much cheaper to sequence these samples. That means that the entire supply chain of RNA amplifiers and so on a more widely available. This then gets shared on a website that can be run at very few dollars. It can get access to millions of people. The companies who are doing the work are using synthetic genes, which means basically writing out new bases, which is another core technology that's going through an exponential cost decline. And they're using a lot of machine learning and big data in order to explore the phenomenally complex biological space to zero in on potential candidates. So that the whole thing knits together a set of these different technologies in a very, very powerful and quite distributed combination.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's to make it easier for other listeners discover the show by leaving a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing us a huge favor.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer. It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in Kindle format. Just go to Amazon and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's step back here for just a minute. So I wonder if you have a thesis—from a fundamental technology perspective, what's really driving the exponential technological change, right? Do you think that that, is there a force maybe outside of semiconductors that are driving biology forward? What's your view? I mean, if you took the computational tools away from life sciences and drug developers, would we still see the same rapid advances in that area, and the answer could be no, because I can tell you my thoughts after you tell me yours.Azeem Azhar: Well, we wouldn't see the same advances, but we would still see significant advances and it's hard to unpack one from another. But if you look at the I mean, you worked on the genome sequencing stuff. So you know that there's a lot of interesting aspects to do with the reagents that are used the electrochemistry, the arrays and making little ongoing improvements in those areas. There are also key improvements in the actual kind of automation of the processes between each to each step, and some of those automations are not, they're not kind of generalized robots, soft robots, they are trays that are being moved at the right time from one spot to another, stop on a kind of lab bench. So you'd still see the improvements, but you wouldn't see the same pace that we have seen from computing. And for two reasons. So one is that kind of the core ability to store lots of this data, which runs into the exabytes and then sift through it, is closely connected to storage capacity and computation capability. But also even the CAD package that the person used to redraw the designs for the new laboratory bench to handle the new vials of reagents required a computer. But yes, but you know, so what? What's your understanding as someone who is on the inside and, note to listener, that was a bit cruel because Harry is the expert on this one!Harry Glorikian: And oh no, no, no, no. I, you know, it's interesting, right… I believe that now that information is more readily available, which again drives back to sensors, technology, computation, speed as well as storage is changing what we do. Because the information feeds our ability to generate that next idea. And most of this was really hard to get. I mean, back in the day, I mean, if you know, now I wear a medical device on my on my wrist. I mean, you know this, I look as a as a data storage device, right? Data aggregation device. And this I look at it more as a coach, right? And but the information that it's getting, you know, from me on a momentary basis is, I mean, one of the companies I helped start, I mean, we have trillions of heartbeats, trillions. Can you imagine the analytics from a machine learning and, you know, A.I. perspective that I can do on that to look for? Is there a signal of a disease? Can I see sleep apnea or one of the I could never have done that 10 years ago.Azeem Azhar: I mean, even 10, how about I mean, five maybe, right? I mean, the thing that I find remarkable about about all of this is what it's told me. So I went from I used to check my bloods every year and so I would get a glucose reading or an insulin reading every year. I then put a CGM on continuous glucose monitor and I wore it for 16 to 18 weeks and it gave me a reading every 15 months minutes. So I literally went from once a year, which is 365 times 96, 15 minute intervals. So it's like a 40,000-fold improvement. I went to from to that every 15 minutes, and it was incredible and amazing and changed my life in so many good ways, which I'm happy to go into later. But the moment I put the 15 minute on, I kid you not, within an hour I was looking for the streaming cGMPs that give you real time feed. No 15-minute delay. And there is one that Abbott makes through a company, sells through a company called Super Sapiens. But because suddenly I was like a pilot whose altimeter doesn't just tell them you're in the air or you've hit the ground, which is what happened when I used to go once a year, I've gone to getting an altitude reading every minute, which is great, but still not brilliant for landing the plane to where I could get this every second. And this would be incredible. And I find that really amazing. I just I just and what we can then do with that across longitudinal data is just something else.Harry Glorikian: We're totally aligned. And, you know, jumping back to the deflationary force of all this. Is. What we can do near-patient, what we can do at home, what we can do at, you know, I'll call it CVS, I think by you, it would be Boots. But what these technologies bring to us and how it helps a person manage themselves more accurately or, you know, more insightfully, I think, brings us not to chronic health, but we will be able to keep people healthier, longer and at a much, much lower cost than we did before because. As you know, every time we go to the hospital, it's usually big machines, very expensive, somebody to do the interpretation. And now if we can get that information to the patient themselves and AI and machine learning can make that information easier for them to interpret. They can actually do something actionable that that that makes a difference.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I think it's a really remarkable opportunity with a big caveat that where we can look at look historically, so you know, we're big fans of the Hamilton musical in my household. And if you go back to that time, which is only a couple of hundred years ago and you said to them, this is the kind of magic medicine they'll have in the US by 2020. I mean, it's space tech. It's alien space tech. You know, you can go in and we measure things they didn't even know could be measured, right, like the level of antibodies in the bloodstream. And you can get that done in an hour almost anywhere, right? Yeah. And it's really quite cheap because GDP per capita in the per head in the US is like $60,000 a year. And I can go and get my blood run. A full panel run for $300 in London, one of the most expensive cities in the world. 60 grand a year. $300. Well, surely everybody's getting that done. And yet and you know this better than me. Right. You know this better than me that despite that, we don't have everyone getting their bloods done because it's just so cheap, right, there are other structural things that go on about who gets access, and I think America is a great example of this because for all the people who read, we are aware of Whoop, and have, you know, biological ages that are 10 years younger than their chronological age, you've also got like a much, much larger incidence of deaths by drug overdose and chronic obesity and sort of diseases of inflammation and so on. And that's despite having magical the magical space technology of the 2020s. So the question I think we have to have is why would we feel that next year's optoelectronic sensors from Rockly or the Series 7 or Series 8 Apple Watch will make the blindest bit of difference to health outcomes for the average American.Harry Glorikian: Now, I totally agree with you, I mean, I think half of it is education, communication. You know, there's a lot of social and political and policy and communication issues that exist, and actually that was going to be my next, one of my next questions for you, which is: What are some of the ways that exponential change challenges our existing social and political structures? And you know, do you see any—based on all the people that you've talked to, you know, writing the book, et cetera—insights of how we're going, what those are and maybe some ideas about how we can move beyond them.Azeem Azhar: Hmm. Well, I mean, on the health care side, I think one of the most important issues is and this is I mean, look, you've got an American audience and your health system is very different to, let's just say everyone.Harry Glorikian: Actually, the audience is global. So everybody, I have people that all over the world that listen to this.Azeem Azhar: Fair enough. Okay. Even better, so the rest of the world will understand this point, perhaps more, which is that, you know, in many place parts of the world, health care is treated as not, you know, it's treated differently to I take a vacation or a mutual bond that you buy, right or a car, it's not seen purely as a kind of profit vehicle. It's seen as something that serves the individual and serves a community and public health and so on matters. And I think one of the opportunities that we have is to think out for it, look out for is how do we get the benefits of aggregated health data, which is what you need. You need aggregate population wide data that connects a genotype to a phenotype. In other words, what the gene says to how it gets expressed to me physically to my biomarkers, you know, my, what's in my microbiota, what my blood pressure is on a minute by minute basis and my glucose levels and so on. And to whatever illnesses and diseases and conditions I seem to have, right, the more of that that we have, the more we can build predictive models that allow for the right kind of interventions and pre-habilitation right rather than rehabilitation. But in order to do that at the heart of that, yes, there's some technology. But at the heart of that is how do we get people's data in such a way that they are willing to provide that in a way that is not forced on them through the duress of the state or the duress of our sort of financial servitude? And so that, I think, is something that we really, really need to think about the trouble that we've had as the companies have done really well out of consumer data recently.Azeem Azhar: And I don't just mean Google and Facebook, but even all the marketing companies before that did so through a kind of abusive use of that data where it wasn't really done for our benefit. You know, I used to get a lot of spam letters through my front door. Physical ones. I was never delighted for it, ever. And so I think that one of the things we have to think, think about is how are we going to be able to build common structures that protect our data but still create the opportunities to develop new and novel therapeutic diagnosis, early warning systems? And that's not to say there shouldn't be profit making companies on there that absolutely should be. But the trouble is, the moment that you allow the data resource to be impinged upon, then you either head down this way of kind of the sort of dominance that Facebook has, or you head down away the root of that kind of abuse of spam, junk email and so on, and junk physical mail.Azeem Azhar: So I think there is this one idea that that emerges as an answer, which is the idea of the data commons or the data collective. Yeah. We actually have a couple of them working in health care in in the U.K., roughly. So there's one around CT scans of COVID patients. So there's lots and lots of CT scans and other kind of lung imaging of COVID patients. And that's maintained in a repository, the sort of national COVID lung imaging databank or something. And if you're if you're an approved researcher, you can get access to that and it's done on a non-commercial basis, but you could build something commercially over the top of it. Now the question is why would I give that scan over? Well, I gave give it over because I've been given a cast-iron guarantee about how it's going to be used and how my personal data will be, may or may not be used within that. I would never consider giving that kind of data to a company run by Mark Zuckerberg or, you know, anyone else. And that, I think, is the the cross-over point, which is in order to access this, the benefits of this aggregate data from all these sensors, we need to have a sort of human-centric approach to ensure that the exploitation can happen profitably, but for our benefit in the long run.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I mean, I'm looking at some interesting encryption technologies where nothing is ever unencrypted, but you can, you know, the algorithm can learn from the data, right? And you're not opening it up. And so there, I believe that there are some solutions that can make give the side that needs the data what they need, but protect the other side. I still think we need to policymakers and regulators to step up. That would cause that shift to happen faster. But you know, I think some of those people that are making those policies don't even understand the phone they're holding in their hands most of the time and the power that they're holding. So. You know, last set of questions is. Do you think it's possible for society to adapt to exponential change and learn how to manage it productively?Azeem Azhar: It's a really hard question. I'm sure we will muddle through. We will muddle through because we're good at muddling through, you know? But the question is, does that muddling through look more like the depression years. Or does that muddling through look like a kind of directed Marshall Plan. Because they both get through. One comes through with sort of more productive, generative vigor? What I hoped to do in the book was to be able to express to a wider audience some underlying understanding about how the technologies work, so they can identify the right questions to to ask. And what I wanted to do for people to work in the technology field is draw some threads together because a lot of this will be familiar to them, but take those threads to their consequences. And in a way, you know, if I if I tell you, Harry, don't think of an elephant. What are you thinking about right  now?Harry Glorikian: Yeah. Yeah, of course it's not, you know, suggestive.Azeem Azhar: And by laying out these things for these different audiences in different ways, I'm hoping that they will remember them and bear those in mind when they go out and think about how they influence the world, whether it's decisions they make from a product they might buy or not buy, or how they talk influence their elected officials or how they steer their corporate strategy or the products they choose to build. I mean, that's what you would you would hope to do. And then hopefully you create a more streamlined approach to it to the change that needs to happen. Now here's the sort of fascinating thing here, is that over the summer of 2021, the Chinese authorities across a wide range of areas went in using a number of different regulators and stamped on a whole set of Exponential Age companies, whether it was online gaming or online education. The big, multi sided social networks, a lot of fintech, a lot of crypto. And they essentially had been observing the experiment to learn, and they had figured out what things didn't align with their perceived obligations as a government to the state and to the people. Now, you know, I'm using that language because I don't want this to become a kind of polarized sort of argument.Azeem Azhar: I'm just saying, here's a state where you may not agree with its objectives and the way it's accountable, but in its own conception, it's accountable to its people and has to look out for their benefit. And it took action on these companies in really, really abrupt ways. And. If you assume that their actions were rational and they were smart people and I've met some of them and they're super smart people, it tells you something about what one group of clever people think is needed at these times. This sort of time. And I'm not I'm not advocating for that kind of response in the US or in Western Europe, but rather than to say, you know, when your next-door neighbor, and you live in an apartment block and your next-door neighbor you don't like much runs out and says the whole building is on fire. The fact that you don't like him shouldn't mean that you should ignore the fact that there's a fire. And I think that some sometimes there is some real value in looking at how other countries are contending with this and trying to understand the rationale for it, because the Chinese were for all the strength of their state, were really struggling with the power of the exponential hedge funds in their in their domain within Europe.Azeem Azhar: The European Union has recognized that these companies, the technologies provide a lot of benefit. But the way the companies are structured has a really challenging impact on the way in which European citizens lives operate, and they are making taking their own moves. And I'll give you a simple example, that the right to repair movement has been a very important one, and there's been a lot of legislative pressure in the in Europe that is that we should be have the right to repair our iPhones and smartphones. And having told us for years it wasn't possible suddenly, Apple in the last few days has announced all these repair kits self-repair kits. So it turns out that what is impossible means may mean what's politically expedient rather than anything else. And so my sense is that that by engaging in the conversation and being more active, we can get ultimately get better outcomes. And we don't have to go the route of China in order to achieve those, which is an incredibly sort of…Harry Glorikian: A draconian way. Yes.Azeem Azhar: Yeah. Very, very draconian. But equally, you can't you know where that where I hear the U.S. debate running around, which is an ultimately about Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, and not much beyond that, I think is problematic because it's missing a lot of opportunities to sort of write the stuff and foster some amazing innovation and some amazing new businesses in this space.Harry Glorikian: Oh yeah, that's, again, that's why, whenever I get a chance to talk to policymakers, I'm like, “You guys need to get ahead of this because you just don't understand how quickly it's moving and how much it's going to impact what's there, and what's going to happen next.” And if you think about the business model shifts by some of these... I mean, what I always tell people is like, okay, if you can now sequence a whole genome for $50 think about all the new business models and all the new opportunities that will open up versus when it was $1000. It sort of changes the paradigm, but most people don't think that we're going to see that stepwise change. Or, you know, Google was, DeepMind was doing the optical analysis, and they announced, you know, they could do one analysis and everybody was like, Oh, that's great, but it's just one. And a year later, they announced we could do 50. Right? And I'm like, you're not seeing how quickly this is changing, right? One to 50 in 12 months is, that's a huge shift, and if you consider what the next one is going to be, it changes the whole field. It could change the entire field of ophthalmology, especially when you combine it with something like telemedicine. So we could talk for hours about this. I look forward to continuing this conversation. I think that we would, you know, there's a lot of common ground, although you're I'm in health care and you're almost everywhere else.Azeem Azhar: I mean, I have to say that the opportunity in in health care is so global as well because, you know, if you think about how long and how much it costs to train a doctor and you think about the kind of margin that live that sits on current medical devices and how fragile, they might be in certain operating environments and the thought that you could start to do more and more of this with a $40 sensor inside a $250 smartwatch is a really, really appealing and exciting, exciting one. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: Excellent. Well, thank you so much for the time and look forward to staying in touch and I wish you great success with the book and everything else.Azeem Azhar: Thank you so much, Harry. Appreciate it.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find past episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and the MoneyBall Medicine show at my website, glorikian.com, under the tab Podcasts.Don't forget to go to Apple Podcasts to leave a rating and review for the show. You can also find me on Twitter at hglorikian. And we always love it when listeners post about the show there, or on other social media. Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

Coffee with a Journalist
Alexandra Levine, Politico

Coffee with a Journalist

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 38:23


Alexandra S. Levine is a technology reporter for POLITICO focused on privacy and data issues in the U.S. and around the world. As of late, she has been most closely following political and policy debates around children's safety online and AI tools like facial recognition. Prior to joining POLITICO in 2019, Alexandra spent three years as a staff reporter at The New York Times. Tech. And when not on deadline, Alex can be found ghostwriting wedding toasts under the pseudonym, “The Toastess.” During the episode, Alex tells us about the wild array of pitches she receives, a lesson she learned from her professor in journalism school, her side career as a speechwriter, and more.

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
1019: 5 Steps for Effective Sales Hiring, with Kristie Jones

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 51:57


Kristie Jones is the Principal of the Sales Acceleration Group. On this episode we're talking about hiring and Kristie's 5 steps for effective sales hiring. We dig into the questions that companies should answer to build a good hiring profile. And we explore why we rarely see a hiring company ask their buyers: What qualities and skills do you need from our sellers to help you do your jobs? More on Andy: Connect on LinkedIn Pre-Order Andy's book "Sell Without Selling Out" on Amazon Learn more at AndyPaul.com Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Blueboard | World's leading experiential rewards & recognition platform | Blueboard.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast RevOps Podcast

Poddin' Next Door
#106 - "Won't He Do It"

Poddin' Next Door

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 98:00


On this episode: The ”Poddin' Next Door" crew opens with the usual banter and slappers for your head tops. The guys hit on Jesus cheaters, Tik Tok education, Hall of Fame Sport's Bar, Fun facts, working as a cashier, investing in Hellcats, a crashing economy, racist glasses, struggle meals, putting horses down, and other misinformation. Listen on most Digital Streaming Platforms. Apple, Amazon, Spotify, Google…… Follow + Subscribe: Instagram - @poddinnextdoor YouTube - Poddin' Next Door

time comedy family food discussion culture social voting japan management jre weed california fighting mexico reflecting spotify music gentrification amazon apple christmas drink shot strippers dating relationships marriage political state sports champs game feelings netflix glasses picking space brothers world west social media theory energy texas single hip hop testing friend stories mother donald trump fun ios variant cons fake news mental health hulu border sugar religion education holidays drugs gaming workplace guns economy cancer emotional hobbies outdoors bar driver baby bros rings school bullying afghanistan thanksgiving rip amish horses exotic ai phone sauce toxic dates body tradition chefs investing mexican haitian after effects disabilities struggle girlfriends abortion helen keller closer whites shooting scams drip pod shopping cleveland browns goldmine palestine trucker fishing dj screw 1985 kanye west lies bill cosby thrifting pros plastic arab bitcoin nonbinary black friday strip clubs facetime hiv how to meals conspiracy theory tendencies goat joe biden scammers historians attention capitol ye ancestry astro followers racist mania stocks jesus christ dangers showering rotten tomatoes industrial chakra wet kwanzaa headphones jeff bezos cheaters nascar arctic vibes incident gamble banking alec baldwin unrest astroworld extravaganza hoover life hacks dave chappelle beans russ jargon eats mike pence graduation fossils adoptions whataburger takeover us military nra cashiers energy drinks 1987 joe rogan colorism defensive finesse boyfriends hug fun facts hall of fame expressing 21savage shaming noobs lacking taco tuesday right to die caitlyn jenner bob saget impacts jay electronica questioning randomness podding eaters baby jesus burning bush influenza alerts winter storms rifles golfing atf donating gangland graduates 23andme j balvin el salvador traits phonetic homies gang culture nfts misinformation ebt muslim brotherhood nextdoor sleepers finish line gamestop picky nicknames king richard dream girl verdict blue origin enforcements bday doja cat hbic couponing ebonics taco truck tiktok sideburns arranged marriages pnd debacle surroundings reconnecting wealth gap summer walker pfas coke cola homesharing misogynist 2022 jbp gun laws terrenos more words dababy child tax credit pimp c alone time panhandling onlyfans birthday gifts hellcats partynextdoor thin blue line taco stand fat pat creosote drink champs poddin ivermectin criminal psychology coronavirus shoes off fifth ward false hope covid-19 ahmaud arbery contact tracing fast 9 delta variant
Your Brain on Facts
Voice Over The Moon, pt 2 (ep 179

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 31:34


How'd it go for the first BBC announcer with an accent?  How much work can you get if you "make it" in voiceover?  How much did the woman behind Siri make?  And what's a pencil got to do with any of this?  All this and more in part 2! Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. 00:25 RP and Wilfred Pickles (voiced by Simon Jackson) 04:26 The cast of Futurama work a lot! 08:17 Voiceover is easy! (right?) 11:30 #moxiemillion 12:30 Trying to find a job 13:55 Props and accessories 15:55 AI (even worse than the movie) 18:24 Bev Standing vs TikTok 20:50 sponsors: Sly Fox Trivia, Sambucol 23:06 Susan Bennett, the voice of Siri 27:53 It's in the game Music: Kevin MacLeod, Track Tribe . Links to all the research resources are on the website.   Back when the BBC was first launched in 1922, the first General Manager of the corporation, Sir John Reith, insisted the BBC be as formal and quintessentially British as possible, and he created a number of rules towards this end.  One thing he stressed in particular was that the newscasters spoke the “King's English.“  He felt it was “a style or quality of English that would not be laughed at in any part of the country”.  He also assumed RP would be easier for people across the empire to understand versus a regional accent, of which the tiny land mass of the UK has dozens.  Reish wanted things to be ‘just so,' even ordering that any newscaster reading the news after 8PM had to wear a dinner jacket while on air, on the radio, where no one could see them.    The BBC didn't create Received Pronunciation, though.  We can trace the origins of RP back to the secondary schools and universities of nineteenth-century Britain, making it the accent of a certain social class, the one with money.  Their speech patterns - based loosely on the local accent of the south-east Midlands, roughly London, Oxford and Cambridge, soon came to be associated with ‘The Establishment.'   although one of Reith's goals in using RP was to appeal to the widest audience possible, many listeners still felt alienated by the broadcasts being beamed into their homes because of this “upper class” accent being used. Despite this, newscasters were required to use Received Pronunciation right up until World War 2.   Why change it during the war?  Didn't they have bigger things to worry about?  Well, the Ministry of Information was worried about the Nazis hijacking the radio waves.  During World War 2, Nazi Germany invested a lot of time and money to train spies and propagandists to speak using perfect Received Pronunciation so that they could pass as British.  If they pulled it off, the Nazis could potentially issue orders over the radio in a thoroughly convincing and official-sounding newscaster voice.  Therefor, the BBC hired several newscasters possessed of broad regional accents that would be more difficult for Nazis to perfectly copy, and as a bonus might also appeal to the “common man”.   The first person to read the news on the BBC with a regional accent was one Wilfred Pickles in 1941.  [sfx clip]  The public trusted that he was in fact British, but they didn't trust, or couldn't ignore his accent to pay attention to, a word he said.  Far from being popular, his mild Yorkshire accent offended many listeners so much that they wrote letters to the BBC, blasting them for having the audacity to sully the news that way.  Nonetheless, after the end of World War 2, the BBC continued to loosen its guidelines and began to hire more people who spoke with the respective accent of the region they were being broadcast.  That said, the BBC does continue to select newscasters with the most mild accents for international broadcasts.   You can't please everyone, but if you can get in good in the voicework industry, you can do a staggering number of roles.  How many?  Here are some examples, pulling only from the cast of one of my favorite shows, Futurama.  You might say my husband and I are fans; we had a Hypnotoad wedding cake.  Billy West, the voice of Fry, Prof. Farnsworth, and Zoidberg, as well as both Ren and Stimpy, has 266 acting credits on his IMDB page.  Maurice LaMarche, who did Calculon, Morbo and Kiff and is the go-to guy for Orson Welles impressions like Brain from Animaniacs, has 390 roles listed.  Tress MacNeille, who did basically every female who wasn't Amy or Leela, as well as Dot on Animaniacs and Agnes Skinner on The Simpsons has 398 roles to her name.  Bender's voice actor, John DiMaggio, without whom the Gears of War video games wouldn't be the same, has worked on some 424 projects.  The man who made Hermes Conrad Jamaican, and gave us Samurai Jack, Phil LaMarr, is the most prolific voice actor on that cast, with a whopping 495 credits to his name.  Still, he falls short of the resume of Rob Paulsen, who did the voices of Yakko and Pinky on Animaniacs, and other examples too numerous to list here, because his IMDB pages lists 541 voice acting credits.  And did I mention they're bringing Animaniacs back? [cheer]  Paulsen is trailing behind Tara Strong, though.  The actress who voiced Bubbles on Powerpuff Girls, Raven on Teen Titans, and Timmy on Fairly Oddparents has 609 roles in her 35 year career, or an average of 17 a year.  That may not sound impressive, but have you've ever tried getting *one acting job?  Strong can't hold a candle to a man whose voice I can identify from two rooms away, a man who will always be Spike Spiegel from Cowboy Bebop no matter who he's playing, Steve Blum, who has racked up 798 voice roles.  And those are just a sampling of voice actors I can name off the top of my head.  So when career day rolls around, maybe skip doctor and firefighter and suggest your kid become a voice actor.  Not everyone who does voice work has a face for radio, so I put pictures of all the actors up on the Vodacast app so you can se what Fry, Yakko, and Raven really look like ..   “Sure,” you say, “that sounds like a sweet gig.  Walk in, say a few things, and cash the check.”  Oh my sweet summer child.  If it was that easy, everyone would do it.  For starters, there is no “got it in one take” in voice acting.  Be prepared to do your lines over and over again, with different emphasis, different inflection, different pacing, or sometimes simply saying it over and over again until, even though each take sounds the same to you, the director gets the subtle difference they're looking for.  Bonus fact: the feeling you get when you say a word or phrase so many times that it stops sounding like a word and becomes a meaningless noise is called semantic satiation.   You may be standing in a little booth all day, but that doesn't mean it won't be physically taxing.  Actors dubbing anime in particular are required to do a lot of screaming.  Chris Sabat, who voices Vegeta in the Dragonball series, says that even with his background in opera and the vocal control that taught him, “I will literally be sick the next day. I will have flu-like symptoms. Because you have to use so much energy, and use up so much of your voice to put power into those scenes, that it will make you sick. That's not an exaggeration; I will be bedridden sometimes after screaming for too long.”   That is, if you can get a gig.  Remember how I rattled off actors who've had hundreds of roles each?  That's because, in rough figures, 5% of the actors get 95% of the work. So unless you're a Tara Strong or Phil LaMarr, noteworthy roles will be hard to come by.  One plus side is you get paid by the word, as well as by the tag.  A tag is part of a recording that can be swapped out, like recording a commercial, and recording the phrases “coming soon,” “opening this Monday,” and “open now.”  The clients gets three distinct commercials from one recording sessions, so you get more money.  Assuming the client actually orders the session.  You may find yourself on stand-by or “avail,” as it's called in the industry.  You may be asked to set aside a few hours or even consecutive days for a recording session.  The problem is, the client isn't actually obligated to use you during that time and no one else can book you during that time until they release you from it.    But it's a job you can do in your pj's, and I often do, and that's always a plus.  Even though no one can see the actors, voice work still uses props and accessories.  While computers can be used to speed up or slow down dialogue (which is more of a concern in dubbing Japanese animation, where the visuals are already done), certain vocal changes can easily be achieved using random items in the studio. “If the character is in a hollowed-out tree, I might stick my head in a wastebasket,” veteran voice actor Corey Burton told Mental Floss. “If it doesn't sound quite right, I can throw some wadded-up Kleenex in there for better acoustics.”  Burton, like Mel Blanc, prefers to eat real food when the moment calls for it. “They want you to sometimes just go, ‘Nom, nom, nom.' No! I want a carrot, a cookie. I don't want to make a dry slurping noise when I could be sipping a drink.”   Pencils also play an important role, not for making notes on the script or creating any sort of convincing sound effect.  The plague of these performers is plosives.  You've probably heard them on podcasts; they've definitely been on mine.  A plosive is the noise you get when a consonant that is produced by stopping the airflow using the lips, teeth, or palate, followed by a sudden release of air.  It's also called popping your p's, since that's the worst culprit.  A round mesh screen in front of the mic helps, but the old-school trick to stop plosives actually uses a pencil.  If they're getting p-pops on the recording, voice actors will hold a pencil or similar linear object upright against the lips.  This disrupts the air enough to avoid the giant, sharp spike in the soundwave.  Now if only there were some cheap and easy trick to get rid of mouth noises and lip smacks.  You may hear a few on this podcast, but for everyone you hear, I cut twenty out.   The most sure-fire way to avoid mouth noises and breathing when ordering a recording is to use a computer-generated or AI voice.  Now this is a sticky wicket in the VO community, a real burr under a lot of saddles.  Whenever it comes up in message groups, a third of people turn into South Park characters [sfx they took our jobs].  I won't get too Insider Baseball here, but here's the scoop.  AI voices are cheap, fast, and they're getting really good.  Have you ever gotten a robodialer call where it took you a moment to realize it was not a live person?  There are companies offering entire audiobooks in AI voices.  There is even an AI voice that can cry!  So why am I not bothered?  The way I see it, the people who will buy the cheapest possible option, in this case an AI voice, weren't going to pay even my Fiverr rate, and invariably, the cheaper a client is, the more working with them makes you regret ever starting this business in the first place.  It's an irony a lot of freelancers and business owners are familiar with -- the $5k client pays you the day you submit the invoice; the $50 client makes you hound them for six weeks and then they say they want you to do it over or come down on the price.  So I'm fine with letting those gigs go.  The other reason is that while AI applications and devices such as smart speakers and digital assistants like Siri are powered by computer-generated voices, those voices actually originate from real actors!  In fact, I just wrapped an AI-generation job this week.    In most cases, even computerized voices need a human voice as a foundation for the development of the vocal database. Nevertheless, AI is creating new work for a wide range of voice actors. Are these actors putting themselves out of a job in future?  Maybe. Maybe not.  It's definitely something I had to wrestle with before accepting the job.  But I figured, AI is coming whether we like it or not, so it's best to be involved to help steer the ship rather than be capsized by its wake.   When I took the AI-generation job, there were two questions I had for the client: what control do I have over how my voice is used, and what happens if you sell the company?  I asked these two questions for two good reasons, Bev Standing and Susan Bennett.  Bev Standing, a VO and coach from Canada, was surprised to hear her own voice being used on peoples' videos when friends and colleagues told her to log onto Tiktok.  For one, people could use her voice to say whatever they liked, no matter how vile, and she'd never worked with, been paid by, or given permission for use of her voice to TikTok.   According to Standing, who I've taken classes with and is a really nice lady, the audio in question was recorded as a job for the Chinese Institute of Acoustics four years ago, ostensibly for translations.  “The only people I've worked with are the people I was hired by, which was for translations... My agreement is not what it's being used for, and it's not with the company that's using my voice,” Standing said in an interview.   Standing files a lawsuit against TikTok's parent company ByteDance on the grounds of intellectual property theft.  She hasn't consented to her performance being used by TikTok, and had very real concerns that the content created using her audio would hurt her ability to get work in the future.  Imagine if Jan 6 insurrectionists and other such hateful wackaloons used your voice on their videos.  Good luck getting hired after that.  TikTok and ByteDance stayed pretty mum, both publicly and to Standing and her lawyer, also a VO, but they did change the AI voice, which certainly looks like they done wrong.  The lawsuit was settled a few months ago, but it's all sealed up in NDAs, so I can't tell you the details, but I'm calling it a win.   The other name I dropped was Susan Bennett, but that's not the name you'd recognize her as.  Though she was training to be a teacher, it soon became clear to Susan Bennet that her voice was destined for more than saying “eyes on your own paper.”  She acted in the theater, was a member of a jazz band, an a cappella group, and she was a backup singer for Burt Bacharac and Roy Orbison.  That background helped her land gigs doing VO and singing jingles for the likes of Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Macy's, Goodyear, Papa John's, IBM, and more.  In 1974, she became the voice of First National Bank of Atlanta's Tillie the All-Time Teller, one of the first bank ATMs.  Her voice made the new technology more user-friendly for a computer-unfamiliar public.     Bonus fact: one of the earliest ATMs in NYC printed the security picture of the user on their receipts.  According to the man who sold them to the bank, “The only people using the machines were prostitutes and gamblers who didn't want to deal with tellers face to face.”  Or it could be the hours they keep.  I can neither confirm nor deny this, but I like to think that sex workers are the underappreciated early-adopters that helped the rest of us to be able to hit the cash machine on the way out of town (or the Mac machine, as my mom called it well into the 90's).  Bennet also became the voice of Delta Airlines announcements, GPS's, and phone systems.   But even with all that, that's not where you know her voice from.  “Hey, Siri, how big is the Serengeti?” [sfx if Google was]  Susan Bennet was the original voice of Siri on the iphone, but she never actually worked for Apple.  In 2005, she recorded a wealth of words and wordy-sounding non-words for a company called ScanSoft or Nuance, I've been seeing either listed.   For four hours a day, every day, in July 2005, Bennett holed up in her home recording booth, saying thousands of phrases and sentences of mostly-to-completely nonsense, which the “ubergeeks” as she called them, could use for generating AI speech.  According to Bennet, “I was reading sentences like 'cow hoist in the tub hut today.' 'Militia oy hallucinate buckra okra ooze.' Then I would read these really tedious things that were the same word, but changing out the vowel. 'Say the shrayding again, say the shreeding again, say the shriding again, say the shredding again, say the shrudding again.' “  These snippets were then synthesized in a process called concatenation that builds words, sentences, paragraphs. And that is how voices like hers find their way into GPS and telephone systems.   The job was done, the check cleared, and life went on, then 2011 rolled around and Siri was unveiled as an integrated feature of the Apple iPhone 4S.  The actors who'd worked for Nuance had no idea until well after it happened.  Bennett found out that her voice is actually Siri after a friend emailed: ”Hey, we've been playing around with this new Apple phone. Isn't this you?'  Apple had bought SoftScan/Nuance and all of its assets.  “Apple bought our voices from Nuance without our knowing it.”  As a voiceactor, this turn of events was problematic for a few reasons.  Typecasting and stereotyping, for one.  The downside of being successful in a role can be that that's all people want you for after that, like Sean Bean and a character who dies.  So Bennett kept her identity close to her vest until 2013, when Apple switched voices.  “My voice was just the original voice on the 4s and the 5. But now it no longer sounds like Apple because [Siri] sounds like everyone else. The original Siri voice had a lot of character; she had a lot of attitude.   Bennet has never said how much she made from Nuance, but we know how much she's made from Apple.  In round figures, give or take for inflation, [sfx calculator] she made $0.  Her voice was on something like 17 million phones.  Even a penny per phone would have been a handsome payday, but no, no penny for you.  “We were paid for the amount of time we spent recording but not at all for usage. The only way I've been able to get any payment for it, really, is through my speaking events, but I'm very grateful to have been the voice of Siri. She's very iconic; it's led to a whole new career for me.”   Another widespread voice that didn't get commensurate royalties is known for a single phrase, barely a full sentence. [sfx clip]  From FIFA and Madden to UFC and NBA, Andrew Anthony's voice has opened EA Sports video games for 30 years now and let us all have a collective shiver of mortality at that fact.  Anthony had a friend who ran a small ad sales company, who had taken on the not-yet-industry-cornerstone Electronic Arts as a client.  "My friend then called me up in Toronto and said 'Hey will you do this thing... for free?' I said 'yeah, of course, I will! I don't even know what this is but I get a free trip down to see you, so for sure'.  So Anthony went to visit his friend, read the line, which was originally “If it's in the game, it's in the game,” and assumed he would never, ever hear anything about it again.  Call that an underestimation.  EA is valued at $37B, with the Sports being a big chunk of that.  And Anthony has seen exactly none of that money, and he's pretty okay with that.  Over the years, Anthony has met plenty of other gaming fans and happily agreed to do his EA Sports voice impression on camera.    Not every screen actor's able to do voice work successfully; we've all heard flat, lackluster performances from big name stars in animated features.  Looking at you, Sarah Michelle Gellar from the recent HeMan cartoon.  Not so with the person who arguably kicked off the trends of booking big names stars for voice work, Robin Williams in his role as Genie.  Williams recorded 30 hours of dialogue, most of it improvised, for the 90 minute movie.  He took the role for *9% of the fee he normally commanded with the condition that the recordings not be used to merchandise products.  He wanted to “leave something wonderful behind for this kids.”  Thanks for spending part of your day with me.   And that's where we run out of ideas, at least for today.  So a wife overheard her boss saying he wanted a voice to notify people when they received email and volunteered her husband. “I recorded it on a cassette deck in my living room,” Edwards told the New York Post on November 7.  “Most people think I'm retired and own an island.”  Instead, he works at WKYC-TV from 3:30 a.m. to noon, and drives an Uber from noon to 6 p.m.  In 2014, Edwards told CNBC that he pranks people by standing behind their computers and booming, “You've got mail!”  Explained the voice-over actor, “I have fun with it!”  He's not bothered by not getting royalties, so I guess we shouldn't be either. 

Leaders in Lending
Back to Basics: AI Lending 101

Leaders in Lending

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:55


We've talked about AI a lot on this show, but we've never explained what it is exactly. In this first part of a series of episodes explaining AI, we're going back to the basics. Host Jeff Keltner, Senior Vice President of Business Development at Upstart, explains the key components of AI, the use cases in lending environments, and some common challenges with machine learning and AI. Topics covered: - Four fundamental components of AI - Use cases in lending - Common challenges - The hard work and dedication needed to get it right To hear more from Leaders in Lending, check us out on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or on our website. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for Leaders in Lending on your favorite podcast player.

Content Callout
How to Create Google-Optimized Content with Ryo Chiba, Ep #74

Content Callout

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 18:14


Among startup founders, Ryo Chiba's story is unique. He wasn't a prodigy, nor did he develop a world-changing technology in his garage. His first coding class was in college, and he found himself working on technical and creative challenges. Over time, his work grew to become a marketing technology app called TINT. The company grew to 40 full-time employees, millions in annual revenue, and 1000+ customers in 172 countries. Ryo's expertise is in understanding Google, how traffic translates into website visits, and how to optimize content to attract Google's attention (and therefore land high in search results). Now he's working on a new project called TOPIC, which the Content Callout team has been experimenting with within our quest to find the best tools for our content creation efforts. Listen to learn what's needed to write a great blog, how AI can help with content generation, and content creators' common mistakes.

Manufacturing Happy Hour
Leading a Company Through an Acquisition with Fiix Software CEO James Novak

Manufacturing Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 37:29


James Novak is the CEO of Fiix Software, a company that provides an industry-leading cloud-based CMMS that helps manufacturers plan, track, and optimize maintenance. It's also worth noting that just over one year ago, they were acquired by Rockwell Automation, which brings us back to the premise of today's show…leading through an acquisition! Managing a company acquisition is a tough job, and keeping your team happy through it can be even more challenging. In this episode, James explains the steps leading up to Rockwell Automation's acquisition and what he did to make the transition as smooth as possible. He explains what the role of a CEO should be in this scenario and some tips for keeping employees reassured and happy with the process. James also gives some insights into how Fiix Software helps manufacturers better plan, track, and optimize maintenance programs. In this episode, find out: What led James to become the CEO of Fiix Software Important lessons learned from his previous experiences at Blackberry Why you should always be innovating if you want to grow a company The kind of company James wanted to build How the Rockwell Automation acquisition happened How to lead a team through an acquisition Why a CEO should try to keep as many options open as possible Advice for other manufacturing leaders looking to be acquired The top surprises James faced when Fiix Software was being acquired http://manufacturinghappyhour.com/iTunes (Enjoying the show? Please leave us a review here.) Even one sentence helps. It's feedback from Manufacturing All-Stars like you that keeps us going! Tweetable Quotes: “We believe that proper maintenance leads to sustainable outcomes in the world.” “So as long as everyone's focused on the customer, regardless of if you have differences of opinions, nobody's right, nobody's wrong. There are different paths to get there, and I felt like Rockwell was going to get the right thing done.” “If I'm a manufacturing company, and I'm going through an acquisition, or I'm thinking about acquiring, you have to be very, very deliberate about every single move that happens.” Links & mentions: https://www.fiixsoftware.com/?utm_source=show+notes&utm_medium=link&utm_campaign=manufacturing+happy+hour (Fiix Software), a cloud-based CMMS software that helps manufacturers plan, track, and optimize maintenance with powerful integrations, reports, and embedded AI tools https://www.2cats.ca/ (2Cats Cocktail Lounge), a relaxed, cozy nightclub with a makeshift dance floor serving up music alongside cocktails & wine in Toronto, Canada Make sure to visit http://manufacturinghappyhour.com/ (http://manufacturinghappyhour.com) for detailed show notes and a full list of resources mentioned in this episode. Stay Innovative, Stay Thirsty.

The Tech.MN Podcast
The tech.mn Podcast: Finding Perfect Pitch With Kelvin Johnson Jr. of Brevity Pitch

The Tech.MN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 47:50


Kelvin Johnson Jr. wasn't born for the public accounting world. With a penchant for storytelling and a passion for honing the art of the pitch, it's only natural that Johnson left the financial world for the looser, more dynamic world of startup to help other founders, well, pitch their asses off. With his company, Brevity Pitch, founders can tap into an AI system to help build the right foundation for any type of pitch. It's an interesting concept, and one that we're sure you'll agree fits Johnson well after hearing this episode of The tech.mn Podcast. Johnson has held the letters "CPA" longer, but CEO seems to fit pretty darn good, too.tech.mn on TwitterBETA on TwitterCasey Shultz on TwitterAlex Skjong on TwitterShacarria Scott on TwitterBrevity Pitch on Twitter

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella
The Practical Business Case for AI Governance - with IBM's Chief AI Officer Seth Dobrin

Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Daniel Faggella

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 24:21


Our guest this week is Dr. Seth Dobrin, the Global Chief AI Officer at IBM, one of the biggest names in artificial intelligence. In this episode, Seth returns to the podcast to speak about AI governance in terms of enabling innovation and driving better results for enterprises. He also discusses the right way to structure and think about AI governance to allow for efficiency and higher quality products. This episode is sponsored by IBM. If you're interested in reaching Emerj's business audience, be sure to visit emerj.com/ad1 to learn more about our media services.

Cybersecurity Heroes
To Protect Against Advanced Email Threats Requires A Different Technology & Approach

Cybersecurity Heroes

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 41:49


Business email compromise may have been a big issue before COVID, but in the past couple of years it's grown exponentially. Not only have nefarious actors been raking in the money, but they've also changed tactics. In the early days of this threat, an actor would register a lookalike domain and hope an email from it would get through. Now 95% of this type of email is coming directly from a trusted coworker, vendor, or client accounts who've unknowingly put their credentials into a fake login form. Cracking down on this threat is harder when the source is someone you do business with. In this episode, Jeremy Schwarzrock, senior information security analyst at Alerus, gave us the rundown on how his team is putting protections in place to eliminate it.Show Links Check out Alerus Connect with Jeremy Schwarzock on LinkedIn or Twitter Follow IRONSCALES on LinkedIn or Twitter Connect with Brendon Rod on LinkedIn ----------------------------We're stronger together. Keep connected with CyberSecurity Heroes at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher and Google Podcast. Catch all the links to the episode below or search for #CyberSecurityHeroes in your favorite podcast player. Sounder: Apple: Spotify: CyberSecurity Heroes is brought to you by IRONSCALES. An email security platform powered by AI, enhanced by thousands of customer security teams and built around detecting and removing threats in the inbox. We offer a service that is fast to deploy, easy to operate and is unparalleled in the ability to stop all types of email threats, including advanced attacks like BEC, ATO and more. Learn more at ironscales.com

NPS I Love You by Catalyst
Give Before You Take (with Lloyed Lobo, Co-Founder and President of Boast.AI)

NPS I Love You by Catalyst

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 44:55


In this episode, Ben sits down with Lloyed Lobo, the Co-Founder and President of Boast.AI., a company that automates access to research and development, tax credits and innovation incentives so companies can fuel their growth while preserving equity and avoiding red tape. During the episode, Lloyed shares the details of his non-linear founding journey, his thoughts on building brand equity, and how creating a strong sense of community can magnify a business's impact.

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott
Dr. Daniela Rus, Director of MIT Computer Science and AI Lab

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 55:01


Imagine nature inspiring us to create robots of the future! Kevin explores the future with Dr. Daniela Rus, who heads MIT's CSAIL program. Hear about the latest research on everything from AI & ML to Human-Computer Interaction and Computational Biology.  Daniela Rus Kevin Scott  Behind the Tech with Kevin Scott  Discover and listen to other Microsoft podcasts.

The Story of a Brand
Kiramoon - Good Skin. Better Mood.

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 29:21


**This episode is brought to you by Ordergroove**   “Find other entrepreneurs that are willing to talk to you,” advises Lindsey in part 2. Lindsey Martin, Founder and CEO of Kiramoon, shares that her products are vegan, gluten-free, fragrance-free, and cruelty-free. She mentions that the brand's customers are millennials and Gen Z's. According to her, surrounding yourself with people who are smart as well as generous is essential. Her brand not only preaches joy but also has a community giving program. Lindsey recommends newcomers to start with their Silky Rinse Cleanser and Moon Globes. In the future, Kiramoon will also be developing fun and exciting functional tools and accessories. Here she discusses: * Kiramoon's incredible formula * Their customer base * Advice for other entrepreneurs * Concept of plus equal minus * Skincare products and tools * What is coming next at Kiramoon * Message for customers Join Ramon Vela and Lindsey Martin as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Kiramoon, visit: https://www.kiramoon.com/  Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Simply search for “The Story of a Brand.” Click here to listen on Apple Podcast or Spotify. * This episode is brought to you by Ordergroove. It's time to let your customers enjoy the products they love without the friction of reordering... That's why innovative brands like Peet's Coffee and Il Makiage rely on Ordergroove's subscription solution to build long-lasting relationships that drive recurring revenue. From enrollment incentives to churn-fighting AI, Ordergroove gives your business the tools it needs to be a subscription success story. Book a demo today and receive 2-months off your contract. Visit https://www.ordergroove.com/story/ 

The Story of a Brand
Kiramoon - To Inspire Joy and Self-Care

The Story of a Brand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 28:36


**This episode is brought to you by Ordergroove**   “To inspire joy and self-care” that's the mission of Kiramoon. In part 1, we have Lindsey Martin, Founder and CEO of Kiramoon, an Austin-based skincare brand encompassing joy and advocating for mental health awareness with skin-loving ingredients. While working as a software sales executive, manager, director, Lindsey fell in love with business but still felt that something was missing. She felt the pull to put all her hard-won experience towards building her own business. Being in love with skincare from an early age, Lindsey knew this would be the area of her focus. So, she launched Kiramoon, a brand that pairs joy, happiness, and cuteness concepts with great formulas. At Kiramoon, it's not just great skincare products, but diversity's at the forefront too. According to Lindsey, customer acquisition and brand awareness are tough, especially for new businesses. In her journey, her background in software sales helped her in problem-solving and other aspects of the brand. In the first part, she discussed: * Gratefulness * Overview of the brand * Her career * Why Kiramoon * Difference between entrepreneurship & sales * What was her motivation * Her vision Join Ramon Vela and Lindsey Martin as they break down the inside story on The Story of a Brand. For more on Kiramoon, visit: https://www.kiramoon.com/  Subscribe and Listen to the podcast on all major apps. Simply search for “The Story of a Brand.” Click here to listen on Apple Podcast or Spotify. * This episode is brought to you by Ordergroove. It's time to let your customers enjoy the products they love without the friction of reordering... That's why innovative brands like Peet's Coffee and Il Makiage rely on Ordergroove's subscription solution to build long-lasting relationships that drive recurring revenue. From enrollment incentives to churn-fighting AI, Ordergroove gives your business the tools it needs to be a subscription success story. Book a demo today and receive 2-months off your contract. Visit https://www.ordergroove.com/story/ 

Conservative Daily Podcast
MLK Jr. Is Rolling In His Grave

Conservative Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 71:33


In memory of MLK Jr. we ask the question is this what he envisioned for our country? Current events might say otherwise! Apollo and Jake cover the AI use in manipulating the beliefs and behavior of the public, the media bias regarding race and politics including the recent synagogue hostage situation, the continued push for mRNA gene therapy mandates despite the failure of the cabal's drive to "combat the pandemic," and more.  If you want to support the show, you can donate here: http://bit.ly/cd-donate The REAWAKENING series is a Christian docuseries set to be released November 15th! The film is the product of Patriot filmmakers Joy and Matthew Thayer, owners of Spero Pictures, who also produced "The Trump I Know." This film is a must watch for every Proud American as it details the truth surrounding the Cabal agenda that has been unleashed on us all. Go to https://reawakeningseries.com/ and use promo code CD21 when you pre-order RE:AWAKENING for 10% off and to be entered for a chance to WIN 2 VIP tickets to the REAWAKEN AMERICA TOUR and get an exclusive BACKSTAGE PASS to meet Gen. Flynn and the other speakers. ($1,000 value). Liberty Cigars is a Patriot owned business with an extensive line of historically themed individual cigars and cigar collections including the Commander Series, Founders Series, and the Presidents Series. All packaging is proudly made in the USA by American workers. A truly unique gift for both cigar and history lovers. All orders over $76 will receive a free Patrick Henry cigar, the perfect gift for anyone who says, "Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death" this holiday season. Use code BEFREE at www.libertycigars.com Today's podcast is again sponsored by AirMedCare Network! Do you live in a rural area that's hard to reach by road? Do you like to hike or spend a lot of time outdoors? Health insurance wont always cover the cost of an emergency medical flight. But with AirMedCare Network, you're covered! For as little as $85 per year, your WHOLE household will be covered in case you ever need an air medical transport. And if you use Promo Code DAILY, you will receive up to a $50 eGift Card back when you sign up today! You can sign up right here: https://www.airmedcarenetwork.com/daily If you want to support Mike Lindell and our show, use promo code CD21 to get up to 66% off at https://www.mypillow.com/radiospecials or by placing your order over the phone at 800-872-0627. When you use promo code CD21, a Queen Sized MyPillow is just $29, the cheapest it has ever been! Make sure you Like, Comment, and Share! Text FREEDOM to 89517 to get added to our text list to receive notifications when we go Live! Please make sure you join our newsletter to receive our action alerts: https://bit.ly/joinconservativedaily Conservative Daily is on Rumble! https://rumble.com/user/ConservativeDaily We are now also going to be streaming on dlive! Check us out here: https://dlive.tv/ConservativeDaily Click here to donate: http://bit.ly/cd-donate Subscribe to our daily podcast at Apple Podcasts: http://bit.ly/ConservativeDailyPodcast on Google Podcasts (for Android users): https://bit.ly/CDPodcastGoogle We are also available on Spotify! https://open.spotify.com/show/2wD8YleiBM8bu0l3ahBLDN And on Pandora: https://www.pandora.com/podcast/conservative-daily-podcast/PC:37034 And on iHeart Radio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/256-conservative-daily-podcast-53710765/ on TuneIn: https://tunein.com/radio/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-p1350272/ And on Podbean: https://conservative.podbean.com/ And now also on Audible! https://www.audible.com/pd/Conservative-Daily-Podcast-Podcast/B08JJQQ4M Support Joe Oltmann in his legal battle against Eric Coomer: https://givesendgo.com/defendjoeoltmann  

This Week in Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast
The New DBfication of ML/AI with Arun Kumar - #553

This Week in Machine Learning & Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 46:08


Today we're joined by Arun Kumarm, an associate professor at UC San Diego. We had the pleasure of catching up with Arun prior to the Workshop on Databases and AI at NeurIPS 2021, where he delivered the talk “The New DBfication of ML/AI.” In our conversation, we explore this “database-ification” of machine learning, a concept analogous to the transformation of relational SQL computation. We discuss the relationship between the ML and database fields and how the merging of the two could have positive outcomes for the end-to-end ML workflow, and a few tools that his team has developed, Cerebro, a tool for reproducible model selection, and SortingHat, a tool for automating data prep, and how tools like these and others affect Arun's outlook on the future of machine learning platforms and MLOps. The complete show notes for this episode can be found at twimlai.com/go/553

FuturesInFocus
Lawrence Shindell, Bringing Transparency and Authentication to a Market Once Totally Dependent on Opinions.

FuturesInFocus

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 38:41


Our guest for this podcast, Lawrence Shindell, is a world-renowned expert in the verification and trustworthiness of methods designed to verify the authenticity of art. His ideas on the potential power of NFT's, nanotechnology, machine learning and AI to solve the challenges of authenticity in artwork by 2030 are a rare glimpse into the world 99.99% of us will never be involved in. Yet the progressive application of technologies may open up a sense of comfort to us who go to art museums and have a doubt that maybe not all the collections are fully authentic. Crazy things still happen in a modern, technology-centered world. For example, a gallery bought and then sold on a Jackson Pollack with misspellings in the signature for $2M less than ten years ago. An inflation-adjusted $127M now.

Museum Archipelago
97. Richard Nixon Hoped to Never Say These Words about Apollo 11. In A New Exhibit, He Does.

Museum Archipelago

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 14:58


As the Apollo 11 astronauts hurtled towards the moon on July 18th, 1969, members of the Nixon administration realized they should probably make a contingency plan. If the astronauts didn't make it – or, even more horrible, if they made it to the moon and crashed and had no way to get back to earth – Richard Nixon would have to address the nation. That haunting speech was written but fortunately was never delivered. But you can go to the Museum of the Moving Image in New York City and watch Nixon somberly reciting those words. It looks like real historic footage, but it's fake. Artists Francesca Panetta and Halsey Burgund used the text of the original address and media manipulation techniques like machine learning to create the synthetic Nixon for a film called In Event of Moon Disaster. It anchors an exhibit called Deepfake: Unstable Evidence on Screen. In this episode, Panetta and Burgund discuss how they created In Event of Moon Disaster as a way to highlight various misinformation techniques, the changing literacy of the general public towards media manipulation, and the effectiveness of misinformation in the museum medium. Topics and Notes 00:00 Intro 00:15 July 18th, 1969 00:40 The Safire Memo (https://www.archives.gov/files/presidential-libraries/events/centennials/nixon/images/exhibit/rn100-6-1-2.pdf) 01:38 Clip From In Event of Moon Disaster (https://moondisaster.org) 02:30 Nixon's Telephone Call (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_8tawnlwr8) 03:00 What is Deepfake? 03:30 Halsey Burgund (https://halseyburgund.com) 04:06 Francesca Panetta (https://www.francescapanetta.com/about/) 04:30 How They Did It 04:50 Why This Speech? 06:02 Deepfake: Unstable Evidence on Screen at the Museum of the Moving Image in New York City (https://movingimage.us/event/deepfake-unstable-evidence-on-screen/) 07:05 Misinformation By Editing 09:53 Misinformation and Medium 10:23 Museums as Trustworthy Institutions (https://www.museumarchipelago.com/71) 11:27 What Would a “Deepfake Museum Gallery” Look Like? 13:43 In Event of Moon Disaster (https://moondisaster.org) 14:00 Outro | Join Club Archipelago

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS
594. News: Fintech funding ramps up as Brex, Qonto and others all hit record valuations

Fintech Insider Podcast by 11:FS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:03


Our expert hosts, Benjamin Ensor and Nasir Ahmad, are joined by some great guests to talk about the most notable fintech, financial services and banking news from the past week. This week's guests include: Samim Abedi, Chief Investment Officer at Wahed Kate Drew, Director of Research, CCG Catalyst We cover the following stories from the fintech and financial services space: Fintech Brex confirms $12.3B valuation, AND snaps up Meta exec to serve as its head of product - 2:50 Wahed Debuts First Shariah-Compliant and ESG-Aware ETF on Nasdaq - 14:50 Business banking startup Qonto raises $552 million at $5 billion valuation - 29:14 Revolut launches as a bank in 10 Western European countries - 35:45 UK FS regulator takes aim at cloud giants - 47:14 Citi to sack unvaccinated staff at the end of the month - 48:42 UK parliament launches crypto group - 50:50 A technical issue sees a bank accidentally hand out £130m on Christmas morning - 52:40 This episode is sponsored by Primer. Primer is the world's first automation platform for payments. With Primer, merchants and developers have all the underlying infrastructure and "lego blocks" they need to build the best buying experiences for their customers. Learn more and book a demo at primer.io (https://primer.io/?utm_source=11fs&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=fintech_insider_) This episode is sponsored by Fintech Meetup. Join Fintech Meetup, the world's largest fintech meetings-only event! That's right - no speakers or content….just 30,000+ double opt-in online meetings that result in Deals, Partnerships and Funding. Meet 3,000+ participants from Fintechs, Banks, Credit Unions, Community Banks, Investors, Networks, Solution Providers, Tech cos, Retailers & Merchants and many others! Online, March 22-24. Learn More & Get Your Ticket (https://fintechmeetup.com/) Fintech Insider by 11:FS is a podcast dedicated to all things fintech, banking, technology and financial services. Hosted by a rotation of 11:FS experts including David Brear, Simon Taylor and Jason Bates, who are joined by a range of brilliant guests. We cover the latest global news, bring you interviews from industry experts or take a deep dive into subject matters such as APIs, AI or digital banking. If you enjoyed this episode, don't forget to subscribe and please leave a review Follow us on Twitter: www.twitter.com/fintechinsiders where you can ask the hosts questions, alternatively email podcasts@11fs.com! Special Guests: Kate Drew and Samim Abedi.

Your Shopify business is a journey. We help navigate and accelerate growth in the complex world of ecommerce.
Personalize Your Shopping Experience In Real Time For Collections, Search, And Recommendations

Your Shopify business is a journey. We help navigate and accelerate growth in the complex world of ecommerce.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:29


In today's episode, my guest is Zohar Gilad the Co-Founder and CEO of FastSimon. They are a shopping optimization platform for SMB all the way through to Enterprise retailers powered by Shopify Plus.Their app provides AI search, visual search, collection filters, collection merchandising, and personalization for fast-growing Shopify brands.Let's jump in and learn more about how FastSimon is assisting Shopify brands with growth and scale!WHAT YOU WILL LEARN TODAYHow to enable and inspire your shopper's product discovery journey.How to scale both online and physical stores.What forward-thinking/progressive brands need to consider in terms of the customer experience.How to personalize your customer's shopping experience to maximize conversions.LINKS AND RESOURCES MENTIONEDFastSimonFastSimon Shopify AppEPISODE SPONSORToday's episode is brought to you by dotdigital, from email marketing to full omnichannel marketing orchestration, dotdigital transforms your customer insights into personalized marketing campaigns. Learn more about their incredible solution and get started today at dotdigital.com. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
January 17: Genesis 18; Matthew 17; Nehemiah 7; Acts 17

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 19:54


With family: Genesis 18; Matthew 17 Genesis 18 (Listen) 18 And the LORD appeared to him by the oaks1 of Mamre, as he sat at the door of his tent in the heat of the day. 2 He lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, three men were standing in front of him. When he saw them, he ran from the tent door to meet them and bowed himself to the earth 3 and said, “O Lord,2 if I have found favor in your sight, do not pass by your servant. 4 Let a little water be brought, and wash your feet, and rest yourselves under the tree, 5 while I bring a morsel of bread, that you may refresh yourselves, and after that you may pass on—since you have come to your servant.” So they said, “Do as you have said.” 6 And Abraham went quickly into the tent to Sarah and said, “Quick! Three seahs3 of fine flour! Knead it, and make cakes.” 7 And Abraham ran to the herd and took a calf, tender and good, and gave it to a young man, who prepared it quickly. 8 Then he took curds and milk and the calf that he had prepared, and set it before them. And he stood by them under the tree while they ate. 9 They said to him, “Where is Sarah your wife?” And he said, “She is in the tent.” 10 The LORD said, “I will surely return to you about this time next year, and Sarah your wife shall have a son.” And Sarah was listening at the tent door behind him. 11 Now Abraham and Sarah were old, advanced in years. The way of women had ceased to be with Sarah. 12 So Sarah laughed to herself, saying, “After I am worn out, and my lord is old, shall I have pleasure?” 13 The LORD said to Abraham, “Why did Sarah laugh and say, ‘Shall I indeed bear a child, now that I am old?' 14 Is anything too hard4 for the LORD? At the appointed time I will return to you, about this time next year, and Sarah shall have a son.” 15 But Sarah denied it,5 saying, “I did not laugh,” for she was afraid. He said, “No, but you did laugh.” 16 Then the men set out from there, and they looked down toward Sodom. And Abraham went with them to set them on their way. 17 The LORD said, “Shall I hide from Abraham what I am about to do, 18 seeing that Abraham shall surely become a great and mighty nation, and all the nations of the earth shall be blessed in him? 19 For I have chosen6 him, that he may command his children and his household after him to keep the way of the LORD by doing righteousness and justice, so that the LORD may bring to Abraham what he has promised him.” 20 Then the LORD said, “Because the outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah is great and their sin is very grave, 21 I will go down to see whether they have done altogether7 according to the outcry that has come to me. And if not, I will know.” Abraham Intercedes for Sodom 22 So the men turned from there and went toward Sodom, but Abraham still stood before the LORD. 23 Then Abraham drew near and said, “Will you indeed sweep away the righteous with the wicked? 24 Suppose there are fifty righteous within the city. Will you then sweep away the place and not spare it for the fifty righteous who are in it? 25 Far be it from you to do such a thing, to put the righteous to death with the wicked, so that the righteous fare as the wicked! Far be that from you! Shall not the Judge of all the earth do what is just?” 26 And the LORD said, “If I find at Sodom fifty righteous in the city, I will spare the whole place for their sake.” 27 Abraham answered and said, “Behold, I have undertaken to speak to the Lord, I who am but dust and ashes. 28 Suppose five of the fifty righteous are lacking. Will you destroy the whole city for lack of five?” And he said, “I will not destroy it if I find forty-five there.” 29 Again he spoke to him and said, “Suppose forty are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of forty I will not do it.” 30 Then he said, “Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak. Suppose thirty are found there.” He answered, “I will not do it, if I find thirty there.” 31 He said, “Behold, I have undertaken to speak to the Lord. Suppose twenty are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of twenty I will not destroy it.” 32 Then he said, “Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak again but this once. Suppose ten are found there.” He answered, “For the sake of ten I will not destroy it.” 33 And the LORD went his way, when he had finished speaking to Abraham, and Abraham returned to his place. Footnotes [1] 18:1 Or terebinths [2] 18:3 Or My lord [3] 18:6 A seah was about 7 quarts or 7.3 liters [4] 18:14 Or wonderful [5] 18:15 Or acted falsely [6] 18:19 Hebrew known [7] 18:21 Or they deserve destruction; Hebrew they have made a complete end (ESV) Matthew 17 (Listen) The Transfiguration 17 And after six days Jesus took with him Peter and James, and John his brother, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. 2 And he was transfigured before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became white as light. 3 And behold, there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him. 4 And Peter said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good that we are here. If you wish, I will make three tents here, one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” 5 He was still speaking when, behold, a bright cloud overshadowed them, and a voice from the cloud said, “This is my beloved Son,1 with whom I am well pleased; listen to him.” 6 When the disciples heard this, they fell on their faces and were terrified. 7 But Jesus came and touched them, saying, “Rise, and have no fear.” 8 And when they lifted up their eyes, they saw no one but Jesus only. 9 And as they were coming down the mountain, Jesus commanded them, “Tell no one the vision, until the Son of Man is raised from the dead.” 10 And the disciples asked him, “Then why do the scribes say that first Elijah must come?” 11 He answered, “Elijah does come, and he will restore all things. 12 But I tell you that Elijah has already come, and they did not recognize him, but did to him whatever they pleased. So also the Son of Man will certainly suffer at their hands.” 13 Then the disciples understood that he was speaking to them of John the Baptist. Jesus Heals a Boy with a Demon 14 And when they came to the crowd, a man came up to him and, kneeling before him, 15 said, “Lord, have mercy on my son, for he has seizures and he suffers terribly. For often he falls into the fire, and often into the water. 16 And I brought him to your disciples, and they could not heal him.” 17 And Jesus answered, “O faithless and twisted generation, how long am I to be with you? How long am I to bear with you? Bring him here to me.” 18 And Jesus rebuked the demon,2 and it3 came out of him, and the boy was healed instantly.4 19 Then the disciples came to Jesus privately and said, “Why could we not cast it out?” 20 He said to them, “Because of your little faith. For truly, I say to you, if you have faith like a grain of mustard seed, you will say to this mountain, ‘Move from here to there,' and it will move, and nothing will be impossible for you.”5 Jesus Again Foretells Death, Resurrection 22 As they were gathering6 in Galilee, Jesus said to them, “The Son of Man is about to be delivered into the hands of men, 23 and they will kill him, and he will be raised on the third day.” And they were greatly distressed. The Temple Tax 24 When they came to Capernaum, the collectors of the two-drachma tax went up to Peter and said, “Does your teacher not pay the tax?” 25 He said, “Yes.” And when he came into the house, Jesus spoke to him first, saying, “What do you think, Simon? From whom do kings of the earth take toll or tax? From their sons or from others?” 26 And when he said, “From others,” Jesus said to him, “Then the sons are free. 27 However, not to give offense to them, go to the sea and cast a hook and take the first fish that comes up, and when you open its mouth you will find a shekel.7 Take that and give it to them for me and for yourself.” Footnotes [1] 17:5 Or my Son, my (or the) Beloved [2] 17:18 Greek it [3] 17:18 Greek the demon [4] 17:18 Greek from that hour [5] 17:20 Some manuscripts insert verse 21: But this kind never comes out except by prayer and fasting [6] 17:22 Some manuscripts remained [7] 17:27 Greek stater, a silver coin worth four drachmas or approximately one shekel (ESV) In private: Nehemiah 7; Acts 17 Nehemiah 7 (Listen) 7 Now when the wall had been built and I had set up the doors, and the gatekeepers, the singers, and the Levites had been appointed, 2 I gave my brother Hanani and Hananiah the governor of the castle charge over Jerusalem, for he was a more faithful and God-fearing man than many. 3 And I said to them, “Let not the gates of Jerusalem be opened until the sun is hot. And while they are still standing guard, let them shut and bar the doors. Appoint guards from among the inhabitants of Jerusalem, some at their guard posts and some in front of their own homes.” 4 The city was wide and large, but the people within it were few, and no houses had been rebuilt. Lists of Returned Exiles 5 Then my God put it into my heart to assemble the nobles and the officials and the people to be enrolled by genealogy. And I found the book of the genealogy of those who came up at the first, and I found written in it: 6 These were the people of the province who came up out of the captivity of those exiles whom Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon had carried into exile. They returned to Jerusalem and Judah, each to his town. 7 They came with Zerubbabel, Jeshua, Nehemiah, Azariah, Raamiah, Nahamani, Mordecai, Bilshan, Mispereth, Bigvai, Nehum, Baanah. The number of the men of the people of Israel: 8 the sons of Parosh, 2,172. 9 The sons of Shephatiah, 372. 10 The sons of Arah, 652. 11 The sons of Pahath-moab, namely the sons of Jeshua and Joab, 2,818. 12 The sons of Elam, 1,254. 13 The sons of Zattu, 845. 14 The sons of Zaccai, 760. 15 The sons of Binnui, 648. 16 The sons of Bebai, 628. 17 The sons of Azgad, 2,322. 18 The sons of Adonikam, 667. 19 The sons of Bigvai, 2,067. 20 The sons of Adin, 655. 21 The sons of Ater, namely of Hezekiah, 98. 22 The sons of Hashum, 328. 23 The sons of Bezai, 324. 24 The sons of Hariph, 112. 25 The sons of Gibeon, 95. 26 The men of Bethlehem and Netophah, 188. 27 The men of Anathoth, 128. 28 The men of Beth-azmaveth, 42. 29 The men of Kiriath-jearim, Chephirah, and Beeroth, 743. 30 The men of Ramah and Geba, 621. 31 The men of Michmas, 122. 32 The men of Bethel and Ai, 123. 33 The men of the other Nebo, 52. 34 The sons of the other Elam, 1,254. 35 The sons of Harim, 320. 36 The sons of Jericho, 345. 37 The sons of Lod, Hadid, and Ono, 721. 38 The sons of Senaah, 3,930. 39 The priests: the sons of Jedaiah, namely the house of Jeshua, 973. 40 The sons of Immer, 1,052. 41 The sons of Pashhur, 1,247. 42 The sons of Harim, 1,017. 43 The Levites: the sons of Jeshua, namely of Kadmiel of the sons of Hodevah, 74. 44 The singers: the sons of Asaph, 148. 45 The gatekeepers: the sons of Shallum, the sons of Ater, the sons of Talmon, the sons of Akkub, the sons of Hatita, the sons of Shobai, 138. 46 The temple servants: the sons of Ziha, the sons of Hasupha, the sons of Tabbaoth, 47 the sons of Keros, the sons of Sia, the sons of Padon, 48 the sons of Lebana, the sons of Hagaba, the sons of Shalmai, 49 the sons of Hanan, the sons of Giddel, the sons of Gahar, 50 the sons of Reaiah, the sons of Rezin, the sons of Nekoda, 51 the sons of Gazzam, the sons of Uzza, the sons of Paseah, 52 the sons of Besai, the sons of Meunim, the sons of Nephushesim, 53 the sons of Bakbuk, the sons of Hakupha, the sons of Harhur, 54 the sons of Bazlith, the sons of Mehida, the sons of Harsha, 55 the sons of Barkos, the sons of Sisera, the sons of Temah, 56 the sons of Neziah, the sons of Hatipha. 57 The sons of Solomon's servants: the sons of Sotai, the sons of Sophereth, the sons of Perida, 58 the sons of Jaala, the sons of Darkon, the sons of Giddel, 59 the sons of Shephatiah, the sons of Hattil, the sons of Pochereth-hazzebaim, the sons of Amon. 60 All the temple servants and the sons of Solomon's servants were 392. 61 The following were those who came up from Tel-melah, Tel-harsha, Cherub, Addon, and Immer, but they could not prove their fathers' houses nor their descent, whether they belonged to Israel: 62 the sons of Delaiah, the sons of Tobiah, the sons of Nekoda, 642. 63 Also, of the priests: the sons of Hobaiah, the sons of Hakkoz, the sons of Barzillai (who had taken a wife of the daughters of Barzillai the Gileadite and was called by their name). 64 These sought their registration among those enrolled in the genealogies, but it was not found there, so they were excluded from the priesthood as unclean. 65 The governor told them that they were not to partake of the most holy food until a priest with Urim and Thummim should arise. Totals of People and Gifts 66 The whole assembly together was 42,360, 67 besides their male and female servants, of whom there were 7,337. And they had 245 singers, male and female. 68 Their horses were 736, their mules 245,1 69 their camels 435, and their donkeys 6,720. 70 Now some of the heads of fathers' houses gave to the work. The governor gave to the treasury 1,000 darics2 of gold, 50 basins, 30 priests' garments and 500 minas3 of silver.4 71 And some of the heads of fathers' houses gave into the treasury of the work 20,000 darics of gold and 2,200 minas of silver. 72 And what the rest of the people gave was 20,000 darics of gold, 2,000 minas of silver, and 67 priests' garments. 73 So the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, some of the people, the temple servants, and all Israel, lived in their towns. And when the seventh month had come, the people of Israel were in their towns. Footnotes [1] 7:68 Compare Ezra 2:66 and the margins of some Hebrew manuscripts; Hebrew lacks Their horses . . . 245 [2] 7:70 A daric was a coin weighing about 1/4 ounce or 8.5 grams [3] 7:70 A mina was about 1 1/4 pounds or 0.6 kilogram [4] 7:70 Probable reading; Hebrew lacks minas of silver (ESV) Acts 17 (Listen) Paul and Silas in Thessalonica 17 Now when they had passed through Amphipolis and Apollonia, they came to Thessalonica, where there was a synagogue of the Jews. 2 And Paul went in, as was his custom, and on three Sabbath days he reasoned with them from the Scriptures, 3 explaining and proving that it was necessary for the Christ to suffer and to rise from the dead, and saying, “This Jesus, whom I proclaim to you, is the Christ.” 4 And some of them were persuaded and joined Paul and Silas, as did a great many of the devout Greeks and not a few of the leading women. 5 But the Jews1 were jealous, and taking some wicked men of the rabble, they formed a mob, set the city in an uproar, and attacked the house of Jason, seeking to bring them out to the crowd. 6 And when they could not find them, they dragged Jason and some of the brothers before the city authorities, shouting, “These men who have turned the world upside down have come here also, 7 and Jason has received them, and they are all acting against the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, Jesus.” 8 And the people and the city authorities were disturbed when they heard these things. 9 And when they had taken money as security from Jason and the rest, they let them go. Paul and Silas in Berea 10 The brothers2 immediately sent Paul and Silas away by night to Berea, and when they arrived they went into the Jewish synagogue. 11 Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so. 12 Many of them therefore believed, with not a few Greek women of high standing as well as men. 13 But when the Jews from Thessalonica learned that the word of God was proclaimed by Paul at Berea also, they came there too, agitating and stirring up the crowds. 14 Then the brothers immediately sent Paul off on his way to the sea, but Silas and Timothy remained there. 15 Those who conducted Paul brought him as far as Athens, and after receiving a command for Silas and Timothy to come to him as soon as possible, they departed. Paul in Athens 16 Now while Paul was waiting for them at Athens, his spirit was provoked within him as he saw that the city was full of idols. 17 So he reasoned in the synagogue with the Jews and the devout persons, and in the marketplace every day with those who happened to be there. 18 Some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers also conversed with him. And some said, “What does this babbler wish to say?” Others said, “He seems to be a preacher of foreign divinities”—because he was preaching Jesus and the resurrection. 19 And they took him and brought him to the Areopagus, saying, “May we know what this new teaching is that you are presenting? 20 For you bring some strange things to our ears. We wish to know therefore what these things mean.” 21 Now all the Athenians and the foreigners who lived there would spend their time in nothing except telling or hearing something new. Paul Addresses the Areopagus 22 So Paul, standing in the midst of the Areopagus, said: “Men of Athens, I perceive that in every way you are very religious. 23 For as I passed along and observed the objects of your worship, I found also an altar with this inscription: ‘To the unknown god.' What therefore you worship as unknown, this I proclaim to you. 24 The God who made the world and everything in it, being Lord of heaven and earth, does not live in temples made by man,3 25 nor is he served by human hands, as though he needed anything, since he himself gives to all mankind life and breath and everything. 26 And he made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth, having determined allotted periods and the boundaries of their dwelling place, 27 that they should seek God, and perhaps feel their way toward him and find him. Yet he is actually not far from each one of us, 28 for   “‘In him we live and move and have our being';4 as even some of your own poets have said,   “‘For we are indeed his offspring.'5 29 Being then God's offspring, we ought not to think that the divine being is like gold or silver or stone, an image formed by the art and imagination of man. 30 The times of ignorance God overlooked, but now he commands all people everywhere to repent, 31 because he has fixed a day on which he will judge the world in righteousness by a man whom he has appointed; and of this he has given assurance to all by raising him from the dead.” 32 Now when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked. But others said, “We will hear you again about this.” 33 So Paul went out from their midst. 34 But some men joined him and believed, among whom also were Dionysius the Areopagite and a woman named Damaris and others with them. Footnotes [1] 17:5 Greek Ioudaioi probably refers here to Jewish religious leaders, and others under their influence, in that time; also verse 13 [2] 17:10 Or brothers and sisters; also verse 14 [3] 17:24 Greek made by hands [4] 17:28 Probably from Epimenides of Crete [5] 17:28 From Aratus's poem “Phainomena” (ESV)

Currently Reading
Season 4, Episode 23: Front and Backlist Beauties + Factors That Affect Our Star Ratings

Currently Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 51:04


On this week's episode of Currently Reading, Mindy and Kaytee are discussing: Bookish Moments: traveling through the mail and anew book light Current Reads: some backlist books and some new releases, some of which really surprised us! Deep Dive: factors that make us add and remove stars Book Presses: redemptive drama and a true-to-life-novel As per usual, time-stamped show notes are below with references to every book and resource we mentioned in this episode. If you'd like to listen first and not spoil the surprise, don't scroll down!  New: we are now including transcripts of the episode (this link only works on the main site). These are generated by AI, so they may not be perfectly accurate, but we want to increase accessibility for our fans! *Please note that all book titles linked below are Bookshop affiliate links. Your cost is the same, but a small portion of your purchase will come back to us to help offset the costs of the show. If you'd prefer to shop on Amazon, you can still do so here through our main storefront. Anything you buy there (even your dishwasher detergent!) kicks a small amount back to us. Thanks for your support!*   . . . . :28 - Currently Reading Patreon :59 - All Systems Red (Murderbot #1) by Martha Wells  2:00 - Bookish Moment of the Week 4:04 - Mindy's Instagram @gratefulforgrace 5:35 - The Lamborghini of Book Lights 5:47 - Current Reads 6:22 - Dear Bob and Sue by Matt and Karen Smith (Mindy) 8:28 - Hamnet by Maggie O'Farrell 9:32 - CeCeRios and the Desert of Souls by Kaela Rivera (Kaytee) 9:40 - Currently Reading on Mighty Networks 10:59 - Amari and the Night Brothers by B.B. Alston 11:51 - The Accidental Apprentice by Amanda Foody 12:46 - Into the Beautiful North by Luis Alberto Urrea (Mindy) 16:12 - We Are Not From Here by Jenny Torres Sanchez  16:51 - American Dirt by Jeanine Cummins 18:01 - Lost and Found by Kathryn Schulz (Kaytee) 18:05 - Fabled Bookshop 18:30 - Furious Hours by Casey Cep 21:26 - In The Wild Night by Jeff Zentner 21:37 - The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner (Mindy) 24:48 - Hell of a Book by Jason Mott (Kaytee) 29:31 - Deep Dive: The Things that Affect our Star Ratings 29:37 - @Katie.lovesbooks on Instagram 30:02 - Lord of the Flies by William Golding 33:43 - Charming as a Verb by Ben Philippe 34:26 - Frankie and Bug by Gayle Foreman  34:51 - These Silent Woods by Kimi Cunningham Grant 36:06 - Cloud Cuckoo Land by Anthony Doerr 38:33 - Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam 40:35 - Razorblade Tears by S.A. Cosby 40:49 - Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson 42:07 - All the Lonely People by Mike Gayle 45:37 - Books We'd Like to Press Into Your Hands 45:42 - Your House Will Pay by Steph Cha (Mindy) 46:22 - Bluebird, Bluebird by Attica Locke 47:35 - We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter (Kaytee) 47:42 - Sarah's Bookshelves Live Episode 1 w/Georgia Hunter 49:18 - Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan 49:21 - The Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly 49:46 - Code Name Helene by Ariel Lawhon Connect With Us: Meredith is @meredith.reads on Instagram Kaytee is @notesonbookmarks on Instagram Mindy is @gratefulforgrace on Instagram Mary is @maryreadsandsips on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast.com @currentlyreadingpodcast on Instagram currentlyreadingpodcast@gmail.com Support us at patreon.com/currentlyreadingpodcast

Business Lunch
ESG, DEI, and 8 Other Business Trends for 2022 (Part 1)

Business Lunch

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 20:01


There are a number of trend-based marketing strategies you can implement to achieve profit breakthroughs in 2022.   In today's episode, host Roland Frasier gives us the inside scoop on a lot of cool things going on right now in the business world. He walks us through the first five today and will share the rest in an upcoming episode.    Listen in if you want to stay on top of both what's happening now and what's coming down the pike.   Trend #1: ESG   This is one you hear a lot about in the investment banking world. ESG stands for Environmental, Social, and Governance. There's a tremendous focus right now on sustainability and corporate responsibility to keep the environment healthy (E), doing social good (S), and building in protections against the companies doing bad things (G).   There are a lot of funds right now set up to do ESG investing. The more focused we are on being sustainable, environmentally-conscious, and socially responsible, the more we'll get business from these bigger companies focused on it. Consumers are demanding this too, so you're winning on both sides.   Ask yourself: what could I do in my business, or what business could I acquire to become more sustainable? Things like rethinking your supply chain, reducing your carbon footprint, and giving back environmentally. From a social perspective, what can I do to contribute? Give back to your local community or the world at large, or specific organizations like Black Lives Matter.   Trend #2: DEI    Yes, there are a lot of acronyms to keep track of. DEI stands for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.  From a diversity (D) standpoint, when it comes to the people working with us—at all levels of the business—we should be diverse both racially and socio-economically.    How can we get people of different genders, however they might identify, to get involved in the company so we can get different perspectives? How can we be friendly to the LGBTQ+ community? Not just people we're selling to, but people in management, in executive positions, on the board. Studies have shown that diverse companies are more profitable, come up with more ideas, and are more innovative.   The equity (E) part is how do we give people ownership and have stakeholders that are diverse? Stakeholders who will profit and be uplifted by their involvement and the things they contribute to the company.   Inclusion (I) is very broad. How are we going to be aware of all these different interests out there, and how can we serve them? What opportunities do we have in the company to bring these diverse viewpoints in and how can we facilitate this? There's a lot of money flowing to companies that are DEI-aware. This is a huge trend and theme in 2022, and will probably go for the rest of this decade.    Trend #3: The Great Resignation   There's a whole flow of people, mostly young people, leaving their jobs saying, “I'm not happy with where I am. I'm not happy with the progress I'm making, with the prospects I have of getting to do something profitable and fulfilling and socially responsible.” People want to contribute to the world, feel good, and take care of themselves.   The Great Resignation is creating real problems for businesses. The opportunity here to think about is: how do we serve all the people who are leaving the workforce and starting businesses for the first time? People want to be entrepreneurs and go into business for themselves.    Starting a business is really hard, so you're going to see people wanting to reenter the workforce, but in better jobs. We'll need career counselors, headhunters, people to help those who failed in businesses and have challenges, business coaches, career training, etc. Anything that will serve the significant portion of people who are working remotely.   Trend #4: Reallocating the Supply Chain   For the past two years, there's been a big challenge in getting goods. We're seeing huge inflation rates. A lot of it has to do with a catch-up period after production was reduced or completely stopped when the pandemic hit.   There are 96 cargo ships in the LA/Long Beach port right now backed up. This will be worked out, but will probably take a couple years. Big opportunity: how can I reallocate the supply chain?    A lot of companies that were acquiring supplies from overseas don't want to get blindsided again and will move some/all of their manufacturing to North America (Mexico or the U.S.). If you can look and find markets where labor and location is inexpensive, this will be profitable.   Trend #5: AI   A lot of humans are being replaced with AI (Artificial Intelligence) right now and this is only the beginning. There's a huge need for companies with the ability to integrate AI with humans. We have AI agencies where AI is writing campaign ads and copy, and it's coming out better than what the humans were writing. The AI is winning. We're hitting the point where computer intelligence is exceeding human beings.   Where's the profit here? Get involved in AI verticalizations. Be part of the companies that are providing AI solutions, AI integrations, helping companies integrate AI, training people to service and work the AI as an AI technician, displacement training to help the people being displaced by AI.    These are five of the biggest trends Roland believes will provide some very profitable opportunities in 2022 and beyond. Stay tuned for Part 2!   OUR PARTNERS: 7 Steps to Scalable workbook Get a free proposal from Conversion Fanatics Get 3% cash back on your ad spend with AdCard Get Roland's book, Zero Down, FREE Join Roland's next EPIC Challenge  

Java with Juli
#396: Diverse Gender Identities: How To See the People Behind the Issue

Java with Juli

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 34:42


Why are so many teens suddenly coming out as trans or non binary? Juli welcomes Dr. Mark Yarhouse to help you understand the difference between gender dysphoria and the emerging gender identities that young people are navigating today. You'll hear how to have compassionate, biblical and  productive conversations around this complex issue—and how to listen and love well. Guest: Dr. Mark Yarhouse Show notes: Understanding Gender Dysphoria by Dr. Mark Yarhouse* Emerging Gender Identities by Dr. Mark Yarhouse & Dr. Julia Sadusky* Introduce the podcast! Tell us how & why you listen to Java with Juli.   *This is an affiliate link. AI may earn referral fees from qualifying purchases. Photo by Aedrian on Unsplash

Violating Community Guidelines with Brittany Broski and Sarah Schauer

You've heard of influencers, but have you heard of AI influencers? On today's episode, Brittany and Sarah do a deep dive on these fake personalities that command impressive social followings on our favorite social platforms. They call out companies behind them, unpack the fake beef, and explain why these artificial stars can be harmful. YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4SYGqhLznPx7HiRzZSMu2Q VCG TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@vcgpodcastclips Brittany's TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@brittany_broski Brittany's Twitter: https://twitter.com/brittany_broski Brittany's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brittany_broski/ Brittany's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCad_KQumqRY06gpb24HkpPw Sarah's TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@sarahschauer Sarah's Twitter: https://twitter.com/sarahschauer Sarah's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sarahschauer/ Sarah's YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1T0JN1hhHfNsiKtqKn_dEQ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Creative Penn Podcast For Writers
The Craft And Business Of Poetry With Rishi Dastidar

The Creative Penn Podcast For Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 60:09


How do you turn an idea into a poem? What are the publishing options for poets, and how does marketing work? Rishi Dastidar talks about his life in poetry and provides tips for taking your creative work further. In the intro, What Readers Want in 2022 [ALLi]; Ads for Authors (affiliate link); Submission on AI […] The post The Craft And Business Of Poetry With Rishi Dastidar first appeared on The Creative Penn.

TRIGGERnometry
The TRUTH About Porn with Eva Lovia

TRIGGERnometry

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 57:27


Candice Horbacz aka Eva Lovia is a former porn actress who now hosts the podcast and YouTube channel Chatting With Candice https://www.youtube.com/c/CandiceHorbacz/featured Join our exclusive TRIGGERnometry community on Locals! https://triggernometry.locals.com/ OR Support TRIGGERnometry Here: https://www.subscribestar.com/triggernometry https://www.patreon.com/triggerpod Bitcoin: bc1qm6vvhduc6s3rvy8u76sllmrfpynfv94qw8p8d5 Buy Merch Here: https://www.triggerpod.co.uk/shop/​​​ Advertise on TRIGGERnometry: marketing@triggerpod.co.uk Join the Mailing List: https://www.triggerpod.co.uk/sign-up/​​​ Find TRIGGERnometry on Social Media:  https://twitter.com/triggerpod​​​ https://www.facebook.com/triggerpod​​​ https://www.instagram.com/triggerpod​​​ About TRIGGERnometry:  Stand-up comedians Konstantin Kisin (@konstantinkisin) and Francis Foster (@francisjfoster) make sense of politics, economics, free speech, AI, drug policy and WW3 with the help of presidential advisors, renowned economists, award-winning journalists, controversial writers, leading scientists and notorious comedians.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast
1849: Cloudera - Why Acceleration Shouldn't Run Rampant Without Control.

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 17:38


With the announcement of the UK publishing its first AI Strategy - a ten-year plan fit to make the UK an AI Superpower - it will be to businesses' detriment to not capitalize on the power of AI and automation. However, with this rapid shift towards automation, one of the primary areas of value is often overlooked — enabling humans to focus on what matters and strategically control the acceleration. Romain Picard, Vice President EMEA, of the recently acquired multi-billion-dollar enterprise data cloud company Cloudera, believes in a world dominated by robots, chatbots, drones, and other machine learning and artificial intelligence-powered technologies, the power of human touch is still relevant. Romain joins me on Tech Talks Daily to share his insight on why acceleration shouldn't run rampant without control. We also discuss how it is essential that, alongside automation, we form bold strategies that keep our focus on what's essential — human ingenuity. Finally, we talk about the ability automation provides for teams to bring their A-Game more, increase productivity and growth. Maybe now is the time for businesses to reimagine their culture to one that uses automation to its fullest value and celebrates human capabilities at their best

The Tech Guy (MP3)
Leo Laporte - The Tech Guy: 1860

The Tech Guy (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 147:20


Getting good video quality from a Blu-ray player with a Plasma TV, Adobe Lightroom & importing incorrect metadata, computer connection issues through captive portals, Bluetooth connection issues with an iPhone 13 & carplay, what happens when 3G is retired on older phones, how to properly set up your new iPhone, is now a good time to get a new MacBook, plus conversations with Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle! Determining french cheeses from pictures with AI PC sales up during 2021 TL;DR act introduced in Congress Possible to get good video from a Blu-ray player with a plasma TV Adobe Lightroom importing photos with wrong metadata A laptop is having problems connecting online through captive portals New TV's remote control not working properly Unable to pair iPhone 13 to 2014 Lexus via Bluetooth What will happen when 3G is retired on older phones? Checking the strength of your cell signal on (most) phones Proper way to set up a new iPhone Now's the time to get a new MacBook? When to replace an old phone DSL Extreme Host: Leo Laporte Guests: Sam Abuelsamid, Chris Marquardt, and Rod Pyle Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Show notes and links for this episode are available at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy/episodes/1860 Download or subscribe to this show at: https://twit.tv/shows/the-tech-guy Sponsor: twit.cachefly.com