Podcasts about high speed rail

Significantly faster advanced rail transport and infrastructure systems

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Best podcasts about high speed rail

Latest podcast episodes about high speed rail

Sunday Morning Matters: The Podcast
144: Abortion and Fresno City Council, Villaraigosa and high-speed rail, bills signed last minute

Sunday Morning Matters: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 43:11


144: Abortion and Fresno City Council, Villaraigosa and high-speed rail, bills signed last minute by KSEE24

Travel Guys Radio
Canada is looking at a high speed rail train

Travel Guys Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 43:06


Listen Now On the Sunday, September 4th edition of The Travel Guys…  In the Travel News, Canada is looking at a high speed rail train which can go 600 mph in a vaccum tube; and by now you've heard about the Southwest Airlines passenger who decided to send nude pictures of himself to everyone on his plane. AirTags and other tracking devices are gaining in popularity. Is it time to put one in your bag?...

#RailNatter
#RailNatter Episode 129: Not quite ten of mainland Europe's missing high speed rail links

#RailNatter

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 70:57


Jon Stone and I are joining the dots in this week's #RailNatter... Where on our side of Europe would really benefit from a new high speed link? We trip our way across from Sweden to Spain, from Swindon to Serbia in search of the answers. This is most certainly an incomplete list. But the real challenges aren't perhaps the physical infrastructure, but the political unimaginativeness of our leaders. Enjoyed this? Please do consider supporting #RailNatter at https://patreon.com/garethdennis or throw loose change at me via https://paypal.me/garethdennis. Merch is at https://masquette.co.uk/collections/r.... Join in the discussion at https://garethdennis.co.uk/discord.

MONEY FM 89.3 - The Breakfast Huddle with Elliott Danker, Manisha Tank and Finance Presenter Ryan Huang
Breakfast Brief: Singapore-KL High Speed Rail, possible extension to Bangkok

MONEY FM 89.3 - The Breakfast Huddle with Elliott Danker, Manisha Tank and Finance Presenter Ryan Huang

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 6:39


In today's Breakfast Brief, we discuss the latest US PMI data that came in well below market expectations which has revived concerns over US's economy. Malaysian Prime Minister Ismail Sabri Yaakob is eager to speed up the process to revive the Singapore-KL HSR high-speed rail (HSR) project and plans for a possible extension to Bangkok.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann:  High-speed rail moving forward slowly

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 16:42


The line could open for service by as soon as 2033, the authority projects. Stations are slated for San Francisco International Airport/Millbrae and the Caltrain Mission Bay station at Fourth and King streets, which would eventually be replaced by a station in the basement of Salesforce Transit Center. Major hurdles to the project remain. For starters, California hasn't figured out where it will get up to $25 billion needed to build the San Francisco and Silicon Valley bullet-train extensions. Nevertheless, approval of the project's final spur north into the heart of the Bay Area is a significant milestone. It's also the latest in a series of wins for high-speed rail in recent months, a reprieve after years of spiraling costs and litigation caused some Democratic state legislators to consider pulling the plug.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann:  High-speed rail moving forward slowly

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 16:42


The line could open for service by as soon as 2033, the authority projects. Stations are slated for San Francisco International Airport/Millbrae and the Caltrain Mission Bay station at Fourth and King streets, which would eventually be replaced by a station in the basement of Salesforce Transit Center. Major hurdles to the project remain. For starters, California hasn't figured out where it will get up to $25 billion needed to build the San Francisco and Silicon Valley bullet-train extensions. Nevertheless, approval of the project's final spur north into the heart of the Bay Area is a significant milestone. It's also the latest in a series of wins for high-speed rail in recent months, a reprieve after years of spiraling costs and litigation caused some Democratic state legislators to consider pulling the plug.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Broeske and Musson
8.18.2022 - High Speed Rail Spends More Money

Broeske and Musson

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 15:43


Joe Basile sits in with Christina Musson; The High Speed Rail Authority authorized spending $86 million on a plan to make a plan.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ray Appleton
Hour 3 - High Speed Rail Update. Ship Carrying Ukrainian Grain Leaves Port. Manafort Claims Michael Cohen Spied. Trump Campaign Made 80K A Day Selling Maga Hats. Beef Prices Set To Surge.

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:36


The groundbreaking for California's high-speed rail system was in Fresno in 2015 when then-Governor Jerry Brown and then-Fresno Mayor Ashley Swearengin officially started the construction on the project. Seven years, one governor and two Fresno mayors later, high-speed trains are yet to run. The first ship carrying Ukrainian grain set out Monday from the port of Odesa under an internationally brokered deal to unblock the embattled country's agricultural exports and ease the growing global food crisis. The Trump campaign was actually being spied on in 2016, claims former Trump campaign chair and convicted felon Paul Manafort in his forthcoming book. It just wasn't by anyone who Trump has accused of doing so on Twitter. Donald Trump's campaign made $80,000 per day selling their famous red "Make America Great Again" hats in 2016, his son-in-law Jared Kushner revealed in his forthcoming memoir. U.S. cattle producers are sending higher numbers of breeding stock to the sale barn, and some are liquidating their herds entirely, signaling a trend that analysts say will likely push already-elevated beef prices even higher in the not-too-distant future.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

TehachaPod
Assemblyman Vince Fong

TehachaPod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 49:55


Assemblyman Vince Fong of California's 32nd Assembly District joins us in studio to discuss some of the major issues he is dealing with in Sacramento including the budget, infrastructure investments, his criticism of the California High Speed Rail Authority and much more. Assemblyman Fong's district includes the City of Tehachapi and many surrounding communities.

Frommer's Day by Day Audio Walking Tours
New High-Speed Rail Service Connecting Rome’s Airport with Florence and Naples

Frommer's Day by Day Audio Walking Tours

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022


New high-speed rail service has launched to link Rome's airport directly with Florence and Naples. | Frommer's

The Cameron Journal Podcast
Abandoned Railways and High Speed Rail

The Cameron Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 24:57


In this episode of The Cameron Journal Podcast, we're talking about the sad and sorry state of America's rail networks. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/cameron-cowan/support

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
Highland Park Updates, CA's High Speed Rail and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson Steps Down

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 44:36


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. The latest out of Highland Park, where news broke that the suspect allegedly contemplated a 2nd shooting shortly after the one on Monday. A new oversight position has been created for CA's high speed rail plans - will it get the project back on track? And British Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced his resignation this morning.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 7a - The Latest Out of Illinois and Analyzing the Mass Shooters Assessed with ABC's Brad Garrett

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 32:52


Wayne Resnick sits in for Bill Handel. More information continues to pour out of Highland Park as the suspect allegedly contemplated a second shooting immediately after the first. ABC News Crime and Terrorism Analyst Brad Garrett joins the show to break down how mass shooters use similar online communities. The drug courts face a choice now after the Prop. 47 fallout. And there's a new oversight position for the California high speed rail - will it get the program back on track?

EarzUp!
EarzUp! In-Depth | Episode #66: High-Speed rail Updates, New WDW Thefts, and More!

EarzUp!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 75:02


Another busy week for Disney News! We finally hear about some updates to Disneyland attractions, and Jeremy takes us through some Walt Disney world drama. We round out the show with some late-breaking news from the Disneyland sub-Reddit, but don't worry, he won't be leaving the show to get a job at a Disney Blog site ... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Phil Matier
The increased costs and criticism facing high-speed rail development

Phil Matier

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 2:52


The California High-Speed Rail is still on thin ice, awaiting approval by officials this summer.  For more, KCBS Radio's Melissa Culross and Eric Thomas spoke with KCBS Radio Insider Phil Matier.

General Knowledge Podcast
GKP S4/E16 - Social Credit, High Speed Rail & Electric Vehicle Swindle

General Knowledge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 88:51


Hi Everyone, Thanks for tuning in to Season 4 Episode 16!   On today's episode Andy & Ethan join me to go over the last fortnights happenings from Australia and the world. Albo goes full steam ahead on High Speed Rail for Australia. All part of the Agenda 2030 Smart City plan we've been discussing for a few years. Shadow Pandemic. Queensland extends the public health emergency for... ah... some reason. There actually is a health emergency. But it's not because of a made up disease. Social credit system trialed in Australia. Our welfare system for people out of work is now a Beta test for the coming social credit system. We have been gamified and trained to a point where we have to earn "points" in order to get jobseeker payments. Psychological social engineering test run was carried out on Australians with the energy threat of "Power Blackouts". We were told we'd be in dire straits if we didn't turn off those heaters in the middle of low temperatures for winter. "Stop using so much power or we'll turn it off altogether!" Andy tables an argument for the deception that is EV's. The electric vehicle swindle is in full swing and is directly tied to agenda 2030 plans as well. But is it a fad that's being set up to fail? If so, why?  Plus much more... NEW STUBBY COOLERS AVAILABLE NOW! Enjoy a "Conspiracy Beery" with friends and start the conversation. 2 stubby coolers for $10 (inc Postage. Australia only). See images below! Pay via my PayPal account and make sure your postage details are in the payment details. http://paypal.me/LeeMaddox79  or Direct Bank Transfer. Please contact me to arrange: editor@realnewsaustralia.com Remember the Bonus Content shows are available now to all Patreon supporters for just AU$7 a month! Now 36 Bonus shows are available just for those who see value in what we do. Including a 5 part series on the Port Arthur Massacre, The Electric Universe with Physicist Wal Thornhill,  The Moon Landing Hoax & The Titanic Conspiracy!   Instead of donating money to a charity that most likely won't pass on your full donation to whomever needs it, why not sign up as a patron over at our Patreon account for all the bonus content and extra podcasts! https://www.patreon.com/RealNewsAustralia   PayPal donations can be made me here at RealNewsAustralia.com to help pay for costs associated with bringing you this show if you don't want any extra bonus content for your support.   As always make sure you subscribe and give us a 5 star rating on iTunes with a nice little review to help us out! Please consider sharing on social media to ensure we reach a bigger audience!    We're relying on YOU!   Links:  https://www.patreon.com/RealNewsAustralia - Join Today!   http://paypal.me/LeeMaddox79- Support today!   https://thecalmstorms.bandcamp.com/track/drop-the-fear - NEW INTRO SONG LINK! https://tottnews.com/2022/06/17/anthony-albanese-high-speed-rail/ https://tottnews.com/2022/06/17/qld-health-emergency-extended/ https://tottnews.com/2022/06/11/social-credit-centrelink-overhaul/ https://www.skynews.com.au/australia-news/major-changes-coming-to-jobseeker-payments-as-centrelink-opts-for-pointsbased-system/news-story/47329fbdabc80612cdd4954797772f76 https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/state/qld/2022/06/13/blackouts-queensland-possible-power-outages/

The Citizens Report
BUILD HIGH-SPEED RAIL! Australia must return to nation building! a NATIONAL BANK can fund it

The Citizens Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 8:27


Australia can build a nationwide system of high-speed railways, and it won't cost taxpayers a cent. It is already long overdue that Australia should join the 21st century and build high-speed railways! Let's not tolerate any more nonsense from accepted authorities who basically argue we can't afford to have progress. The only way Australia will get out of this economic crisis is to build the infrastructure that will support the manufacturing and agricultural industries we need to become a productive economy again. With a national infrastructure bank we can do this very quickly and create more than 1.5 million productive industrial jobs in the process. Please watch this short explanation of a national development bank and sign the petition: https://info.citizensparty.org.au/national-bank-high-speed-rail

Ray Appleton
Hour 2 - Michael Avenatti Sentenced 4 Years In Prison. CSU Faculty Calls For Open Search. High-Speed Rail Wants to Take a 7-Eleven. Reports Of Needle Attacks In Europe. Social Security Won't Pay Benefits By 2035

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 36:43


Disgraced attorney Michael Avenatti was sentenced to four years in prison by a federal judge Thursday for stealing nearly $300,000 in book advance money from porn star Stormy Daniels. In the wake of the fallout of former California State University President Joseph Castro resigning his position, the CSU Academic Senate is pushing for increases transparency in the search for the next chancellor. The High-Speed Rail Authority wants more than just a Slurpee at a northwest Fresno 7-Eleven. It wants a piece of the property. Across France, more than 300 people have reported being pricked out of the blue with needles at nightclubs or concerts in recent months. Americans will stop receiving their full Social Security benefits in about 13 years if lawmakers don't act to address the pending shortfall, according to an annual report released Thursday by the Social Security and Medicare trustees. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

BFM :: Morning Brief
HSR Back In Limelight, This Time From Bangkok

BFM :: Morning Brief

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 14:25


Once again, the High-Speed Rail project is back on the cards, this time from Bangkok.Professor Dr. Ahmad Farhan Mohd Sadullah, Professor of Transport Engineering at USM addresses its viability and highlighting the all-important demand aspects.

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show
Russia Could Declare War on Ukraine, LA's Failing Street Improvement Programs and the High Speed Rail Dispute

Handel 45-Minute Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 48:13


Bill Handel talks about Russia celebrating Victory Day, centralized around WWII but potentially an opportunity to officially declare war on Ukraine. Los Angeles' street improvement programs are severely understaffed as the streets become 'a threat to public safety.' And Governor Gavin Newsom continues to negotiate the high speed rail initiative with legislators, as the two won't budge on their demands.

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 8a - LA's Street Improvement Programs Are Failing and HOTN [LE]

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 28:33


Bill Handel emphasizes the 'threat to public safety' as LA's street improvement programs are severely understaffed. Governor Gavin Newsom and legislators won't budge on their high-speed rail dispute. Wayne Resnick and Jennifer Jones Lee join Bill for the Late Edition of Handel on the News, where the trio discusses news topics that include: The Russian Ambassador to Poland was doused in red paint at the Warsaw Victory Day memorial today, CA's two largest reservoirs are at 'critically low' levels, and a new Bill is aiming to limit the frenzy of well drilling on CA farms as it becomes 'a race to the bottom.'

The John Gerardi Show
Abortion Ruling Impact on California Plus the San Francisco to L.A. High Speed Rail Squabble

The John Gerardi Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 39:31


California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton
California's High Speed Rail Disaster

California Rebel Base with Steve Hilton

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 60:15


Steve welcomes Katy Grimes, Editor of The California Globe to talk about the waste of money that has been the high speed rail, the attacks on Lanhee Chen, candidate for State Controller, and how George Gascon keeps letting criminals get away with (attempted) murder. Then, in our final CA GOP convention interview, Steve sits with Charles Moran, President of the Log Cabin Republicans.

KGO 810 Podcast
John Rothmann: High speed rail is coming. Also, guess who came to dinner?

KGO 810 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 35:23


A proposed route between the San Joaquin Valley and the Bay Area for California's bullet-train system received final approval Thursday from the California High Speed Rail Authority. The agency's board of directors, meeting in Sacramento, voted to certify a massive four-volume report of environmental and social impacts that the route would have on communities, farms, parks and wildlife habitats along the 89-mile stretch of the line from San Jose through Gilroy into Merced County. That vote set the stage for a second action that formally approved the preferred route, filtered out over a years-long process from among four options involving crossing the Diablo Range via Pacheco Pass west of Los Banos. “Daily Show” host Trevor Noah didn't discriminate when it came to the receiving end of his roasts during Saturday's White House Correspondents' Dinner. The comedian went after President Joe Biden, Democrats, Republicans and members of the media from CNN to Fox News. The headliner took the stage after the event's two-year pandemic hiatus to deliver the traditional WHCA dinner roast, quipping that it was his “great honor” to speak at the “nation's most distinguished superspreader event.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Rothmann Show Podcast
John Rothmann: High speed rail is coming. Also, guess who came to dinner?

The John Rothmann Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 35:23


A proposed route between the San Joaquin Valley and the Bay Area for California's bullet-train system received final approval Thursday from the California High Speed Rail Authority. The agency's board of directors, meeting in Sacramento, voted to certify a massive four-volume report of environmental and social impacts that the route would have on communities, farms, parks and wildlife habitats along the 89-mile stretch of the line from San Jose through Gilroy into Merced County. That vote set the stage for a second action that formally approved the preferred route, filtered out over a years-long process from among four options involving crossing the Diablo Range via Pacheco Pass west of Los Banos. “Daily Show” host Trevor Noah didn't discriminate when it came to the receiving end of his roasts during Saturday's White House Correspondents' Dinner. The comedian went after President Joe Biden, Democrats, Republicans and members of the media from CNN to Fox News. The headliner took the stage after the event's two-year pandemic hiatus to deliver the traditional WHCA dinner roast, quipping that it was his “great honor” to speak at the “nation's most distinguished superspreader event.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The John Gerardi Show
Men in Women's Jails & More High Speed Rail Nonsense

The John Gerardi Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 39:39


The Joe & Lisa Basile Podcast
April 30 2022 Garlic Festival, High Speed Rail, and Adventure Church

The Joe & Lisa Basile Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 40:07


This week we look to the future with the First Annual Fresno Garlic Festival coming May 13-15, new plans for the High Speed Rail station in downtown Fresno, and Adventure Church looks to sue. We also discuss what the Bible has to say about Christians and lawsuits. It starts with vampires and ends with Christians... sounds like a movie, but it’s just the usual discussion with Joe and Lisa.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Broeske and Musson
4.28.2022 - High Speed Rail Saga Continues

Broeske and Musson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 16:55


Matt Otstot sits in for John Broeske; The HSR Authority has approved preliminary planning and designs for four future stations - do we really need them? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Blaze Podcast
Episode 166

The Blaze Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 34:08


On this weeks episode we talk about the new High Speed Rail station currently awaiting construction in downtown Fresno. We talk about Violence in the Media affiliate Nino Bless and his latest project "Illuminati Reject II." We talk Fresno State baseball, softball, and the Grizzlies. Be sure to support your local businesses, artists, and podcasts. Have a great week! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theblazepodcast/message

KQED's The California Report
High Speed Rail Leaves Many In Central Valley Divided

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 11:32


California's high speed rail project, is supposed to one day whisk passengers between L.A. and San Francisco at over 200 miles per hour. But the project is tens of billions of dollars over budget and years behind schedule. Despite that, it's brought big changes to the Central Valley. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report

Charlottesville Community Engagement
April 20, 2022: City Council briefed on planning for climate action; House Finance Committee moves forward with gas tax holiday

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 16:07


April 20 is Chinese Language Day but perhaps more importantly, 4/20 is also Lima Bean Respect Day, National Banana Day, and National Cheddar Fries Day. Is there anything else that signifies this day? While you ponder that question, I’ll tell you that this is Charlottesville Community Engagement, a program back from a brief break and ready to get going with another year of information as it flows. On today’s program:Charlottesville City Council gets an update on what environmental staff are doing to plan for climate actionFatalities on Virginia roads reached a 14-year high in 2021Andy Parker concedes in the 5th District race to be the Democratic nomineePaul Goldman explains in writing to a federal judge why he thinks a House of Delegates race must be run this year And the Virginia House of Finance advances a bill to provide a three month period where fuel haulers would not have to pay a tax to the state of Virginia First shout-out goes to the Rivanna Solid Waste Authority for e-waste collection dayIn today’s first subscriber supported public service announcement, the Rivanna Solid Waste Authority wants you to know about Electronic Waste Collection Day coming up on April 23, 2022. Residents of both Albemarle County and Charlottesville have the opportunity to drop off old electronics from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Ivy Material Utilization Center. Permissible items include computers, printers, VCRs, stereos and televisions and people can dispose of up to ten items. Only two tube-style monitors or televisions per person! You must register in advance online where you will be give a time slot. Registration is limited to 110 people per hour. Visit rivanna.org for more information.Crashes reached 14-year high in Virginia in 2021Nine hundred and sixty-eight people died on Virginia roads last year. That’s the highest number in 14 years, according to the Department of Motor Vehicles. Fatalities were up in several categories including speed-related crashes, pedestrians, motorcyclists, young drivers, and bicyclists. The acting commissioner of the DMV is urging people to slow down, wear seat belts, and avoid distractions. “Vehicles and roadways are safer than they ever have been, yet we continue to lose lives to senseless crashes,” said Linda Ford, who is also Governor Glenn Youngkin’s highway safety representative. “Do your part to help.”Last year’s numbers in Virginia are part of a national trend toward higher fatalities in 2021 when over 31,000 people died across the United States in the first nine months. The full data for the whole country will be available later this year. 2022 might be worse than 2021. So far this year, 245 people have been killed on Virginia roadways, which is a 12 percent increase over last year. Parker concedes Democratic nomination to ThroneburgA candidate who failed to get a thousand signatures to be on the Democratic ballot in the June 21 primary has conceded to the only one who met that threshold. Andy Parker made his announcement via Twitter on Monday.“I was looking forward to a spirited primary and campaign against [incumbent Bob] Good but did not meet the technical requirements to be on the primary ballot,” Parker wrote in the tweet. Parker’s daughter was murdered on live television while doing a report from Smith Mountain Lake in 2015, along with her colleague. The default nominee, Josh Throneburg, noted this in his statement on Parker’s concession. "Andy is a person who rose from the ashes of his tragic personal loss and dedicated himself to a life of public service,” Throneburg wrote in a statement. “He was a tireless advocate who wanted to shield other families from the terrible grief he experienced, and I know his mission doesn’t end with this race.” First-term incumbent Bob Good faces Dan Moy in the Republican convention to be held on May 21 at Hampden Sydney College in Prince Edward County. That’s right in the middle of the new Fifth District as drawn by two Special Masters appointed by the Virginia Supreme Court last year to complete the redistricting process. Goldman files new motion arguing for oral arguments in suit to force 2022 Delegate electionWhen the statewide primary is held on June 21, will there be candidates for the House of Delegates on the ballot? Richmond attorney Paul Goldman hopes so and filed a new document on Monday arguing why Judge David Novak should not dismiss the case. To recap, Goldman filed suit against the Virginia Board of Elections last year asserting that their certification of the 2021 election was unlawful because the districts were based on the 2010 Census. Goldman argues that action violates the principle of “one person, one vote” because some legislative districts are much larger than others. “The old House District 87 ranked as the most populated with 130,192 inhabitants,” Goldman writes on page seven. “Old House District 75 ranked as the least populated with 67,404 inhabitants.” The response goes into detail in its claim that this deviation is unconstitutional and deserves a remedy in the form of an election this year based on the new districts. At heart, Goldman argues that none of the current members of the House of Delegates are in legally valid districts, citing the Cosner v. Dalton case that forced a House of Delegates race in 1982. (learn more on Wikipedia)Virginia’s Solicitor General has until April 25 to respond to Goldman’s response. Second shout-out goes to a Charlottesville Jazz Society event this weekendIn today’s second subscriber-supported shout-out, the Charlottesville Jazz Society is partnering with the Front Porch and the Tom Tom Festival to host musician Joel Harrison and Free Country this upcoming Saturday. The free show will feature the guitarist, composer, and vocalist with the touring band of Adam Larrabee on guitar, Stephan Crump on bass, and Jordan Perlson on drums. The timeless, haunting melodies of this music anchor the flights of improvisation that the band creates anew every night. The tour is funded in part by South Arts through the auspices of the Doris Duke Fund and the Jazz Road initiative. For more information, visit frontporchcville.org! Charlottesville City Council briefed on climate actionEarlier this year, the nonprofit group Community Climate Collaborative waged a campaign to get Charlottesville City Council to push staff toward meeting the city’s greenhouse gas emission goals. On July 1, 2019, Council adopted a goal of reducing community-wide gas emissions by 45 percent of 2011 levels by 2030, and to be carbon neutral by 2050. Council had an hour-long work session on the issue on Monday. Kristel Riddervold, the city’s environmental sustainability and facilities development manager, led off the discussion.“The city of Charlottesville has had an active climate program since 2007 when it committed to reducing community-wide greenhouse gas emissions by joining the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement,” Riddervold said. (watch the update)Riddervold said the City reaffirmed that commitment by also joining the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, which offers resources for both reduction of gasses and adaptation to changing weather patterns. “We use the terms climate action to be the umbrella for both of these areas of focus,” Riddervold said. The presentation covered what work has been underway since the July 2019 goal was endorsed by Council. Riddervold said there have been stumbling blocks to preparing a specific climate action plan, and that includes the adoption of a new Comprehensive Plan. She also said going through several city managers during that time has been an issue, as has been the loss of top management in city government.“I for example have been serving not only as the environmental sustainability manager, but also since mid-2018, the facilities development manager, and have been pulled into a variety of roles and responsibilities,” Riddervold said. The city is currently taking applications for a climate program specialist to assist with planning and action. The job closes April 29, if you know of anyone. “What we are looking at now is a reboot of focused effort to bring this process back on the rails and to get back on the same page,” Riddervold said. Riddervold acknowledged the frustration on the part of climate groups and she asked for their support going forward.Susan Elliott, the city’s climate protection manager, said a climate hazard assessment is complete, a climate vulnerability assessment is underway, and the adaptation plan will be ready for review next year.“In parallel with these planning activities on these two tracks, we are also still delivering a program aimed at supporting and achieving greenhouse gas emissions across our community,” Elliot said. “What we have seen when we look at our emissions community-wide is that approximately 95 percent of emissions are coming from the community outside of our local government control and about five percent are from our municipal operations.” About 30 percent comes from residential, 30 percent comes from transportation, and 30 percent comes from commercial uses. That will inform where government resources will go. “This includes supporting and funding energy efficiency improvements including hundreds of home energy assessments annually, helping to find gap fill measures so that our low-income houses are as eligible for as many utility-funded programs as possible, providing EnergySmart home rebates, [and] the Commercial and Clean Energy Loan Fund,” Elliott said.Other recent initiatives:This month, the city hired CMTA Energy Solutions to review public buildings to see how energy and water usage could be reduced (press release)Charlottesville Area Transit is conducting a study of how vehicles might transition to alternative fuels Charlottesville participated in an urban heat island study last summer (press release)Lower occupancy in city buildings due to the pandemic lead to less water and energy use (press release)This morning, the city also released two public surveys to help inform future planning efforts. One is a climate action survey and the other is a climate vulnerability survey. Both will close on May 20. Youngkin’s bill to temporarily eliminate gas tax advances The Virginia General Assembly is in special session but have not had much action. Yesterday, the House of Delegates Finance Committee heard testimony of a bill sent down from Governor Glenn Youngkin that would waive the state motor fuel tax from May 1 to July 31. “The purpose for this bill is to help cut the cost for Virginia families and fight the price of gasoline that has increased 48 percent in the last 12 months,” said Delegate Tara Durant (R-28). “This uses unanticipated transportation revenues to provide Virginians much needed tax relief.”Under the bill, the tax would be restored to half-strength in August and September before going back to normal in October. Speaking to the bill, Transportation Secretary Shep Miller talked about its fiscal impact. “The revenue impact for the FY22-24 budget that I am responsible for is about $470 million,” Miller said. “That’s about a 12 percent reduction in the motor fuels over the 26 month period in question. The total [Commonwealth Transportation Fund] collections during that same period is about $14 billion. So this represents about a three percent reduction in the CTF collections during that period.”Democrats are skeptical that any of the reduction in the tax will translate to lower prices at the pump because consumers don’t actually pay the tax. Here’s Delegate Vivian Watts (D-39).“I wanted to make sure that the patron was aware that the gas tax is collected when the tanker truck fills up,” Watts said. “There’s no guarantee at all that when I fill up my tank that if there’s no gas tax charged that I’m going to benefit from this.” Delegate Sally Hudson (D-57) said many in the state want to invest more in transportation. “When I hear from Virginians, I hear them tell me that they think our transportation infrastructure or even behind, that the roads are too crowded, their commutes are too long, the buses are infrequent and unreliable,” Hudson said. “We have nothing approaching modern commuter trains.” Durant said no existing projects would be cut, but this would just lower the amount of funds available in exchange for tax relief. Testimony against the bill came from Virginians for Better Transportation, the Amalgamated Transit Union, the Virginia Transportation Construction Alliance, the Northern Virginia Chamber of Commerce, Virginians for High Speed Rail, the Old Dominion Highway Contractors Association, the New Virginia Majority, the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Commonwealth Institute, and the Virginia Association for Commercial Real Estate“This coalition includes some pretty strange bedfellows,” said Trip Pollard of the Southern Environmental Law Center. Testimony in favor of the bill came from a series of individuals representing small businesses or speaking to their own pain.“I’d rather spend the money than have the government spend the money,” said Colonel Courtney Whitney, who served in the Youngkin campaign. Democrats on the committee sought to introduce a substitute that would issue a direct tax relief to Virginians for each registered motor vehicle, but the effort failed. On voice vote, the motion to advance the bill passed and it will now move to the House Appropriations Committee. No meetings are currently scheduled. Support Town Crier Productions through Ting!Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

The Epoch Times, US China Watch
China High-Speed Rail Line Ordered to Urgent Halt En Route Due to Chief Conductor Diagnosed With COVID

The Epoch Times, US China Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 3:41


A running high-speed rail line in southern China was called to suspend service after receiving a notice announcing that its manager had been diagnosed with COVID-19. https://ept.ms/3qVJ012 High-Speed Rail Line, COVID-19, zero-COVID policy, CCP, Chinese Communist Party, Shanghai, 

The Daily Dive
WEEKEND EDITION- CA High-Speed Rail at a Crossroads, Selling Used Cars at a Profit, High Cost of Police Misconduct

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 24:46


This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Ray Appleton
Hour 3 - DA Charges 17 With EDD Fraud Totaling $394K. Billions Of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes May Swarm California. California's Ambitious High-Speed Rail at a Crossroads.

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 36:54


Seventeen people have been charged in an unemployment insurance fraud scheme that cost the state Employment Development Department more than $394,555, Kern prosecutors said. A swarm of 2 billion genetically modified mosquitoes could soon buzz across California to help combat an invasive mosquito species known to spread diseases such as dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever. On an average day, 1,000 workers head to dozens of construction sites spread over 119 miles across California's vast Central Valley See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Daily Dive
Behind Schedule and Billions Over Budget, Where Does California's High Speed Rail Stand?

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 22:42


California's high speed rail is an ambitious infrastructure project that is behind schedule, billions of dollars over budget, and struggling to maintain support as the political energy behind it is murky at best. Plenty of work is being done right now, but it doesn't completely match what was originally sold. Jill Cowan, California reporter at the NY Times, joins us for a look at where the biggest infrastructure project of them all is currently standing. Next, the war in Ukraine is threatening the economic recovery here at home. Supply chains haven't fully recovered from the pandemic and inflation is at record highs. Sanctions on Russia are crippling their economy, but also hurting us when it comes to energy, cars and food. Emily Peck, markets correspondent at Axios, joins us for more. Finally, the CDC wants to monitor everyone's poop, but states are not all on board. During the pandemic, state and local health officials were able to detect Covid in their communities before residents developed symptoms and the CDC wants to expand those programs to stay ahead of variants and other viruses too. States would need a widespread buy-in for this to be successful, but may logistical challenges remain. Katherine Foley, healthcare reporter at Politico, joins us for the plan to monitor the nation's sewage. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Bill Handel on Demand
The Bill Handel Show - 9a - Biden's Supreme Court Nominee and CA's Ambitious High-Speed Rail at Crossroads

Bill Handel on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 30:45


Bill Handel talks about the coming battle over President Biden's Supreme Court nominee, as Republicans seek other targets. A look at whether or not booking Airbnb's is really the best way to help Ukrainians. California's ambitious high-speed rail is at a crossroads. And a look into fertility benefits having evolved to become the ultimate workplace perk.

Sunday Morning Matters: The Podcast
134: The state of the state, high speed rail and more on the Brown Act investigation

Sunday Morning Matters: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 42:41


134: The state of the state, high speed rail and more on the Brown Act investigation by KSEE24

Shift: A podcast about mobility
Andy Kunz makes the case for high-speed rail in the U.S. (Episode 139)

Shift: A podcast about mobility

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 62:30


The president and CEO of the U.S. High Speed Rail Association details how super-fast trains could help alleviate traffic congestion on the road and in the air, discusses the nation's historic investment in Amtrak and examines rail's role in global economic competitiveness.

Central Florida: Beyond The Soundbite
Will high-speed rail revolutionize Florida?

Central Florida: Beyond The Soundbite

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 32:10


There is nothing we hate more than getting stuck in traffic, especially on the verge of a weekend getaway to, say, Miami.    Now, imagine bypassing the Turnpike and getting to Miami, going at points 135 miles per hour, and you don't even have to do the driving!  That is part of the pitch from the group behind Brightline, the near-high-speed rail service in development right now that will soon link Central Florida with South Florida by rail.    We talk about the four corners of the project with Brightline Chief Executive Officer Mike Reininger on this week's Beyond the Soundbite. ABOUT THE SHOW   Political figures and influencers are often heard in brief bites that don't capture the context of the whole story. “Central Florida: Beyond the Soundbite” expands the conversation with these newsmakers along the I-4 corridor and beyond. Join award-winning Spectrum News 13 anchor and Orlando Woman of the Year Ybeth Bruzual, political reporter Greg Angel, and veteran producer Gary Darling for a must-hear interview each week and learn about the issues affecting Central Florida.

John and Ken on Demand
John & Ken Show Hour 4 (03/01)

John and Ken on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 44:06


High Speed Rail update. How rich is Putin? A Ukrainian-American congresswoman made a plea to Biden. Ukrainian radio host Nadya Vasina comes on the show live from Kyiv.

Congressional Dish
CD247: BIF: The Growth of US Railroads

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 13, 2022 105:50


The infrastructure law provides the most significant investment in passenger rail in U.S. history, but substantial hurdles - including a powerful cartel - stand firmly in the way of a real national network. In this episode, learn the ways the infrastructure law paves the way for a better future for passenger rail along with the significant obstacles that it failed to address. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish YouTube Video What is the World Trade System? Contributors to Supply Chain Issues Matthew Jinoo Buck. February 4, 2022. “How America's Supply Chains Got Railroaded.” The American Prospect. “Cartel.” Merriam-Webster.com. 2022. “Energy Group Joins Shippers Alleging Price Fixing in Rail Transport.” January 6, 2020. The Houston Chronicle. Testimony of Dennis R. Pierce. Passenger and Freight Rail: The Current Status of the Rail Network and the Track Ahead. October 21, 2020. 116th Cong. U.S. Internal Revenue Service. December 31, 2019. “IRS issues standard mileage rates for 2020.” Dangers of Monster Trains and Rail Profiteering Aaron Gordon. Mar 22, 2021. “‘It's Going to End Up Like Boeing': How Freight Rail Is Courting Catastrophe.” Vice. U.S. National Transportation Safety Board. Dec 29, 2020. “Accident Report: Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Train MGRCY04 with a Stationary Train, Granite Canyon, Wyoming, October 4, 2018” [NTSB/RAR-20/05 / PB2020-101016.] Marybeth Luczak. Nov 30, 2020. “Transport Canada Updates Rail Employee Fatigue Rules.” Railway Age. U.S. Government Accountability Office. May 30, 2019. “Rail Safety: Freight Trains Are Getting Longer, and Additional Information Is Needed to Assess Their Impact” [GAO-19-443.] Christina M. Rudin-Brown, Sarah Harris, and Ari Rosberg. May 2019. “How shift scheduling practices contribute to fatigue amongst freight rail operating employees: Findings from Canadian accident investigations.” Accident Analysis and Prevention. Jessica Murphy. Jan 19, 2018. “Lac-Megantic: The runaway train that destroyed a town.” BBC. Eric M. Johnson. Dec 6, 2017. “Growing length of U.S. freight trains in federal crosshairs after crashes: GAO.” Reuters. Cumberland Times-News. Aug 12, 2017. “Last of Hyndman's evacuated residents return home.” The Tribune Democrat. Jeffrey Alderton. Aug 5, 2017. “Propane fire out at Hyndman train crash site, residents await news of when they can return.” The Tribune Democrat. Jeffrey Alderton. Aug 3, 2017. “Train derailment destroys Bedford County home, forces evacuation.” The Tribune Democrat. New Jersey Department of Health. Revised June 2011. “Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet: Sodium Chlorate.” Stephen Joiner. Feb 11, 2010 “Is Bigger Better? 'Monster' Trains vs Freight Trains.” Popular Mechanics. Lobbying and Corruption “CSX Corp: Recipients.” 2020. Open Secrets. CSX Corporation Lobbying Report. 2020. Senate.gov. “Union Pacific Corp: Summary.” 2020. Open Secrets. “Union Pacific Corp: Members Invested.” 2018. Open Secrets. Union Pacific Corporation Lobbying Report. 2020. Senate.gov. What you really pay for TV Gavin Bridge. Oct 27, 2020. “The True Cost to Consumers of Pay TV's Top Channels.” Variety. Laws H.R.3684 - Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act Sponsor: Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR) Status: Became Public Law No. 117-58 Law Outline DIVISION A: SURFACE TRANSPORTATION TITLE I - FEDERAL-AID HIGHWAYS Subtitle A - Authorizations and Programs Sec. 11101: Authorization of appropriations Authorizes appropriations for Federal-Aid for highways at between $52 billion and $56 billion per year through fiscal year 2026 (over $273 billion total). Authorizes $300 million for "charging and fueling infrastructure grants" for 2022, which increases by $100 million per year (maxing out at $700 million in 2026) Authorizes between $25 million and $30 million per year for "community resilience and evacuation route grants" on top of equal amounts for "at risk coastal infrastructure grants" Authorizes a total of $6.53 billion (from two funds) for the bridge investment program Sec. 11102: Obligation ceiling Caps the annual total funding from all laws (with many exceptions) that can be spent on Federal highway programs. Total through 2026: $300.3 billion Sec. 11109: Surface transportation block grant program: Allows money from the surface transportation block grant program to be used for "planning and construction" of projects that "facilitate intermodel connections between emerging transportation technologies", specifically naming the hyperloop Sec. 11508: Requirements for Transportation Projects Carried Out Through Public Private Partnerships For projects that cost $100 million or more, before entering into a contract with a private company, the government partner has to conduct a "value for money analysis" of the partnership. Three years after a project is opened to traffic, the government partner has to review the compliance of the private company and either certify their compliance or report to the Secretary of Transportation the details of the violation. The certifications or violation notifications must be publicly available "in a form that does not disclose any proprietary or confidential business information." DIVISION B - SURFACE TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT ACT OF 2021 TITLE I - MULTIMODAL AND FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION Subtitle A - Multimodal Freight Policy Sec. 21101: Office of Multimodal Freight Infrastructure and Policy Restructures/eliminates offices at the Department of Transportation to create an Office of Multimodal Freight Infrastructure and Policy The person in charge will be appointed by the President and has to be confirmed by the Senate Authorizes "such sums as are necessary" Subtitle B - Multimodal Investment Sec. 21201: National infrastructure project assistance Authorizes $2 billion per year until 2026 ($10 billion total) on projects that cost at least $100 million that include highways, bridges, freight rail, passenger rail, and public transportation projects. The Federal government will pay a maximum of 80% of the project costs. Sec. 21202: Local and regional project assistance Authorizes $1.5 billion per year until 2026 ($7.5 billion) (which will expire after 3 years) for grants for local transportation projects in amounts between $1 million and $25 million for projects that include highway, bridge, public transportation, passenger and freight rail, port infrastructure, surface transportation at airports, and more. Sec. 21203: National culvert removal, replacement, and restoration grant program Authorizes $800 million per year through 2026 ($4 billion) for grants for projects that replace, remove, or repair culverts (water channels) that improve or restore passages for fish. Subtitle C - Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement Financing Reforms TITLE II - RAIL Subtitle A - Authorization of Appropriations Sec. 22101: Grants to Amtrak Authorizes appropriations for Amtrak in the Northeast Corridor at between $1.1 billion and $1.57 billion per year through 2026 ($6.57 billion total). Authorizes appropriations for Amtrak in the National Network at between $2.2 billion and $3 billion per year through 2026 ($12.65 billion total). Sec. 22103: Consolidated rail infrastructure and safety improvements grants Authorizes $1 billion per year through 2026 ($5 billion total) for rail infrastructure safety improvement grants Sec. 22104: Railroad crossing elimination program Authorizes $500 million per year through 2016 ($2.5 billion total) for the elimination of railroad crossings Sec. 22106: Federal-State partnership for intercity passenger rail grants Authorizes $1.5 billion per year through 2026 ($7.5 billion total) for grants to states to expand intercity passenger rail grants Subtitle B - Amtrak Reforms Sec. 22201: Amtrak findings, mission, and goals Changes the goal of cooperation between Amtrak, governments, & other rail carriers from "to achieve a performance level sufficient to justify expending public money" to "in order to meet the intercity passenger rail needs of the United States" and expands the service areas beyond "urban" locations. Changes the goals of Amtrak to include... "Improving its contracts with rail carriers over whose tracks Amtrak operates." "Offering competitive fares" "Increasing revenue from the transportation of mail and express" "Encourages" Amtrak to make agreement with private companies that will generate additional revenue Sec. 22203: Station agents Requires that at least one Amtrak ticket agent works at each station, unless there is a commuter rail agent who has the authority to sell Amtrak tickets Sec. 22208: Passenger Experience Enhancement Removes the requirement that Amtrak's food and beverage service financially break even in order to be offered on its trains Creates a working group to make recommendations about how to improve the onboard food and beverage service The report must be complete within one year of the working group's formation After the report is complete, Amtrak must create a plan to implementing the working group's recommendations and/or tell Congress in writing why they will not implement the recommendations The plan can not include Amtrak employee layoffs Sec . 22209: Amtrak smoking policy Requires Amtrak to prohibit smoking - including electronic cigarettes - on all Amtrak trains Sec. 22210: Protecting Amtrak routes through rural communities Prohibits Amtrak from cutting or reducing service to a rail route if they receive adequate Federal funding for that route Sec. 22213: Creating Quality Jobs Amtrak will not be allowed to privatize the jobs previously performed by laid off union workers. Sec. 22214: Amtrak Daily Long Distance Study Authorizes $15 million for an Amtrak study on bringing back long distance rail routes that were discontinued. Subtitle C - Intercity Passenger Rail Policy Sec. 22304: Restoration and Enhancement Grants Extends the amount of time the government will pay the operating costs of Amtrak or "any rail carrier" partnered with Amtrak or a government agency that provides passenger rail service from 3 years to 6 years, and pays higher percentages of the the costs. Sec. 22305: Railroad crossing elimination program Creates a program to eliminate highway-rail crossings where vehicles are frequently stopped by trains Authorizes the construction on tunnels and bridges Requires the government agency in charge of the project to "obtain the necessary approvals from any impacted rail carriers or real property owners before proceeding with the construction of a project" Each grant will be for at least $1 million each The Federal government will pay no more than 80% of the project's cost Sec. 22306: Interstate rail compacts Authorizes up to 10 grants per year valued at a maximum of $1 million each to plan and promote new Amtrak routes The grant recipient will have to match the grant by at least 50% of the eligible expenses Sec. 22308: Corridor identification and development program The Secretary of Transportation will create a program for public entities to plan for expanded intercity passenger rail corridors (which are routes that are less than 750 miles), operated by Amtrak or private companies. When developing plans for corridors, the Secretary has to "consult" with "host railroads for the proposed corridor" Subtitle D - Rail Safety Sec. 22404: Blocked Crossing Portal The Administration of the Federal Railroad Administration would establish a "3 year blocked crossing portal" which would collect information about blocked crossing by trains from the public and first responders and provide every person submitting the complaint the contact information of the "relevant railroad" and would "encourage" them to complain to them too. Information collected would NOT be allowed to be used for any regulatory or enforcement purposes Reports to Congress will be created using the information collected Sec. 22406: Emergency Lighting The Secretary of Transportation will have to issue a rule requiring that all carriers that transport human passengers have an emergency lighting system that turns on when there is a power failure. Sec. 22408: Completion of Hours of Service and Fatigue Studies Requires the Administrator of the Federal Railroad Administration to start pilot programs that were supposed to be conducted no later than 2010, which will test railroad employee scheduling rules designed to reduce employee fatigue. They will test... Assigning employees to shifts with 10 hours advance notice For employees subject to being on-call, having some shifts when those employees are not subject to being on-call. If the pilot programs have not begun by around March of 2023, a report will have to be submitted to Congress explaining the challenges, including "efforts to recruit participant railroads" Sec. 22409: Positive Train Control Study The Comptroller General will conduct a study to determine the annual operation and maintenance costs for positive train control. Sec. 22418: Civil Penalty Enforcement Authority Requires the Secretary of Transportation to provide notice and an opportunity for a hearing to "persons" who violate regulations requiring railroads to report information about railroad crossings. Eliminates the minimum $500 fine for violating the regulations Allows the Attorney General to take the railroad to court to collect the penalty but prohibits the amount of the civil penalty from being reviewed by the courts. Sec. 22423: High-Speed Train Noise Emissions Allows, but does not require, the Secretary of Transportation to create regulations governing the noise levels of trains that exceed 160 mph. Sec. 22425: Requirements for railroad freight cars placed into service in the United States Effective 3 years after the regulations are complete (maximum 5 years after this becomes law), freight cars will be prohibited from operating within the United States if it has sensitive technology originating from or if more than 15% of it is manufactured in... "A country of concern" (which is defined as a country identified by the Commerce Department "as a nonmarket economy country"). Countries on the nonmarket economy list include... Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China Georgia Kyrgyz Republic Moldova Tajikistan Turkmenistan Uzbekistan Vietnam A country identified by the United States Trade Representative on its priority watch list, which in 2020 included... China Indonesia India Algeria Saudi Arabia Russia Ukraine Argentina Chile Venezuela State owned enterprises The Secretary of Transportation can assess fines between $100,000 and $250,000 per freight car. A company that has been found in violation 3 times can be kicked out of the United States transportation system until they are in compliance and have paid all their fines in full. These rules will apply regardless of what was agreed to in the USMCA trade agreement. Sec. 22427: Controlled substances testing for mechanical employees 180 days after this becomes law, all railroad mechanics will be subject to drug testing, which can be conducted at random. Bills H.R.1748 - Safe Freight Act of 2019 Sponsor: Rep. Don Young (R-AK) Status: Referred to Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 03/14/2019 Hearings Leveraging IIJA: Plans for Expanding Intercity Passenger Rail House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials December 9, 2021 During the hearing, witnesses discussed plans for expanding intercity passenger rail in their states, regions, and networks, and how the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, which was recently signed into law, will support these efforts. Witnesses: Stephen Gardner, President, Amtrak David Kim, Secretary, California State Transportation Agency Kevin Corbett, President and CEO of New Jersey Transit, Co-Chair, Northeast Corridor Commission, On behalf of Northeast Corridor Commission Julie White, Deputy Secretary for Multimodal Transportation, North Carolina Department of Transportation, Commission Chair, Southeast Corridor Commission, On behalf of the North Carolina Department of Transportation and the Southeast Corridor Commission Ms. Donna DeMartino, Managing Director, Los Angeles – San Diego – San Luis Obispo Rail Corridor Agency Knox Ross, Mississippi Commission and Chair of the Southern Rail Commission Clips 8:52 - 9:12 Rep. Rick Crawford: Finally, any potential expansion of the Amtrak system must include the full input of the freight railroads on capacity and track sharing issues. The ongoing supply chain crisis only further emphasizes the value of freight railroads and efficiently moving goods across the nation. The important work the freight railroads cannot be obstructed. 16:49 - 17:10 Rep. Peter DeFazio The law is pretty clear: preference over freight transportation except in an emergency. Intercity and commuter rail passenger transportation provided for Amtrak has preference over freight transportation and using a rail line junction crossing unless the board orders otherwise under this subsection. Well, obviously that has not been observed. 22:05 - 22:24 Stephen Gardner: With the $66 billion provided to the Federal Railroad Administration and Amtrak we and our partners can finally have the chance to renew, improve or replace antiquated assets like the century old bridges and tunnels in the Northeast, inaccessible stations around the nation, and our vintage trains. 23:44 - 24:11 Stephen Gardner: Additionally, we'll continue to work collaboratively with our partners where they see value in working with other parties to deliver parts of their service and with new railroad entities that aim to develop or deliver their own service. We simply ask that key railroad laws like the Railway Labor Act and railway retirement apply to new entrants, that the federal government gets equity and accountability for investments it makes in private systems, and that any new services create connections with Amtrak's national network 1:25:00 - 1:25:37 Stephen Gardner: We've been working very closely with a variety of host railroads on opportunities to expand, notably Burlington Northern Santa Fe and our work to expand the Heartland Flyer service between Texas and Oklahoma and potentially extend that North to Wichita, Newton, in Colorado along the front range also with BNSF, to look at opportunities there. With Canadian Pacific we've been having really good conversations about launching a new service between the Twin Cities, Milwaukee and Chicago. Similarly, I think there's opportunities for that Baton Rouge to New Orleans service that Mr. Ross mentioned. 1:54:24 - 1:55:10 Rep. Chuy Garcia: You've each had different experiences with freight railroads as the host railroad for your respective services. What can Congress do to help you as you discuss expanding and improving passenger rail service with your freight railroad? You'll have about 15 seconds each. Knox Ross: Congressman, thank you. I think it's enforcing the will of Congress and the law that set up Amtrak in the beginning is, as the Chairman talked about, in the beginning, that people have a preference over freight. Now we understand that we all have to work together to do that. But we think there are many ways that Amtrak and other other hosts can work together with the fright to get this done, but the law has to be enforced. 1:55:14 - 1:55:30 Julie White: I would say that the money in the IIJA is going to be really important as we work, for example, on the S Line it is an FRA grant that enables us to acquire that line from CSX and enables us to grow freight rail on it at the same time as passenger. 1:58:05 - 1:58:23 Rep. Tim Burchett: Also understand that Amtrak is planning to either expand or build new rail corridors in 26 states across the country over the next 15 years and I was wondering: what makes you think Amtrak will turn a profit in any of those communities? 1:58:43 - 1:59:29 Stephen Gardner: But I would be clear here that our expectation is that these corridors do require support from states and the federal government, that they produce real value and support a lot of important transportation needs. But we measure those not necessarily by the profit of the farebox, so to speak, even though Amtrak has the highest farebox recovery of any system in the United States by far in terms of rail systems, we believe that Amtrak mission is to create mobility, mobility that creates value. We do that with as little public funding as we can, but the current services do require support investment and I think that's fair. All transportation modes require investment. 2:00:12 - 2:00:24 Rep. Tim Burchett: Since you mentioned that you needed more funding down the line, don't you think it'd be better to make your current service corridors more profit -- or just profitable before you build new ones in other parts of the country? When Unlimited Potential Meets Limited Resources: The Benefits and Challenges of High-Speed Rail and Emerging Rail Technologies House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials May 6, 2021 This hearing featured twelve witnesses from a range of perspectives, exploring the opportunities and limitations associated with high-speed rail and emerging technologies, including regulatory oversight, technology readiness, project costs, and available federal resources. Witnesses: John Porcari, Former Deputy Secretary of the US Department of Transportation Rachel Smith, President and CEO of the Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce Phillip Washington, CEO of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Danielle Eckert, International Representative for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Carbett "Trey" Duhon III, Judge in Waller County, TX Andy Kunz, President and CEO of the US High Speed Rail Association Carlos Aguilar, President and CEO of Texas Central High Speed Rail William Flynn, CEO of Amtrak Josh Giegel, CEO and Co-Founder of Virgin Hyperloop Andres de Leon, CEO of Hyperloop Transportation Technologies Michal Reininger, CEO of Brightline Trains Wayne Rogers, Chairman and CEO of Northeast Maglev Clips 8:37 - 8:48 Rep. Rick Crawford: Rail is also considered one of the most fuel efficient ways to move freight. On average freight rail can move one ton of freight over 470 miles on one gallon of fuel. 18:05 - 18:46 Rep. Peter DeFazio: You know we have put aggregate with the essentially post World War Two, mostly the Eisenhower program, $2 trillion -- trillion -- into highways, invested by the federal government, a lot of money. But post World War Two $777 billion into aviation, airports, runways, air traffic control etc. And, and we have put about $90 billion total into rail. 22:45 - 23:25 John Porcari: As I evaluated ways to increase capacity in the Baltimore-New York City corridor, these were my choices: I could add air capacity between BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport and New York with 90% federal funding for runway and taxiway improvements, I could add highway capacity on I-95 to New York with 80% federal funding, or add passenger rail capacity with zero federal funding for that 215 mile segment. A passenger rail trip makes far more sense than driving or flying, yet passenger rail capacity was the least likely alternative to be selected. So if you wonder why we have the unbalanced transportation system we have today, follow the money. 23:26 - 23:54 John Porcari: It's an extraordinary statement of state priorities that the California High Speed Rail Authority's 2020 Business Plan anticipates 85% of its funding from state sources and only 15% federal funding for this project of national and regional significance. This is a remarkable state financial commitment and a clear declaration of the state's project priorities. Yet there's no ongoing sustained federal financial partner for this multi year program of projects. 23:54 - 24:28 John Porcari: To match the people carrying capacity of phase one of the high speed rail system, California would need to invest $122 to $199 billion towards building almost 4200 highway lane miles, the equivalent of a new six lane highway and the construction of 91 new airport gates and two new runways. The San Francisco-Los Angeles air loop is already the ninth busiest in the world, and the busiest air route in America. Doesn't it make sense to prioritize this finite and expensive airport capacity for trans continental and international flights? 24:28 - 24:40 John Porcari: For California the 120 to 209 billion of required highway and airport capacity as an alternative to high speed rail is double the 69 to 99 billion cost estimate for phase one of the high speed rail system. 25:05 - 25:18 John Porcari: Providing real transportation choices at the local and state level requires the establishment of a Passenger Rail Trust Fund on par with our Highway Trust Fund and Airport and Airway Trust Fund. 48:00 - 48:23 Trey Duhon: Texas Central promised this project was privately financed, and everything they've done today, including the EIS was based on that. So we say let it live or die in the free market and invest our tax dollars in more equitable transportation solutions. We should not have to pay for another train to nowhere while having our communities destroyed by the very tax dollars that we work hard to contribute. 49:48 - 50:42 Andy Kunz: High Speed Rail can unlock numerous ridership opportunities. Essential workers like teachers, police and firemen in the high price Silicon Valley could find affordable housing options with a short train ride to Merced or Fresno in California's Central Valley. Residents of Eugene, Oregon could access jobs in Portland's tech sector or booming recreational industry with a 35 minute commute. A Houston salesperson could prepare for an important client meeting in Dallas with dedicated Wi Fi and ample workspace while gliding past the notorious congestion on I-45. A college student in Atlanta could make it home for Thanksgiving in Charlotte while picking up grandma along the way in Greenville, South Carolina. International tourists visiting Disney World in Orlando could extend their vacation with a day trip to the Gulf beaches of the Greater Tampa Bay area. 51:41 - 54:58 Andy Kunz: High Speed Rail has an unmatched track record of safety. Japan, with the world's first high speed rail network, has carried millions of people over 50 years without a single fatality, in comparison as many as 40,000 Americans are killed every year in auto accidents on our highways. 52:22 - 52:45 Andy Kunz: China has invested over a trillion dollars in high speed rail, allowing them to build a world class 22,000 mile network in 14 years. Not taking a pause, China plans to construct another 21,000 miles of track over the next nine years. Modern infrastructure like this fuels China's explosive economic growth, making it challenging for us to compete with them in the 21st century. 52:46 - 53:10 Andy Kunz: On the other side of the globe, the United Kingdom is currently doubling their rail network with $120 billion investment. France has invested over $160 billion in constructing their system. Spain's 2000 mile High Speed Rail Network is the largest in Europe, costing more than 175 billion. These are considerable investments by nations that are similar in size to Texas. 1:08:00 - 1:09:00 Rep. Peter DeFazio: Are you aware of any high speed rail project in the world that isn't government subsidized? I know, Virgin in, you know, in Great Britain says, well, we make money. Yeah, you make money. You don't have to maintain the rail, the government does that, all you do is put a train set on it and run it. John Porcari: Yeah, that's a really important point, Mr. Chairman, virtually every one that I'm aware of in the world has had a very big public investment in the infrastructure itself, the operation by a private operator can be very profitable. I would point out that that is no different, conceptually from our airways system, for example, where federal taxpayer investments make possible the operations of our airlines, which in turn are profitable and no different than our very profitable trucking industry in the US, which is enabled by the public infrastructure investment of the highway system itself. 1:09:46 - 1:10:37 Philip Washington: The potential is very, very good to make that connection with the private railroad. And actually that is the plan. And we are working with that, that private railroad right now to do that. And that connection with the help of some twin bore tunnel will allow train speeds to be at anywhere from 180 to 200 miles an hour, getting from that high desert corridor to Los Angeles. And so it's a it's a huge, huge effort. It links up with high speed rail from the north as well, with the link up coming into Union Station as well. So I think the potential to link up both of these are very, very great. And we're working with both entities. 1:11:31 - 1:12:13 Philip Washington: Well one of our ideas very quickly is right now we have as you know, Mr. Chairman, assembly plants, assembly plants all over the country what we are proposing is a soup to nuts, all included manufacturing outfit in this country that manufactures trains from the ground up, forging steel, all of those things. So we have proposed an industrial park with suppliers on site as well to actually build again from the ground up, rail car passenger rail car vehicles and locomotives. It is the return of manufacturing to this country as we see it. 1:21:16 - 1:21:50 John Porcari: We have 111 year old tunnel in New York, we have a B&P tunnel in Baltimore, that Civil War era. Those are not the biggest obstacles. It is more a question of will. What we want to do as a country in infrastructure, we do, and we've never made rail, really the priority that that I think it needs to be. And we've never provided meaningful choices for the states to select rail and build a multi year rail program because we don't have the funding part of it. 1:21:55 - 1:22:19 John Porcari: Our passenger rail system in the US is moving from a survival mode to a growth mode. And I think that's a very healthy thing for the country. Whether you're talking about our cross country service, one of the coastal corridors or the Midwest service, all of that is really important. In just the same way we built the interstates, city pairs aggregating into a national system, we can really do that with the passenger rail system if we have the will. 1:27:13 - 1:27:41 Rep. Michelle Steel: My constituents are already taxed enough, with California state and local taxes and skyrocketing gas prices making it unaffordable to live. I just came back from Texas, their gas price was $2 something and we are paying over $4 in California. We must preserve our local economy by lowering taxes not raising them. And we must not continue throwing tax dollars into a high speed money pit. 1:30:53 - 1:31:11 Trey Duhon: The folks in Waller county the folks that I know, a family of four is not going to pay $1,000 To ride a train between Houston and Dallas, when they can get there on a $50 tank of gas an hour and a half later. It's just not going to happen. So it's not a mass transit solution, at least not for this corridor. 1:48:56 - 1:49:25 Andy Kunz: The other big thing that hasn't been mentioned is the the cost of people's time and waste sitting stuck in traffic or stuck in airports. It's estimated to be several 100 billion dollars a year. And then as a business person, time is money. So if all your people are taking all day to get anywhere your entire company is less competitive, especially against nations that actually have these efficient systems, and then they can out compete us 2:03:52 - 2:04:13 Seth Moulton: And I would just add, you know, we build high speed rail, no one's gonna force you to take it. You have that freedom of choice that Americans don't have today and yet travelers all around the world have. I don't understand why travelers in China should have so much more freedom than we do today. In America, high speed railway would rapidly rectify that 3:01:09 - 3:01:27 Josh Giegel: In 2014 I co-founded this company in a garage when Hyperloop was just an idea on a whiteboard. By late 2016 We began construction of our first full system test set, dev loop, north of Las Vegas. To date we've completed over 500 tests of our system. 3:01:38 - 3:01:48 Josh Giegel: Today we have approximately 300 employees and are the leading Hyperloop company in the world and the only company, the only company to have had passengers travel safely in a Hyperloop. 3:01:48 - 3:02:33 Josh Giegel: Hyperloop is a high speed surface transportation system. Travel occurs within a low pressure enclosure equivalent to 200,000 feet above sea level, in a vehicle pressurized to normal atmospheric conditions, much like a commercial aircraft. This, along with our proprietary magnetic levitation engine, allows us to reach and maintain airline speeds with significantly less energy than other modes of transportation. Not only is Hyperloop fast, it's a high capacity mass transit system capable of comfortably moving people and goods at 670 miles per hour with 50,000 passengers per hour per direction, on demand and direct to your destination, meaning no stops along the way. 3:02:54 - 3:02:58 Josh Giegel: We achieve all this on a fully electric system with no direct emissions. 3:11:34 - 3:11:53 Mike Reininger: Since our 2018 launch in Florida, we operate the only private high speed system in the US, showcasing the potential of American high speed passenger rail. We carried more than a million passengers in our first full year and learned a lot that is worth sharing from the investment of over $4 billion over the last 10 years. 3:12:45 - 3:12:57 Mike Reininger: We use existing road alignments and infrastructure corridors to leverage previous investments, reduce environmental impacts, lower costs, and speed execution as a basis for profitability. 3:13:00 - 3:13:28 Mike Reininger: In 2022, we will complete the extension into the Orlando International Airport, making our total route 235 miles, linking four of the largest cities in America's third largest state. 400 million annual trips occur between these cities today, 95% of them by car. By upgrading a freight railway first built in the 1890s and building along an Express Highway, we leveraged 130 years of previous investment to support our 21st century service. 3:13:31 - 3:13:51 Mike Reininger: Brightline West will connect Las Vegas to Los Angeles, where today 50 million annual trips and over 100 daily flights occur. Traveling on trains capable of speeds of 200 miles an hour using the I-15 corridor, but cutting the drive time in half, Brightline West's better option expects to serve 11 million annual riders. 3:14:56 - 3:15:08 Mike Reininger: Consider allowing private entities to become eligible parties for FRA grant programs by partnering with currently eligible applicants as a simple way to stretch direct government investment. 3:29:39 - 3:29:54 Rep. Rick Crawford: Amtrak announced plans to expand its routes including to several small cities where there doesn't appear to be enough demand or population to warrant those new lines. Can you guarantee that those new routes will be self sustaining and turn a profit or will they lose money? 3:38:42 - 3:38:55 Bill Flynn: 125 miles an hour on existing track infrastructure is high speed. The newest Acelas we ordered will have a top speed of 186 miles an hour. 3:36:46 - 3:37:05 Rep. Seth Moulton: What is the top speed of the Acela service? Bill Flynn: The Acela service in the southern network, Washington to New York, top speeds 135 miles an hour, and then in New York to Boston top speed of 150 miles an hour across different segments of the track. 4:11:57 - 4:12:30 Bill Flynn: When we think about NEPA and the other permitting processes that take place, and then ultimately into construction, on many major projects, we're talking a decade or more. So without the visibility and predictability and the certainty of funding, these projects are all affected, they ultimately become more high cost, and they take longer than they should. So if I were to recommend one policy action, creating a trust fund, or trust fund like structure, for intercity passenger rail would be key. Full Steam Ahead for Rail: Why Rail is More Relevant Than Ever for Economic and Environmental Progress House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials March 10, 2021 The hearing explored the importance of rail to the U.S. economy and as a tool to mitigate climate change. Witnesses: Shannon Valentine, Secretary of Transportation, The Commonwealth of Virginia Caren Kraska, President/Chairman, Arkansas & Missouri Railroad Greg Regan, President, Transportation Trades Department, AFL-CIO Tom Williams, Group Vice President for Consumer Products, BNSF Railway Clips 18:17 - 18:50 Shannon Valentine: One of the worst rail bottlenecks, mentioned by Chairman DeFazio, along the east coast is at the Potomac River between Virginia and DC and it's called the long bridge which is owned by CSX. The bridge carries on passenger, commuter, and freight rail, nearly 80 trains a day and is at 98% capacity during peak periods. Due to these constraints, Virginia has been unable to expand passenger rail service, even though demand prior to the pandemic was reaching record highs. 18:50 - 19:42 Shannon Valentine: Virginia has been engaged in corridor planning studies, one of which was the I-95 corridor, which as you all know, is heavily congested. Even today as we emerge from this pandemic, traffic has returned to 90% of pre-pandemic levels. Through this study, we learned that adding just one lane in each direction for 50 miles would cost $12.5 billion. While the cost was staggering, the most sobering part of the analysis was that by the time that construction was complete, in 10 years, the corridor would be just as congested as it is today. That finding is what led Virginia to a mode that could provide the capacity at a third of the cost. 20:34 - 20:43 Shannon Valentine: According to APTA rail travel emits up to 83% fewer greenhouse gases than driving and up to 73% fewer than flying. 20:58 - 21:22 Shannon Valentine: Benefits can also be measured by increased access to jobs and improving the quality of life. The new service plan includes late night and weekend service because many essential jobs are not nine to five Monday through Friday. That is why we work to add trains leaving Washington in the late evening and on weekends, matching train schedules to the reality of our economy. 52:23 - 53:06* Rep. Peter DeFazio: I am concerned particularly when we have some railroads running trains as long as three miles. And they want to go to a single crew for a three mile long train. I asked the the former head of the FRA under Trump if the train broke down in Albany, Oregon and it's blocking every crossing through the city means no police, no fire, no ambulance, how long it's going to take the engineer to walk three miles from the front of the train to, say, the second car from the rear which is having a brake problem. And he said, Well, I don't know an hour. So you know there's some real concerns here that we have to pursue. 1:23:25 - 1:24:15 Shannon Valentine: When we first launched the intercity passenger rail, Virginia sponsored passenger rail, back in 2009, it really started with a pilot with $17 million for three years from Lynchburg, Virginia into DC into the new Northeast Corridor. And, and I had to make sure that we had 51,000 riders and we didn't know if we were going to be able to sustain it. And in that first year, we had 125,000 passengers. It always exceeded expectations for ridership and profitability. And today, that rail service which we now extend over to Roanoke, and we're working to get it to Blacksburg Christiansburg is really one of our most profitable rail services. In fact, probably in the country. It doesn't even need a subsidy because they're able to generate that kind of ridership. 2:10:21 - 2:12:11 Shannon Valentine: Our project, in my mind, is really the first step in creating a southeast high speed corridor, we have to build the bridge. In order to expand access, we need to be able to begin separating passenger and freight. And even before that is able to occur, building signings and creating the ability to move. We took a lot of lessons from a study called the DC to RDA again, it's the first part of that high speed southeast corridor. For us, it was recommended that we take an incremental approach rather than having a large 100 billion dollar project we're doing in increments. And so this is a $3.7 billion which is still going to help us over 10 years create hourly service between Richmond and DC. It was recommended that we use existing infrastructure and right of way so in our negotiations with CSX, we are acquiring 386 miles of right of way and 223 miles of track. We are also purchasing as part of this an S line. It's abandoned. It goes down into Ridgeway, North Carolina from Petersburg, Virginia, just south of Richmond. Because it's abandoned, we have a lot of opportunity for development for future phases or even higher speed rail. And we actually included part of Buckingham branch, it's an East West freight corridor that we would like to upgrade and protect for, for East West connection. All of these were incremental steps using existing right of way and tracks and achieving higher speeds where it was achievable. Examining the Surface Transportation Board's Role in Ensuring a Robust Passenger Rail System House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials November 18, 2020 Witnesses: Ann D. Begeman, Chairman, Surface Transportation Board Martin J. Oberman, Vice Chairman, Surface Transportation Board Romayne C. Brown, Chair of the Board of Directors, Metra Stephen Gardner, Senior Executive Vice President, Amtrak Ian Jefferies, President and Chief Executive Officer, Association of American Railroads Randal O'Toole, Senior Fellow, Cato Institute Paul Skoutelas, President and Chief Executive Officer, American Public Transportation Association Clips 27:31 - 27:59 Daniel Lipinski: Unlike Amtrak, Metra and other commuter railroads do not have a statutory federal preference prioritizing commuter trains over freight trains. Additionally, commuter railroads generally do not have standing to bring cases before the STB. Therefore, commuter railroads have very limited leverage when it comes to trying to expand their service on freight rail lines and ensuring that freight railroads Do not delay commuter trains. 35:42 - 36:27 Rep. Peter DeFazio: In fact, Congress included provisions to fix Amtrak on time performance in 2008. That is when PRIA added a provisions directing the FRA and Amtrak to work to develop on time performance metric standards to be used as a basis for an STB investigation. Unfortunately, those benefits haven't been realized. It's been 12 years since PRIA was passed. If our eyes metric and standards for on time performance were published this last Monday 12 years later, for the second time, and after this long and unacceptable delay, I look forward to seeing an improvement on Amtrak's performance both in in my state and nationwide. 38:01 - 38:32 Rep. Peter DeFazio: Worldwide, I'm not aware of any railroads, passenger railroads, that make money, although Virgin claims they do in England because they don't have to maintain the tracks. Pretty easy to make money if all you have to do is put a train set on it, run it back and forth. That's not the major expense. So, you know, to say that we shouldn't be subsidizing commuter or we shouldn't be subsidizing Amtrak is, you know, is just saying you don't want to run trains. Because everywhere else in the world they're subsidized. 43:45 - 44:30 Ann Begeman: Most intercity passenger rail service is provided by Amtrak, which is statutorily excluded from many of the board's regulatory requirements applicable to freight carriers. However, with the enactment of the Passenger Rail Investment Improvement Act of 2008 (PRIA) which both Chairman Lipinski and Chairman De Fazio has have mentioned in their opening comments, as well as the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act of 2015. FAST Act, the board assumed additional Amtrak oversight responsibilities, including the authority to conduct investigations under certain circumstances, and when appropriate, to award relief and identify reasonable measures to improve performance on passenger rail routes. 1:02:24 - 1:03:07 Stephen Gardner: Congress created Amtrak in 1970 to take on a job that today's freight railroads no longer wanted. In exchange for contracts assumption of these private railroads common carrier obligation for passengers and the associated operating losses for passenger service, the freights agreed to allow Amtrak to operate wherever and whenever it wanted over their lines, to provide Amtrak trains with dispatching preference over freight, and to empower what is now the STB to ensure Amtrak's access to the rail network. It's been nearly 50 years since the freight railroads and agreed eagerly to this bargain. And yet today, many of our hosts railroads fall short and fulfilling some of these key obligations 1:03:28 - 1:04:38 Stephen Gardner: Since our founding, Congress has had to clarify and amend the law to try and ensure host compliance. For example, by 1973, the freights had begun delaying Amtrak train so severely that Congress enshrined this promise of Amtrak preference into federal law, and in 2008, delays had gotten so bad that Congress created a new process to set Amtrak on time performance and provided the STB with the authority to investigate poor OTP. But for several reasons, these efforts haven't remedied the problems. For Amtrak and your constituents that has meant millions of delayed passengers and years of impediment as we try to add trains or start new routes to keep up with changing markets and demand. As the AAR are made clear and its litigation opposing the PRIA metrics and standards rule, many hosts see supporting our operation not as their obligation to the public, but as competition for the use of their infrastructure. But Amtrak wasn't created to relieve host railroads of their requirements to support passenger trains. It was created to help them reduce financial losses and ensure that passenger trains could still serve the country 1:04:38 - 1:05:15 Stephen Gardner: We need this committee's help to restore your original deal with the freights. For example you can provide us as you have in the moving forward Act, a way to enforce our existing rights of preference. You can make real Amtrak statutory ability to start new routes and add additional trains without arbitrary barriers. You can create an office of passenger rail within the STB and require them to use their investigative powers to pursue significant instances of for OTP. You can require more efficient STB processes to grant Amtrak access to hosts and fairly set any compensation and capital investment requirements. 1:06:19 - 1:07:57 Stephen Gardner: A rarely heralded fact is that the U.S. has the largest rail network in the world. And yet we use so little of it for intercity passenger rail service. A fundamental reason for this is our inability to gain quick, reasonable access to the network and receive reliable service that we are owed under law. This has effectively blocked our growth and left much of our nation underserved. City pairs like Los Angeles and Phoenix, or Atlanta to Nashville could clearly benefit from Amtrak service. Existing rail lines already connect them. Shouldn't Amtrak be serving these and many other similar corridors nationwide? 1:12:34 - 1:12:57 Randall O'Toole: Last year, the average American traveled more than 15,000 miles by automobile, more than 2000 Miles, road several 100 miles on buses, walked more than 100 Miles, rode 100 miles by urban rail, transit and bicycled 26 miles. Meanwhile, Amtrak carried the average American just 19 Miles. 1:13:35 - 1:13:55 Randall O'Toole: In 1970, the railroads' main problem was not money losing passenger trains, but over regulation by the federal and state governments. Regulation or not, passenger trains are unable to compete against airlines and automobiles. A 1958 Interstate Commerce Commission report concluded that there was no way to make passenger trains profitable. 1:14:52 - 1:15:20 Randall O'Toole: The 1970 collapse of Penn Central shook the industry. Congress should have responded by eliminating the over regulation that was stifling the railroads. Instead, it created Amtrak with the expectation that it would be a for profit corporation and that taking passenger trains off the railroads hands would save them from bankruptcy 50 years and more than $50 billion in operating subsidies later, we know that Amtrak isn't and never will be profitable. 1:15:40 - 1:16:10 Randall O'Toole: When Amtrak was created, average rail fares per passenger mile were two thirds of average airfares. Thanks to airline deregulation since then, inflation adjusted air fares have fallen by 60%. Even as Amtrak fares per passenger mile have doubled. Average Amtrak fares exceeded airfares by 1990 despite huge operating subsidies, or perhaps as has well predicted, because those subsidies encouraged inefficiencies. 1:16:50 - 1:17:15 Randall O'Toole: Today thanks to more efficient operations, rail routes that once saw only a handful of trains per day support 60, 70 or 80 or more freight trains a day. This sometimes leaves little room for Amtrak. Displacing a money making freight train with a money losing passenger train is especially unfair considering that so few people use a passenger trains, while so many rely on freight. 1:17:15 - 1:17:25 Randall O'Toole: Passenger trains are pretty, but they're an obsolete form of transportation. Efforts to give passenger trains preference over freight we'll harm more people than it will help. 2:42:40 - 2:43:50 Stephen Gardner: We think that the poor on time performance that many of our routes have is a significant impediment to ridership and revenue growth. It's quite apparent, many of our passengers, particularly on our long distance network, that serves Dunsmuir, for instance, you know their routes frequently experience significant delays, the number one cause of those delays are freight train interference. This is delays encountered, that Amtrak encounters when freight trains are run in front of us or otherwise dispatching decisions are made that prioritize the freight trains in front of Amtrak. And the reduction in reliability is clearly a problem for passengers with many hour delays. Often our whole long distance network is operating at 50% or less on time performance if you look at over the many past years. Even right now, through this period of COVID, where freight traffic has been down and we're only at 60% over the last 12 months on time performance for the entire long distance network. 2:52:44 - 2:53:23 Stephen Gardner: The difference between the US system and most of the international examples is that the infrastructure is publicly owned, publicly owned and developed in all of these nations, the nations that Mr. O'Toole mentioned, there is a rail infrastructure entity and they're developing it for both passenger and freight in some of those locations are optimized for passenger service primarily, that's for sure the case. China is a great example of a nation that's investing for both as a massive freight system and an incredible amount of investment for passenger rail. And again, they see high speed as a means of dealing with their very significant population and efficient way. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

covid-19 united states america ceo american new york director california texas president health donald trump thanksgiving chicago china europe los angeles washington las vegas france england japan growth service americans canadian travel co founders office colorado challenges international united kingdom board local north carolina dc oregon national spain nashville congress portland north modern train new orleans judge bbc oklahoma monster silicon valley baltimore essential south carolina managing directors traveling world war ii testimony senate act improving civil war midwest restoration federal effort economic vice prevention secretary dangers sec milwaukee increasing offering wifi disney world richmond reports wyoming irs airports chief executive officer donations creates virgin transportation newton examining variety countries northeast regulation consumers requirements great britain trains commonwealth surface gulf requires residents senior fellow attorney generals obligations reuters albany eis caps existing passenger bp grants railroads contributors administrators petersburg controlled baton rouge ensuring us department business plan co chair greenville twin cities fresno fra dwight eisenhower cartel findings completion interstate wichita vice chairman roanoke waller amtrak lobbying hyperloop pipelines pria buckingham merriam webster jobs act houston chronicle east west corridor central valley true cost aar cong usmca deputy secretary gao lynchburg rda merced authorization union station national network internal revenue service consumer products hwy assigning propane subcommittee otp popular mechanics open secrets eliminates ridgeway commerce department nepa freight trains consolidated american prospect full steam ahead apta high speed rail potomac river international brotherhood government accountability office group vice president north carolina department stb metra pay tv intercity authorizes csx eric m national transportation safety board federal aid bill flynn congressional dish sarah harris orlando international airport new jersey department displacing federal state senior executive vice president bnsf hazardous materials music alley fixing america christina m acela oberman crestview united states trade representative dennis r former deputy secretary jessica murphy bedford county fast act highway trust fund new jersey transit federal railroad administration northeast corridor surface transportation board waller county seattle metropolitan chamber san francisco los angeles international representative cover art design david ippolito
Broeske and Musson
2.9.2022 - Surprise! High Speed Rail Costs are Rising AGAIN

Broeske and Musson

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 36:11


High Speed Rail Authority increases its costs estimate by $5 billion in its latest business plan... AND... Two Senators are proposing a Federal gas tax holiday for all of 2022 to lower gas prices at the pump. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The WTF California Podcast
Antioch Homicide, Homeless Catch Fire Station on Fire and BART Needs More Money

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2022 49:41


On this episode of WTF California, we discuss how transparency is lacking and the City of Antioch PIO Rolando Bonilla is intentionally missing news cycles to keep Antioch out of the news at the direction of Mayor Lamar Thorpe. BART may need local taxpayer money to stay operational. High Speed Rail costs go up. Sacramento could launch guaranteed basic income program for artists and PG&E bills and grocery bills increase. Articles From the Show: Woman Fatally Shot in Drive-By Shooting on Mountain Ridge Way in Antioch Station 81 in Antioch Catches Fire After Homeless Encampment Goes Up in Flames Omicron worsened BART ridership recovery, fiscal woes — and taxpayers may be asked to pay for it New CA bill would hold hotels, motels accountable for trafficking Costs climb again for California's high-speed rail project California GOP senator launches longshot bid for governor Sacramento Mayor Proposes Guaranteed Basic Income for Artists Deputies Recover $19K Worth Of Stolen Copper Wire; 3 Stockton Residents Arrested It stresses our family': PG&E customers face hefty bill increase Brace yourself: Grocery prices are about to go through the roof — again

Think Out Loud
What would high speed rail mean for the Pacific Northwest?

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 23:08


What if you could get from Portland to Seattle in an hour? Or from Portland to Vancouver, British Columbia in two hours? That's the vision behind the Cascadia Ultra High Speed Ground Transportation project. Former Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire is the CEO of Challenge Seattle. She joins us to talk about the project and where plans stand right now.

Landi's Taiwan Diaries
Ep07 On the roads of Taiwan 在台灣的路上

Landi's Taiwan Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 15:04


In the past 30 years, I've witnessed the development and importance of transportation in Taiwan, a highly populated small island. Also a lot of interesting stories happened when I was on the road. Want to know how I got through when I was stopped by the police? You don't want to miss this episode. 台灣是個人口高度密集的小島,我在台灣的近三十年,見證了台灣交通建設的發展與重要性,也遇到了許多有趣的事。想知道我被交通警察臨檢的故事嗎?不要錯過這一集! *Music by M-Dewala from Pixabay

NEWS THAT MATTER
Why The US Has No High-Speed Rail

NEWS THAT MATTER

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 16:10


China has the world's fastest and largest high-speed rail network — more than 19,000 miles, the vast majority of which was built in the past decade. Japan's bullet trains can reach nearly 200 miles per hour and date to the 1960s. They have moved more than 9 billion people without a single passenger causality. casualty France began service of the high-speed TGV train in 1981 and the rest of Europe quickly followed. But the U.S. has no true high-speed trains, aside from sections of Amtrak's Acela line in the Northeast Corridor. The Acela can reach 150 mph for only 34 miles of its 457-mile span. Its average speed between New York and Boston is about 65 mph.

The Mike Slater Show
Critical Race Theory + Return of the High Speed Rail

The Mike Slater Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 35:11


Will Creative Race Theory backfire and empower white people? California's high speed rail isn't dead yet.

Right Now with Stephen Kent
E4: E4 Daniel Di Martino on immigration, socialism and messaging to Latinos

Right Now with Stephen Kent

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 48:51


How can the right appeal to immigrants? What policies need to be revamped to include the immigrant population? Watch as host Stephen Kent, co-host Shoshana Weissmann, and guest Daniel Di Martino discuss how our leaders and institutions can reach immigrant populations. ---- Content of This Episode ---- 00:00 Episode Start 00:08 GOP getting its act together on immigration 03:13 Messaging that resonates with Hispanics 09:40 The forgotten issue: energy 12:02 Democrats’ losses are GOP’s gains by default 15:45 Reorienting GOP policies 21:38 Heartland visas and other ideas 24:07 Doom-loop problem solving 29:30 Making 2020 gains permanent 34:52 Going in the wrong direction 39:57 Border crisis 42:09 Social scan: High-speed rail meme gains speed 45:55 Good news: Sarah Silverman & Utah ---- Reading List ---- David Shor on Why Trump Was Good for the GOP and How Dems Can Win in 2022 (New York Magazine) https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2021/03/david-shor-2020-democrats-autopsy-hispanic-vote-midterms-trump-gop.html A Vexing Question for Democrats: What Drives Latino Men to Republicans (The New York Times) https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/05/us/politics/latino-voters-democrats.htmlVenezuelans are proof that immigrants aren’t GOP’s enemies (Orlando Sentinel) https://www.orlandosentinel.com/opinion/guest-commentary/os-op-venezuelan-immigrants-excel-20210309-m27dxsafvzbonlzth2jyuoeyru-story.htmlGen Z’s high-speed rail meme dream, explained (Vox) https://www.vox.com/2021/3/10/22303355/gen-z-high-speed-rail-biden-map-meme-buttigiegThe Future of the Latino Vote, If There Is Such a Thing (Reason) https://reason.com/2021/02/14/the-future-of-the-latino-vote-if-there-is-such-a-thing/---- Plugs for our Guest ---- Follow Daniel Di Martino on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DanielDiMartino

The Anti-Dystopians
Nationalize Gmail!: Climate Change, Critical Infrastructure, and the USPS

The Anti-Dystopians

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2021 57:30


Alina Utrata talks with Josh Lappen, a fellow Californian and environmental historian researching at Oxford University, who studies some of the most important technology there is: critical infrastructure. They discuss why hundreds of Elon Musks can't (and won't) solve climate change, the government funding and politics behind many technology entrepreneurs' businesses, why low-tech solutions and indigenous practices are critical sources of knowledge, and the surprising number of technological innovations enabled by the US Postal Service (including Amazon's e-commerce business and commercial flight). Plus, is PG&E really the worst company, what's going on with the Texas blackouts, and should the government give you an email (and a bank account)?Addendum from Josh: "When recognizing the climate benefits of indigenous land management, we need to stress that a purely technical approach, which seeks to identify knowledge and incorporate it into existing management regimes, is simultaneously inadequate, amoral, and probably counterproductive. As we stressed during the interview, climate change is a political question which presents problems of distribution that run deeper than its problems of budgeting. In places like California, indigenous land management regimes ended due to enslavement, removal, and genocide of the state's native peoples, and modern land management practices have long depended on ignoring that fact, and the experiences of people who live on the land in general. Durably solving climate change is not just about assembling new tools; it requires rebuilding social and political systems to avoid new iterations of extractivism. In the case of cultural land management practices, that means restoring indigenous communities' role in shaping and caring for the land."Mentioned in this podcast:By Josh: How Climate-Driven Disasters Threaten Climate ProgressBill Tripp, the director of natural resources and environmental policy for the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources, in the Guardian: “Our land was taken. But we still hold the knowledge of how to stop mega-fires.” As well as Jared Dahl Alder, “Cultural Fire on the Mountain: An Introduction to Native Cultural Burning" and Indigenous Conservation Practices Are Not a Monolith: Western cultural biases and a lack of engagement with Indigenous experts undermine studies of land stewardship.How California's firefighters are made up of incarcerated people who are paid $1 a day,An explainer on PG&E and California's (basically, annual) rolling blackouts and the recent Texas energy grid failures.If you're wondering why California doesn't have a train line between its two most populous cities, here's a good explainer on the High Speed Rail (spoiler alert: its local politics), more long view coverage from Ralph Vartabedian at the LA Times. Plus, why Elon Musk's Hyperloop literally won't solve anything.“It's the government, stupid.” Elon Musk is a state-made man. In case you didn't catch the number, Elon Musk ventures' Telsa, Solar City and SpaceX have received a total of $4.9 billion dollars from the government in tax breaks, grants and subsidies, and Tesla literally was not profitable until this year.For more on so-called libertarian tech entrepreneurs who make their fortunes contracting with Big Government, check out our previous Anti-Dystopians podcast about Peter Thiel with Andrew Granato (a mutual friend of me and Josh).More on the climate impacts of AI language modeling in the memo that Google fired Dr Timnit Gebru over, plus the environmental toll of a Netflix binge.For more on how Google buses and tech corporations are creating two-tier public/private infrastructure in the Bay, check out Inside a Secretive $250 Million Private Transit System Just for Techies.And, how Congress is Sabotaging Your Post Office. Plus a really interesting argument about the benefit of state-issues crypto-currencies aka why doesn't the Fed just give everyone a bank account?Books:Marianna Mazzucato's The Entrepreneurial StateWinifred Gallagher's How the Post Office Created AmericaTimothy Mitchell's Rule of ExpertsHenri Lefebvre's The Production of SpaceSusan Leigh Star's Ecologies of KnowledgeRichard White's The Organic MachineNowhere Land by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4148-nowhere-landLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The EcoPolitics Podcast
Episode 2.5: Global Ecopolitics After COVID-19: Social Movements and International ENGOs

The EcoPolitics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2021 44:40


There's no denying COVID-19 has had a major impact on the climate movement. After non-governmental organizations worked so hard to access global climate decision-making, being without the ability to organize protests and the like has left the movement disconnected from the major decision-makers again. But it's an important year for climate decisions. In this episode, we speak with Dr. Jen Allan, Lecturer in the School of Law and Politics at Cardiff University to get a better sense of how NGOs are navigating COVID, and the potential opportunities that may arise for climate decisions post-COVID.