Podcasts about Gregorian

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  • 402PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Gregorian

Latest podcast episodes about Gregorian

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
12.5.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 15:29


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 2nd Sunday in Advent, December 5th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Come Thou Long Expected Jesus," Charles Wesley Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Romans 13v11-12 Responsory Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Immaculate Mary (c.1905) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Stepping into a Joy Filled Life™ | Christian Mom, Christian Wife, Christian Woman, Faith, Mindset, Kingdom Mindset, Intenti
99. His Appointed Times // How to Apply the Hebrew Calendar and the Concept of Shabbat to your Life with Christine Vales

Stepping into a Joy Filled Life™ | Christian Mom, Christian Wife, Christian Woman, Faith, Mindset, Kingdom Mindset, Intenti

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 30:31


99. Today's podcast features a really special guest, the author of His Appointed Times, Christine Vales! Perhaps you've heard of her? She's well known for her simple, powerful “chalkboard” teachings on YouTube. What does she teach about? God's calendar!   When I first started learning about this topic, I simply couldn't get enough of Christine and her wisdom. You're going to absolutely love her AND… learn SO much! Tune in as Christine and I discuss the Hebrew Calendar in depth, including what it is, how it's different from the Gregorian calendar and tips for how we can begin to apply God's amazing timepiece to our life, starting today!  With Great Joy!  Katie ​​Find today's show notes and links at KatieHedrick.com/ChristineVales ————————— Faith Fueled Breakthrough, Katie's brand new, go-at-your-own-pace Life Coaching course is coming soon! This self-guided program will help you breakthrough from the junk in your past so you can live a more abundant future, as you step into your true identity and purpose.   If you've been waiting for a chance to experience Biblical-based life coaching at an affordable price, this is it. Don't miss the launch! Join the waitlist at FaithFueledBreakthrough.com  ————————— Life Coaching & Courses | KatieHedrickCoaching.com  FB Community | KatieHedrick.com/GrowthMindedMoms  Connect with Katie | Katie@KatieHedrick.com TikTok and IG | @KatieLynnHedrick

New Books Network
Crawford Gribben, "The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:44


Today Crawford Gribben joins us to talk about his new book, The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland (Oxford UP, 2021). Ireland has long been regarded as a 'land of saints and scholars'. Yet the Irish experience of Christianity has never been simple or uncomplicated. The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland describes the emergence, long dominance, sudden division, and recent decline of Ireland's most important religion, as a way of telling the history of the island and its peoples. Throughout its long history, Christianity in Ireland has lurched from crisis to crisis. Surviving the hostility of earlier religious cultures and the depredations of Vikings, evolving in the face of Gregorian reformation in the 11th and 12th centuries and more radical protestant renewal from the 16th century, Christianity has shaped in foundational ways how the Irish have understood themselves and their place in the world. And the Irish have shaped Christianity, too. Their churches have staffed some of the religion's most important institutions and developed some of its most popular ideas. But the Irish church, like the island, is divided. After 1922, a border marked out two jurisdictions with competing religious politics. The southern state turned to the Catholic church to shape its social mores, until it emerged from an experience of sudden-onset secularization to become one of the most progressive nations in Europe. The northern state moved more slowly beyond the protestant culture of its principal institutions, but in a similar direction of travel. In 2021, fifteen hundred years on from the birth of Saint Columba, Christian Ireland appears to be vanishing. But its critics need not relax any more than believers ought to despair. After the failure of several varieties of religious nationalism, what looks like irredeemable failure might actually be a second chance. In the ruins of the church, new Columbas and Patricks shape the rise of another Christian Ireland. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Crawford Gribben, "The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:44


Today Crawford Gribben joins us to talk about his new book, The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland (Oxford UP, 2021). Ireland has long been regarded as a 'land of saints and scholars'. Yet the Irish experience of Christianity has never been simple or uncomplicated. The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland describes the emergence, long dominance, sudden division, and recent decline of Ireland's most important religion, as a way of telling the history of the island and its peoples. Throughout its long history, Christianity in Ireland has lurched from crisis to crisis. Surviving the hostility of earlier religious cultures and the depredations of Vikings, evolving in the face of Gregorian reformation in the 11th and 12th centuries and more radical protestant renewal from the 16th century, Christianity has shaped in foundational ways how the Irish have understood themselves and their place in the world. And the Irish have shaped Christianity, too. Their churches have staffed some of the religion's most important institutions and developed some of its most popular ideas. But the Irish church, like the island, is divided. After 1922, a border marked out two jurisdictions with competing religious politics. The southern state turned to the Catholic church to shape its social mores, until it emerged from an experience of sudden-onset secularization to become one of the most progressive nations in Europe. The northern state moved more slowly beyond the protestant culture of its principal institutions, but in a similar direction of travel. In 2021, fifteen hundred years on from the birth of Saint Columba, Christian Ireland appears to be vanishing. But its critics need not relax any more than believers ought to despair. After the failure of several varieties of religious nationalism, what looks like irredeemable failure might actually be a second chance. In the ruins of the church, new Columbas and Patricks shape the rise of another Christian Ireland. Jana Byars is the Academic Director of Netherlands: International Perspectives on Sexuality and Gender. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
11.21.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 16:45


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 34th Sunday in Ordinary Time, November 21st, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, Folk) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Ask Father Josh (Your Catholic Question and Answer Podcast)
Offering Gregorian Masses for the Deceased and Experiencing Disabilities

Ask Father Josh (Your Catholic Question and Answer Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 24:12


Fr. Josh answers questions about the Church's tradition of offering Gregorian Masses for the deceased, and whether a physical or mental disability can affect one's road to his or her vocation. Snippet From the Show The Sacred Congregation on Indulgences has declared that "the offering of Gregorian Masses has a special efficacy for obtaining from God the speedy deliverance of a suffering soul, and that this is a pious and reasonable belief of the faithful." Text “askfrjosh” to 33-777 to subscribe to Fr. Josh's shownotes or go to www.AscensionPress.com/askfatherjosh Submit your questions and feedback to Fr.Josh by filling out a form at www.ascensionpress.com/askfatherjosh

Sober is Dope
Prayer For Protection Against Evil and Addiction with Gregorian Hymnal

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 3:11


Prayer for Protection https://www.catholicwarriors.com/pages/warfare_prayers.htm Dear Lord Jesus, thank you for sharing with me your wonderful ministry of healing and deliverance. Thank you for the healings that I have experienced today. I realize that the sickness of evil is more than my humanity can bear, so I ask you to cleanse me of any sadness, negative thinking, or despair that I may have picked up while interceding for others. If I have been tempted to anger, impatience, or lust, cleanse me of those temptations, and replace them with your love, joy, and peace. If any evil spirits have attached themselves to me or oppressed me in any way, I command you, spirits of earth, fire, water, the netherworld, or the evil forces of nature, to depart now and go straight to Jesus Christ, for him to deal with you as he wills. Come Holy Spirit, renew me, fill me with your love, peace, and joy. Strengthen me where I feel weak and clothe me with your light. Fill me with your life. Lord Jesus, please send your holy angels to minister to me and protect me from all forms of sickness, harm, and accidents. I thank you and praise you my Lord, God, and King. Sober is Dope podcast, is a safe place for addicts, the sober curious, and anyone dealing with addiction, depression, sadness, loss, and pain. We do not judge and all are welcomed. Find free prayers, tips, strategies, and motivation that can help transform your life. I am POP Buchanan. Thank you for joining our family. #prayer #god #soberisdope #sobriety #spiritualwarfare #willsmith

Why I Hate this Album
#136 - Jars of Clay - Jars of Clay

Why I Hate this Album

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 109:24


This week Tim tries furiously to convert Garrett while Garrett tricks Tim into forsaking his god. We also talk about Jars of Clay and their debut studio album Jars of Clay, released October 24, 1995. In this episode we discuss blasphemy, donkeys, horse emissions, forgiveness, Gregorian chants, crickets, art, Joe Buck, floods, Dawson's Creek and so much more! Hatepod.com | TW: @AlbumHatePod | IG: @hatePod | hatePodMail@gmail.com  Episode Outline: Top of the show "Do you hate it?" Personal History History of the Band General Thoughts Song by Song - What do they mean!?! How Did it Do Reviews Post Episode "Do you hate it?"

Larry Huch Ministries Podcast
Kesliv - What Is It and Why Is It Important? - November, 7 2021

Larry Huch Ministries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 41:20


Kislev is a month which occurs in November–December on the Gregorian calendar and is sometimes known as the month of dreams. The name of the month derives from Akkadian kislimu. Pator Lydia Sigman shares more information in her message.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
11.7.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, November 7th 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: 2 Timothy 2v8, 11-13 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer (Latin) Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

The Pearl of Great Price
Nov 2 The Theology of Failure according to John Navone

The Pearl of Great Price

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 7:19


One of the most intriguing works of Christology is the Theology of Failure by John Navone. An edition was published today in 1974 and it has had a lasting influence on Pope Francis

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
10.24.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 16:28


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time, October 24th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, Folk) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Tudor Time Machine Podcast
Tudor Time Machine Episode 36

Tudor Time Machine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 36:46


In which January 1st  is celebrated, the queen evens the score and the Countess of Lennox writes verse.   After the story, Jessica and Gage discuss the messy switch from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar, Tudor festivals, and the lords of misrule. 

Composers Datebook
A quirky piece by Marga Richter

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Let's face it. Brevity and wit are not always qualities one associates with new music. But today we offer a sample: this comic overture is less than 5 minutes long, and opens, as you just heard, with a Fellini-esque duet for piccolo and contrabassoon. The overture is entitled “Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark,” and is a rather burlesque celebration of modern theoretical physics. Its alliterative title evokes those subatomic particles known as “quarks” that, we're told, make up our universe. And, since this music changes time signature so often, perhaps Heisenberg's “uncertainty principle” is thrown in for good measure. The music is by Marga Richter, who was born on this date in 1926 in Reedsburg, Wisconsin. Richter received her early music training in Minneapolis, and then moved to New York's Juilliard School. By the time of her death in 2020, she had composed over 75 works including an opera and two ballets, as well as two piano concertos and a variety of solo, chamber and symphonic works. "Composing,” said Richter,” is my response to a constant desire to transform my perceptions and emotions into music … Music is the way I speak to the silence of the universe." Music Played in Today's Program Marga Richter (b. 1926) — Quantum Quirks of a Quick Quaint Quark (Czech Radio Orchestra; Gerard Schwarz) MMC 2006 On This Day Births 1879 - French composer, pianist, and writer Joseph Canteloube, in Annonay (near Tournon); 1885 - Austrian composer and musicologist Egon Wellesz, in Vienna; 1921 - English composer (Sir) Malcolm Arnold, in Northampton; 1926 - American composer Marga Richter, in Reedsburg, Wisconsin; 1949 - Israeli composer Shulamit Ran, in Tel Aviv; Deaths 1662 - English composer Henry Lawes, age 66, in London; Premieres 1784 - Gretry: opera, "Richard Coeur de Lion" (Richard the Lionhearted), in Paris; 1858 - Offenbach: comic opera, "Orphée aux enfers" (Orpheus in the Underworld), in Paris; 1900 - Rimsky-Korsakov: opera "The Tale of Tsar Saltan," at the Solodovnikov Theatre in Moscow, with Mikhail Ippolitov-Ivanov conducting (Gregorian date: Nov. 3); 1921 - Third (and final) version of Sibelius: Symphony No. 5, in Helsinki under the composer's direction; Sibelius conducted the first performances of two earlier versions of this symphony in Helsinki on Dec. 8, 1915 and Dec. 14, 1916; 1926 - Nielsen: Flute Concerto (first version), in Paris, conducted by Emil Telmányi (the composer's son-in-law), with Holger Gilbert-Jespersen the soloist; Nielsen revised this score and premiered the final version in Oslo on November 9, 1926, again with Gilbert-Jespersen as the soloist; 1933 - Gershwin: musical "Let 'Em Eat Cake," at the Imperial Theater in New York City; 1941 - Copland: Piano Sonata, in Buenos Aires, by the composer; 1956 - Menotti: madrigal-fable "The Unicorn, the Gordon and the Manticore," at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C.; 1984 - Ellen Taaffe Zwilich: Double Quartet for strings, at a concert of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, by the Emerson Quartet and friends. 2004 - Danielpour: "Songs of Solitude" (to texts of W.B. Yeats), at the Kimmel Center's Verizon Hall in Philadelphia, by baritone Thomas Hampson and the Philadelphia Orchestra, with Daniel Robertson conducting; Others 1739 - Handel completes in London his Concerto Grosso in D, Op. 6, no. 5 and possibly his Concerto Grosso in F, Op. 6, no. 9 as well (see Julian date: Oct. 10). Links and Resources On Marga Richter An interview with Richter

New Books in Literature
Meredith Hall, "Beneficence" (Godine, 2020)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:37


Today I talked to Meredith Hall about her new novel Beneficence (Godine, 2020). A beautiful family is torn apart by a shocking loss, and three of its members blame themselves. It's the middle of the twentieth century, their farm in Maine needs tending, and the seasons move swiftly with specific chores and tasks. The cows need calving, the chickens need feeding, the laundry needs washing, the rugs need airing, the food needs preparing. But each member of the family is numb from their huge loss, and they go their separate ways, telling small bits of the story as their lives unfold. Their dreams and hopes change, and some decisions have harsh consequences, but slowly, through the changing seasons, they struggle to make their way back to the family they once loved. Meredith Hall taught in the MFA program at the University of New Hampshire for many years. In her late fifties, she wrote an essay that won the Pushcart Prize, and on the basis of that encouragement, she was awarded the Gift of Freedom Award, which provided two years of dedicated writing. Her memoir Without a Map was named a best book of the year by Kirkus and BookSense and was both a NYT bestseller and an Elle magazine Reader's Pick of the Year. She was a recipient of the 2004 Gift of Freedom Award from A Room of Her Own Foundation and her work has appeared in Five Points, The Gettysburg Review, The Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, The New York Times, and many other publications. Hall writes while listening to Gregorian chant, and when she is not writing or reading, she is outdoors, finding beautiful wild places. She spends her time in Northern California and Maine, so beauty is available all around her, vital sustenance. She loves and needs the arts and spends each winter in the Bay Area gorging on performances of contemporary dance, modern and classical music, and drama. She wanders museums and galleries a lot. Her family and friends are at the center, always. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Meredith Hall, "Beneficence" (Godine, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 34:37


Today I talked to Meredith Hall about her new novel Beneficence (Godine, 2020). A beautiful family is torn apart by a shocking loss, and three of its members blame themselves. It's the middle of the twentieth century, their farm in Maine needs tending, and the seasons move swiftly with specific chores and tasks. The cows need calving, the chickens need feeding, the laundry needs washing, the rugs need airing, the food needs preparing. But each member of the family is numb from their huge loss, and they go their separate ways, telling small bits of the story as their lives unfold. Their dreams and hopes change, and some decisions have harsh consequences, but slowly, through the changing seasons, they struggle to make their way back to the family they once loved. Meredith Hall taught in the MFA program at the University of New Hampshire for many years. In her late fifties, she wrote an essay that won the Pushcart Prize, and on the basis of that encouragement, she was awarded the Gift of Freedom Award, which provided two years of dedicated writing. Her memoir Without a Map was named a best book of the year by Kirkus and BookSense and was both a NYT bestseller and an Elle magazine Reader's Pick of the Year. She was a recipient of the 2004 Gift of Freedom Award from A Room of Her Own Foundation and her work has appeared in Five Points, The Gettysburg Review, The Kenyon Review, The Southern Review, The New York Times, and many other publications. Hall writes while listening to Gregorian chant, and when she is not writing or reading, she is outdoors, finding beautiful wild places. She spends her time in Northern California and Maine, so beauty is available all around her, vital sustenance. She loves and needs the arts and spends each winter in the Bay Area gorging on performances of contemporary dance, modern and classical music, and drama. She wanders museums and galleries a lot. Her family and friends are at the center, always. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Say Yes to Holiness
Episode #91--"The Singing Organist"--1 on 1 Podcast Conversation with Whitney Maslak

Say Yes to Holiness

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 38:37


In this 1 on 1 podcast conversation, Christina has the privilege of speaking with Whitney Maslak, Singer, Musician, and Recording Artist. Whitney and I connected through my Say Yes to Holiness website, and our conversation focused upon music, particularly the release of Whitnek's upcoming album. Based in the Rocky Mountains near Yellowstone National Park, Whitney Maslak is a classically-trained vocalist and multi-instrumentalist who is inspiring audiences throughout the world with her interpretation of classical sacred music. Dubbed “The Singing Organist,” Whitney accompanies her vocals herself not only with pipe organ, but also with acoustic guitar and piano. The sacred music she records covers many centuries—from medieval Gregorian chant and early music, to classical sacred arias, to beloved traditional hymns. Whitney's debut single, O God Beyond All Praising, was released on February 12, 2021. This beautiful hymn set to Gustav Holst's theme from the “Jupiter” movement of The Planets is set to be a fan favorite for years to come. In the meantime, Whitney is working on a full-length album of other traditional hymns which is planned to be released later in 2021. Along with working on her first album, Whitney also devotes a large amount of her time to being an organist and cantor at her local parish, providing music for weekend Masses as well as funerals and weddings. In addition, she provides lessons to both children and adults in piano, guitar, and voice. Whitney loves bringing inspiring music to a world that so desperately needs to find hope. She has discovered that sacred music carries the message of Christ's love and peace in a way that nothing else can, and she is so grateful to be able to share her music with people all over the world. May this podcast help inspire, encourage and accompany you to continue doing WHATEVER IT TAKES so we can tell the Master of Death, “Not Today!” You can find out more about Whitney here: https://www.whitneymaslak.com/ You can watch videos of her music here: https://www.whitneymaslak.com/videos Or you can purchase her music here: https://www.whitneymaslak.com/shop And you can also watch this podcast on the Say Yes to Holiness YouTube channel --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sayyestoholiness/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sayyestoholiness/support

More of a Comment, Really...
Harry Gregson-Williams (The Last Duel)

More of a Comment, Really...

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 23:20


Grammy and Golden Globe-nominated composer Harry Gregson-Williams is no stranger to director Ridley Scott: First working with his brother, the late Tony Scott, on films like Enemy of the State and Spy Game, Gregson-Williams began working with Ridley on Kingdom of Heaven, and has scored several other films with him since (including his sprawling score for The Martian). But his latest score -- one of two with Ridley this year; he'll be providing the music for House of Gucci in a couple months' time -- takes them from the Red Planet to 14th-century France in The Last Duel, which is currently in theaters this weekend. Telling the story of the last true royally-sanctioned duel in medieval French history, Scott's latest is a Rashomon-like fable that flits between the perspectives of the three people involved: brutish knight Jean de Carrouges (Matt Damon), libertine squire Jacques Le Gris (Adam Driver), and Jean's wife Marguerite (Jodie Comer), whose alleged rape by Le Gris brings the two former friends to blows. While the score taps into the big, spectacular motions we'd expect from the director of Gladiator and Kingdom of Heaven, Gregson-Williams' approach plays with perspective in much the same way the film does. Themes overlap and warp depending on who's telling the story at any given moment, and certain scenes are scored in vastly different ways as we see them through new eyes. The medieval musical trappings are there, from countertenor voices to Gregorian chant evocative of the Catholic Church, whose reach informs much of the film's drama. But they also shake things up with guitar, taiko drum, and a host of other unconventional instruments that hone in on The Last Duel's intriguing streak of modernity -- a sharp reminder that the shame and pressure Marguerite experiences as a result of her speaking out against her rapist is hardly the stuff of history. I had the pleasure of sitting down with Gregson-Williams to talk about the unconventional modes of The Last Duel's score, his long working relationship with Ridley Scott, and what we might be able to look forward to in House of Gucci. The Last Duel is currently playing in theaters, and Harry Gregson-Williams' soundtrack is available on your preferred music streaming service courtesy of 20th Century Studios.

The Pearl of Great Price
Oct 15 How we measure time - Pope Gregory's Calendar

The Pearl of Great Price

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:10


The Gregorian calendar is now almost universally used. This is the story about how Pope Gregory promulgated it after some revisions were made of the Julian Calendar which slightly overestimated the solar orbit of planet Earth

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
10.10.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 17:48


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 28th Sunday in Ordinary Time, October 10th, 2021 Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: 2 Timothy 2v8, 11-13 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer (Latin) Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Composers Datebook
Torke's "Overnight Mail"

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Yes, Juliet, a rose by any other name may smell as sweet, but a catchy title alone can't help a piece of music that's uninspired or just plain boring. An intriguing title, however can sometimes help put audiences into a more receptive frame of mind – or at least pique their curiosity. From the very beginning of his career in the 1980s, the young American composer Michael Torke had the knack of coming up with quite evocative titles. His early works had titles like “Ecstatic Orange” and “Bright Blue Music.” A piece composed for the 1994 Olympic Games in Atlanta was titled “Javelin,” and this music, an orchestral suite that premiered in Amsterdam on today's date in 1997, was titled “Overnight Mail.” And each of the three movements of his orchestral suite had an ADDITIONAL title, as Torke explains: “The titles of the suite's three movements, Priority, Standard, and Saturday Delivery present the options for expediency when sending things, but musically, they represent different reactions to an abstract compositional problem I set up for myself … For me this was important, because I want to write music that follows all the old rules of voice leading and counterpoint, but sounds fresh.” Music Played in Today's Program Michael Torke (b. 1961) — Overnight Mail (Orkest de Volharding; Jurjen Hempel, cond.) Argo 455 684 On This Day Births 1673 - French flutist and composer Jacques-Martin Hottetere, in Paris; Deaths 1977 - Russian composer Alexander Tcherepnin, age 78, in Paris; Premieres 1918 - Holst: "The Planets," at Queen's Hall, London; 1921 - Sigmund Romberg: operetta "Blossom Time," in New York City; 1949 - Bliss: opera "The Olympians," in London; 1968 - Henze: Piano Concerto No. 2, in Bielefeld, Germany; 1969 - Shostakovich: Symphony No. 14 (to poems of Lorca, Apollinaire, Küchelbecker, and Rilke), in Leningrad, by the Moscow Chamber Orchestra, Rudolf Barshai conducting, with vocal soloists Galina Vishnevskaya and Yevgeny Vladimirov; 1983 - Lutoslawski: Symphony No. 3, in Chicago; 1997 - Michael Torke: "Overnight Mail" for chamber ensemble, in Carre, Amsterdam, by the Orkest de Volharding, Jurjen Hempel conducting; 2000 - Tan Dun: "Crouching Tiger Concerto," at the Barbican Festival in London, by the London Sinfonietta; Others 1739 - Handel completes in London his Concerto Grosso in G, Op. 6, no. 1 (Gregorian date: Oct. 10); 1789 - Mozart completes in Vienna his Quintet in A for clarinet and strings, K. 581, written for clarinetist Anton Stadler, who gave the first public performance of the new work in December of that year. Links and Resources On Torke

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
9.26.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 16:37


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 26th Sunday in Ordinary Time, September 26th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, Folk) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

UBM Unleavened Bread Ministries

Great Shakings Bring Man-child Revival (2) (Audio) David Eells - 9/22/21   Something 100 Times Worse Than CV-19 Coming  William Steenland - 9/21/21 (David's notes in red)   (First I want to say that today I will share a lot of circumstantial evidence but time will tell what is fact. It is necessary to warn you a storm is coming.)   I had a short dream that there was a large storm coming. I was shown a map and the top hemisphere of the entire globe was consumed in this storm. From Russia to the west coast of North America. I'm not sure if this is connected or not but that night as I was sleeping I heard the words, "100 times worse than Co/vid.” (A storm could be any judgment, but the Co/vid plague of the vaccines can be multiplied. Back at Wuhan when this started it was proven that Co/vid was severely aggravated by 5G that had just been turned on in the major cities where people were dropping dead. I think the Lord showed me that they will turn 5G up to kill the people who are infected with Co/vid or at least those who have the vac/cin/ation which is far worse. C-19 infected the Lungs and 5G radiation magnified this to a death sentence. The DS are spraying spike protein nanoparticles on cities, especially in red states and large gatherings of right wing conservatives to infect them according to Mike Adams the Health Ranger. The combination of these things could certainly give us a plague 100 times worse since this would parallel Wuhan. The DS is planning a worse plague and/or event in the near future. Biden just gave a speech at the U.N. general assembly in which he predicted another pandemic coming among other dire predictions with weather and 'climate change' which the DS has been doing with their weather warfare around the world on governments that won't submit.) I believe Sept. 24, 9/24/21 could be a pivotal date for happenings that will bring a great storm, including an spiritual and possibly a physical earthquake between opposing sides. Earthquakes are a tearing of the earth between two sides. For one thing it is an important day that will cause many to know that Trump is officially coming back, even though he never really left. Trump made a deal a few days back with the DS that there would be no fal/se fla/gs if he withheld declassing their crimes on the Emergency Broadcast System.    On September 18 in Restored Republic Whiplash347 stated: Why do you think the White Hats telegraphed that the AZ Audit results will be released next Friday, September 24th? Wouldn't that be an invitation to the Cabal to plan Fal/se Fla/gs for then? The date is firmly stated because the Cabal has made a SURRENDER DEAL. The Cabal caved to Trump's threat of launching the EBS this weekend if The Cabal & media failed to show the AZ Audit results that were due to come out Fri. 17 Sept.  To make the deal, all Trump had to do was delay the AZ Audit results for one week, and no EBS this weekend. (This deal of no FF's is up on the 24th, which enables them to do more FF's so the 25th could bring the horrendous FF's the DS have been threatening.) In return, Durham got to indict Sussmann on Friday without a False Flag distraction, and any FF's by the Cabal going forward will break the deal and the EBS will immediately launch. This should prevent False Flag attempts at the Sept 18 ‘protest'. Additionally, the deal appears to include allowing Durham to go forward, unobstructed, in his Fisagate indictments, which will include Obama. The Art Of The Deal. Negotiations were indeed real. In summary..., on Sat. 18 Sept. the Cabal surrendered in no coincidence with with activation of Trump's Executive Order 13959 Declaration of War against Big Corporations. Now going forward any False Flags by the Cabal and/or if the Mass Media failed to cover 2020 Election Fraud, Co/vid Vax hoax events, or not allow Durham to go forward, unobstructed, in his Fisagate indictments, which would include Obama, it would break the deal and immediately launch the Emergency Broadcast System and Martial Law worldwide.   On Fri. 24 Sept. 2020 Election Fraud exposed with release of Arizona Audit, while Georgia, Minn, Penn and other key states were looking at election fraud. President Trump on audits: “That train is moving along the track very rapidly.” The Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case to reinstate Trump. https://t.me/Jeanine_Pirro_Official/153   Water Event expected at any time: A volcano on LaPalma Island, of the Canary Islands, Spain was causing a land detachment the size of Manhattan Island that could easily slide into the Atlantic Ocean, generating a Tsunami  – that would strike the US East Coast seven hours later, possibly inundating several miles on the US coastline under tens of feet of water and destroying almost everything in its path as it comes ashore.   All of these attacks are possibilities of the great storm to stop the Alliance from destroying the DS.    Restored Republic 9/21/21- Q said: “My fellow Americans, the Storm is upon us. Trust the Plan.” (We have been told for years these words would be spoken as a sign for everything to begin.)  General McInerney said: Major False Flags incoming say Intelligence Agency Whistleblowers. These events will make 9/11 look like nothing. Beware of what you eat, drink and consume.” …(This is probably because they are talking of putting the vac/cin/ation spike proteins in the lettuce and spinach, and other vegetables etc. Pray over your food and mean it.  Many do not understand why dates set by the Alliance have not been met.  The date part is disinformation to bring out of hiding the DS. They build up a date publicly and purposely to provoke the DS to try to stop them because this thing is devastating them.  Then the NSA and military intelligence is watching them do the crime and then they arrest more of the DS. It has worked well. I believe we are coming to a date that I believe will not be moved, 9/24 which will lead to an above ground war with many kinds of weapons, hence we include 9/25.) Nick's Intel Report - 9/21/21 EBS SET, READY TO GO. 9/24/21 is a good target date for the military to announce: (I am not sure they will announce anything but they are working towards this now.)   … that operation “warp speed” was code for military takeover   … the return of President Trump   … the crimes of the Dems   … the fraud of the elections   … indictment of more cabalist   … the arrest of fake Fauci for crimes against humanity   … fraudulent use of $3m given to Wuhan lab   … the continuation of gain of function research   … the finding and disarming of 11 cabal nukes used as leverage by cabal to prevent their arrests   … the arrest of all former cabal and Federal Reserve members for treason   This is all in play, Fauci has already been arrested.   All will culminate on the 24th?    Earthquakes and Shakings on September 24th/25th? The news is saying that the Arizona election audit results will be announced on Sept. 24th and that Trump is having a rally in Georgia the next day on the 25th. We are also hearing that Sept. 24th will be the new Christmas? Alliance handing out gifts to the DS or giving out GCR gifts possibly? 9/24 is definitely a beginning of a division of the land or people, a polarizing event that could be a spiritual earthquake and we are not discounting the possibility of major natural earthquakes as we will see. Eve said: I asked if 9/24 could be a physical earthquake or a spiritual 'shaking of men' and received Isa. 31:5. My finger was on the phrase, “he will pass over”. (Passover was a time of destruction for the enemies of God's people and a protection for those under the blood, which many apostate Christians and factious people will find they dont have.). What stood out to me in the text was the phrase, “flesh and not spirit” in verse 3. (1-9 in context) Woe to them that go down to Egypt for help, and rely on horses, and trust in chariots because they are many, and in horsemen because they are very strong, but they look not unto the Holy One of Israel, neither seek Jehovah! ("Cursed is the man that trusteth in man and maketh the flesh his arm”) 2 Yet he also is wise, and will bring evil, and will not call back his words, but will arise against the house of the evil-doers (Apostate Christianity), and against the help of them that work iniquity. (The DS false government they ignorantly pledge allegiance to) 3 Now the Egyptians are men, and not God; and their horses flesh, and not spirit: and when Jehovah shall stretch out his hand, both he that helpeth shall stumble, and he that is helped shall fall, and they all shall be consumed together.    4 For thus saith Jehovah unto me, As the lion and the young lion growling over his prey, if a multitude of shepherds (the religious leaders against DS) be called forth against him, will not be dismayed at their voice, nor abase himself for the noise of them: so will Jehovah of hosts come down to fight upon mount Zion, and upon the hill thereof. (The Brides prayers and spiritual warfare) 5 As birds hovering, so will Jehovah of hosts protect Jerusalem; he will protect and deliver it, he will pass over and preserve it. (The Brides Passover) 6 Turn ye unto him from whom ye have deeply revolted, O children of Israel. (The Church) 7 For in that day they shall cast away every man his idols of silver, and his idols of gold, which your own hands have made unto you for a sin. 8 And the Assyrian (the DS and Church factions) shall fall by the sword, not of man; and the sword, not of men, shall devour him; (The sword NOT OF MEN sounds like a natural catastrophe will be used.) and he shall flee from the sword, and his young men shall become subject to task work. (DS will lose this war after they have drained the swamp of apostate Christianity) 9 And his rock shall pass away by reason of terror, and his princes shall be dismayed at the ensign, saith Jehovah, whose fire is in Zion, and his furnace in Jerusalem. David; I asked the Lord give me a 'miracle answer' if an earthquake will hit America on Sept. 24/25 and I received by faith at random,  Pro. 10:25 (in context 24-25 the two days)  The fear of the wicked, it shall come upon him; And the desire of the righteous shall be granted. 25  When the whirlwind passeth, the wicked is no more; But the righteous is an everlasting foundation. ('When the whirlwind passeth' made me think "look at when it hits in 24". My note that I wrote next to verse 25 early in Biden's false presidency was, "Will Biden be overthrown by shaking of P-X? - 2 heads yes - Hag 2:22”. Two is a number representing division, and in the text is a great earthquake dividing the earth. And today is the 22nd. Planet X is in our solar system now according to astronomers, and could be what will cause a physical earthquake on the 24th/25th. It will at least be a sign of a spiritual earthquake and could be both.)   A possibility for judgment on Sept. 24th/25th and a great distraction is the scenario in the Canary Islands, but time will tell. There have been many earthquake swarms over there again recently and it is now erupting quite a bit and has scientists concerned. If there is an earthquake and/or volcanic explosion that causes the western part of the island to slide into the Atlantic ocean, it will create a devastating Tsunami that would destroy the East coast of the U.S.  The timing of this is not an accident and the DS is well able to accomplish this. Video links below: La Palma Earthquakes and Cumbre Vieja Volcano Erupting Now 9/19/21 The Future Tsunami That Could Destroy the East Coast Megatsunami Scenario - La Palma Landslide   It is important to understand that the beast destruction at this time is temporary to give the people of God relative peace from the beast governments for the Man-child reformers to retrain the Church during the first 3 1/2 years of the Tribulation so they will be ready to spiritually survive and prosper in the war the beast wages against them in the second 3 1/2 years of Tribulation after the full Mark of the Beast. The vac/cin/ation is a prelude to the real mark in mid-trib.The great shaking is accompanied by the coming of Jesus manifested in the Man-child reformers by Word and Spirit and the change of fortunes for God's people as they go into the wilderness. It is all coming soon and we need to be ready. Isa. 64:1-4, Oh that thou wouldest rend the heavens, that thou wouldest come down, that the mountains might quake at thy presence, 2 as when fire kindleth the brushwood, and the fire causeth the waters to boil; to make thy name known to thine adversaries, that the nations may tremble at thy presence! 3 When thou didst terrible things which we looked not for, thou camest down, the mountains quaked at thy presence. 4 For from of old men have not heard, nor perceived by the ear, neither hath the eye seen a God besides thee, who worketh for him that waiteth for him.   As always we see in part and prophesy in part. The following are attempts to make sense of the happenings in the world around us, and current news, in light of Biblical prophesy.The Jewish 9/24, a Type for the Church's Gregorian 9/24? The Jewish Feast of Hanukkah typifies the time of the anointing of the Man-child at the beginning of the Tribulation in order to spread that anointing throughout the Bride and the larger Church. Hanukkah is celebrated for eight days and nights, starting on the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar [in 2021 it runs from Nov. 28-Dec. 6]. It celebrates a time in the second century BCE when a small group of Jews with little arms led by Judah the Maccabee, conquered the greatest DS army of their time and drove them from their land, reclaiming the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. When they found themselves without enough holy oil to rededicate their temple from a time of Greek defilement. When they wanted to light the Temple's Menorah (the seven-branched candelabrum representing the seven Churches), they found only a single cruse of holy oil. They lit the menorah and that one-day supply of oil lasted for eight days until they prepared more oil so God multiplied that oil for them. The Hellenists were Jews who sided with their DS like many apostate “Christians” ignorantly do today. I do not expect the First-fruits Man-child will be anointed with the holy oil during the literal Feast of Hanukkah but God is still about to fulfill that sign in the days to come by rededicating the New Testament Temple of His people and multiplying the oil of the First-fruits Man-child in the seven branched Church. As Jesus multiplied His anointing through His apostolic witnesses to the larger Church, so the Man-child will multiply that anointing through end-time witnesses to miraculously restore the light of the Church. ...On the evening of the 24th of Kislev begins Hanukkah when Haggai was told by the Lord that He would bless them "from this day" by shaking the heavens and earth and breaking the power of the nations over them, sending them into the wilderness tribulation behind the Man-child reformers. (Hag.2:10) In the four and twentieth [day] of the ninth [month-Kislev] [9/24], in the second year of Darius, came the word of Jehovah by Haggai the prophet... (19) ...from this day will I bless [you] (Those in Jerusalem the Bride).   (20) And the word of Jehovah came the second time unto Haggai in the four and twentieth [day] of the month (Kislev 9/24), saying, (21) Speak to Zerubbabel, governor of Judah (the Man-child), saying, I will shake the heavens and the earth; {22} and I will overthrow the throne of kingdoms; (Kingdoms of the world ruled by DS will fall to the new One World Order.) and I will destroy the strength of the kingdoms of the nations; and I will overthrow the chariots, and those that ride in them; and the horses and their riders shall come down, every one by the sword of his brother. (This is as when Egypt's power, as the DS power, was broken over the called out ones of Israel, representing the Church, as they went into the wilderness tribulation to learn to walk by faith in God. At this time Israel was led by their Man-child, Moses, who is being typed here as the first-fruits leadership, Zerubbabel, meaning "born from Babylon".)  (23) In that day, saith Jehovah of hosts, will I take thee, O Zerubbabel, my servant, the son of Shealtiel, saith Jehovah, and will make thee as a signet; for I have chosen thee, saith Jehovah of hosts. Notice "In that day" of Hanukkah, Zerubbabel will be a signet, which is a ring or seal of authority such as Mordecai and Joseph received from the King. The man-child will come with the authority of God to bring God's people out of bondage to the world and through the wilderness tribulation to their heavenly Promised Land. Also on this day the foundation of the Lord's house, not made with man's hands, is laid again after a great falling away since the time of the Apostles. (Hag.2:18) Consider, I pray you, from this day and backward, from the four and twentieth day of the ninth [month], since the day that the foundation of Jehovah's temple was laid, consider it. It is through the shaking of the nations in the tribulation that God's "desired" people come out from among them to become the temple of peace. (2:7) and I will shake all nations; and the precious things (Hebrew: desired) of all nations shall come (The Lord in Temple of His people); and I will fill this house with glory, saith Jehovah of hosts.  (8) The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith Jehovah of hosts. (Which He will supply through Cyrus/Trump) (9) The latter glory of this house shall be greater than the former, saith Jehovah of hosts; and in this place will I give peace, saith Jehovah of hosts. (In the former rain, Jesus, the Man-child, laid the foundation of the former glory house.) (1 Cor.3:11) For other foundation can no man lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ. (So also in the latter rain, Jesus in Zerubbabel, as a type of the Man-child reformers, will lay the foundation of the latter, greater glory house. (Zec.4:9) The hands of Zerubbabel have laid the foundation of this house; his hands shall also finish it; and thou shalt know that Jehovah of hosts hath sent me unto you". Notice this verse is saying that it is the Lord who is coming in the Zerubbabel Man-child to rebuild the house of God. So now we have discovered a type under the Jewish calendar for 9/24. The Jewish type is literal and a type for the spiritual Jews of the New Testament. Let's examine the same text in the light of 9/24 on the Gregorian Churches calendar.   We have discussed the day of Sep. 24th for years as a possible day for the approach of the Dragon AKA Planet X and shaking of the Earth because of Haggai's prophecy. (But we were never sure of the year. However everything points to the tribulation starting very soon. We are seeing and will see the passover where those not under the blood are dying of a plague just like it was in Egypt. It was then that they received funds from the Egyptians which Cyrus also did when he freed God's people from bondage. Trump is about to do the same thing with NESARA/GESARA so the timing seems to be now. On another note when they left Egypt the Man-child Moses parted the Red Sea and closed it on their enemies, which in our day would be the DS and the factions against Christianity. Then on the other side of the Red Sea, Paul said they were baptized in the cloud which is the Holy Spirit. They indeed had a great celebration at that time. Then they went into the wilderness, which is the tribulation according to Rev 12 & 17.)  Hag. 2:18 Consider I pray you from this day and backward from the four and twentieth day of the ninth month (A Hebrew day but since the gentile Church is grafted into the olive tree of those circumcised in heart the Gregorian date for 9/24 could be applicable) since the day that the foundation of the Lords temple was laid, consider it. (9/24 begins the building of the temple of God's people)  {19} Is the seed yet in the barn? Yea the vine and the fig tree and the pomegranate and the olive tree have not brought forth; from this day will I bless you. (What day?) {20} And the word of Jehovah came the second time unto Haggai in the four and twentieth day of the (ninth) month, saying, {21} Speak to Zerubbabel (A type of the Man-child), governor of Judah, saying, I will shake the heavens and the earth (Due to the approach of the Dragon planet Nibiru, P-X stresses helped out by the DS); {22} and I will overthrow the throne of kingdoms; and I will destroy the strength of the kingdoms of the nations (Nations will be devastated and leaderships will fall. The DS governments around the world are about to fall to the Alliance of Nations.); and I will overthrow the chariots, and those that ride in them; and the horses and their riders shall come down, every one by the sword of his brother. (The Red Sea destruction of the DS and their army who are fighting against God's people) {23} In that day, saith Jehovah of hosts, will I take thee, O Zerubbabel, my servant, the son of Shealtiel, saith Jehovah, and will make thee as a signet; for I have chosen thee, saith Jehovah of hosts. (Zerubbabel means "born from Babylon" as he was the first fruits leadership to come out from among them and lead the rebuilding of the temple of God's people. Notice that 9/24 is the great shaking... And it is the coming of the Man-child and change of fortunes to God's people as they go into the wilderness, it is all coming soon and we need to be ready. The beginning of this text reads: {Hag.2:7} and I will shake all nations; and the precious things (or desire) of all nations shall come (Jesus in the Man-child typed by Zerubbabel in this chapter); and I will fill this house with glory, saith Jehovah of hosts. {8} The silver is mine, and the gold is mine, saith Jehovah of hosts (Here is where God supplies the funds as happened after the passover when Moses told the people to ask gold and silver from the Egyptians for their trip into the wilderness tribulation. In parallel to this Cyrus did the same thing as Trump is doing now.)  {9} The latter glory of this house shall be greater than the former, saith Jehovah of hosts; and in this place will I give peace, saith Jehovah of hosts. {10} In the four and twentieth day of the ninth month, in the second year of Darius, came the word of Jehovah by Haggai the prophet... This shaking of all nations happens when the Man-child Zerubabel is present. It is only to happen once more since the time Paul wrote Hebrews. Heb.12:25-29 {25} See that ye refuse not him that speaketh. For if they escaped not when they refused him that warned them on earth, much more shall not we escape who turn away from him that warneth from heaven: {26} whose voice then shook the earth (comparing this with the next shaking by the Dragon): but now he hath promised, saying, Yet once more will I make to tremble not the earth only, but also the heaven. (Once more the dragon approaches to shake all things while our dreams say the DS will magnify the stress with their earthquake abilities) {27} And this word, Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that have been made, that those things which are not shaken may remain. {28} Wherefore, receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us have grace, whereby we may offer service well-pleasing to God with reverence and awe: {29} for our God is a consuming fire. (He is coming to judge the Earth through the Dragon Beast body ruled by DS temporarily.)  We will see whether the earthquakes are spiritual or physical or both.             Attachments area Preview YouTube video The Future Tsunami That Could Destroy the US East Coast     The Future Tsunami That Could Destroy the US East Coast Preview YouTube video Megatsunami Scenario - La Palma Landslide     Megatsunami Scenario - La Palma Landslide    

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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Composers Datebook
Brahms and the clarinet

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 2:00


Synopsis During his later years, the German composer Johannes Brahms was a frequent visitor to the town of Meiningen, where the Grand Duke had a fine orchestra that gave stellar performances of Brahms' music. Early in 1891, Brahms heard one member of that orchestra, the clarinetist Richard Mülhfeld, perform chamber works by Mozart and Weber. Brahms was so impressed that they became fast friends. Listening to Mülhfeld play, Brahms became so enthusiastic about the clarinet's possibilities that he began writing chamber works for his new friend. Brahms was always particularly fond of the female alto voice whose timbre is similar to that of the clarinet, so Brahms promptly nicknamed Mülhfeld “Fraeulein Clarinet” and the “new prima donna.” For Mülhfeld, Brahms wrote a clarinet trio, which was followed by a clarinet quintet, and finally, a pair of clarinet sonatas, both composed in the summer of 1894. These two sonatas were first played by Mülhfeld with Brahms at a private performance in the home of the sister of the Duke of Meiningen on today's date that year. In November, the pair also gave private performances in Frankfurt for Clara Schumann and at Castle Altenstein for the Duke of Meiningen.  The first public performances occurred in Vienna in January of 1895. Music Played in Today's Program Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897) — Clarinet Sonata, Op. 120, no. 2 (Michael Collins, clarinet; Mikhail Pletnev, piano) Virgin 91076 On This Day Births 1829 - Music publisher Gustav Schirmer, in Königsee, Thuringia; He came to America in 1840 with his parents, and in 1861 founded in New York City the music publishing house that bears his name, G. Schirmer, Inc.; 1911 - Swedish composer Allan Pettersson, in Västra Ryd; Deaths 1949 - Greek composer Nikos Skalkottas, age 45, in Athens; 1972 - French composer and pianist Robert Casadesus, age 73, in Paris; Premieres 1894 - Brahms: two Clarinet Sonatas, Op. 120, at a private performance in the home of the sister of the Duke of Meiningen at Berchtesgaden, by clarinetist Richard Mühlfeld (of the Grand Ducal Orchestra of Meiningen) with the composer at the piano; Brahms and Mühlfeld also gave private performances of both sonatas on November 10-13, 1894, in Frankfurt (for Clara Schumann and others); on November 14, 1894, at Castle Altenstein (for the Duke of Meiningen); and on Jan. 7, 1895, in Vienna (for members of the Tonkünstler Society); The first public performances of the two sonatas took place in Vienna on January 8 (Sonata No. 2) and 11 (Sonata No. 2), 1895, with the same performers, as part of the Rosé Quartet's chamber music series; 1908 - Mahler: Symphony No. 7 ("Song of the Night"), in Prague, with the composer conducting; 1927 - Schoenberg: String Quartet No. 3, in Vienna, by the Kolisch Quartet; 1937 - Hanson: Symphony No. 3 (partial performance), on a CBS Radio Symphony concert conducted by the composer; The first complete performance occurred with the rival network's NBC Symphony, again with the composer conducting, on March 26, 1938; 1970 - Morton Feldman: "The Viola in My Life" No. 1 for viola and orchestra, in London; 1998 - André Previn: opera "A Streetcar Named Desire," with cast including Rene Fleming, by the San Francisco Opera, the composer conducting; 1998 - Michael Torke: "Jasper" for orchestra, by the Madison (Wisc.) Symphony, John DeMain conducting; 1999 - Elmer Bernstein: Guitar Concerto, with Honolulu Symphony conducted by Samuel Wong and soloist Christopher Parkening; 2002 - John Adams: "On the Transmigration of Souls" for vocal soloists, chorus and orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic, Lorin Maazel conducting; 2002 - John Adams: “On the Transmigration of Souls” for vocal soloists, chorus and orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic, Lorin Maazel conducting; Others 1725 - J.S. Bach gives organ recitals in the Sophienkirche, Dresden, on Sept. 19 and 20; 1738 - Oratorio librettist Charles Jennens writes to a young relative describing a visit to Handel the previous day, dismayed by Handel's ideas for their collaboration on the oratorio "Saul": "Mr. Handel's head is more full of maggots than ever . . ." (Gregorian date: Sept. 30). Links and Resources On Johannes Brahms More on Mülhfeld's clarinet

This Day in Esoteric Political History
Calendar Confusion (1752)

This Day in Esoteric Political History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 12:30


It's September 16th. Or is it? We recently got an email from a listener asking us which calendar we are using when we discuss episodes prior to 1752. Jody, Niki, and Kellie look at the switchover from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar that took place in the mid-1700s, how it got politicized, and how it continues to lead to mass confusion. This Day In Esoteric Political History is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Your support helps foster independent, artist-owned podcasts and award-winning stories. If you want to support the show directly, you can do so on our website: ThisDayPod.com Get in touch if you have any ideas for future topics, or just want to say hello. Our website is thisdaypod.com Follow us on social @thisdaypod Our team: Jacob Feldman, Researcher/Producer; Brittani Brown, Producer; Khawla Nakua, Transcripts; music by Teen Daze and Blue Dot Sessions; Julie Shapiro, Executive Producer at Radiotopia

Composers Datebook
María Joaquina de la Portilla Torres

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Today's date marks the birthday in 1885 of María Joaquina de la Portilla Torres, in the Mexican state of Guanajuato. Under her married name of Maria Grever, she became the first female Mexican composer to achieve international fame. She composed her first song at age four, studied in France with Claude Debussy among others, and at 18, one of her songs sold 3 million copies. At age 22, she married Leo A. Grever, an American oil company executive, moved to New York City, and by the 1930s was composing for Paramount and 20th Century Fox films. Her best-known song is probably "What A Difference A Day Makes" (originally "Cuando vuelva a tu lado"), written in 1934. Her songs have been recorded by singers ranging from the Andrews Sisters and Frank Sinatra to Dinah Washington and Aretha Franklin to Plácido Domingo and Juan Diego Flórez. “I am interested in Jazz and Modern Rhythms,” said Grever, “but above all, in Mexican Music … There is such a cultural richness in Mexican Music, its Hispanic and indigenous origins ... It is my wish and yearning to present these native rhythms and tunes from a real perspective, but with the necessary flexibility to appeal to a universal audience." Music Played in Today's Program María Grever (1885 – 1951) – Júrame (Juan Diego Flórez, tenor; Fort Worth Symphony; Miguel Harth-Bedoya, cond.) Decca 4757576 On This Day Births 1737 - Austrian composer Johann Michael Haydn, in Rohrau; He was the younger brother of Franz Joseph Haydn (b. 1732); 1760 - Italian composer Luigi Cherubini, in Florence (although August 14 is occasionally cited as his birthdate); 1910 - American composer and eminent theatrical conductor Lehman Engel, in Jackson, Miss.; 1910 - Swiss composer Rolf Liebermann, in Zurich; Premieres 1854 - Bruckner: Mass in Bb ("Missa Solemnis") in St. Florian, Austria; 1952 - Frank Martin: Concerto for Harpsichord, in Venice; 1954 - Britten: opera "The Turn of the Screw," in Venice at the Teatro La Fenice; 1968 - Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 12, in Moscow, by the Beethoven Quartet; 1978 - Barber: Third Essay for Orchestra, by the New York Philharmonic conducted by Zubin Mehta; 1994 - Richard Danielpour: Cello Concerto, commissioned and performed by San Francisco Symphony conducted by Herbert Blomstedt, with soloist Yo-Yo Ma; 1996 - Stockhausen: "Freitag aus Licht" (Friday from Light), at the Leipzig Opera; 1997 - Saariaho: "Graal Théâtre" (chamber version), in Helsinki, by the Avanti Ensemble and violinist John Storgards. 2002 - David Amram: Flute Concerto ("Giants of the Night"), in New Orleans by the Louisiana Philharmonic conducted by Klauspeter Seibel, with James Galway the soloist; 2002 - Colin Matthews, Judith Weir, Poul Ruders, David Sower, Michael Torke, Anthony Payne, and Magnus Linberg: "Bright Cecilia: Variations on a Theme by Purcell," at Royal Albert Hall in London, with the BBC Symphony, Leonard Slatkin conducting; This set of orchestral variations on a Purcell theme was commissioned by BBC Music magazine to celebrate its 10th anniversary; Others 1731 - J.S. Bach performs organ recitals in Dresden on Sept. 14-21; 1741 - Handel finishes scoring his famous oratorio, "Messiah," begun on August 22 (The entire work was composed in a period of 24 days); These dates are according to the Julian "Old Style" calendar (Gregorian dates: Sept 2 to Sept. 25); 1914 - W. C. Handy copyrights his most famous song, "The St. Louis Blues"; 1973 - The Philadelphia Orchestra gives a concert in Beijing, the first American orchestra to perform in Red China; Eugene Ormandy conducts symphonies by Mozart (No. 35), Brahms (No. 1) and the American composer Roy Harris (No. 3).

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
9.12.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 17:50


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time, September 12th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: 2 Timothy 2v8, 11-13 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer (Latin) Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Journeys of Hope | a Pilgrim Center of Hope podcast
A NEW JOURNEY: Jerusalem – St. Anne Church & Sacred Music

Journeys of Hope | a Pilgrim Center of Hope podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 52:58


Come on a journey with Angela Sealana as she guides us in an audio pilgrimage to the Church of St. Anne in Jerusalem, built over the Virgin Mary's birthplace, the home of Mary's parents Sts. Joachim and Anne. During our journey, we will: Learn about the history of this famous church and the City of Jerusalem itself Take you on a guided walk through the Church –what you would see, experience, and hear as a pilgrim Learn about the history of sacred music along with various samples, and will define some terms like Gregorian chant, Byzantine, etc. Much more! Click here to see photos, a video of Fr. Victor Shoemaker singing the Salve Regina, listen to audio clips of the sacred music used In this Program, and a map view of St. Anne Church. Jewel for the Journey: “There is the music of heaven in all things, but we have forgotten to hear it until we sing.” – St. Hildegard of Bingen Learn more at PilgrimCenterOfHope.org/Journeys Help us spread hope! PilgrimCenterOfHope.org/Donate

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church (Gilbert, AZ) Podcasts
Father Chris Axline Video Chat - Sep. 3, 2021

St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church (Gilbert, AZ) Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 5:01


Happy Labor Day and celebrating Pope St. Gregory the Great Hello St. Mary Magdalene, Happy Labor Day! In today's video I reflect on Pope St. Gregory the Great whose feast the Church celebrates every September 3rd. He died in 604 AD and began one of the great missionary efforts within the Church sending missionaries and priests to: England, France, Spain, and Africa. He also wrote down music from many different cultures using a notation that still exists today and is the basis for all of western music, Gregorian chant! He's a pretty awesome saint, a great pope, an an inspiring man of prayer and missionary zeal. Pope St. Gregory the great, pray for us! God bless, Fr. Chris Visit us: www.smarymag.org Support us: https://membership.faithdirect.net/AZ754

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, September 3, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsMemorial of Saint Gregory the Great, Pope and Doctor of the Church Lectionary: 435All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Gregory the GreatGregory was the prefect of Rome before he was 30. After five years in office he resigned, founded six monasteries on his Sicilian estate, and became a Benedictine monk in his own home at Rome. Ordained a priest, Gregory became one of the pope's seven deacons, and also served six years in the East as papal representative in Constantinople. He was recalled to become abbot, but at the age of 50 was elected pope by the clergy and people of Rome. Gregory was direct and firm. He removed unworthy priests from office, forbade taking money for many services, emptied the papal treasury to ransom prisoners of the Lombards and to care for persecuted Jews and the victims of plague and famine. He was very concerned about the conversion of England, sending 40 monks from his own monastery. He is known for his reform of the liturgy, and for strengthening respect for doctrine. Whether he was largely responsible for the revision of “Gregorian” chant is disputed. Gregory lived in a time of perpetual strife with invading Lombards and difficult relations with the East. When Rome itself was under attack, he interviewed the Lombard king. His book, Pastoral Care, on the duties and qualities of a bishop, was read for centuries after his death. He described bishops mainly as physicians whose main duties were preaching and the enforcement of discipline. In his own down-to-earth preaching, Gregory was skilled at applying the daily Gospel to the needs of his listeners. Called “the Great,” Gregory has been given a place with Augustine, Ambrose, and Jerome, as one of the four key doctors of the Western Church. An Anglican historian has written: “It is impossible to conceive what would have been the confusion, the lawlessness, the chaotic state of the Middle Ages without the medieval papacy; and of the medieval papacy, the real father is Gregory the Great.” Reflection Gregory was content to be a monk, but he willingly served the Church in other ways when asked. He sacrificed his own preferences in many ways, especially when he was called to be Bishop of Rome. Once he was called to public service, Gregory gave his considerable energies completely to this work. Gregory's description of bishops as physicians fits in well with Pope Francis' description of the Church as a "field hospital." Saint Gregory the Great is the Patron Saint of: England Epilepsy Musicians Teachers Saint of the Day Copyright Franciscan Media

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio
Father Kubicki – Prayer Reflections September 3, 2021

Fr. Kubicki’s 2 Minute Prayer Reflection – Relevant Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 2:00


Today, the Church celebrates the feast of Pope St. Gregory the Great. Pope Gregory lived in very turbulent times around the year 600. He gave his name to music that is still popular today; Gregorian chant. All show notes at Father Kubicki – Prayer Reflections September 3, 2021 - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Faith Community Bible Church
Loved to Death

Faith Community Bible Church

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 37:48


Slideshow for this message is available Introduction As a society we disagree. With so many people, so many backgrounds, perspectives, religions, this disagreement is inevitable. Now, resolving factual disputes, in theory, should be relatively easy: find a group of experts to collect the data and ask them to lay out the conclusions. This approach works fabulously when the issue at stake is the atomic weight of helium. We hear the expert opinion and we have no reason to question it. It's settled. But what if those FACTS have implications? As humans we are programmed, maybe even hard-wired, to dismiss FACTS that don't align with our worldview. We have this built in tendency to interpret, favor, selectively recall certain information that confirms our prior beliefs or values. This tendency is strongest when we are dealing with highly emotionally charged issues or deeply entrenched beliefs. Social scientists call this MOTIVATED REASONING. We are all motivated to look at data a certain way based on your preconceptions. Take a hot topic issue. Are we all being objective with the data? What does the data say about climate change, or gun control or vaccination or the safety of nuclear energy or genetically modified foods? I'm sure you have an opinion on that. We are all biased. We are all victims of our own MOTIVATED REASONING. According to studies done on this subject, this MOTIVATED REASONING has nothing to do with the level of education a person has, the family they grew up in, the type of culture in which a person lives. None of us are immune to this. Now today we get to John chapter 11. This is the story of the raising of Lazarus from the dead. This is one of the only examples we have in the Bible of Jesus intentionally making a miracle more dramatic. What Jesus is doing is graciously creating a situation in which even those who are heavily biased by motivated reasoning will have to confess the truth. He's trying to establish the FACTS of who he is so dramatically, so indisputably, so incontestably, so undeniably, so indubitably that his opponents will have no choice. Some will believe. But we will also see some, astoundingly, harden themselves further in unbelief. Now before we get too judgmental, let me assure you, all of us in the room are approaching the text this morning with MOTIVATED REASONING. Jesus will tell is things we don't want to hear and we are hard-wired to go to great lengths to explain those things away, to find alternate explanations, to rationalize, to justify and to excuse ourselves from the implications. So as we begin would you just ask the Lord to remove that from you right now. “Lord, would you allow the truth to penetrate my heart regardless of the implications and protect me from my motivated reasoning.” Overview We are in John chapter 11 and we are at a bit of a turning point in the book so we would do well to take a moment to get our bearings. Chapter 11 and the story of the raising of Lazarus occurs sometime between September and April. We know that because of two time markers we have been given in John 10 and 12. This is a calendar of the Jewish feast and how the Jewish calendar overlays on top of our Gregorian calendar. If you remember in John chapter 8-9 it was the feast of tabernacles. That's here in September/October. In John 10 we are told it is the feast of dedication (Hannakah) which is here in December and in John 12 we are told it's passover. And this is Jesus' last passover. So today we enter John chapter 11, which means we are somewhere in between those two which means we are approaching the final months of Jesus' ministry. Think about where we are in the book. We are just a little over half way. That tells you something about the emphasis doesn't it? The gospels are essentially four biographies of the Life of Jesus of Nazareth but they are oddly heavily lopsided in their content. If you were to count the number of chapters in Mt-Jn you'd have 89 chapters. 85 of those chapters focus on the last 3 1/2 years of Jesus ministry. Of those 85 chapters 27 of them deal with the last 8 days of his life. Why? Because you give space for that which you want to emphasize. The focus of Jesus life is his death. Because it is through his death that we achieve atonement, redemption, forgiveness of sins, resurrection and life. That becomes the entire focus of the epistles that follow. So we are roughly halfway through the book of John and John will spend as much time on these last 8 days of Jesus life as he does on the previous 33 years of Jesus life. Now there are events which really set the stage for these last eight days and John 11 is one of the most significant. Now to understand it, let's pick it up where we left off last week. Remember from John chapter 10, Jesus preaches the sermon on the good shepherd. The Jews say, tell us plainly who you are and Jesus says, "I and the Father are one." The Jews pick up stones to stone him. I want to focus for just a moment on the geography and strategy behind that move for just a moment. Let's ask the question, why does Jesus make this move to the area across the Jordan. Answer: this is almost certainly a political move on the part of Jesus. The emperor in Rome at this time is Tiberius. And the way Roman emperors ruled their empire is to appoint prefects over the various districts of the Roman empire. So the area we call Israel was broken up into these various regions. Here's a map that demonstrates that. In John 10 Jesus is in the city of Jerusalem celebrating the feast of dedication at the temple. Jerusalem was part of the region of Judea and this whole area was under the governing jurisdiction of Pontius Pilate who of course features heavily in the chapters to come. After the Jews pick up stones, Jesus flees and heads East to Perea. This area along with Judea were under the Jurisdiction of Herod Antipas. To go from Jerusalem to Perea is not very far, maybe something like 15-20 miles. Why would Jesus do this? You have to understand Pilate's situation. Pilate at this time, was a bit of a crippled ruler. Early on in his reign he was very powerful. He ruled with significant authority. He had a protector in Rome named Seganus who funded and protected him. But a couple things happened that changed that. First, Segenus his protector was executed for sedition. And then Pilate did a few things that upset the Jews and Rome sided with the Jews. So Pilate got in trouble and he no longer had a defender. Pilate was in the dog house with Rome and the Jews knew it. He couldn't muscle his way around among the Jews. The Jews had leverage on him and could get him to do their bidding. And the overwhelming evidence of this in the NT is the crucifixion. Just a cursory reading of the text shows that Pilate doesn't want to crucify this guy but the Jews force his hand. So Jesus flees from the area of Judea where Pilate is ruling because the Jews have all sorts of power there. He crosses over the Jordan river and ministers in Perea where Herod Antipas is ruling. Now let's talk about Herod Antipas. This is a different Herod by the way, than Herod you read about in nativity story. Herod Antipas and Tiberius (who, remember, was the emperor) were childhood friends. He's got all sorts of protection from Rome. In addition to that, Herod Antipas is ruling a largely gentile area. The Jews don't factor into the politics of this area. The Jews have no power over Herod Antipas. So Jesus flees to this area to escape the Jews and particularly to escape the political power the Jewish leaders enjoy in this area over Pontius Pilate. So he's going to be in Perea for 2-3 months. Now only Luke records this part of Jesus' ministry. And there's one very significant interchange that Jesus has that is going to be very helpful both in illustrating this political dynamic but also in setting us up for John chapter 11 and the raising of Lazarus. Now you have Pharisees coming to Jesus and warning him that Herod wants to kill him. Now right there, just that in and of itself, ought to be a red flag. Didn't the Pharisees, just a chapter earlier want him dead? Something doesn't seem right. Something's afoot. I'm pretty sure the Pharisee isn't motivated by his affectionate desire for the wellfare of Jesus. And almost certainly this is a ploy. Herod doesn't care about Jesus. Herod Antipas probably barely knows who Jesus is. He hasn't stirred up any trouble in his domain. So when the Jews say, “Herod wants to kill you.” Jesus knows it's a trap. The Pharisees are trying to push him out of the territory of Herod Antipas and move him into the territory of Pilate where they have control. That's what's going on. Now Jesus knows that and so he responds. 32 And he said to them, Go and tell that fox, ‘Behold, I cast out demons and perform cures today and tomorrow, and the third day I finish my course. 33 Nevertheless, I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the day following, for it cannot be that a prophet should perish away from Jerusalem.' He's saying, my time has not yet come. It's really kind of dark humor. He responds, “You guys are coming from Jerusalem, the city that always kills the prophets. Remember Jeremiah? remember Micah? Prophets have to die in Jerusalem, so until I go there I'm safe.” If you wanted to make an analogy you might say, “Surfers don't have to worry about being eaten by sharks unless their surfing in shark infested waters and prophets don't have to worry about dying unless they are in Jerusalem.” Do, you realize the Jews of Jesus' day would actually build tombs for the prophets. They didn't pretend that the bodies were there, but they wanted a place to put wreaths and garlands as if to say, “We are so embarrassed that our forefathers killed the prophets who wrote our Bible.” And of course we would never do that. In another place Jesus is going to say, “You build tombs to the prophets, but you are going to bring the blood of Abel to Zechariah upon yourselves.” All those prophets spoke of Jesus, and they are trying to kill Jesus! And then you have this lament. 34 O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! Behold, your house is forsaken. Jesus isn't in Jerusalem. But he's mourning their hardened hearts. And then he says this marvelous, prophetic WORD. And I tell you, you will not see me until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!'" What does that mean? Jesus, right here is quoting Psalm 118. Psalm 118 is a Messianic Psalm. This is the Psalmist giving God's people instruction on how they are to receive their Messiah. It's almost like the Psalmist is giving them a future hymn book. When Messiah comes, you sing this Psalm. Who hasn't woken up and said, “This is the day that the Lord has made. Let us rejoice and be glad in it.” Yeah, that's true. But that's not what this Psalm is talking about. It's talking about the day that Messiah comes. And when that day comes, you should all cry out, “Hossana” which means save us. Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord. That's how you welcome Messiah. And so what Jesus is saying to the Pharisees is this: the next time you see me will be when all of the inhabitants of Jerusalem spill out of the city and lay down their garments and palm branches and WELCOME ME AS MESSIAH, "Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord." The whole city is going to welcome me as KING. Now, here's the point, if you were to have been there when Jesus said those words, you would have said, “That's impossible. By this time it was public knowledge, The Pharisees hate Jesus. The Pharisees and Saducees control that entire hill. They control the temple. The disciples of Jesus are convinced that a journey to Jerusalem is the same thing as a journey to the grave.” How in the world, Jesus, are you going to OPENLY walk into Jerusalem with the crowds welcoming you as Messiah, when you know good and well that the Pharisees and Sadducees are BENT on destroying you? Well the answer in part the raising of Lazarus. And you want to talk about MOTIVATED REASONING? This is a text book example. Now let's regain our bearings. Jesus has crossed over the Jordan and has had this entire exchange with the Pharisees in the relative safety of Herod Antipas. But now Jesus gets word that Lazarus is sick. Jesus is good friends with Lazarus. Lazarus lives in Bethany. Where is Bethany? Bethany is only about a mile from Jerusalem so Jesus would have likely stayed here when he was in the city for Feasts. But notice the region in which Bethany lies. Bethany is right here, back in the region of Judea, right where the Pharisees want him (back in the jurisdiction of Pontius Pilate where they have control). So this is a dangerous mission. Jesus, come back to the area where you were just about stoned to death. As we continue through the text you can detect the disciples resistance to the suggestion that they should go back up to Judea. As a side note, it's very interesting that John distinguishes which Mary he's referencing. Mary, the one who annointed Jesus feet with oil and washed it with her hair. Why is that interesting? Because he hasn't yet told the story yet about Mary anointing Jesus feet with oil. That's coming later in chapter 12. This is a pretty good evidence that John assumes you've got the other gospels in your hand. Remember John wrote his gospel last. What he's doing is assuming that you as the reader know the story as told by Matthew, Mark and Luke and since we've been introduced to more than one Mary in the synoptic gospels, he's clarifying which one he's referencing. At any rate, Jesus gets word that his friend Lazarus is very ill. Now notice the careful wording of Jesus. This is an illness that does not lead to death. He doesn't say, Lazarus will not die. He says it's an illness that doesn't culminate, terminate in death. Instead it's a sickness that leads to the glory of God. Now let's get very specific as to what is meant by that. God's doesn't receive glory from the fact that illness exists. Illness is not part of the original design. God did not look at illness in the garden and pronounce it good. Death is the consequence of sin. But, this disease and its associated suffering will be the mechanism through which God's glory over illness is displayed. In the end, the illness DOES not win. The illness lead to death. In the LONG VIEW, this illness actually leads to resurrection life. And it's at that moment that God's glory is revealed. Now at this point, the disciples understand PRECISELY ZERO of what Jesus means by this. Here's almost certainly what is going through the disciples minds. They get word that Lazarus is sick and Jesus, using his divine insight responds to the messenger, this is not a sickness that leads to death and he sends the messenger away. Sweet! Instead this is an illness that leads to the glory of God. Great! He's going to get healed like many of the others that Jesus healed. There are multiple examples in the Scripture where Jesus heals from afar with a mere word. I'm certain that's what the disciples thought. I'm certain that's what the messenger who returned thought. I'm sure the disciples thought, it will be interesting to hear the rest of the story next time we meet up and see Lazarus. I'm sure everyone mentally checked the time and said, “Okay's about noon on Thursday and Lazarus will say, ‘yeah, right about noon on Thursday I just instantly started feeling better.'” And everyone forgets about it. Jesus announces no further intention. But, we as readers get special insight into his plan. But our special insight is shocking! Did you hear that? Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus. Let's zoom in on that word for love. As you know, there are several words for love for love in Greek and this is the word agape. It's the highest form of love. It's perfect, unconditional, pure. It most often refers to DIVINE love because only God can love with that much purity. So the text says, he LOVED these three with that kind of love. Now look at verse 6. The word so is a strong word. It means THEREFORE. Jesus LOVED these guys and on the basis of his love for them, he stayed two days longer in the place where he was. Did you hear that? Because God loved them so perfectly, in a totally unconditional way, he didn't come when they called upon him in their moment of GREATEST need. This is bottomlessly instructive for us. We think it ought to read, since Jesus loved them so much, he immediately did what they asked and went to the aid of Lazarus to make sure he wouldn't die. We think that the Love of God means doing what we we want. God if you loved me you would fix this financial problem in my life. God if you REALLY loved me, you'd fix this relational problem that I am experiencing either in my marriage or with my kids, or my friends or in the church. That, Lord would be evidence of your love for me. God if you REALLY, REALLY loved me then you would get rid of this cancer or this disease or this health handicap. But actually the love of God is doing what is best for the person even if it involves our suffering. Did you catch that? God LOVES you; and so often times he will wait those two extra days. The very best thing in the world for you right now might be the delay of God. Why did he wait two additional days? When Jesus arrived on the scene Lazarus had already been dead four days so If he had set out immediately, Lazarus would have still been dead two full days. But he waited. Why? Because he wanted to establish with spectacular certainty that LAZARUS was not just mostly dead, but CERTAINLY dead. God's delays are not denials. The fact you think its a delay is an evidence of your MOTIVATED REASONING. What Mary and Martha wanted was for Jesus to swoop in and overcome sickness. What Jesus wanted was to swoop in and overcome death. Which is better? Now at this point, remember, the disciples still have no idea that this is what's going to go down. Remember, the last thing they heard was that this was not an illness that leads to death. They assumed this was a healing from afar. That was two days ago when Jesus said that. They've completely forgotten about Lazarus. They've totally learned to trust Jesus. He's not going to die. End of story. Move on with our life. But then Jesus, undoubtedly, surprises them and says. Now I'm not sure they are even making the connection at this point between Lazarus and Judea. I think because they have so completely abandoned the idea that the sickness of Lazarus was a problem that when they hear Jesus say, “Let us go to Judea” they understood him to be updating them on their itinerary. And their initial reaction was this idea is not one of your better ideas, Jesus. To our ears this would be like Jesus saying, “let us go to Kabul international airport in Afghanistan.” What's wrong with JFK or Kona? When they hear this suggestion, they get real concerned. Jesus, you know the politics over there. Last time we were there they tried to kill you. You barely escaped with your life. Are you sure, Jesus? So out of their mouths comes this complaint and Jesus' response: Now Jesus is basically forcing them to square their theology with their fear. He says, why do we work in the day instead of the night? Because in the day you can see. You don't stumble in the day. There's no fear of stumbling when there is light. The light of the world prevents you from making a wrong step. If you are with me, guess what? It's daytime. Why? because I am the light of the world. You can't make a mistake if you are following me. Keep that in mind folks. You can't make a mistake if you are obeying what Jesus tells you to do. There is no possible way to REGRET obedience. That is a perfect step made in the light. The outcome might be horrendous by any other standard, but it's not a mistake. It's not a mistep. Following Jesus means you will never stumble. And the converse is true as well. "If anyone walks in the night he stumbles, because the light of the world is not in him." If you do anything apart from Jesus, if you make decisions in life and don't include Jesus, if you ignore your conscience and push Jesus to the side, then whatever decision you make, no matter how successful it is in the eyes of the world, will result in stumbling. You can't be on the right path if the path doesn't include Jesus as Lord and savior of your life. You will CERTAINLY stumble. Listen, we are going to Judea. Yes, it is dangerous. But you won't stumble because I am the light of the world. Now he tells them what their Judean mission will be. The disciples are, at times, dense; however, this is not one of those times. Jesus had plainly told them this was not a sickness that leads to death. How else is a person supposed to interpret those words? The disciples hear Jesus say, “I'm going to go wake up Lazarus.” Again, how else are they supposed to interpret those words. Jesus, I'm sure he's tired. After all, he's had a brush with death. But you told us it wasn't a sickness leading to death. Right? I'm sure he's sleepy. Do we really need to go to Judea and risk our lives to get him out of bed? He'll wake up when he's kicked the virus and feels better. Now comes plain language. Now here's where things get chilling. I am glad for your sake that I was not there so that you might believe that I really do have power to raise people from the dead. Which means what? Which means that they currently DO NOT believe. This is basically our stopping point. The miracle itself we are going to talk about next time. But I want you to just hear what Jesus is saying. You guys have been following me around for a few years now. And you still don't really believe. And this is applicable for all of us as well. We believe in Jesus, but we don't really believe he has power over the things we are suffering RIGHT NOW. You believe. But you don't believe. Jesus says to to his disciples, you believe I can heal people. You've seen that. But do you realize who I am? Who I really am? I can raise people from the dead. I can overcome the grave. You don't yet believe that. Now as evidence that they don't belive that, look what Thomas says. So Thomas, called the Twin, said to his fellow disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.” This gives you some idea of the level of danger represented in Jesus' suggestion. In the minds of the disciples, this was a suicide mission. This was Normandy. These guys know the hornets nest of Judea. Now what does Thomas mean here? This is one place in the Bible where you'd love to have some tone, inflection and intonation. Either Thomas is saying: “Jesus, I'm so committed to you, I'll gladly go to Jerusalem and die with you.” In that case it's a very commendable statement of loyalty… “Fine, if you want to go to Jersualem to try and raise Lazarus from the dead, you'll likely be having to raise more than just Lazarus. We are all dead if we go there.” In this case it's heavy sarcasm But in either case, in both cases, what is Thomas lacking? He does not believe that Jesus has power OVER death. Either we will die, Jesus will die or both. But someone is going to die. And Jesus says, “I'm glad Lazarus died, so you can believe.” He's painting them into a corner. Let's apply this. Gospel Message Let me assure you. All of us today walk into the room with motivated reasoning. None are unbiased. None are objective. None are willing to just receive truth without question. There are FACTS presented here that our conception of reality wont readily support. What is the FACT established in this passage? The FACT above every other FACT is that Jesus has power over suffering and death. The FACT is that Jesus has purposes in SUFFERING and DEATH. Jesus is LORD over it. The whole Bible is written to establish that FACT. Now that conflicts with a deeply emotional conviction that if God loves me, I will not suffer. And so when we suffer, our MOTIVATED REASONING kicks in. How can God still love me. And rather than interpreting our circumstances through the love of God we interpret the LOVE of God through our circumstances. That's motivated reasoning. If you are suffering right now, what is true of Lazarus is true of you, "your suffering is for the glory of God." But I guarantee you that if you are suffering right now you are motivated to reason differently. It doesn't feel that way. The FACT that Jesus is LORD over suffering is in conflict with your sense that if Jesus loved you, he would rescue me from suffering. This passage is teaching us to look beyond our feelings to what is true. Of course it feels that way. Of course the suffering is not fun. Suffering always hurts. For Lazarus the coughing and the vomiting and the sweating and the fever were all real. He had to endure all that. The evil of suffering had its way. If God was to exercise supremacy OVER death, then logically speaking, death and the accompanying suffering must have its way first. Perhaps the silence of God in our life is the silence of those two days. Perhaps God is waiting so that he can establish with such spectacular certainty that he is sovereign over the suffering you experience. We don't know his good purposes. But we know that they are for his glory and our good. I'm glad, for your sake, that you are suffering. Why? How can you say that? Because through the suffering you will believe. You will know who I am. There's no alternate explanation. And would you not agree, that there is no more loving thing in the world that God could possibly do for you than to help you see him more clearly. Baptism This evening, we have a baptism service. And so come out to that. Come out and watch a FUNERAL and a BIRTH. That's what baptism is. We bury the old man. This man whose MOTIVATED to reason that this world is all about me. We put that old man in the grave. And what rises is new life. New life is born. Unless a man is BORN AGAIN, he cannot enter the kingdom of heaven. If you are not a Christian and are wondering how you become one, the answer of the Scriptures, is repent and be baptized. The Bible sees these events are simultaneous. It's a physical expression of what has taken place in the heart. We were buried therefore with him by baptism into death, in order that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life. (Rom. 6:4 ESV) Baptism is our funeral and birthday. We get a death certificate and a birth certificate on the same day. So bring a dinner to enjoy on the lawn afterwards. Bring a chair or a blanket and let's listen to the stories of life and celebrate Jesus' victory over death.

Natural Time
Red Planetary Earth

Natural Time

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 31:23


8.28.21 - Day 10/13 of the Yellow Star Wavespell - Lunar Moon 5 We are almost to the end of the Yellow Star wavespell, but that climax is overshadowed by the simultaneous ending of the Tzolkin. In a few days we will begin the Red Dragon wavespell and the next 260-day cycle. You are in a metaphysical completion of a gestational phase that began in the last days of the Gregorian year 2020. What started late fall, in mid-December, that is finishing now? How can you feel the sea change of something that has been propelling you, growing from your creativity, coming to an end or decisive shift? Look around at your life - 'good' and 'bad', it's the culmination of the last 260 days. While you were busy with your individual changes, a collective shift has also occurred. Late 2020 we were jovial and optimistic about a 'new year,' goodbye to layers of lockdown and one administration's Machiavellian gestalt. But 260 days later, we've only been pushed farther into spiral of dismay, of a kind of doomsday. And maybe - the silver lining - out of denial.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
8.29.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 16:25


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, August 29th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, Folk) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Screaming in the Cloud
The Security Coat of Many Colors with Will Gregorian

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 35:57


About WillWill is recovering System Administrator with a decade's worth of experience in technology and management. He now embraces the never-ending wild and exciting world of Information Security.Links: Color Health: https://www.color.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/willgregorian TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at the Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by CircleCI. CircleCI is the leading platform for software innovation at scale. With intelligent automation and delivery tools, more than 25,000 engineering organizations worldwide—including most of the ones that you've heard of—are using CircleCI to radically reduce the time from idea to execution to—if you were Google—deprecating the entire product. Check out CircleCI and stop trying to build these things yourself from scratch, when people are solving this problem better than you are internally. I promise. To learn more, visit circleci.com.Corey: Up next we've got the latest hits from Veem. Its climbing charts everywhere and soon its going to climb right into your heart. Here it is!Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. Sometimes I like to talk about my previous job being in a large regulated finance company. It's true. I was employee number 41 at a small startup that got acquired by BlackRock. I was not exactly a culture fit, as you probably can imagine by basically every word that comes out of my mouth and then imagining that juxtaposed but they're a highly regulated finance company.Today, my guest is someone who knows me from those days because we worked together back in that era. Will Gregorian is the head of Information Security at Color Health, and is entirely too used to my nonsense, to the point where he becomes sick of it, and somehow came back around. Will, thanks for joining me.Will: Hello. How are you?Corey: It's been a while, and so far, things are better now. It turns out that I don't have—well, I was going to say I don't have the same level of scrutiny around my social media usage that you do at large regulated finance companies anymore, but it turns out that when you basically spend your entire day shitposting about a $1.8 trillion company in the form of Amazon, oh, it turns out your tweets get an awful lot of scrutiny. Just, you know, not by the company that pays you.Will: That's very true. And you knew how to actually capitalize on that.Corey: No, I sort of basically figured that one out by getting it wrong as I went from step to step to step. No, it was a wild and whirlwind time because I joined the company as employee 41. I was the first non-developer ops hire, which happens at startups a fair bit, and developers try to interview you and ask you a bunch of algorithm questions you don't do very well at. And they say, “Well, I have no further questions. Do you?”And of course, there's nothing that says bad job interview like short job interview. “Yeah, just one. What are you actually working on in an ops context?” And we talked about, I think, migrating from EC2 Classic to VPC back in those days, and I started sketching on the whiteboard, “Let me guess it breaks here, here, and here.” And suddenly, there are three more people in the room watching me do the thing on the whiteboard.Long story short, I get hired and things sort of progressed from there. The acquisition comes down and then how, uh, we suddenly, it turns out, had this real pressing need for someone to do InfoSec on a full-time slash rigorous basis. Which is where you came in.Will: That's exactly where I came in. I came in a month after the acquisition, if I remember correctly. That was fun. I actually interviewed with you, didn't I?Corey: You did. You passed, clearly.Will: I did pass. That's pretty hard to pass.Corey: It was fun, to be perfectly blunt. This is the whole problem with startup FinTech in some ways, where you're dealing in regulated industries, but at what point do you start bringing security in, as someone—where that becomes its own function? And how do you build that out? You can get surprisingly far without it until right afterwards then you really can't. But for a startup in the finance space, your first breach can very much be something of a death knell for the company.Will: That's very true. And there's no really good calculation on when you bring those security people in, which is probably the reason why—brace yourself—we're talking about DevSecOps.Corey: Oh, good. Let's put more words into DevOps because goes well.Will: Yeah. It does. It really does. I love it. You should look at my Twitter feed; I do make fun of it. But the thing is, it's mostly about risk. And founders ought to know what that risk is, so maybe that's the reason why they hired me because they felt like there's existential risk around brand and reputation, which is the reason why I joined. But yeah, [sigh] fundamentally, the problem with that is that if you hire a security practitioner, especially the first one, it's kind of like dating, in a way—Corey: Oh, yes.Will: If you don't set them up correctly, then they're doomed to be failed, and there are plenty of complexities as a result. Imagine you're a scrappy FinTech startup, you have a bunch of developers, they want to start writing code, they want to do big and great things, and all of a sudden security comes in and says, “Thou shalt not do the following things.” That's where it fails. So, I think it's part culture, part awareness from a founder perspective, part DevOps because let's face it, most of the stuff happens in infra side. And that's not to slam on anybody. And delicious goes on.Corey: Yeah. Something that I developed a keen appreciation for when I went into business for myself after that and started the Duckbill Group, is that when you talk to attorneys, that was really the best way to I found to frame it because they've been doing this for 2000 years. It turns out InfoSec isn't quite that old, although occasionally it feels like some of the practices are. Like, you know, password rotation every 30 days. I digress.And lawyers will never tell you what to do, or at least anyone who's been doing this for more than six months. Instead, the answer to everything is, “It depends. Here are the risk factors to consider; here are the trade-offs.” My wife is a corporate attorney and I learned early on not to let her have any crack at my proposal documents in those days because it's fundamentally a sales document, but her point was, “Well, this exposes you to this risk, and this risk, and this risk, and this risk.” And it's, “Yes, I'm aware of all of that. If I don't know how to do what I do, effectively, I'm not going to be able to fulfill this. It's not the contract; it is the proposal and worst case I'll give them their money back with an apology and life goes on.”Because at that point, I was basically a tiny one-man band, and there was no real downside risk. Worst case, the entity gets sued into oblivion; I have to go get a real job again. Maybe Amazon's hiring, I don't know. And it's sort of progressed from there. Left to their logical conclusion and letting them decide how it's going to work, it becomes untenable, and it feels like InfoSec is something of the same story where the InfoSec practitioners I've known would not be happy and satisfied until every computer was turned off, sunken into concrete, and then dropped into Challenger Deep out in the Pacific.Will: Yep. And that's part of the issue is that InfoSec, generally speaking, hasn't kept up with the modern practices, technologies, and advancements around even methodologies and culture. They're still very much [unintelligible 00:06:32] approaching the information security conversation, militaristically speaking; everything is very much based on DOD standards. Therein lies the problem. And funny enough, you mentioned password rotation. I vividly remember we had that conversation. Do you remember that?Corey: It does sound familiar. I've picked that fight so many times in so many different places. Yeah. My current thing that drives me up a wall is, in AWS's IAM console, you get alerts for any IAM credential parents older than 90 days and it's not configurable. And it's, yes, if I get a hold of someone's IAM credentials, I'm going to be exploiting it within seconds.And there are studies; you can prove this empirically. Turns out it's super economical to mine Bitcoin in someone else's Cloud account. But the 90-day idea is just—all that does—the only good part of that to me is it enforces that you don't have those credentials stashed somewhere that they become load-bearing and you don't understand what's going on in your infrastructure. But that's not really the best-practice hill, I would expect AWS to wind up staking out.Will: Precisely. And there lies the problem is that you have basically industry standards that really haven't adopted the cloud mentality and methodologies. The 90-day rotation comes from the world of PCI as well as a few other frameworks out there. Yeah, I agree. It only takes a few seconds, and if somebody is account—for example, in this case, IAM account—has programmatic access, game over.Yeah, they're going to basically spin up a whole bunch of EC2 instances and start mining. And that's the issue is that you're basically trying to bolt on a very passe and archaic standard to this fast-moving world of cloud. It just doesn't work. So, things have gotten considerably better. I feel like our last conversation was, what, circa 2015, '16?Corey: Yeah. That was the year I left: 2016. And then it was all right, maybe this cloud thing has legs? Let's find out.Will: It does. It does. It actually really does. But it has gotten better and it has matured in dramatic ways, even on the cybersecurity side of the house. So, we're no longer having to really argue our way through, “Why do we have to rotate passwords every 90 days?”And I've been part of a few of these conversations with maybe the larger institutions to say, look, we have compensating controls—and I speak their language: ‘compensating controls'—you want to basically frame it that way and you want to basically try to rationalize why, technically speaking, that policy doesn't make sense. And if it does, well, there is a better way to do it.Corey: I feel very similarly about the idea of data being encrypted at rest in a cloud context. Yeah in an old data center story this has happened, where people will drive a pickup truck through the wall of the data center, grab a rack into the bed and peel out of there, that's not really a risk factor in a time of cloud, especially with things like S3 where it is pretty clear that your data does not all live in easily accessible format in one facility. You'd have to grab multiple drives from different places and assemble it all together however it is they're doing it—I presume—and great. I don't actually need to do any encryption at rest story there. However, every compliance regime out there winds up demanding it and it's easier for me to just check the box and get the thing encrypted—which is super easy, and no noticeable performance impact these days—than it is for me to sit here and have this argument with the auditor.It's one of the things I've learned that would arguably make me a way better employee than I was when we worked together is I've learned to pick my battles. Which fights do I really need to fight and which are, fine, whatever, click the ridiculous box. Life goes on.Will: Ah, the love of learning from mistakes. The basic model of learning.Corey: Someday I aspire to learn from mistakes of others instead of my own. But, you know, baby steps.Will: Exactly. And you know, what's funny about it is that I just tweeted about this. EA had a data breach and apparently, their data breach was caused by a Slack conversation. Now, here's my rebuttal. Why doesn't the information security community come together and actually talk about those anti-patterns to learn from one another?We all keep it in a very in a confidential mode. We locked it away, throw the keys away, and we never talk about why this thing happened. That's one problem. But, yeah, going back to what you were talking about, yeah, it's interesting. Choose your battles carefully, frankly, speaking.And I feel like there's a lesson to be learned there—and I do experience this from time to time—is that, look, our hands are tied. We are basically in the world of relevance and we still have to make money. Some of these things don't make sense. I wholeheartedly agree with my engineering counterparts where these things don't make sense. For example, the encryption at rest.Yeah, if you encrypt the EBS volume, does really get you a whole lot? No. You have to encrypt the payload in order to be able to secure and keep the data that you want confidential and that's a massive lift. But we don't ever talk about that. What we talk about and how we basically optimize our conversations, at least in the current form, is let's harp on that compliance framework that doesn't make sense.But that compliance frameworks makes us the money. We have to generate revenue in order to remain employed and we have to make sure that—let's face it, we work in startups—at least I do—and we have to basically demonstrate at least some form of efficacy. This is the only thing that we have at our disposal right now. I wish that we would get to the world where we can in fact practice the true security practices that make a fundamental difference.Corey: Absolutely. There's a bunch of companies that would more or less look all the same on the floor of the RSA Expo—Will: Yep.Corey: —and you walk up and down and they're selling what seems to be the same product, just different logos and different marketing taglines. Okay. And then AWS got into the game where they offered a bunch of native tools that help around these things, like CloudTrail logs, et cetera, and then you had GuardDuty to wind up analyzing this, and Macie to analyze this, but that's still [unintelligible 00:12:12], and they have Detective on top of that, and Security Hub that ties it all together, and a few more. And then, because I'm a cloud economist, I wind up sitting here and doing the math out on this and yes, it does turn out the data breach would be cheaper. So, at what point do you stop hurling money into the InfoSec basket on some level?Because it's similar to DR; it's a bit of a white elephant you can throw any amount of money at and still get it wrong, as well as at some point you have now gone so far toward the security side of things that you have impaired usability for folks who are building things. Obviously, you need your data to be secure, but you also need that data to be useful.Will: Yep. The short answer to that is, I would like to find anybody who can give you the straight answer for that one. There is no [unintelligible 00:13:00] to any of this. You cannot basically say, “This is a point of stop.” If you will, from an expenditure perspective.The fundamental difference right now is we're trying to basically cross that chasm. Security has traditionally been in a silo. It hasn't worked out really well. I think that security really needs to buck up and collaborate. It cannot basically remain in a control function, which is where we are right now.A lot of security practitioners have the belief that they are the master of everything and no one is right. That fundamentally needs to stop. Then we can have conversations around when we can basically stop spending the expenditure on security. I think that's where we are right now. Right now, it still feels very much disparate in a not-so-good way.It has gotten better, I think; the companies in the Valley are really trying to basically figure out how to do this correctly. I would say the larger organizations are still not there. And I want to really, sort of, sit from the sideline and watch the digital transformation thing happen. One of the larger institutions just announced that they're going to go with AWS Cloud, I think you know who I'm talking about.Corey: I do indeed.Will: Yeah. [laugh]. So, I'm waiting to see what's going to happen out of that. I think that a lot of their security practitioners are up for a moment of wake-up. [laugh].Corey: They really are. And moving to cloud has been a fascinating case study in this. Back in 2012, when I was working in FinTech, we were doing a fair bit of work on AWS, so we did a deal with a large financial partner. And their response was, “So okay, what data centers are you using?” “Oh, yeah, we're hosting in AWS.”And their response was, “No, you're not. Where are you hosting?” “Okay, then.” I checked recently and sure enough, that financial partner now is all-in on Cloud. Great. So, I said—when one of these deals was announced—that large finance companies are one of the bellwether institutions, that when they wind up publicly admitting that they can go all-in on cloud or use a cloud provider, that is a signal to a lot of companies that are no longer even finance-adjacent, but folks who look at that and say, “Okay, cloud is probably safe.”Because when someone says, “Oh, our data is too sensitive to live on the cloud.” “Really? Because your government uses it, your tax authority uses it, your bank uses it, your insurance underwriter uses it, and your auditor uses it. So, what makes your data so much more special than that?” And there aren't usually a lot of great answers other than just curmudgeonly stubbornness, which, hey, I'm as guilty of as anyone else.Will: Well, I mean, there's a bunch of risk people sitting there and trying to quantify what the risk is. That's part of the issue is that you have your business people who may actually be embracing it, but then you—and your technologists, frankly speaking. But then you have the entire risk arm, who is potentially reading some white paper that they read, and they're concluding that the cloud is insecure. I always challenge that.Corey: Yeah, it's who funded this paper, what are they trying to sell? Because no one says that without a vested interest.Will: Well, I mean, there's a bunch of server manufacturers that are going to be left out of the conversation.Corey: A recurring pattern is that a big company will acquire a startup of some sort, and say, “Okay, so you're on the cloud.” And they'll view that through a lens of, “Well, obviously of course you're on the cloud. You're a startup; you can't afford to do a data center build-out, but don't worry. We're here now. We can now finance the CapEx build-out.”And they're surprised to see pushback because the thing that they miss is, it was not an economic decision that drove companies to cloud. If it started off that way, it very quickly stopped being that way. It's a capability story, it's if I need to suddenly scale up an entire clone of the production environment to run a few tests and then shut it down, it doesn't take me eight weeks and a whole bunch of arguing with procurement to get that. It takes me changing an argument to, ideally a command line or doing some pull request or something like that does this all programmatically, waiting a few minutes and then testing it there. And—this is the part everyone forgets—McLeod economic side—and then turning it back off again so you don't pay for it in perpetuity.It really does offer a tremendous boost in terms of infrastructure, in terms of productivity, in terms of capability stories. So, we're going to move back to a data center now that you've been acquired has never been a really viable strategy in many respects. For starters, a bunch of you engineers are not going to be super happy with that, and are going to take their extremely hard-to-find skill set elsewhere as soon as that becomes a threat to what they're doing.Will: Precisely. I have seen that pattern. And the second part to that pattern, [laugh] which is very interesting is trying to figure out the compromise between cloud and on-prem. Meaning that you're going to try to bolt-on your on-prem solutions into the cloud solution, which equally doesn't work if not it makes it even worse. So, you end up with this quasi-hybrid model of sorts, and that doesn't work. So, it's all-in or nothing. Like I said, we've gotten to the point where the realization is cloud is the way to do it.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense. Corey: For the most part, yes. There are occasional use cases where not being in cloud or not being in a particular cloud absolutely makes sense. And when companies come to me and talk to me that this is their perspective and that's why they do it, my default response is, “You're probably right.” When I talk about these things, I'm speaking about the general case. But companies have put actual strategic thought into things, usually.There's some merit behind that and some contexts and constraints that I'm missing. It's the old Chesterton's Fence story, where it's a logic tool to say, okay, if you come to a fence in the middle of nowhere, the naive person, “Oh, I'm going to remove this fence because it's useless.” The smarter approach is, “Why is there a fence here? I should probably understand that before I take it down.” It's one of those trying to make sure that you understand the constraints and the various strategic objectives that lend themselves to doing things in certain ways.I think that nuance gets lost, particularly in mass media, where people want these nuanced observations somehow distilled down into something that fits in a tweet. And that's hard to do.Will: Yep. How many characters are we talking about now? 280.Corey: 280 now, but you can also say a lot with gifs. So, that helps.Will: Exactly, yeah. A hundred percent.Corey: So, in your career, you've been in a lot of different places. Before you came over and did a lot of the financial-regulated stuff. You were at Omada Health where you were focusing on healthcare-regulated side of things. These days, you're in a bit of a different direction, but what have you noticed that, I guess, keeps dragging you into various forms of regulated entities? Are those generally the companies that admit that they, while still in startup stage, actually need someone to focus on security? Or is there more to it that draws you in?Will: Yeah, I know. There's probably several different personas to every company that's out there. You have your engineering-oriented companies who are wildly unregulated, and I'm talking about maybe your autonomous vehicle companies who have no regulations to follow, they have to figure it out on their own. Then you have your companies that are in highly regulated industries like healthcare and financial industry, et cetera. I have found that my particular experience is more applicable to the latter, not the former.I think when you basically end up in companies that are trying to figure it out, it's more about engineering, less about regulations or frameworks, et cetera. So, for me, it's been a blend between compliance and security and engineering. And that's where I strive. That doesn't mean that I don't know what I'm doing, it just means that I'm probably more effective in healthcare and FinTech. But I will say—you know, this is an interesting part—what used to take months to implement now is considerably shorter from an implementation timeline perspective.And that's the good news. So, you have more opportunities in healthcare and FinTech. You can do it nimbly, you can do things that you generally had to basically spend massive amounts of money and capital to implement. And it has gotten better. I find myself that, you know, I struggle less now, even in the AWS stack trying to basically implement something that gets us close to what is required, at least from a bare minimum perspective.And by the way, the bare minimum is compliance.Corey: Yes.Will: That's where it starts, but it doesn't end there.Corey: A lot of security folks start off thinking that, “Oh, it's all about red team and pentesting and the rest, and no, no, an awful lot of InfoSec is in fact compliance.” It's not just, do the right thing, but how do you demonstrate you're doing the right thing? And that is not for everyone.Will: I would caution anybody who wants to get into security to first consider how many different colors there are to the rainbow in the security side of the house, and then figure out what they really want to do. But there is a misconception around when you call security often, to your point, people kind of default to, “Oh, it's red teaming.” Or, “It's basically trying to break or zero-days.” Those happens seldom, although seems they're happening far more often than they should.Corey: They just have better marketing now.Will: Yeah. [laugh].Corey: They get names and websites and a marketing campaign. And who knows, probably a Google Ad buy somewhere.Will: Yep, exactly. So, you have to start with compliance. I also would caution my DevOps and my engineering counterparts and colleagues to, maybe, rethink the approach. When you approach a practitioner from a security side, it's not all about compliance, and if you ask them, “Well, you only do compliance,” they're going to may laugh at you. Think of it as it's all-inclusive.It is compliance mixed with security, but in order for us to be able to demonstrate success, we have to start somewhere, and that's where compliance is—that's the starting point. That becomes sort of your northern light in a referential perspective. Then you figure out, okay, how do we up our game? How do we refine this thing that we just implemented? So, it becomes evolving; it becomes a living entity within the company. That's how I usually approach it.Corey: I think that's the only sensible way to go about these things. Starting from a company of one to, at the time is recording, I believe we're nine people but don't quote me on that. I don't want to count noses. One of the watershed moments for us when we started hiring people who—gasp, shock—did not have backgrounds as engineers themselves—it turns out that you can't generally run most companies with only people who have been spending the last 15 years staring at computers. Who knew?—and it's a different mindset; it's a different approach to these things.And because again, it's that same tension, you don't want to be the Department of No. You don't want to make it difficult for people to do their jobs. There's some low bar stuff such as you don't want people using a password of ‘kitty' everywhere and then having it on a post-it note on the back of their laptop in an airport lounge, but you also don't want them to have to sit there and go through years of InfoSec training to make this stuff makes sense. So, building up processes like we have here, like security awareness training, about half of it is garbage; I got to be perfectly honest. It doesn't apply to how any of us do business. It has a whole bunch of stuff that presupposes that we have an office. We don't. We're full remote with no plans to change that. And it's a lot of frankly, terrible advice, like, “Never click a link in email.” It's yeah, in theory, that makes sense from a security perspective, but have you met humans?Will: Yeah, exactly.Corey: It's this understanding of what you want to be doing idealistically versus what you can do with people trying to get jobs done because they are hired to serve a purpose for the company that is not security. “Security is everyone's job,” is a great slogan and I understand where it's going, but it's not realistic.Will: Nope, it's not. It's funny it's you mentioned that. I'm going through a similar experience from a security awareness training perspective and I have been cycling through several vendors—one prominent one that has a Chief Hacking Officer of sorts—and amazingly enough, their content is so very badly written and so very badly optimized on the fact that we're still in this world of going to a office or doing things that don't make sense. “Don't click the link?” You're right. Who doesn't click the link? [laugh].Corey: Right. Oh, yeah. It's a constant ongoing thing where you continually keep running into folks who just don't get it, on some level. We all have that security practitioner friend who only ever sends you email that is GPG encrypted. And what do they say in those emails?I don't know. Who has the time to sit there and decrypt it? I'm not running anything that requires disclosure. I just don't understand the mindset behind some of these things. The folks living off the grid as best they can, they don't participate in society, they never have a smartphone, et cetera, et cetera. Having seen some things I've seen, I get it, but at some point, it's one of those you… you don't have to like it, but accepting that we live in a society sort of becomes non-optional.Will: Exactly. There lies the issue with security is that you have your wonks who are overly paranoid, they're effectively like the your talented engineer types: they know what they're talking about and obviously, they use open-source projects like GPG, et cetera. And that's all great, but they don't necessarily fit into the contemporary context of the business world and they're seen as outliers who are basically relied on to do things that aren't part of the normal day-to-day business operations. Then you have your folks who are just getting into it and they're reading your CISSP guides, and they're saying, “This is the way we do things.” And then you have people who are basically trying to cross that chasm in between. [laugh].And that's where the security is right now. And it's a cornucopia of different personalities, et cetera. It is getting better, but what we all have to collectively realize is that it is not perfect. To your point, there is no one true way of practicing security. It's all based on how the business perceived security and what their needs are, first and foremost, and then trying to map the generalities of security into the business context.Corey: That's always the hardest part is so many engineering-focused solutions don't take business context into account. I feel very aligned with this from the cost perspective. The reason I picked cost instead of something like security—because frankly, me doing basically what I'm doing now with a different position of, “Oh, I will come in and absolutely clear up the mistakes you have made in your IAM policies.” And, “Oh, we haven't made any mistakes in our IAM policies.” You ever met someone for who not only is that true, but also is confident enough to say that? Because, “Great. We'll do an audit. You want to bet? If we don't find anything, we'll give you a refund.” [laugh]. And it's fun, but are people going to call you with that in the middle of the night and wake you up? The cloud economics thing, it is strictly a business hours problem.Will: Yeah, yeah. It's funny that you mention that. So, somebody makes a mistake in that IAM cloud policy. They say, “Everybody gets admin.” Next thing you know, yes, that ends up causing an auth event, you have a bunch of EC2 instances that were basically spun up by some bad actor, and now you have a $1 million bill that you have to pay.Corey: Right. And you can get adjustments to your bill by talking to AWS support and bending the knee. And you're going to have to get yelled at, and they will make you clean up your security policies, which you really shut it down anyway, and that's the end of it. For the most part.Will: I remember I spun up a Macie when it had just came out.Corey: Oh, no.Will: Oh, yeah.Corey: That was $5 per gigabyte of data ingested, which is right around the breakeven point of hire a bunch of college interns to do it instead, by hand.Will: Yeah, I remember the experience. It ended up costing $24,000 in a span of 24 hours.Corey: Yep.Will: [laugh].Corey: And it was one of the most blindsidingly obvious things, to the point where they wound up releasing something like a 90% pay cut with the second generation of billing. And the billing's still not great on something like that. I was working with a client when that came out, and their account manager immediately starts pushing it to them and they turn to me almost in unison, and, “Should we do it?”—good. We have them trained well, and I, “Hang on,”—envelope math—“Great. Running this on the data you have an S3 right now would cost for the first month, $76 million, so I vote we go with Option B, which is literally anything that isn't that, up to and including we fund our own startup that will do this ourselves, have them go through your data, then declare failure on Medium with a slash success post of our incredible journey has come to an end; here's what's next. And then you pocket the difference and use it for something good.”And then—this is at the table with the AWS account manager. Their response, “So, you're saying we have a pricing problem with Macie?” It's like well, “Whether it's a problem or not really depends on what side of that transaction [laugh] you're on, but I will say I'll never use the thing.” And only four short years later, they fixed the pricing model.Will: Finally. And that was the problem is that you want to do good; you end up doing bad as a result. And that was my learning experience. And then I had to obviously talk to them and beg, borrow, and steal and try to explain to them why I made that mistake. [laugh]. And then finally, you know [crosstalk 00:29:52]—Corey: Oh, yeah. It's rare that you can make an honest, well-intentioned mistake and not get that taken care of. But that is not broadly well known. And they of course can't make guarantees around it because as soon as you do that you're going to open the door for all kinds of bad actors. But it's something where, this is the whole problem with their billing model is they have made it feel dangerous to experiment with it. “Oh, you just released a new service. I'm not going to play with that yet.”Not because you don't trust the service and not because you don't trust the results you're going to get from it, but because there's this haunting fear of a bill surprise. And after you've gone through that once or twice, the scars stick with you.Will: Yep. PTSD. I actually learned from that mistake, and let's face it, it was a mistake and you learn from that. And I feel like I sort of honed in on the fact that I need to pay attention to your Twitter feed because you talk about this stuff. And that was really, like, the first and last mistake that I made with a AWS service stack.Corey: Following on my Twitter feed? Yeah, first and last mistake a lot of people make.Will: Oh, I mean, it was—that's too, but you know, that's a good mistake to make. [laugh]. But yeah, it was really enlightening in a good way. And I actually—you know, what's funny about it is if you start with a AWS service that has just basically been released, be cautious and be very calculated around what you're implementing and how you're implementing it. And I'll give you one example: AWS Shield, for example.Corey: Oh, yeah. The free version or the $3,000 per month with a one-year commitment?Will: [unintelligible 00:31:15] version. Yeah, you start there, and then you quickly realize the web application firewall rules, et cetera, they're just not there yet. And that needs to be refined. But would I pay $3,000 for AWS Shield Advanced or something else? I probably will go with something else.There lies the issue is that AWS is very quick to release new features and to corner that market, but they just aren't fast enough to, like, at least in the current form—you know, from a security perspective, when you look at those services, they're just not fast enough to refine. And there is, maybe, an issue with that, at least from my experience perspective. I would want them to pay a little bit more attention to, not so much your developers, but your security practitioners because they know what they're looking for. But AWS is nowhere to be found on that side of the house.Corey: Yeah. It's a hard problem. And I'm not entirely sure the best way to solve for it, yet.Will: Yeah, yeah. And there lies a comment where I said that we're crossing that chasm right now…. We're just not there yet.Corey: Yeah. One of these days. If people want to hear more about what you're up to and how you view these things, where can they find you?Will: Twitter.Corey: Always a good decision. What's your username? And we will, of course, throw a link to it in the [show notes 00:32:33].Will: Yeah, @willgregorian. Don't go to LinkedIn. [laugh].Corey: No. No one likes—LinkedIn is trying to be a social network, but not anywhere near getting there. Thank you so much for taking the time to basically reminisce with me if nothing else.Will: This was awesome.Corey: Really was. Will Gregorian, head of information security at Color Health. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an ignorant comment telling me why I'm wrong about rotating passwords every 60 days.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need the Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)
How Gregorian chant inspired a Halifax visual artist's exhibit

Information Morning from CBC Radio Nova Scotia (Highlights)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 6:34


Hear how Halifax visual artist Christopher Webb, who doesn't read or write music, ended up conducting a group of singers in Annapolis Valley in a performance of Gregorian chant.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
8.1.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 16:32


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, August 1st, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, Folk) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Natural Time
Blue Lunar Night

Natural Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021


7.25.21 - Day 2/13 of the White Wind Wavespell * Day Out of Time Today is called the 'Day Out of Time' as a poetic description of being unconnected to any of the 13 Moons. It's neither the furtherance of our recent, final Cosmic Moon or an antecedent of the Magnetic Moon that launches our new year on July 26. It's a day's breath away from the 13 Moon wavespell that is demanding work for all of us who follow its fluid changes. In that way, time stops - no consideration for the purposefulness that tomorrow's Magnetic tone drives, no last grip on the year that was completed in a form of transcendence in the Cosmic time. Like the late night of New Year's Eve in the Gregorian tradition, we're awash in enchantment, finalizing and releasing the past while turning wakefully toward the future. It's a special way to be in connection to the ancient cultures that saw July 26 as the new year - the Maya and Egyptians both - and to feel caught again in the power of any devotion you feel to this modern Mayan movement.

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
7.18.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 18:00


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 18th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: 2 Timothy 2v8, 11-13 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer (Latin) Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (Gregorian) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Metal Nerdery
098: 1988 Metal and Thrash Albums

Metal Nerdery

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2021 89:23


Metal Prophecy states that TB4 (The Big 4) made a pact with TAI (The Almighty Iommi) to unite like some ginormous Voltronesque Thrash Beast for the furtherance and advancement of Thrash (and really, ALL Metal, but mostly, REALLY Thrash) to a new frontier (or perhaps even “a new level”, you might say…) of unheralded, unmatched power.  The prophecy required that each of TB4 release an album of their latest and finest work during the same designated Gregorian based calendar year:  1988.     1988 was THE year of The Big 4 (are you (KK) kidding?  That's “not even” (KK) up for debate!), THE rise of “the next wave” of Thrash (ummm (KK) Testament, (KK) Forbidden, (KK) Death Angel MUCH!?), and THE dawn of a “new” Pantera (that's right…OUR (KK) PanterA!!!).   Subtract 3 decades to reach TAOTBA (The Age of The Black Album), subtract another 3 years to reach TAOTAMP (The Age of the Aforementioned Metal Prophecy) and then solve for the variable of WHY the words “Bon Jovi” were EVER uttered within our 33rd Floor Bunker P00n Inversion Studio airspaces before you JOIN US as we embrace the year of the audiogasm in Thrash (and also “other” Metal) and celebrate the YORL (Year of Our Riff Lord) in Metal that could only be 1988!!!   *KK=This post made proudly bland courtesy of Kancel Kulture and the wreckless censorship of mouth farts in print (aka “WORDS”).  Just kidding, it's those kuss words (mouth farts) that hurt their feelers.  This is just dumb, passive-aggressive nonsense that has nothing to do with the original post, but we thank you for reading onward.  Please, Go Listen…Metal Nerdery Podcast is on ALL platforms wherever podcasts are available and its actually way funner than reading, although there are also show notes available that you can read along to, too, that are often mystical, hilarious, and even insightful (assuming you can read.  If not, find someone who can read to you for you.)  Yeah, we've planned for everything!!  (And you're also welcome, btw.)  Oh yeah, THANK YOU for listening!!!  It means an awful bunch.  And if you could send us some relaxers through the gum app, we'd appreciate it.  #TallDenmarkian is the account.  Don't worry, Lars already knows what's up.  Thanks.  We hope you enjoy the show.   Visit www.metalnerdery.com/podcast for more on this episode   Leave us a Voicemail to be played on a future episode: 980-666-8182 Metal Nerdery Tees and Hoodies – metalnerdery.com/merch and kindly leave us a review and/or rating on the iTunes/Apple Podcasts - Spotify or your favorite Podcast app Listen on iTunes, Spotify, Podbean, Google Play or wherever you get your Podcasts. Follow us on the Socials: Facebook - Instagram - Twitter   Email: metalnerdery@gmail.com   Show Notes: (00:00) - #drnotsoevil #domination #clinky accents and tests of #irishness (with 2 "K"s) and grammatical cancel culture / #covid compliant nudity and relative #pantslessness / #mathhurts #numbers (Russell was right) and using #theunnamedalbum as a yardstick to determine the passage of time #blackalbummath #sorrynotsorry / What were YOU doing in 1988?  #Phenomenalness (Because it was a #muchly #bigly year for #metal and #thrash) / #voicemails #staycool #growing #what ***CALL THE METAL NERDERY VOICEMAIL WARMLINE NOW AT 980-666-8182*** #yepyepthursday #tonebone #itwasntme #tabulature #Decimation #Ascension #him and/or #nothim  (09:07) - #onmicopening and #SuicidalTendencies and their evolution through the spectrum from punk to thrash to metal (and a moment of #ST #tangentionalalityismness #halfadifficulty #noteightyeight SEND ME YOUR MONEY) Mike Muir's stage presence and “frontpersonness” and coming in at the end of...wait, what!?  (HOW WILL I LAUGH TOMORROW) #hard (17:35) - The year of #thebigfour and the year that thrash came together like some #Voltron #ThrashBeast / Some other memories and highlights from 1988, #scolded for #moistASMR and Brian Johnson's vocal metamorphosis #ACDC (MEANSTREAK) #akkadakka / #AcidReign early #bitcoin #billionaire #lore (see also new #Quicksand tune “Missile Command”) and a moment of #tangentionalalityismness to #GorillaBiscuits /#Moshkinstein and that #tone (GODDESS)  (25:18) - #Anthrax (BE ALL END ALL), the progression of Anthrax's sound and a #sneakattack from #AcidReign #ghostinthemachine (Yes, no, yes, no, #NOT) Remember back in the day when you could get cassettes for #onedollar? / #Bathory (the #BlackSabbath of #vikingmetal) ***go watch #metalgrasshopper, and its Dave HILL, NOT Hall, as in #thehillofthemountainking*** #bigbudgetsoftintro A FINE DAY TO DIE #extrememetal #blackmetal (no room for vocals after all those soft intros...) #bigbudget #softintro #vikingdoomstonercore and a moment of madness regarding  #BonJovi and that elusive #CelticFrost tune #iseewhatyoudidthere #yeah #moist. (35:53) - #Coroner and an #onmicopening and #triggers and #drpimplepopper #zimpleimpaler #triggerwarning (ABSORBED #technicalprogthrash) / #Danzig (THE HUNTER  (and a loose tangentional connection to Led Zeppelin I) & POSSESSION (#supercreepy #notsosoftintro) #evil #darkcrooner / #zeroexpectations #DeathAngel (I'M BORED) ***PSA:  We here at #metalnerderypodcast are proud to say that we are #tentaclepositive*** and how to build a simple riff into a monstrosity of crushing thrashtactical devastation / #laughingmyballsoff and then #laughingmyballson and #lessonslearned #thedevilisinthedetails  (47.:47) - #Destruction #tittlytrack (RELEASE FROM AGONY) #stopburpingASMR check out that #albumcover #donttinfoilme / Other memorable mentions for 1988... / #IronMaiden (MOONCHILD) #recordscratch #uhoh #tunedout #progmetal #cantbeloudenough #zerohate / #FatesWarning #nope #movingon  #dudehaveyouheardthis / The connectivity and #tangentionalityismness of #progmetal and #thrashmetal (ANARCHY DIVINE) #guitarporn and #moreriffs and #stopburping and a word regarding the upcoming show from the mind and mouth that brought you #screamfromtheballs (59:22) - #Forbidden #derp #amiwrong #cble #cantbeloudenough (AS GOOD AS DEAD) #audiogasm / What would a female #Lemmy be like? / #itmoved #Pantera and a #tittlytrack (POWER METAL) #itnevergetsold #reinventingthemetal and the transition from the glammy to the thrashy and "what if" analysis / #KingDiamond and "Them" and #albumart and the #Abigail #graphicnovel / "If you pull it up, I can tell you..." #KingdomCome #alotofcome and #lessonslearnedreprise (WHAT LOVE CAN BE), and a sort of modern "reimagining" of Since I've Been Loving You by the mighty #LedZeppelin #slowdance / #closeted #hairmetalfans #whyblown / upcoming rollout for the #timetravelrelaxers and #metalnerdery #manowar #mancloth (1:14:51) - #petty and #difficult / #Metallica (SHORTEST STRAW) and the story behind #Wrigleys sponsorship for Laryngitis' drum kit (and clearly also Jason's #ghostbass) / More various metal releasticals for 1988...#DavidLeeRoth embodied everything that was the 80's (***go check out our #shredders episode***) / #bassshredders #gagtrigger What did they 8? and the return of the #kuntykuntasaurus #yeahtheyregoodilikethosedudes / #Slayer #producerschoice (BEHIND THE CROOKED CROSS) and a #boneus track off of "Scrolls from the Elder" / #moist and the #softoutros that some people work #hardon #thankyouforthat  #softoutroASMR ***BUY OUR SHIT AT www.metalnerdery.com/merch***  

Titan Up The Defense
Episode 309: Titan Up the Defense 237- New Teen Titans (Vol 2) #43

Titan Up The Defense

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 96:18


Woosah! We read all about Raven taking on Phobia in New Teen Titans (Vol 2) #43, and get more diversion prone than usual as we discuss: the Columbo of Azarath, Horse chestnuts, Sarah Simms' flirting techniques, Gregorian chants, and what is Raven eating? Enjoy! Enjoy! please consider donating at patreon.com/ttwasteland You can get into touch with us at ttwasteland@gmail.com or Titan Up the Defense PO Box 20311 Portland, OR 97294

The Dictionary
#C208 (church mode to churr)

The Dictionary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2021 13:55


I read from church mode to churr.   More info on church modes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_mode https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mode_(music)     The word of the episode is "churn".     dictionarypod@gmail.com https://www.facebook.com/thedictionarypod/ https://twitter.com/dictionarypod https://www.instagram.com/dictionarypod/ https://www.patreon.com/spejampar 917-727-5757

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours
7.4.21 Lauds, Sunday Morning Prayer

The Liturgy of the Hours: Sing the Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 16:40


Lauds (Morning Prayer) for the 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time, July 4th, 2021. Thanks for praying with us, for inquiries, requests, feedback, please email singthehours@gmail.com. Visit our website at www.singthehours.org To support this work, please visit www.patreon.com/singthehours or for direct support venmo @singthehours Deus in Adjutorium Hymn: “Holy Holy Holy," Heber (1826) Psalm 118 (Gregorian tone 4) Canticle: Daniel 3v52-57 (Gregorian tone 5) Psalm 150 (Gregorian tone 6) Reading: Ezekiel 36v25-27 Responsory: We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name. Canticle of Zechariah (Luke 1v68-79) (Gregorian tone 8) Intercessions: We praise you, Lord, and trust in you. The Lord’s Prayer Concluding Prayers Ave Maria (English, Folk) The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes), ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Readings and Old and New Testament Canticles (except the Gospel Canticles) are from the New American Bible © 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, Washington, D.C.

Defining Disney Podcast
Episode 2x13 - The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Defining Disney Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 152:53


Our super-sized season two finale tackles one of Disney's most ambitious and adult adaptations, The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Join us as we discuss the difficult issues it takes on and how well it navigates the fine line between making a film of children and bringing a faithful film version forth from this classic piece of French literature.  Don't miss: The in-depth research that Alan Menken and Stephen Schwartz did into Gregorian chants and Catholic tradition to weave Latin and Greek Biblical references throughout the film's score How masterfully Tab Murphy's script explores the complex relationship between religion and morality  Our discussion of the few really negative things that keep this film from breaking the top five Our final score for the film - it ties a fellow Renaissance film but arrives at that number pretty differently PLUS, we talk through all the thoughts our audience had when they watched the movie, including our friend Emily who offered us the chance to discuss the missed opportunity in removing the book's original ending.    Links for you: Our website has our ranking graph for all the movies we've rated so far Become a Ko-fi member for exclusive content and access to your hosts and our team Join our ‘Ohana to be among the first to know about new content we're developing Follow us on Twitter @definingdisney and let us know your thoughts on The Hunchback of Notre Dame Check out this production of the musical version of this film that features a deaf actor playing Quasimodo When our transcription is available, we'll link it here Don't forget to SUBSCRIBE so you don't miss a single episode, and if you enjoyed this one, please leave us a rating and review. Thanks for listening and we'll see ya real soon!

Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

Nicole starts the show by reading Sasheer's tarot cards, and the results are INTENSE! But also promising! Sasheer then reads Nicole's - which were mainly upside down and all about career. She wants to know about love! The share times the cards have been meaningful to them, discuss Sasheer's upcoming move to Atlanta, and then dive back into questioning the Gregorian calendar. Nicole invents new numbers, and they rename teeth food bones. They take a quiz to see what decade they belong in, and answer listener questions dealing with a friend's ex-husband, and losing friends when getting sober.   Email or call Nicole & Sasheer with your friendship questions at: nicoleandsasheer@gmail.com (424) 645-7003

Sips, Suds, & Smokes
I’ll have a Pils after the Doxology

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2021 51:17


I’ll have a Pils after the Doxology @MunkleBrewingCo #beer #charleston #roadkill Co hosts : Good ol Boy Dave, Good ol Boy Kendall, Good ol Boy Sparky, Rev. Mark, and Good ol Gal Julieanna SUDS  Episode – A brewery takeover from Munkle Brewing Company out of Charleston, SC. After consultation with the religious order, we obtained the rights to mow their lawn because they provide some great lawnmower beer in trade. The beer does taste better if you are wearing the Pope slippers while enjoying these beers. I like it based on the basis of liking it. We taste and rate the following beer from 1-5:   All Beer in this episode from Munkle Brewing Company, Charleston, SC 9:02               Gully Washer Wit 5.2% ABV  made with 3 different types of citrus peel, chamomile and Indian coriander seeds. SUDS-3 14:17            Munk Pils 5.1% ABV  German Pilsner  SUDS-4 19:34            Brugge City Brune Belgian style brown ale brewed with Belgian dark candi syrup made from beet sugar  SUDS-3 24:50            Munk Light Belgian-style table beer brewed with fresh raspberries 3.6% ABV  SUDS-2 30:22            Silver Shoes Belgian Style stout made with lots of brown sugar, chocolate/roasted malts and their house Abbey Ale yeast. 6.1% ABV  SUDS-4 40:09            3rd Floor Tripel medium bodied Belgian tripel 8.2% ABV SUDS-3 44:55            Westmalle Trappist Tripel 9.5% ABV  Malle, Vlaanderen Belgium  SUDS-5   info@sipssudsandsmokes.com @sipssudssmokes Sips, Suds, & Smokes™ is produced by One Tan Hand Productions using the power of beer, whiskey, and golf.  Available on Apple & Google Podcasts, PRX, Spotify, Podbean, Soundcloud, and nearly anywhere you can find a podcast. Check out Good ol Boy Dave on 60 Second Reviews https://www.instagram.com/goodoleboydave/ Kendall is still trying to nail that Gregorian chant with a SC accent. His beer blog is: https://www.beermakesthree.com/ Enjoying that cool new Outro Music, it’s from Woods & Whitehead – Back Roads Download your copy here: https://amzn.to/2Xblorc The easiest way to find this award winning podcast on your phone is ask Alexa, Siri or Google, “Play Podcast , Sips, Suds, & Smokes” 

The Seven Streams Method

Mark 10-11 We are in the Christ Stream today reading about Palm Sunday and more. We are using the Common English Bible this week. 7streamsmethod.com | @7StreamsMethod | @serenatravis | #7Streams | @drakewtravis Commentary by Dr. Drake Travis Dear Lord Jesus, thank you for sharing your endless wisdom, your mind, your life and your eternal home with us.  Amen 1 - In case anyone is wondering: Jesus is in the final days - week or two at the most - of His life/ministry before He is crucified. It is the Springtime. If we put our calendar transparently right on top of the local calendar of the era and region we would be calling the month April. If you are into calendars, the Julian and the Gregorian and (it's a laborious study so we will simply mention it here) The year is 29 A.D. -Fascinating little study about the dates. But, on to Jesus' march to Jerusalem. He has just come far south. He is still east of the Jordan and getting mashed in by a crowd again, He is teaching and some Pharisees are there. They ask him if divorce is permitted by law.  It's always amusing when someone asks a question and they are not really on a quest to get their question answered. These Pharisees are tramps! They were the type to divorce and give out easy divorces for ... a wife burning the food, for casually stating "she isn't attractive to me anymore". They treated women below dogs. And so over the years, most of these clowns had turned their wives into skittish, cowering ladies who lived with little value in their own minds so their own husbands were not drawn to them anymore. They don't care that the Law forbids divorce. They are just trying to set up a situation where Jesus seems pitted against Moses. Makes one shake their head to watch these guys get "owned" or exposed like crooks in broad daylight. I like to say that Jesus tied them in a knot and left them baking in the sun. OK, that's not very nice :-( Next we see Jesus blessing little children, and the disciples rebuke this. For them, children are a segue to nothing. They can't be added to the "vital contacts" list. Jesus, always ready to create a teachable moment, does so and portrays "the child" as the ones who access God far more readily for they come to God for love. They come purely. No finesse, no secondary or hidden agenda. No attempt to deceive or be dubious. They just come to Jesus because they want HIM. Adults rarely do that, though children always do. And we better learn something here. ~Then there comes a rich young ruler; he has wealth, youth, time, and power. He wants to add Jesus' wisdom to his arsenal AND have eternal life. Jesus basically says to him, that Jesus is to be the number one priority in his life. We've met people who glance over Jesus' statement here and declare they can never follow Jesus. This is paper-thin scholarship. Just a few verses later Jesus tells his disciples that ALL things are possible with God. Jesus asserts that those who serve Him wholeheartedly will be rewarded accordingly and they can "take that to the bank". -He tells of his Passion again - remember Jesus does this five times during this season of His ministry -  James and Johns' little "I'm #1" squabble is turned into a teaching lesson for service. Interesting that Christians lead the world in service because of this passage right here! -in the blind Bartimaeus story, notice that when Jesus calls to him, he throws off his mantle. This mantle was a cloak that was sanctioned by the government meaning he was 'cleared' to beg. BarT- throwing it away as soon as he hears Jesus' voice means he KNOWS he will be healed. Do we come to Jesus' with that confidence?! 11 - The triumphal entry is the event that is commemorated each Palm Sunday the world over. 'Pretty bold of him to go straight to the Temple and bash all the bookkeepers and kaBoom the bazaar that had developed into an eternal fundraiser. To charge people for praying was disgusting and Jesus' made is statement didn't He.??  The fig tree incident can be analyzed for a lifetime, I'll just pick one facet and say this, "we need to be producing something for God's sake. Jesus is hungry and wants a fig. Are we going to be coming to God empty handed forever? Come on! He tells us to be full of faith and quick to forgive. Let's do what we are told here. -It ends today with the Temple leaders coming to him again with a question that is just a ploy to ensnarl Him. Again, their "question" is no quest. Jesus throws it right back at them and they fall dumbfoundedly silent.  This whole interchange is actually taught in law schools today for it's brilliance and quick reply that exposes what is really going on. -Looking over the two chapters today, let's not come to Jesus with our "educated agenda", let's come like Bartimaeus and the children with our needs before us and excitement to be with Him.

Do Something Beautiful
103: What Happens to You When You Listen to Chant? (with Br. Stefan, OP and Br. Alexandre, OP)

Do Something Beautiful

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 39:42


In this episode, Leah is joined by Br. Stefan Ansinger OP and Br. Alexandre Frezzato, OP:  Dominican brothers from the Netherlands and Switzerland, who have begun the OP Chant Project, to provide and promote Gregorian chant according to the Dominican tradition.They tell the story of coming to learn and love what Leah's kids refer to as "God's music!"  (Gregorian chant), both before their vocation and in their Dominican community. They also share how and why they began a youtube channel devoted to sharing chant in the Dominican tradition, and what that is. Did you even know there was more than one kind of Gregorian chant?? The Brothers also discuss the uplifting daily effects of bringing Gregorian Chant into your life.Advice on getting started: Don't worry about understanding the meaning. Just enjoy the melodies. To listen to some of what the Fathers talk about, check out their youtube channel and their website.Challenge for listeners from the Fathers: Learn the Chant MediaVita (text below) The Antiphon “Media Vita” was formerly sung before the “Nunc Dimittis” at compline from the third Sunday of Lent until Passion Sunday. Nowadays it is sung as the Responsory on Saturdays, Sundays, feasts and Solemnities in Lent during Vespers or compline. Media vita in morte sumusQuem quaerimus adjutorem nisi te, Domine?Qui pro peccatis nostris juste irascerisSancte Deus, Sancte fortis,Sancte et misericors Salvator,Amaræ morti ne tradas nos.Versus: Ne projicias nos in tempore senectutis cum defecerit virtus nostra ne derelinquas nos Domine.Translation: In the midst of life we are in death; of whom may we seek help but you, O Lord, who for our offences are justly displeased? Yet, O God most holy, O holy and mighty, O holy and merciful Saviour, give us not over unto bitter death.Verse: Cast us not away in the time of our old age; forsake us not, O Lord, when our strength fails us.Yet, O God...HEY YOU! Yep. You. Are you Pam Beesly, Kelly Kapoor, or Jim Halpert? Could you possibly be Dwight?No idea what I'm talking about? Then you need to check this out –> Join my team, Become a Patron, and join me in bringing and highlighting God's beauty in the world!Have you checked out the Lux app? The Church and the world need you to be a light and to become who you were meant to be, and we believe in your ability to do it! Come join the community, be joined in prayer with a priest chaplain, get Catholic content and formation, and become the leader the world needs.Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/leahdarrow)

Square Notes: The Sacred Music Podcast
SE03 EP11 – The Origins of Gregorian Chant: The Roman Schola Cantorum and Old Roman Chant – with Dr. Joseph Dyer

Square Notes: The Sacred Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2021 42:16


Eminent chant scholar, Dr. Joseph Dyer, explains the Roman origins of Gregorian chant, the role of the Roman Schola Cantorum in the development of Roman chant, and what happened to that chant once it interacted with Franco-Gallican chant to become Gregorian chant. Join us for an episode which brings clarity to a complex history, and helps us better understand the roots of our Catholic sacred music traditions.  Follow Dr. Dyer's work at: https://um-boston.academia.edu/JosephDyer  Learn more about the summer sacred music study at St. Joseph's Seminary at: https://www.dunwoodie.edu/dunwoodie-music-classes