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Alternative (and religiously neutral) naming of the traditional calendar era, Anno Domini

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Designated Drinker Show
Epi 194 :: Laura Sook Duncombe :: Author :: A Pirate's Life for She

Designated Drinker Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:46


Get the featured cocktail recipe: Rum Rumaway Shiver me timbers! This week's epi features lawyer turned author and pirate, Laura Sook Duncombe, whose work uncovers the bounty of female pirates history has long ignored. From Grace O'Malley, who terrorized shipping operations around the British Isles during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, to the earliest known female pirate, Queen Artemisia I of Halicarnassus, who plundered Greek and Persian ships around 500 BCE. Laura helps us scallywags find our sea legs as we have much to learn from these powerful women who came from all walks of life but had one thing in common: a desire for freedom. Looking for the best cocktail to accompany you while you listen. Then head over to our library of libations for the right recipe to get you in the mood. Don't forget to follow, download and review to share your thoughts about the show! The Designated Drinker Show is produced by Missing Link—a podcast media company that is dedicated to connecting people to intelligent, engaging and informative content. Also in the Missing Link line-up of podcasts, is Rodger That—a podcast dedicated to guiding you through the haze of dementia led by skilled caregivers, Bobbi and Mike Carducci. Now, if you are looking for a whole new way to enjoy the theatre, check out Between Acts—an immersive audio theatre podcast experience. Each episode takes you on a spellbinding journey through the works of newfound playwrights—from dramas to comedies and everything in between.

Your Brain on Facts
Twins Remix (ep. 169)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 43:04


Twins, synchronicity, science, anomalies, and dark mysteries. Support the show Merch, book Music by Kevin MacLeod  Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email.     In 1940, a pair of twin boys, only three weeks old, were put up for adoption in Ohio.  Separate families adopted each boy and coincidentally named both James, calling them Jim for short.  They grew up never knowing anything about one another, but their lives were bizarrely similar.  They each had a dog named Toy and in elementary school, each both was good at math, showed talent in woodshop, but struggled with spelling.  But it was as they moved into adulthood that coincidences really started to pile up.  My name... If one is good, two must be better, so today we were talking about twin on the first of a pair of twin episodes.  Let's start with a quick review.  Fraternal twins occur when two eggs are separately fertilized.  They are genetically distinct, basically regular siblings that happened to be conceived at the same time.  Or not.  There's a rare circumstance called superfetation, where a woman ovulates while already pregnant and the second egg also gets fertilized.  Multiple eggs being released during ovulation can sometimes result in heteropaternal superfecundation, meaning the eggs were fertilized by different men's sperm, creating fraternal twins with different fathers.  Identical twins occur when a fertilized egg splits, creating two zygotes with the same cells.  The splitting ovum usually produces identical twins, but if the split comes after about a week of development, it can result in mirror-image twins.  Conjoined twins, what we used to call Siamese twins, can result from eggs that split most of the way, but not complete.  Twins account for 1.5% of all pregnancies or 3% of the population.  The rate of twinning has risen 50% in the last 20 years.  Several factors can make having twins more likely, such as fertility therapy, advanced age, heredity, number of previous pregnancies, and race, with African women have the highest incidence of twins, while Asian women have the lowest.    Twins have always been of great interest to scientists.  There's simply no better way to test variable vs control than to have two people with identical DNA.  Identical twins share all of their genes, while fraternal twins only share 50%.  If a trait is more common among identical twins than fraternal twins, it suggests genetic factors are at work.  "Twins studies are the only real way of doing natural experiments in humans," says Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at Kings College, London. "By studying twins, you can learn a great deal about what makes us tick, what makes us different, and particularly the roles of nature versus nature that you just can't get any other way.”   NASA was presented with a unique opportunity in the Kelly brothers, identical twins Scott, a current astronaut, and Mark, a retired astronaut.  As part of the "Year in Space" project, which would see Scott spend 340 on the ISS, the brothers provided blood, saliva, and urine samples, as well as undergoing a battery of physical and psychological tests designed to study the effects of long-duration spaceflight on the human body.  According to Dr Spector, twin studies are currently underway in over 100 countries.  Working with data and biological samples in the TwinsUK Registry, Spector's team has found more than 600 published papers showing a clear genetic basis for common diseases like osteoarthritis, cataracts and even back pain.  "When I started in this field, it was thought that only 'sexy' diseases [such as cancer] were genetic," Spector says. "Our findings changed that perception."   Back on our side of the pond, the Michigan State University Twin Registry was founded in 2001 to study genetic and environmental influences on a wide range of psychiatric and medical disorders.  One of their more surprising findings is that many eating disorders such as anorexia may not be wholly to blame on societal pressured by may actually have a genetic component to them.  "Because of twins studies,” says co-director Kelly Klump, “we now know that genes account for the same amount of variability in eating disorders as they do in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We would have never known that without twins studies."  On the topic of body-fat, a LSU study by Claude Bouchard in 1990 overfed a dozen young male twins by 1,000 calories a day for three months.  Although every participant gained weight, the amount of weight, and more importantly for the study, fat varied considerably, from 9-29lbs/4-13kg.  Twins tended to gain a similar amount of weight and in the same places as each other, but each pair differed from the other pairs in the test.   While some twin studies, like Year In Space, are famous, others are infamous.   If you're worried where this topic is going, don't be.  We're not talking about Joseph Mengele or the Russian conjoined twins, Masha and Dasha, though they may show up next week.  Twin studies helped create the thinking and even the word “eugenics.”  Francis Galton, a half-cousin of Charles Darwin, was one of the first people to recognize the value of twins to study inherited traits.  In his 1875 paper, "The History of Twins," Galton used twins to estimate the relative effects of nature versus nature, a term he is credited with coining.  Unfortunately, his firm belief that intelligence is a matter of nature led him to become a vocal proponent of the idea that "a highly gifted race of men" could be produced through selective breeding and that unsuitable people should be prevented from reproducing.  The word “eugenics” came up a lot during the Nuremberg trials, if it wasn't already clear with adherents to the idea had in mind.  More recently, in 2003, a psychology professor at the University of Virginia reviewed the research on the heritability of I.Q.  He noticed that most of the studies that declared that I.Q. is genetic involved twins from middle-class backgrounds.  When he looked at twins from poorer families, he found that the I.Q.s of identical twins varied just as much as the I.Q.s of fraternal twins.  In other words, the impact of growing up poor can overwhelm a child's natural intelligence.   Bonus fact: The trope of the evil twin can be traced back as far as 300 BCE, to the Zurvanite branch of Zoroastrianism, the world's oldest continuously-observed religion.    Of all the things inherent to and special about twins, one of the most fascinating is twin language.  You might have seen the adorable viral video of a pair of toddlers having an animated conversation in their twin language.  If you want to bust out your Latin, it's cryptophasia, a form of idioglossia, an idiosyncratic language invented and spoken by only one person or very few people.  It was a struggle not to throw myself head-first down the idioglossia rabbit hole; maybe for a later episode.  Twin speak, or even sibling speak has existed, for as long as human language, but has only been seriously studied for the last few decades, not only to determine how the languages develop but to see if speaking a twin language could hamper the children learning their parents' language.  The reason twins are more likely than other sibling pairs to create their own language is less interesting than psychic phenomena - twins spend a lot of time together, being built-in companions, and are at the same developmental stage.  They unconsciously work together to build their language by imitating and pretending to understand one another, reinforcing their use of the language.  This can weaken their incentive to learn to speak to everyone else--they already have someone to talk to.  Some researchers advocate treating cryptophasia as early as possible.  According to Oxford neuropsychologist Dorothy Bishop, twins often get less intervention from speech therapists than nontwins. “People often assume that it's normal for twins to have funny language, and so they don't get a proper assessment and diagnosis. And then, when they are identified, they are often treated together as a unit, and so each gets half the attention of the professionals working with them.”   When doctors first began examining cryptophasic children, they discovered that the language isn't created out of nothing, but is made up of mispronounced words they've heard or references that only work inside their family.  It's usually not a language at all.  According to Karen Thorpe, a psychologist with Queensland University of Technology, you can think of it like “conversations between married couples where words are invented and abbreviated or restricted codes are used because full explanations are redundant.”  That absolutely happens here.  My husband and I talk like kids in a tree fort clubhouse.  But sometimes, just sometimes, a full-blown language does develop, complete with syntax and totally independent of the language spoken at home.  The syntax of a true twin language doesn't arise from mistakes made while learning the family's language.  It's similar to the syntax seen in deaf children who create their own sign language when not taught to sign.  This syntax could “gives us a potential insight into the nature of language” and mankind's “first language,” says linguist Peter Bakker.  Twin languages play fast and loose with word order, putting subjects, verbs, and objects wherever, but always putting the most important item first, which makes sense.  Negation, making something negative, is used as the first or last word of the statement, regardless of how the parental language handles negation.  It's almost like a Spanish question mark, letting you know where the sentence is going.  Verbs aren't conjugated--go is go, regardless of it's attached to I, he/she, us, or them.  There are also no pronouns, like he, she, or they, only the proper nouns.  There is also no way to locate things in time and space; everything just is.  If you're a fan of Tom Scott's language series on YouTube, he's started making them again.  If not, start with “Fantastic Features We Don't Have In The English Language.”  I'll put a link to it in the show notes.  If I forget, or you want to tell me what you thought, Soc Med.  Breakroom  Most children stop using private languages on their own or with minimal intervention, which is good, according to psychologists, because the longer they practice cryptophasia, the worse they do in tests later.  If you remember nothing else I say ever, remember that correlation does not equal causation.  Cryptophasia could be a symptom of an underlying handicap and that's the cause of the low test scores.     This simple-structured language is fine for two or a few people, but once there are more people to talk to or more things to talk about, you're going to need some more features, “unambiguous ways to distinguish between subject and object,” Bakker says.  “In the twin situation these can be dispensed with, but not in languages in which it is necessary to refer to events outside the direct situation.”  So do twin languages really offer insight into mankind's first language?  Could a primitive society have functioned as a cohesive unit with a language that can only refer to what can be seen at that moment?  That's what linguists are studying, but UC-Santa Barbara's Bernard Comrie adds the asterisk that this research into the infancy of spoken language is still a baby itself.  “First we were told that creole languages [that is, a distinct language that develops from the meeting a two or more languages] would provide us with insight into ‘first language,' then when that didn't pan out interest shifted to deaf sign language (also with mixed results)—I guess twin language will be the next thing.”     It's not an easy scientific row to hoe.  Twin languages come and go quickly as the children develop hearing their parents' language much more than their twin language.  They might keep speaking their twin language if they were very isolated, like two people in a Nell situation or that Russian family who lived alone for 40 years, but we'll file that idea under “grossly unethically and probably illegal.”  Not that it hasn't been tried.  Herodotus tells us of what is considered the first every psychological experiment, when Pharaoh Psammetichus I in the sixth century BCE wanted to know if the capacity for speech was innate to humans and beyond that, what language would that be.  He ordered two infants to be raised by a shepherd hermit who was forbidden to speak in their presence.  After two years the children began to speak; the word that they used most often was the Phrygian word for bread.  Thus, Psammetichus concluded that the capacity for speech is innate, and that the natural language of human beings is Phrygian.  Similar experiments were conducted by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in the 12th century CE who ordered children to be raised by caretakers forbidden to speak to them and 15th century James I of Scotland who ordered children raised exclusively by a deaf-mute woman, which was repeated by 16th century Mughal Indian Emperor Akbar, among others.  I shouldn't have to tell you that they were all based on dubious methodology and soaking in confirmation bias.  A less-terrible test was done in the 20th century by British ethologist, or animal behavior scientist, William H. Thorpe, who raised birds in isolation to determine which songs are innate.   One of the best-known cases a negative impact from cryptophasia is the Kennedy sisters of San Diego, Grace and Virginia, of Poto and Cabengo, as they called each other.  They created a media whirlwind in 1970s when it was reported that they only spoke their twin language, to the complete exclusion of English, at the rather advanced age of 6.  “Twin Girls Invent Own Language,” “Gibberish-Talking Twins,” “Like a Martian” the headlines read.  Here is a clip of the girls speaking and sadly this is the best audio quality I could find.  Grace and Virginia had suffered apparent seizures as infants, leading their parents to conclude that the girls had been left mentally handicapped.  Their parents opted to keep them inside and away from other children, leaving them mostly in the care of a laconic grandmother who often left them to their own devices.  They seemed like the next big thing in language-creation studies, but on closer examination, it was discovered that, like most cryptophasics, the girls were just very badly, and very quickly, mispronouncing English and German, the languages spoken at home.  Adding to their disappointment, when scientists tried to use the girls' words to converse with them, the girls couldn't stop laughing.  Grace and Virginia were also cleared of their parents mis-labeling them as intellectually handicapped.  Both were found to have relatively normal IQs, for as much good as IQ tests are, which is very little, but that's another show.  The girls eventually underwent speech therapy and learned regular English, though their language skills were a bit stunted, even into adulthood.  identical twins come from a fertilized egg that splits.  If the zygote splits most of the way, but not all, it results in conjoined twins.  Or if the zygotes collide and fuse, science isn't really sure.  Thus conjoined twins are always identical, meaning the same gender.  Why am I pointing that out?  I met two moms of twins at the She PodcastsLive conference who regularly have people ask them if their identical twins are the same gender.  This is why we need sex ed in school.  You'll also notice I'm not using the term Siamese twins.  That term comes from Chang & Eng Bunker, who were born in Siam, modern day Thailand, in 1811, connected by a band of tissue at the chest.  It's not offensive per e, but just doesn't apply to anyone not born in Siam, so people have stopped using it.   Conjoined twins occur once every 2-500,000 live births, according to the University of Minnesota. About 70% of conjoined twins are female, though I couldn't find a reason or theory why.  40 to 60% of these births are delivered stillborn, with 35% surviving only one day.  The overall survival rate is less than 1 in 4.  Often, one twin will have birth defects that are not conducive to life and can endanger the stronger twin.   Conjoined twins are physically connected to one another at some point on their bodies, and are referred to by that place of joining.  Brace yourself while I wallow in my medical Latin.  The most common conjoinments are thoracopagus (heart, liver, intestine), omphalopagus (liver, biliary tree, intestine), pygopagus (spine, rectum, genitourinary tract), ischiopagus (pelvis, liver, intestine, genitourinary tract), and craniopagus (brain, meninges).  75% are joined at the chest or upper abdomen, 23% are joined at the hips, legs or genitalia, 2% are joined at the head.     If the twins have separate organs, chances for separation surgery are markedly better than if they share the organs.  As a rule, conjoined twins that share a heart cannot be separated. Worldwide, only about 250 separation surgeries have been successful, meaning at least one twin survived over the long term, according to the American Pediatric Surgical Association. The surgical separation success rate has improved over the years, and about 75 percent of surgical separations result in at least one twin surviving.  The process begins long before the procedure, with tests and scans, as well as tissue expanders, balloons inserted under the skin and slowly filled with saline or air to stretch the skin, so there will be enough skin to cover the area where the other twin's body used to be. It requires a whole hospital full of specialties to separate conjoined twins, from general surgeons, plastic and reconstructive surgeons, neurosurgeons, neonatologists, cardiologists, advanced practice nurses, and maternal-fetal medicine specialists, among others.  In fact, the longest surgery of all time was a conjoined twin separation.  Separation surgeries often last an entire day; this one required 103 hours.  If they started at 8am Monday, the team finished the surgery at 3pm Thursday.  In 2001, a team of 20 doctors at Singapore General Hospital worked in shifts to separate Ganga and Jamuna Shrestha, 11-month-old twins conjoined at the head.  Not only did the girls share a cranial cavity, their brains were partially fused.  Each tiny brain had hundreds of bitty blood vessels, each of which had to be traced and identified as belonging to one or the other of the girls.  Their brains were not only connected, they were wrapped around each other like a helix.  Plus, each twin's skull needed to be reshaped and added to, using a blend of bone material and Gore-Tex fibers.  Both babies survived the surgery.  Sadly, Ganga died of meningitis at age 7, but Jamuna has gone on to live a healthy life and attend school.   We interrupt this podcast script for an exciting article.  Meaning I was almost done writing it, then I found something I had to go back and include.  There was another pair of conjoined twins named Ganga and Jamuna, this pair born in 1970 in West Bengal.  The pairing of the names makes sense when you learn that the Ganga and Jamuna are sacred rivers.  The sisters are ischio-omphalopagus tripus, meaning joined at the abdomen and pelvis.  They have two hearts and four arms, but share a set of kidneys, a liver and a single reproductive tract.  Between then they have three legs, the third being a nine-toed fusion of two legs, which was non-functional and they kept that one under their clothing.  They can stand, but they cannot walk and crawl on their hands and feet, earning them the show name "The Spider Girls".  Managed by their uncle while on the road with the Dreamland Circus, they exhibit themselves by lying on a charpoy bed, talking to the spectators who come to look at them.  They earned a good living, making about $6/hr, compared to the average wage in India of $.40.   Ganga and Jamuna have two ration cards for subsidized grain, though they eat from the same plate.  They cast two votes, but were refused a joint bank account.  They also share a husband, Gadadhar, a carnival worker who is twenty years their senior.  When asked which he loves more, Gadadhar replies, "I love both equally."  In 1993, the twins had a daughter via Caesarean section, but the baby only lived a few hours.  Though the sister would like to have children, doctors fear that pregnancy would endanger their lives.  Doctors have offered them separation surgery, but they're not interested.  They feel it would be against God's will, be too great of a risk, and put them out of a job.  "We are happy as we are. The family will starve if we are separated."   Not all parasitic twins are as obvious as a torso with arms and legs.  The condition is called fetus in fetu, a parasitic twin developing or having been absorbed by the autosite twin.  It's extremely rare, occurring only once in every 500,000 births and twice as likely to happen in a male.  The question of how a parasitic twin might develop is one that currently has no answer.  To say the fetuses in question are only partially developed is still overstating thing.  They are usually little more than a ball of tissues with perhaps one or two recognizable body parts.  One school of thought holds that fetus in fetu is a complete misnomer.  Adherents contend that the alien tissue is not in fact a fetus at all, but a form of tumor, a teratoma, specifically.  A teratoma, also known as a dermoid cyst, is a sort of highly advanced tumor that can develop human skin, sweat glands, hair, and even teeth.  Some believe that, left long enough, a teratoma could become advanced enough to develop primitive organs.   There have only been about 90 verified cases in the medical record.  One reason fetus in fetu is rare is that the condition is antithetical to full-term development.  Usually, both twins die in utero from the strain of sharing a placenta.  Take 7 year old Alamjan Nematilaev of Kazakstan, who reported to his family abdominal pain and a feeling that something was moving inside him.  His doctors thought he had a large cyst that needed to be removed.  Once they got in there, though, doctors discovered one of the most developed cases of fetus in fetu ever seen.  Alamjan's fetus had a head, four limbs, hands, fingernails, hair and a human if badly misshapen face.    Fetus in fetu, when it is discovered, is usually found in children, but one man lived 36 years, carrying his fetal twin in his abdomen.  Sanju Bhagat lived his whole life with a bulging stomach, constantly ridiculed by people in his village for looking nine months pregnant.  Little did they know, eh?  Fetus in fetu is usually discovered after the parasitic twin grows so large that it causes discomfort to the host.  In Bhagat's case, he began having trouble breathing because the mass was pushing against his diaphragm.  In June of 1999, Bhagat was rushed to Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India for emergency surgery.  According to Dr. Ajay Mehta, "Basically, the tumor was so big that it was pressing on his diaphragm and that's why he was very breathless.  Because of the sheer size of the tumor, it makes it difficult [to operate]. We anticipated a lot of problems."   While operating on Bhagat, Mehta saw something he had never encountered.  The squeamish may wish to jump30 and think about kittens, though if you've made it this far, you're cut from strong cloth.  As the doctor cut deeper into Bhagat's stomach, gallons of fluid spilled out.  "To my surprise and horror, I could shake hands with somebody inside," he said. "It was a bit shocking for me."   One unnamed doctor interviewed in the ABC News story described what she saw that day in the operating room:  “[The surgeon] just put his hand inside and he said there are a lot of bones inside,” she said. “First, one limb came out, then another limb came out. Then some part of genitalia, then some part of hair, some limbs, jaws, limbs, hair.”  There was no placenta inside Bhagat -- the enveloped parasitic twin had connected directly to Bhagat's blood supply. Right after the surgery, Bhagat's pain and inability to breathe disappeared and he recovered immediately.  Upon recovery from the surgery, in which his twin was removed, Bhagat immediately felt better. But he says that villagers still tease him about it. The story I was referring to was made into a plot point on AHS:FS, the tale of Edward Mordrake, the man with two faces.  In 1895, The Boston Post published an article titled “The Wonders of Modern Science” that presented astonished readers with reports from the Royal Scientific Society documenting the existence of “marvels and monsters” hitherto believed imaginary.   Edward Mordrake was a handsome, intelligent English nobleman with a talent for music and a peerage to inherit.  But there was a catch.  With all his blessings came a terrible curse.  Opposite his handsome was, was a grotesque face on the back of his head.  Edward Mordrake was constantly plagued by his “devil twin,” which kept him up all night whispering “such things as they only speak of in hell.”  He begged his doctors to remove the face, but they didn't dare try.  He asked them to simply bash the evil face in, anything to silence it.  It was never heard by anyone else, but it whispered to Edward all night, a dark passenger that could never be satisfied.  At age 23, after living in seclusion for years, Edward Mordrake committed suicide, leaving behind a note ordering the evil face be destroyed after his death, “lest it continues its dreadful whispering in my grave.”   This macabre story ...is just that, a story, a regular old work of fiction.  “But, but, I've seen a photograph of him.”  Sadly, no.  You've seen a photo of a wax model of the legendary head, Madame Toussad style.  Don't feel bad that you were convinced.  The description of the cursed nobleman was so widely accepted that his condition appeared in an 1896 medical encyclopedia, co-authored by two respected physicians.  Since they recounted the original newspaper story in full without any additional details, gave an added air of authority to Mordrake's tale.   “No, there's a picture of his mummified head on a stand.”  I hate to puncture your dreams, but that's papier mache.  It looks great, but the artist who made it has gone on record stating it was created entirely for entertainment purposes.  If you were to look at that newspaper account of Mordrake, it would fall apart immediately.  “One of the weirdest as well as most melancholy stories of human deformity is that of Edward Mordake, said to have been heir to one of the noblest peerages in England. He never claimed the title, however, and committed suicide in his twenty-third year. He lived in complete seclusion, refusing the visits even of the members of his own family. He was a young man of fine attainments, a profound scholar, and a musician of rare ability. His figure was remarkable for its grace, and his face – that is to say, his natural face – was that of Antinous. But upon the back of his head was another face, that of a beautiful girl, ‘lovely as a dream, hideous as a devil.'”  What did we say at the top?  Conjoined twins are identical, meaning among other things, the same gender.   And that… though we'll finish up out story of the twin Jims.  Their lives were so unbelievably similar, if you saw it in a movie, you'd throw your popcorn at the screen.  Both Jims had married women named Linda, divorced them and married women named Betty.   They each had sons that they named James Alan, though one was Alan and the other Allan.  Both smoked, drove a Chevrolet, held security-based jobs, and even vacationed at the exact same Florida beach, though one assumes not at the same time.  After being reunited at age 37, they took part in a study at University of Minnesota, which showed that their medical histories, personality tests, and even brain-wave tests were almost identical.  Remember, you can always find… Thanks…  

Best of the Web: the MetaFilter Podcast

I accidentally wrote "make a podcast" on a colander instead of the calendar, so on the downside this episode is pretty late but on the upside it has been thoroughly rinsed. Is that anything? Can we do anything with that? Anyway, here's a podcast, it's about 90 minutes, and it involves me and Jessamyn getting off on at least a couple different tangents on the subject *of* getting off on tangents, so it's a very MetaFilter podcast indeed.Helpful LinksPodcast FeedSubscribe with iTunesDirect mp3 downloadMisc - look at this pretty and invasive Emerald Ash Borer - I still think Louis DeJoy sucks honestly - the kids on TikTok have been confounding me lately with what, it turns out, is audio of Adam Driver saying "good soup" - I feel like jessamyn's sister Kate isn't contributing enough - at some point we said something about librarycarpentry.org - also I am supposed to watch The Unbelievable Truth but I do not remember which one now - a flowchart of distractible storytelling Projects - 1,228,178 genetic variants, 2 million years by clawsoon - Datasette Desktop (macOS application) by simonw - Copying a mid-century stool....mid-14th century BCE by brachiopod (MeFi Post) - Wildcard Bicycle Novelties by adamrice - Invisible Sun by cstross - A channel vocoder walkthrough by ignignokt MetaFilter - What I learned about my writing by seeing only the punctuation by eotvos - "Also would've accepted Nine Inch Oates" by carrienation - DO YOU REMEMBER - Can someone explain how this video has 4.1M Views but has 200 likes????? by theodolite - "If we make more angry content, we get more engagement." by They sucked his brains out! - Rewild Your Attention by MonkeyToes - One Woman's Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia by cgc373 Ask MeFi - Can you help find the current location of this old Vienna address? by Miss T.Horn - Can you solve this mystery about a book? by grumblebee - a comment by pocams - Should my child's school's PTA accept cryptocurrency? by Toddles - Nervous system hacks/resets by danceswithlight - What's the oldest thing I can buy, just to have? by tiamat - "Y'know, this stuff is kinda wasted on just ponies..." by Wordshore - Preventing maggots in trash by Anonymous - a comment by Jack Karaoke - Looking for 90s sci-fi story about a librarian & all-knowing computer by kaisemic - Please help me solve a VERY DUMB plumbing emergency. by centrifugal MetaTalk - Metatalktails: Must be the season of the ... which? by taz

The History of Egypt Podcast
152: An Unexpected Burial

The History of Egypt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 56:42


Tutankhamun's Funeral. Following his death, the body of Tutankhamun underwent mummification. From studying his body, archaeologists can identify strange aspects of his preservation. We also know many details of his burial, thanks to paintings in the tomb, and curious items discovered nearby. From these sources, we can imagine King Tutankhamun's funeral…Episode details:Date: c. 1334 BCE.King: Neb-kheperu-Ra Tut-ankh-Amun.Logo image: The north wall of Tutankhamun's burial chamber. FactumArte.Music by Keith Zizza https://www.keithzizza.net/Music: Michael Levy http://www.ancientlyre.com/Music by Ancient Lyric http://www.bettinajoydeguzman.com/Sound interludes by Luke Chaos https://twitter.com/Luke_ChaosAudio mixing/editing by Vincent Cavanagh.See other shows from the Agora Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast
Ep. 279: Aristotle's "Categories" of Being (Part One)

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 54:28


On the Categories (ca. 350 BCE), which purports to describe all the types of entities that exist. We mostly talk about substances, as A's presentation raises interesting questions about, e.g. the status of the species of substance, and the rest of the categories (e.g. quality, quantity, relative) rely on substances existing. So how exactly do these other categories relate to substances, and why does A divide the world the way he does? Part two of this episode is only going to be available to you if you sign up at partiallyexaminedlife.com/support or via Apple Podcasts. Get it now or listen to a preview. Sponsors: Get a free month of Great Courses lectures and lots of other great content at Wondrium.com/PEL. Get a free month's access to a vast library of guided meditations at Headspace.com/PEL.

Ancient History Hound
Jason of Pherae with guest Dr Michael Furman.

Ancient History Hound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 39:41


In the 4th century BCE the region of Thessaly underwent a transformation. It went from being fractured to becoming a unified state under the leadership of Jason. In a short time Jason became a prominent player in Greece, earning the admiration of Xenophon and calling the shots after Leuctra. But then it all ended abruptly. How did he achieve this? What were his intentions and why is he overlooked? Join us and find out. Music by Music by Brakhage (Le Vrai Instrumental).

MAIM TIME
#042 | Korea's National Foundation Day: Garlic and Tigers and Bears, Oh My!

MAIM TIME

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 35:37


#042: October 3 is Korea's National Foundation Day, Gaecheonjeol (개천절; 開天節). It celebrates the founding of the Korean people! Gaecheon means “Opening of Heaven.” It actually commemorates 2 dates: October 3 2457 BCE and October 3 2333 BCE. On October 3 2457 BCE, Hwanung 환웅, a son of a god of heaven came HARD upon the Earth like a GAWD, mate. That's gaecheon, the opening of Heaven. Later, Hwanung had sex with a woman who used to be a bear (we'll get to that later) and had a son, named Dangun Wanggeom, or Dangun. On October 3, 2333 BCE, Dangun founded the first Korean state of Gojoseon, meaning Old Joseon. We'll talk about Korea's Creation Myth and Dangun, the legendary founder and GAWD-king of Korea's first kingdom, Gojoseon. Is Korea really 5000 years old? Do Korean people come from ALIENS? Who gives af? Why should we give af or any f's at all? As with my previous episodes on heritage/culture… the short answer is you don't have to give af. You're an individual with your own volition and destiny. It's your own choice to care about your heritage or not. The long answer? Tune in and hear me ramble on and on! Support the show (http://maimtime.com/support)

Jew Oughta Know
128. TFTYOS: The Birth of Judaism

Jew Oughta Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 22:59


Amidst weeping and rejoicing, the priest-scribe Ezra reads from the Scroll of Teaching before all the people gathered in Jerusalem. The governor Nehemiah records the moment that Judaism burst onto the scene, as the glory of Jerusalem was restored in 445 BCE.

The John Batchelor Show
1729: The New Axis Powers for the New Cold War. Jonathan Spyer, MECRA. @jonathan_spyer Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 12:10


Photo: The 138–126 BCE travels of Zhang Qian to the West, including Persia; from the Mogao Caves, 618–712 CE mural.. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The New Axis Powers for the New Cold War. Jonathan Spyer, MECRA. @jonathan_spyer Malcolm Hoenlein @Conf_of_pres @mhoenlein1 Jonathan Spyer is a Middle East analyst, author and journalist specializing in the Levant and Iraq. He is the director of the Middle East Center for Reporting and Analysis (MECRA), a  Research Fellow at the Jerusalem Center for Strategy and Security and a Fellow at the Middle East Forum. https://jonathanspyer.com/2021/09/26/iran-china-alliance/ https://www.washingtoninstitute.org/policy-analysis/iranian-membership-shanghai-cooperation-organization-motivations-and-implications  https://www.axios.com/russia-trilateral-talks-us-israel-syria-ccaac91f-d746-4fd8-8cbe-34fd396846cd.html https://www.jpost.com/opinion/is-syria-returning-to-the-arab-fold-opinion-680287  

The ABMP Podcast | Speaking With the Massage & Bodywork Profession

Cupping was described in the Ebers Papyrus, one of the oldest medical textbooks in the world, which means ancient Egyptians may have been using cupping therapy as early as 1500 BCE. But how does cupping really work? In this episode, Kristin and Darren speak to Dr. Joi Edwards, DPT, about how cupping can create mobility within the tissue to restore function and decrease pain, what kind of cups are used and why, scope of practice, and how long patients should wait between sessions. Dr. Joi Edwards is a licensed massage therapist and a licensed physical therapist. She holds a bachelor's degree in parks and recreation, a doctorate degree in physical therapy, and has held specialization in orthopedic manual therapy. She has extensive experience in the orthopedic field with both injuries and surgical conditions. She works full time as a physical therapist, owns her own continuing education company, Owlchemy Education, and successfully fuses the science of orthopedics with the art and intuition of massage, bridging both worlds together with the magic of silicone cups. Learn more at www.owlchemymassage.com.   Sponsors:     Anatomy Trains: www.anatomytrains.com    CBD Clinic: www.cbdclinic.co      Elements Massage: www.elementsmassage.com     Anatomy Trains is a global leader in online anatomy education and also provides in-classroom certification programs for structural integration in the US, Canada, Australia, Europe, Japan, and China, as well as fresh-tissue cadaver dissection labs and weekend courses. The work of Anatomy Trains originated with founder Tom Myers, who mapped the human body into 13 myofascial meridians in his original book, currently in its fourth edition and translated into 12 languages. The principles of Anatomy Trains are used by osteopaths, physical therapists, bodyworkers, massage therapists, personal trainers, yoga, Pilates, Gyrotonics, and other body-minded manual therapists and movement professionals. Anatomy Trains inspires these practitioners to work with holistic anatomy in treating system-wide patterns to provide improved client outcomes in terms of structure and function.       Website: anatomytrains.com                       Email: info@anatomytrains.com                         Facebook: facebook.com/AnatomyTrains                        Instagram: www.instagram.com/anatomytrainsofficial   YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2g6TOEFrX4b-CigknssKHA                   CBD Clinic products are the first nonprescription, over-the-counter topical medications that combine authorized active pharmaceutical ingredients and CBD enriching emollients such as hemp extract. Visit cbdclinic.co to get a sample and start feeling the difference for yourself today. Join our private Facebook group and connect with other massage therapists and HCPs using CBD Clinic products already.                     Website: www.cbdclinic.co                    Email: info@cbdclinic.co                    Phone: 303-223-0863                    Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/CBDCLINIC                    Instagram: www.instagram.com/officialcbdclinic YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2g6TOEFrX4b-CigknssKHA                     Founded by a massage therapist for massage therapists, the Elements Massage® brand is a network of independently owned and operated studios dedicated to changing lives--including yours!  The Elements Massage brand believes massage therapists deserve a supportive team, business and marketing resources, and the chance to learn as much as they want, so many Elements Massage studios offer and reimburse continuing education on an ongoing basis. It's no surprise Elements Massage therapist and client satisfaction leads the industry. That's because from day one, the brand has kept an unmatched commitment to deliver the best therapeutic massage experiences possible for both clients and massage therapists. Elements Massage studios expects the best. So should you. If this sounds like a fit, reach out. Studios are hiring!  Visit ElementsMassage.com/ABMP for more information.   Website: elementsmassage.com/ABMP   Facebook: www.facebook.com/elementsmassage   Instagram: www.instagram.com/elementsmassage   Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXLHkAYMgmA6_MJ8DSEZm-A   Disclaimer: Each Elements Massage® studio is independently owned and operated. Franchise owners (or their designated hiring managers) are solely responsible for all employment and personnel decisions and matters regarding their independently owned and operated studios, including hiring, direction, training, supervision, discipline, discharge, compensation (e.g., wage practices and tax withholding and reporting requirements), and termination of employment. Elements Therapeutic Massage, LLC (ETM) is not involved in, and is not responsible for, employment and personnel matters and decisions made by any franchise owner. All individuals hired by franchise owners' studios are their employees, not those of ETM. Benefits vary by independently owned and operated Elements Massage® studios. Elements Massage® and Elements Massage + design are registered trademarks owned by ETM.  

Myth Matters
The Bacchae: How do you imagine the dark?

Myth Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 42:01


"He is a young god.Mythologically obscure,always just arrivingat some new placeto disrupt the status quo,wearing the start of a smile."--from Ann Carson' translation "The Bakkhai"In the northern hemisphere we began our collective descent into winter's darkness, with the fall equinox on Wednesday September 22nd.This is a good time to meditate on the most famous myth of the god Dionysus, intoxicating god of the night. It's a play written by Euripides in the 5th century BCE called "The Bacchae."Athenians found the cautionary message of this play subversive. It disturbed their image of Greek reason, democracy, social order, and power. The women don't stay in their place. It ends on a gruesome note.A few years after the play was performed, Athens fell to Sparta and their empire building was over. Euripides was in self-imposed exile, and perhaps he saw something that his fellow citizens could not...Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/mythmatterspodcast)

C dans l'air
BUDGET : DES DÉPENSES ET... DES DÉPENSES – 22/09/21

C dans l'air

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 64:21


BUDGET : DES DÉPENSES ET... DES DÉPENSES – 22/09/21 PHILIPPE DESSERTINE Directeur de l'Institut de Haute Finance GAËLLE MACKE Directrice déléguée de la rédaction – « Challenges » SYLVIE MATELLY Économiste Directrice adjointe de l'IRIS (Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques) SOPHIE FAY Journaliste - « L'Obs » Chroniqueuse - « France-Inter » Si cet été Bruno Le Maire a voulu siffler la fin de partie en annonçant la fin du « quoi qu'il en coûte », le dernier budget du quinquennat, dévoilé ce mercredi en Conseil des ministres, se présente clairement sous le signe de la dépense publique, avec une hausse attendue de plus de 12 milliards d'euros en 2022. La moitié de cette enveloppe correspond à des dépenses prévues par des lois de programmation pour augmenter le budget de l'armée, de l'intérieur, de la justice, de la recherche mais aussi de l'éducation où il est question de revaloriser le salaire des enseignants. A cela viennent s'ajouter six autres milliards pour financer les nouvelles promesses, annoncées depuis la rentrée par le chef de l'Etat au gré de ses déplacements (rallonge du plan sécurité, mesures pour Marseille, pour les sportifs, les indépendants, chèque énergie, plan chômeurs longue durée…). Un budget loin de l'orthodoxie budgétaire promue par Emmanuel Macron au début de son quinquennat qui fait grincer des dents à sept mois de l'élection présidentielle. En première ligne, les candidats déclarés à droite critiquent violemment le chef de l'Etat : Xavier Bertrand l'accuse de mener une politique de « quoi qu'il en coûte pour sa réélection » et de « faire campagne avec le chéquier de la France », Valérie Pécresse de « cramer la caisse ». Du côté de la majorité, on assume cette augmentation des dépenses : « Des économies ? Il n'y en aura pas. Ce n'est pas le moment », a affirmé Laurent Saint-Martin, le rapporteur (La République en marche, LRM) du budget. Alors que le Covid-19 commence tout doucement à sortir du quotidien des Français, et que l'économie connaît un rebond, « pas question de faire du rabot ou de l'austérité », a résumé M. Saint-Martin, pour qui « il y a eu le quoi qu'il en coûte économique, il y a désormais le quoi qu'il en coûte des politiques publiques ». Mais comment financer ces 12 milliards d'euros de dépenses supplémentaires ? Le ministre de l'Economie Bruno Le Maire compte sur une forte croissance économique (6 % pour 2021, 4 % pour 2022) et sur des recettes fiscales meilleures que prévues pour financer la dépense publique. Mais cette méthode ne convient pas à tout le monde. A commencer par le président de la commission des finances Éric Woerth qui dénonce une « euphorie dépensière », et s'inquiète de la dérive des comptes publics ainsi que du peu d'attention, portée à ces questions. D'autant que ce budget compte deux cases encore vides qui pèsent plusieurs milliards d'euros : le futur revenu d'engagement pour les jeunes et le plan d'investissement censé préparer la « France de 2030 », dont les contours et le montant n'ont pas encore été dévoilés. Le gouvernement les ajoutera par amendements au cours des débats parlementaires, vers la mi-octobre. Un calendrier bousculé qui a fortement contrarié le Haut Conseil des finances publiques. Chargé d'approuver la trajectoire macroéconomique du gouvernement il a dénoncé ce mercredi un budget incomplet, qui l'empêche de rendre un avis «pleinement éclairé». « Le Haut Conseil regrette ces conditions de saisine», indique-t-il dans son avis, ajoutant qu'il « n'est pas à ce stade en mesure de se prononcer sur la plausibilité de la prévision de déficit pour 2022 (-4,8 points de PIB). C'est la première fois depuis 2016, et le dernier budget du quinquennat de François Hollande, que le HCFP est aussi sévère avec un projet de loi de finances. Alors que contient le projet de budget 2022 présenté ce mercredi ? En matière de déficits et dettes publics, où en est la France face à ses voisins ? Que se passe-t-il en Allemagne où l'inflation a encore accéléré sur le mois d'août, atteignant + 3,9 % en rythme annuel, son niveau le plus élevé depuis près de 30 ans ? Olli Rehn, l'un des membres du Conseil des gouverneurs de la Banque centrale européenne (BCE) a estimé récemment que les Etats de la zone euro doivent se préparer à la remontée des taux d'intérêt. Quelles en seraient les conséquences ? Enfin pourquoi les Etats-Unis sont-ils sous la menace d'un défaut de paiement ? DIFFUSION : du lundi au samedi à 17h45 FORMAT : 65 minutes PRÉSENTATION : Caroline Roux - Axel de Tarlé REDIFFUSION : du lundi au vendredi vers 23h40 RÉALISATION : Nicolas Ferraro, Bruno Piney PRODUCTION : France Télévisions / Maximal Productions Retrouvez C DANS L'AIR sur internet & les réseaux : INTERNET : francetv.fr FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/Cdanslairf5 TWITTER : https://twitter.com/cdanslair INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/cdanslair/

Expanded Perspectives
Expanded Perspectives Classic Rewind: John Anthony West

Expanded Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 65:12


On today's show, we're going all the way back to May 5th, 2014 when we did an exclusive interview with the legendary John Anthony West. This is perhaps our favorite interview we've ever done. John Anthony West was an American author, lecturer, guide, and proponent of the Sphinx water erosion hypothesis in geology. Influenced by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz,  in 1993 his work with Robert M. Schoch, a geologist and associate professor of natural science at the College of General Studies at Boston University was presented by Charlton Heston in an NBC special called “The Mystery of the Sphinx” that won a News & Documentary Emmy Award for Best Research and a nomination for Best Documentary. The documentary contends that the main type of weathering evident on the Great Sphinx and surrounding enclosure walls could only have been caused by prolonged and extensive rainfall during the time period from 10,000 to 5000 BCE and was carved out of limestone bedrock by an ancient advanced culture. This challenged the conventional dating of the carving of the statue circa 2500 BCE. West suggested that the Sphinx may be over twice as old as originally determined, whereas Schoch made a more conservative determination of between 5000 and 7000 BCE. All of this and more on this episode of Expanded Perspectives Classic Rewind! Show Notes: Serpent in the Sky: The High Wisdom of Ancient Egypt The Traveler's Key to Ancient Egypt: A Guide to Sacred Places Want to share your story? Email: expandedperspectives@yahoo.com Hotline: 888-393-2783 Want to help out the show? Expanded Perspectives Elite Music: All music for Expanded Perspectives is provided by Epidemic Sound!  

Faber Institute Podcast
The Author of the Letter to the Ephesians: Night School, 21 September 2021

Faber Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 62:45


The Night School is an adventurous exercise of greater depth and reflectivity than is normal for most people. For each of these gatherings, we welcome a profound thinker, explorer, philosopher, painter, poet, theologian or mystic from the ancient or nearer past. For example, we may invite Aristotle (4th century BCE) to attend, and through some short and penetrating texts from his writings to give us his best thoughts on friendship. This monthly habit offered by the Faber Institute is meant to be enjoyable, startling at times (surprised by the wisdom we have available to us if we know how to read such authors), and to be an experience of deep thought skillfully invited and engagingly presented. For Session I of Series IX, Rick Ganz welcomes our special "guest" the Author of the Letter to the Ephesians.

New Books Network
Richard Janko, “The Derveni Papyrus” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 87:37


The Derveni Papyrus is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. This wide-ranging conversation covers Prof. Janko's research on the Derveni Papyrus, Europe's oldest surviving manuscript from the 4th century BCE and the most important text relating to early Greek literature, science, religion and philosophy to have come to light since the Renaissance. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Richard Janko, “The Derveni Papyrus” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 87:37


The Derveni Papyrus is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. This wide-ranging conversation covers Prof. Janko's research on the Derveni Papyrus, Europe's oldest surviving manuscript from the 4th century BCE and the most important text relating to early Greek literature, science, religion and philosophy to have come to light since the Renaissance. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in History
Richard Janko, “The Derveni Papyrus” (Open Agenda, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 87:37


The Derveni Papyrus is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. This wide-ranging conversation covers Prof. Janko's research on the Derveni Papyrus, Europe's oldest surviving manuscript from the 4th century BCE and the most important text relating to early Greek literature, science, religion and philosophy to have come to light since the Renaissance. Howard Burton is the founder of the Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Film and host of the Ideas Roadshow Podcast. He can be reached at howard@ideasroadshow.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Market Mover
Bce, le “parole importanti” di Christine Lagarde

Market Mover

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 14:42


La Bce ha ridotto gli acquisti di titoli nell'ambito del suo piano pandemico. Ma la retorica della presidente Christine Lagarde ha fatto digerire ai mercati la decisione. Lo spieghiamo con l'aiuto di Isabella Bufacchi, corrispondente da Francoforte del Sole 24 Ore

Good Morning Business
Le Journal de l'économie - 10/09

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 7:23


Ce vendredi 10 septembre, SandraGandoin a présenté le Journal de l'économie dont voici les premiers sujets : Eurofins fait son entrée dans le CAC 40 et chasse Atos. Le discours de la BCE par Christine Lagarde. Puis Bercy a livré hier sa feuille de route pour le budget 2022. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

La ContraCrónica
La sombra de la inflación es alargada

La ContraCrónica

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 40:22


Según el instituto de estadística europeo, Eurostat, la tasa de inflación anual en la Eurozona subió en agosto al 3%, una cifra que supera por un punto el objetivo del 2% del Banco Central Europeo. En julio estaba ya en el 2,2% y muchos temían que la cosa iba a ir a peor como así ha ocurrido. Se ha confirmado la tendencia al alza, en particular en el sector energético, el principal responsable del repunte inflacionario. Sólo la energía ha subido de promedio en Europa a lo largo del último año un 15,4%. El gas natural marca máximos históricos y el barril de petróleo está firmemente asentado por encima de los 70 dólares. La descarbonización paulatina de la economía europea ha hecho el resto. Con pocas centrales nucleares y las de carbón en plena retirada, a los sistemas eléctricos de la eurozona no les queda más remedio que tirar del gas natural para respaldar sus centrales eólicas y fotovoltaicas. La última vez que la Eurozona había registrado inflación de 3% fue en noviembre de 2011, en plena crisis de deuda de la eurozona y con el barril de petróleo a cien dólares. Los analistas creen que esto podría ir a más en los próximos meses, especialmente en Alemania, la principal economía de Europa en la que se teme que de aquí a fin de año alcance e incluso supere el 5% interanual. Para colmo de males el país se encuentra en plena campaña electoral y la actual canciller no concurre a las elecciones. Los sudores fríos no han llegado a Berlín aún, lo que ha dado confianza a la gobernadora del BCE, Cristine Lagarde, para mostrarse confiada y quitar hierro al repentino aumento de los precios. Por ahora no va a cambiar nada en Fráncfort, el BCE seguirá con sus planes de estímulo mediante compras a discreción de bonos del Estado y corporativos a través de continuas flexibilizaciones cuantitativas. La pandemia para ella no ha terminado y cree que compensa seguir echando leña a una caldera que ya está sobre calentada. En La ContraRéplica: - La crisis de los Estados-nación - El impacto global de la retirada de Afganistán - Los motivos de la retirada - Dos varas de medir Apoya La Contra en: · Patreon... https://www.patreon.com/diazvillanueva · iVoox... https://www.ivoox.com/podcast-contracronica_sq_f1267769_1.html · Paypal... https://www.paypal.me/diazvillanueva Sígueme en: · Web... https://diazvillanueva.com · Twitter... https://twitter.com/diazvillanueva · Facebook... https://www.facebook.com/fernandodiazvillanueva1/ · Instagram... https://www.instagram.com/diazvillanueva · Linkedin… https://www.linkedin.com/in/fernando-d%C3%ADaz-villanueva-7303865/ · Flickr... https://www.flickr.com/photos/147276463@N05/?/ · Pinterest... https://www.pinterest.com/fernandodiazvillanueva Encuentra mis libros en: · Amazon... https://www.amazon.es/Fernando-Diaz-Villanueva/e/B00J2ASBXM Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Oldest Stories
OS 96 - Fall of the Hittite Empire

Oldest Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 58:33


In 1200 BCE, the Hittite Empire fell, its capitol of Hattusa was abandoned and its final king, Suppuliliuma II, was probably dead. The circumstances leading up to that fall, and the reign of Tudhaliya IV, the final significant Hittite king, are as much a roller coaster of ups, downs, and gaps in the historical record as the whole of Hittite history has been, but the empire had to end at some point, and it chose to end here. Note that this is the final episode of season 1 of the podcast, check the show website oldeststories.net to find out where you can submit your questions for the special question and answer episode and to learn when special episodes are released. And make sure you are subscribed to this feed right here. I appreciate all the interest that you listeners have had up until now, and I promise I will be returning to the show when my life settles down. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/oldeststories/message

MASH Podcast
MASH Podcast: Indian Art History - Episode Ten: The Gandhara School of Art

MASH Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 12:24


This one is all about the Greeks who were Buddhists. Basically Buddhism was taking rounds in Afghanistan and Pakistan around 90 BCE. And the new age Buddha sculptures were a hit all over. Listen for more.

Naatak Radio
Song 2: Baisakh Ki Purnima; from Naatak's Grand Musical in a Park: BUDDHA

Naatak Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 2:05


Presenting songs from Naatak's  GRAND MUSICAL, BUDDHA! Naatak's annual musical is set in the sixth century BCE and written entirely in rhyme. The Shakya prince Siddharth leaves his father's palace, attains enlightenment under a peepal tree to become Buddha, roams the kingdoms of Magadh and Kaushal to persuade the world, and alters the course of human history. The play features an ensemble cast, live music and dance. With a giant mural for a set, colorful costumes and imaginative props, the play is a visual treat, and a unique outdoor experience in the shade of lush maple and oak trees.Playwright and Director: Sujit SarafMusic Director: Nachiketa YakkundiVocalists, Organ, and Tabla: Anitha Dixit, Amit Shenoy, Vinata Karra, Anand Karve, Ajay Sundar RajSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/naatak)

Naatak Radio
Song 1: Antim Pravrajya from Naatak's Grand Musical in a Park: BUDDHA

Naatak Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 1:43


Presenting songs from Naatak's  GRAND MUSICAL, BUDDHA! Naatak's annual musical is set in the sixth century BCE and written entirely in rhyme. The Shakya prince Siddharth leaves his father's palace, attains enlightenment under a peepal tree to become Buddha, roams the kingdoms of Magadh and Kaushal to persuade the world, and alters the course of human history. The play features an ensemble cast, live music and dance. With a giant mural for a set, colorful costumes and imaginative props, the play is a visual treat, and a unique outdoor experience in the shade of lush maple and oak trees.Playwright and Director: Sujit SarafMusic Director: Nachiketa YakkundiVocalists, Organ, and Tabla: Anitha Dixit, Amit Shenoy, Vinata Karra, Anand Karve, Ajay Sundar RajSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/naatak)

Naatak Radio
Song 3: Jamudweep from Naatak's Grand Musical in a Park; BUDDHA

Naatak Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 3:06


Presenting songs from Naatak's  GRAND MUSICAL, BUDDHA! Naatak's annual musical is set in the sixth century BCE and written entirely in rhyme. The Shakya prince Siddharth leaves his father's palace, attains enlightenment under a peepal tree to become Buddha, roams the kingdoms of Magadh and Kaushal to persuade the world, and alters the course of human history. The play features an ensemble cast, live music and dance. With a giant mural for a set, colorful costumes and imaginative props, the play is a visual treat, and a unique outdoor experience in the shade of lush maple and oak trees.Playwright and Director: Sujit SarafMusic Director: Nachiketa YakkundiVocalists, Organ, and Tabla: Anitha Dixit, Amit Shenoy, Vinata Karra, Anand Karve, Ajay Sundar RajSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/naatak)

Naatak Radio
Song 4: Megh Umadkar, from Naatak's Grand Musical in a Park: BUDDHA

Naatak Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 2:02


Presenting songs from Naatak's  GRAND MUSICAL, BUDDHA! Naatak's annual musical is set in the sixth century BCE and written entirely in rhyme. The Shakya prince Siddharth leaves his father's palace, attains enlightenment under a peepal tree to become Buddha, roams the kingdoms of Magadh and Kaushal to persuade the world, and alters the course of human history. The play features an ensemble cast, live music and dance. With a giant mural for a set, colorful costumes and imaginative props, the play is a visual treat, and a unique outdoor experience in the shade of lush maple and oak trees.Playwright and Director: Sujit SarafMusic Director: Nachiketa YakkundiVocalists, Organ, and Tabla: Anitha Dixit, Amit Shenoy, Vinata Karra, Anand Karve, Ajay Sundar RajSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/naatak)

Good Morning Business
L'intégrale de Good Morning Business du vendredi 27 août

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 150:36


Ce vendredi 27 août, Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn ont reçu Alexandre Haggai, cofondateur de Not So Dark, Ludovic Faroult, administrateur national du syndicat Active FNEAPL, Frédéric Merlin, président de la Société des Grands Magasins (SGM), Jean-Claude Trichet, ancien président de la BCE, dans l'émission Good Morning Business sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Good Morning Business
Jean-Claude Trichet, ancien président de la BCE - 27/08

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 11:46


Jean-Claude Trichet, ancien président de la BCE, était l'invité de Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn dans Good Morning Business, ce vendredi 27 août. Ils sont revenus sur la fin éventuelle du "quantitave easing" et le début du "tapering" sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Good Morning Business
Jean-Claude Trichet, ancien président de la BCE - 27/08

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 11:46


Jean-Claude Trichet, ancien président de la BCE, était l'invité de Sandra Gandoin et Christophe Jakubyszyn dans Good Morning Business, ce vendredi 27 août. Ils sont revenus sur la fin éventuelle du "quantitave easing" et le début du "tapering" sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

The History of Egypt Podcast
151: The Death of Tutankhamun

The History of Egypt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 34:30


A life cut short. By 1334 BCE, Tut'ankhamun had ruled Egypt for approx. 10 years. Sadly, this would be his last. At the age of nineteen or so, the young ruler died. How did it happen? There are a few major hypotheses (illness, accident, or murder). However, as technology and medical science develops, some ideas seem less likely than others. In this episode, I review the major studies and proposals, and present a hypothetical reconstruction of the King's final moments...Date: c. 1334 BCE.King: Neb-kheperu-Ra Tut-ankh-Amun.Logo image: Statue of Anubis, from the tomb of Tut'ankhamun, KV62 (Artstor).Music by Keith Zizza https://www.keithzizza.net/Music: Michael Levy http://www.ancientlyre.com/.Music by Ancient Lyric http://www.bettinajoydeguzman.com/.Sound interludes by Luke Chaos https://twitter.com/Luke_Chaos.Audio mixing/editing by Vincent Cavanagh.Hear additional music on my Spotify Playlist.Facebook www.facebook.com/egyptpodcast.Twitter www.twitter.com/egyptianpodcast.See other shows from the Agora Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Good Morning Business
Christopher Dembik, chef économiste de Saxo Bank - 23/08

Good Morning Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 6:38


Christopher Dembik, chef économiste de Saxo Bank, était l'invité de Christophe Jakubyszyn dans Good Morning Business, ce lundi 23 août. Ils sont revenus sur la situation financière des entreprises et ce que pourraient décider les banques centraux, sur BFM Business. Retrouvez l'émission du lundi au vendredi et réécoutez la en podcast.

Horns of a Dilemma
Diplomacy Shaken Not Stirred

Horns of a Dilemma

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2021 41:46


Mark Twain once said that history doesn't repeat itself, but it does rhyme. The repetition of patterns of events and responses is one reason that scholars and policymakers often turn to the past for insight into how to best deal with contemporary events. It is also why classic works of history and strategy — such as Thucydides' The History of the Peloponnesian War — have become classic and remain relevant. In this episode of Horns of a Dilemma, Dr. Paul Edgar, associate director of the Clements Center at the University of Texas, Austin, goes 1,000 years before Thucydides to find enduring lessons as told in an inscription on a statue from the 15th century BCE.  While the names of the rulers and powers may not be familiar, Edgar illustrates how the themes of strategy, alliance, and statecraft in great-power competition are familiar and relevant to power struggles today. This talk was recorded at the Summer Seminar on History and Statecraft, sponsored by the Clements Center at the University of Texas, Austin, and held in Beaver Creek, Colorado.

Better Than Human
Do Coconuts Migrate? Coconuts: The Tree of Life, One of The Worlds Most Useful Tree

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 55:12


Do coconuts migrate? Yes, they do, but not by sparrows. It was actually humans who spread coconuts across the globe. Besides making great horse sounds when banged together, coconuts are extremely useful to humans. Coconuts are not just a new health fad, humans have been using coconuts since 3000 BCE, and not just for food and water.In The Good, The Bad, The NewsThe Bad: There is an organization in PA that wants you to think rising CO2 is good for you and the planet. Nope. July 2021 was the hottest month ever in recorded history. Global climate change is caused by humans, and we need to stop it. The Good: We can reverse global climate change, but we need to do it NOW. Then Jen talks about a preserved female cave lion cub named Sparta.Before we get into coconuts, have you ever heard of the Order of the Sun, the sun worshiping coconut cult from the early 1900s? Well, a nudist German named August Engelhardt was convinced you could live off just coconut. Guess what, you can't. Coconut trees can grow up to 100 ft  ( 30 m) tall, and produce on average of 30 coconuts a year. They are naturally restricted to coastal areas in sandy, saline soils, and need direct sunlight and a lot of water to grow. The coconut plant was distributed by early Austronesian voyagers, who carried them as a source of food and water, and  traded them throughout different cultures globally.Listen now to learn about the lovely coconut tree, the tree of life. For more information on us, visit our website at betterthanhumanpodcast.comFollow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!#betterthanhuman #cultofweirdnesYou've got two empty halves of coconut and you're bangin' 'em together.

The John Batchelor Show
1603: One week before the tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, August 9, 2021. @LongWarJournal.

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 40:59


Photo:Arachosia, Aria and Bactria were the ancient satraps of the Achaemenid Empire that made up most of what is now Afghanistan during 500 BCE. . CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow One week before the tragedy: #ClassicLongWarJournal: @BillRoggio and @ThomasJoscelyn #UNBOUND the complete, forty-minute interview, August 9, 2021. @LongWarJournal. https://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2021/08/fifth-northern-afghan-capital-falls-to-the-taliban.php

The History of Egypt Podcast
150: Teenage Hunting Fighting Pharaoh

The History of Egypt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 36:45


King Tut'ankhamun was young, rich, and well-equipped for sport. His tomb contained an arsenal of goods, including chariots, bows, arrows, throwing sticks, and more. Also, artistic images convey the idea of the pharaoh as a triumphant hunter and warrior. In this episode, we explore evidence for Tut'ankhamun as a sportsman, pursuing game across the desert and through the marshes. From archaeology and art, the King's pastimes come through clearly...Episode details:Date: c.1334 BCE.King: Neb-khepeur-Ra Tut-'ankh-Amun.Logo image: G. M. Vogelsang-Eastwood, Tutankhamun's Wardrobe (Rotterdam, 1999).Music: Keith Zizza https://www.keithzizza.net/.Music: Michael Levy http://www.ancientlyre.com/.Interludes: Luke Chaos https://twitter.com/Luke_Chaos.Audio mixing and editing: Vincent Cavanagh.Hear additional music on my Spotify Playlist.See other shows from the Agora Podcast Network.Website www.egyptianhistorypodcast.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
160 | Edward Slingerland on Confucianism, Daoism, and Wu Wei

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 83:45


Plato and Aristotle founded much of what we think of as Western philosophy during the fourth and fifth centuries BCE. Interestingly, that historical period also witnessed the foundation of some of the major schools of Chinese philosophy, especially Confucianism and Daoism. This is a long-overdue discussion of ancient Chinese ideas, featuring philosopher and religious-studies scholar Edward Slingerland. We talk about the relationship between these two schools of thought, and their differences and similarities with Western philosophy. One of the biggest ideas is wu wei, or “effortless action” — the way that true mastery consists of doing things without too much conscious control. Today we would call it “flow” or “being in the zone,” but the idea stretches back quite a ways.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Edward Slingerland received his Ph.D. in religious studies from Stanford. He is currently Distinguished University Scholar, Professor of Philosophy, and Associate Member of the departments of Asian Studies and Psychology at the University of British Columbia. He is Director of the Database of Religious History, and co-director of the Center for the Study of Human Evolution, Cognition, and Culture. Among his books are Trying Not to Try: Ancient China, Modern Science, and the Power of Spontaneity, and a translation of Confucius's Analects. His new book is Drunk: How We Sipped, Danced, and Stumbled Our Way to Civilization.Web siteUBC web pageGoogle Scholar publicationsAmazon.com author pageWikipediaTwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The John Batchelor Show
1587: New Delhi watches Kabul closely. Sadanand @Dhume @AEI @WSJOpinion GLXXG

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 12:16


Photo:  An edict of Ashoka from Kandahar, now in the Kabul museum. . Relations between the people of Afghanistan and India traces to the Indus Valley Civilisation. Following Alexander the Great's brief occupation, the successor state of the Seleucid Empire controlled the region known today as Afghanistan. In 305 BCE, they ceded much of it to the Indian Maurya Empire as part of an alliance treaty. "Kabul has a castle celebrated for its strength, accessible only by one road. In it there are Musulmáns, and it has a town, in which are infidels from Hind." — Istahkrí, 921 CE CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow New Delhi watches Kabul closely. Sadanand @Dhume @AEI @WSJOpinion GLXXG https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-withdrawal-afghanistan-taliban-islamist-jihadist-human-rights-violations-11628196829?mkt_tok=NDc1LVBCUS05NzEAAAF-yj2WH89VlVSD9x8JBNwqfYelSOPibdjFmMVd48wvsY45GW7TwESdU46QufiQRvxhSyPQRA1x6-ID2DVmlmU-wO2PAZ645fxwSBm1Zi_f8tk

New Books Network
Jeffery D. Long, "Jainism: An Introduction" (I. B. Tauris, 2009)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 52:16


Jainism evokes images of monks wearing face-masks to protect insects and mico-organisms from being inhaled. Or of Jains sweeping the ground in front of them to ensure that living creatures are not inadvertently crushed: a practice of non-violence so radical as to defy easy comprehension. Yet for all its apparent exoticism, Jainism is still little understood in the West. What is this mysterious philosophy which originated in the 6th century BCE, whose absolute requirement is vegetarianism, and which now commands a following of four million adherents both in its native India and diaspora communities across the globe?  In Jainism: An Introduction (I. B. Tauris, 2009), Long makes an ancient tradition fully intelligible to the modern reader. Plunging back more than two and a half millennia, to the plains of northern India and the life of a prince who - much like the Buddha - gave up a life of luxury to pursue enlightenment, Long traces the history of the Jain community from founding sage Mahavira to the present day. He explores asceticism, worship, the life of the Jain layperson, relations between Jainism and other Indic traditions, the Jain philosophy of relativity, and the implications of Jain ideals for the contemporary world. The book presents Jainism in a way that is authentic and engaging to specialists and non-specialists alike. Dr. Pankaj Jain is a Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies at FLAME University, where he is heading the Indic Studies Initiative in the FLAME School of Liberal Education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The History of Egypt Podcast
149: The King's Men

The History of Egypt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 50:23


Maya, Ay, Horemheb, and others. The men who served King Tut'ankhamun were unusually prominent and powerful. The Overseer of the Treasury (Maya), the Supreme General (Horemheb) and the highest courtier (Ay) may have divided power among themselves. Why were they so powerful? The youth of Tut'ankhamun, and developments in royal power since the reign of Akhenaten, may have weakened the authority or influence of the individual ruler. This was the next phase in an ongoing trend, as the power of the pharaohs evolved over time...Epilogue: We meet the King's servants, including his personal scribe (Iny); his personal driver (Per-aa-neheh); and the chief manager of the palaces (Ipy).Episode details:Date: c. 1334 BCE.King: Neb-kheperu-Ra Tut-ankh-Amun.Logo: Statue of Horemheb, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Music by Keith Zizza https://www.keithzizza.net/.Music by Ancient Lyric http://www.bettinajoydeguzman.com/.Sound interludes by Luke Chaos https://twitter.com/Luke_Chaos.Audio mixing/editing by Vincent Cavanagh.Hear additional music on my Spotify Playlist.Support the Show at www.patreon.com/egyptpodcast.Website www.egyptianhistorypodcast.com.Facebook www.facebook.com/egyptpodcast.Twitter www.twitter.com/egyptianpodcast.See other shows from the Agora Podcast Network.The History of Egypt Podcast endorses RA EGYPTIAN, the clean, natural skincare line with products derived from ancient Egyptian sources. Use the checkout code EGYPT to enjoy 30% off your order. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Liberi Oltre & Michele Boldrin
Nuova Strategia BCE la giusta direzione

Liberi Oltre & Michele Boldrin

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 67:19


Cosa implica l'obiettivo “simmetrico” del 2% dell'inflazione? Comporterà dei cambiamenti sostanziali nella politica monetaria della BCE, o rappresenta soltanto una presa di posizione verso i timori di rialzi dei prezzi? ----------------------------

WikiSleep Podcast
Episode 97: A Brief History of Marijuana

WikiSleep Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 37:58


The history of cannabis, also known as weed, ganja and marijuana, dates back to at least the third millennium BCE in written history—and even further back by archaeological evidence. For thousands of years, the plant has been valued for its material use, as food and medicine, and for its psychoactive properties for religious and recreational use. #WikiSleep #Sleep #Marijuana #Cannabis #MentalHealth

Tales from the Moosiverse

Meet the passionate but untrained dragon named T'oka. What will happen when she meets Montgomery the Moose and Ringo the Unpredictable Horse - two future protectors of magic - in 642 BCE?   Join our Storylab writing programs on Outschool.   Support us on Patreon!   Buy Tales from the Moosiverse merchandise through our Teepublic store. Your order helps cover the production costs of these episodes!   Subscribe to the Moosiverse newsletter at Moosiverse.com for storytelling tips, news, events, and more!   Send your stories by email, audio or video to hello@moosiverse.com; we'll post some on Moosiverse.com and play snippets in future episodes.   Writer/narrator: Ian Jackson   Team Moosiverse: Angel, Sam, Matthew & Emily Jackson   Audio Engineering: Trevor Whitaker Black - trevorwhitakerblack.com   Music: Easy Stroll by Jay-Man - ourmusicbox.com   Artwork: Phil Hodgkiss - rakishdesign.co.uk

Jew Oughta Know
121. TFTYOS: The Fall of Israel

Jew Oughta Know

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 22:13


After two hundred years, the Kingdom of Israel falls to the Assyrians in 720 BCE. The prophet Amos blames it on social injustice -- the capture of wealth by the rich neglected the poor, violating the covenant with God. The Ten Lost Tribes disappear into history, while refugees make their way to Judah, bringing their stories with them.

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien
JavaServer Faces, Web Components, PrimeFaces and JavaScript Frameworks

airhacks.fm podcast with adam bien

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 66:01


An airhacks.fm conversation with Cagatay Civici (@cagataycivici) about: support for vue 3, components for vue 3, vue 2 to vue 3 upgrade requires a migration, vue 3 is backwards incompatible, JavaServer Faces / Jakarta Server Faces (JSF), PrimeFaces / JSF design was updated, primefaces / JSF keeps being popular, Java Server Pages / JSPs for server side rendering, Angular is the new JSF, styling and functionality separation, primeblocks is CSS only, primeflex CSS utility, components vs. templates, primevue as web component library, BCE design template, the BElement, NPM-free web component template, Microsoft Blazor for server side rendering, accessibility with semantic HTML, wrapping a checkbox for accessibility and design, blocks are comprising components, React Chakra blocks library, code2 and bubble low code platforms, SSE with Java screencast, Cagatay Civici on twitter: @cagataycivici

Tales from the Moosiverse

As they attempt to restore chocolate in 642 BCE - in what is now known as the Tabasco region of Mexico - Montgomery the Moose and friends meet someone familiar, who is... unpredictable.   Join our Storylab writing programs on Outschool.   Support us on Patreon!   Buy Tales from the Moosiverse merchandise through our Teepublic store. Your order helps cover the production costs of these episodes!   Subscribe to the Moosiverse newsletter at Moosiverse.com for storytelling tips, news, events, and more!   Send your stories by email, audio or video to hello@moosiverse.com; we'll post some on Moosiverse.com and play snippets in future episodes.   Writer/narrator: Ian Jackson   Team Moosiverse: Angel, Sam, Matthew & Emily Jackson   Audio Engineering: Trevor Whitaker Black - trevorwhitakerblack.com   Music: Easy Stroll by Jay-Man - ourmusicbox.com   Artwork: Phil Hodgkiss - rakishdesign.co.uk

Midnight Train Podcast
The Necronomicon

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 115:45


In today's episode we are taking a different approach. We are starting off in the realm of fiction and learning about the Necronomicon, a fictitious book made up by a man we've discussed in the past. Then we switch gears and head into the real world, the land of the living, as some say, except we are looking at the land of the dead. We will be discussing a few true life Necronomicon books, or books of the dead. We have some examples of true to life books discussing preparation of the dead, helping them cross over, even what to do and expect when you get to the other side. Without further ado, let's get into this by visiting a previous subject, the one and only magnificently weird… H.P. Lovecraft!        Since we've discussed ol H.P. in a separate episode we are not going to get into the man himself really. If you want to hear our take on Lovecraft, make sure to check out episode 37 from way back in January of 2020. What we are going to look at, however, is the book that he references in 10 separate stories. Those stories include: The Call of The Cthulhu, The Dunwich Horror, The Haunter of The Dark, The Thing On The Doorstep, and several others. The book we are talking about is, of course, the mother fuckin' necronomicon. That's right… The Necronomicon as most of you know it, was made up by Lovecraft himself.  The book became such a part of his stories that Lovecraft wrote a short history of the book itself. That being said, let's see what the history of the book is as written by the creepy genius, himself:    Original title Al Azif—azif being the word used by Arabs to designate that nocturnal sound (made by insects) suppos'd to be the howling of daemons.      Composed by Abdul Alhazred, a mad poet of Sanaá, in Yemen, who is said to have flourished during the period of the Ommiade caliphs, circa 700 A.D. He visited the ruins of Babylon and the subterranean secrets of Memphis and spent ten years alone in the great southern desert of Arabia—the Roba el Khaliyeh or “Empty Space” of the ancients—and “Dahna” or “Crimson” desert of the modern Arabs, which is held to be inhabited by protective evil spirits and monsters of death. Of this desert many strange and unbelievable marvels are told by those who pretend to have penetrated it. In his last years Alhazred dwelt in Damascus, where the Necronomicon (Al Azif) was written, and of his final death or disappearance (738 A.D.) many terrible and conflicting things are told. He is said by Ebn Khallikan (12th cent. biographer) to have been seized by an invisible monster in broad daylight and devoured horribly before a large number of fright-frozen witnesses. Of his madness many things are told. He claimed to have seen fabulous Irem, or City of Pillars, and to have found beneath the ruins of a certain nameless desert town the shocking annals and secrets of a race older than mankind. He was only an indifferent Moslem, worshipping unknown entities whom he called Yog-Sothoth and Cthulhu.      In A.D. 950 the Azif, which had gained a considerable tho' surreptitious circulation amongst the philosophers of the age, was secretly translated into Greek by Theodorus Philetas of Constantinople under the title Necronomicon. For a century it impelled certain experimenters to terrible attempts, when it was suppressed and burnt by the patriarch Michael. After this it is only heard of furtively, but (1228) Olaus Wormius made a Latin translation later in the Middle Ages, and the Latin text was printed twice—once in the fifteenth century in black-letter (evidently in Germany) and once in the seventeenth (prob. Spanish)—both editions being without identifying marks, and located as to time and place by internal typographical evidence only. The work both Latin and Greek was banned by Pope Gregory IX in 1232, shortly after its Latin translation, which called attention to it. The Arabic original was lost as early as Wormius' time, as indicated by his prefatory note; and no sight of the Greek copy—which was printed in Italy between 1500 and 1550—has been reported since the burning of a certain Salem man's library in 1692. An English translation made by Dr. Dee was never printed, and exists only in fragments recovered from the original manuscript. Of the Latin texts now existing one (15th cent.) is known to be in the British Museum under lock and key, while another (17th cent.) is in the Bibliothèque Nationale at Paris. A seventeenth-century edition is in the Widener Library at Harvard, and in the library of Miskatonic University at Arkham. Also in the library of the University of Buenos Ayres. Numerous other copies probably exist in secret, and a fifteenth-century one is persistently rumoured to form part of the collection of a celebrated American millionaire. A still vaguer rumour credits the preservation of a sixteenth-century Greek text in the Salem family of Pickman; but if it was so preserved, it vanished with the artist R.U. Pickman, who disappeared early in 1926. The book is rigidly suppressed by the authorities of most countries, and by all branches of organised ecclesiasticism. Reading leads to terrible consequences. It was from rumours of this book (of which relatively few of the general public know) that R.W. Chambers is said to have derived the idea of his early novel The King in Yellow.   That was the history of the necronomicon as written by Lovecraft. Lovecraft stated that the name of the book came to him in a dream. Some claim however that Lovecraft was inspired by Robert W. Chambers' collection of stories titled The King In Yellow even though he isn't thought to have read the book until the late 1920s. Another person theorized that the book was derived from Nathanial Hawthorne. When asked about the Necronomicon, Lovecraft always maintained that it was wholly his invention even though The History Of The Necronomicon played as an historical text.    Despite the book showing up in several stories the details of the book were pretty sparse. There were a few passages and words that were attributed to the necronomicon. The book's physical properties are not really talked about but generally it's described as being bound in some sort of leather and with metal clasps. As for the passages attributed to the book, there is a fairly long one that is described in the Dunwich Horror. The passage reads as follows:              Nor is it to be thought...that man is either the oldest or the last of earth's masters, or that the common bulk of life and substance walks alone. The Old Ones were, the Old Ones are, and the Old Ones shall be. Not in the spaces we know, but between them, they walk serene and primal, undimensioned and to us unseen. Yog-Sothoth knows the gate. Yog-Sothoth is the gate. Yog-Sothoth is the key and guardian of the gate. Past, present, future, all are one in Yog-Sothoth. He knows where the Old Ones broke through of old, and where They shall break through again. He knows where They had trod earth's fields, and where They still tread them, and why no one can behold Them as They tread. By Their smell can men sometimes know Them near, but of Their semblance can no man know, saving only in the features of those They have begotten on mankind; and of those are there many sorts, differing in likeness from man's truest eidolon to that shape without sight or substance which is Them. They walk unseen and foul in lonely places where the Words have been spoken and the Rites howled through at their Seasons. The wind gibbers with Their voices, and the earth mutters with Their consciousness. They bend the forest and crush the city, yet may not forest or city behold the hand that smites. Kadath in the cold waste hath known Them, and what man knows Kadath? The ice desert of the South and the sunken isles of Ocean hold stones whereon Their seal is engraven, but who hath seen the deep frozen city or the sealed tower long garlanded with seaweed and barnacles? Great Cthulhu is Their cousin, yet can he spy Them only dimly. Iä! Shub-Niggurath! As a foulness shall ye know Them. Their hand is at your throats, yet ye see Them not; and Their habitation is even one with your guarded threshold. Yog-Sothoth is the key to the gate, whereby the spheres meet. Man rules now where They ruled once; They shall soon rule where man rules now. After summer is winter, after winter summer. They wait patient and potent, for here shall They reign again.   Another is a considerably smaller snippet that is actually found in 2 stories, call of the Cthulhu and the nameless city, which goes as follows :          That is not dead which can eternal lie. And with strange aeons even death may die.   It is in Call of the Cthulhu that this small couplet is said to be from the Necronomicon.   In at least one story, the book was discovered to be disguised as another book.    When asked about the contents Lovecraft once wrote:          "if anyone were to try to write the Necronomicon, it would disappoint all those who have shuddered at cryptic references to it."   According to Lovecraft's "History of the Necronomicon", copies of the original Necronomicon were held by only five institutions worldwide:   The British Museum The Bibliothèque nationale de France Widener Library of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts The University of Buenos Aires The library of the fictional Miskatonic University in the also fictitious Arkham, Massachusetts The Miskatonic University also holds the Latin translation by Olaus Wormius, printed in Spain in the 17th century.   Other copies, Lovecraft wrote, were kept by private individuals. Joseph Curwen, as noted, had a copy in The Case of Charles Dexter Ward (1941). A version is held in Kingsport in "The Festival" (1925). The provenance of the copy read by the narrator of "The Nameless City" is unknown; a version is read by the protagonist in "The Hound" (1924).   Although Lovecraft always maintained he created the book, there have always been plenty of people who believed the book to be real. There have been several books published that are supposedly translations of the actual Necronomicon. Interestingly enough the Vatican received calls every year from people that believe the real Necronomicon resides there. There have been hoaxes and others who have added their cards into library files to make it appear as if they have a copy but it is checked out. In Norway, the library of Tromso lists that they have a translated version but it is listed as unavailable.    In 1978 a version of the necronomicon popped up that had been edited by George Hay. Hay was a writer and the founder of the science fiction foundation. The version included an introduction by the paranormal researcher and writer Colin Wilson. Wilson also wrote a story, "The Return of the Lloigor", in which the Voynich manuscript turns out to be a copy of the Necronomicon. Which is a pretty cool idea. The Voynich manuscript will be a bonus we're going to tackle so make sure you become a Patreon Poopr to get access to that and all of the other amazing bonuses.    Kenneth Grant, the British occultist, disciple of Aleister Crowley, (another future bonus episode topic) and head of the Typhonian Ordo Templi Orientis, suggested in his 1972 book The Magical Revival that there was an unconscious connection between Crowley and Lovecraft. Grant claimed that the Necronomicon existed as an astral book as part of the Akashic records and could be accessed through ritual magic or in dreams.  The Akashic records are a pretty crazy topic which we will definitely cover one day. In theosophy and anthroposophy, the Akashic records are a compendium of all universal events, thoughts, words, emotions, and intent ever to have occurred in the past, present, or future in terms of all entities and life forms, not just human. They are believed by theosophists to be encoded in a non-physical plane of existence known as the mental plane. There are anecdotal accounts but there is no scientific evidence for the existence of the Akashic records.   In 2004, Necronomicon: The Wanderings of Alhazred, by Canadian occultist Donald Tyson, was published by Llewellyn Worldwide. The Tyson Necronomicon is generally thought to be closer to Lovecraft's vision than other published versions.[citation needed] Donald Tyson has clearly stated that the Necronomicon is fictional, but that has not prevented his book from being the center of some controversy. Tyson has since published Alhazred, a novelization of the life of the Necronomicon's author. Tyson had also been known to back Grant's thoughts about Crowley, Lovecraft and the Akashic records.   l The most famous of these versions of the book is the  “Simon Necronomicon,” named for its pseudo mononymous compiler (widely believed to be occultist Peter Levenda). The book is cobbled together from a mishmash of recontextualized Sumerian and Babylonian texts peppered with added references to fictional deities created by Lovecraft and the orientalist magical system of Aleister Crowley. Simon's text basically steals the work of pioneering Assyriologists like R.C. Thompson, from whose Devils and Evil Spirits of Babylonia many of the translations are lifted. In their original context, these texts were incantations against evil spirits and the various ills they caused, not spells for conjuring them. (“Simon” has a tendency to present descriptions of demons' evil natures in English, but slips back into transliterated Akkadian when the texts begin to call for the spirits to be cast out, leading to an implication that the demons are being invoked rather than exorcised.) These ancient Mesopotamian incantations have come to be considered “satanic” through a centuries-long process of reinterpretation. The Simon Necronomicon reads its ancient sources through a combination of medieval demonology, 19th-century Theosophy, and 20th-century pulp fiction.   But despite its clear origins as a hoax, the Simon Necronomicon has been used as evidence in murder trials like that of Rod Ferrell and his so-called “Vampire Clan.” In 1996, Ferrell murdered the parents of one of his friends in a brutal but mundane home invasion. But numerous factors that emerged in media coverage of the crime-- including Ferrell's self-identification as a vampire and the discovery of a copy of the Simon Necronomicon in his car--led to the murders being reframed as a satanic ritual killing. This information on the Simon Necronomicon comes from an article written by Gabriel McKee for The Institute For The Study of The Ancient World.   So that's a basic history of the Lovecraft Necronomicon. Versions of this book have been in storytelling through the ages. Including Moody's favorite movies like… The evil dead series. It also makes an appearance in Jason goes to hell to build the narrative that the Necronomicon was used in some capacity to bring Jason Vohees back. The Necronomicon was again shown in Pumpkinhead 2: Electric Boogaloo. Oh wait… Make that “Blood Wings”, wrong sequel. This version of the necronomicon was shown to be written in sumerian instead of Arabic.  So what about real life books of the dead? Well, there are some out there. The Egyptian book of the dead is probably the most famous.    The Egyptian Book of the Dead is a collection of spells which enable the soul of the deceased to navigate the afterlife. The famous title was given the work by western scholars; the actual title would translate as The Book of Coming Forth by Day or Spells for Going Forth by Day and a more apt translation to English would be The Egyptian Book of Life. Although the work is often referred to as "the Ancient Egyptian Bible" there is no such thing although the two works share the similarity of being ancient compilations of texts written at different times eventually gathered together in book form. The Book of the Dead was never codified and no two copies of the work are exactly the same. They were created specifically for each individual who could afford to purchase one as a kind of manual to help them after death. The afterlife was considered to be a continuation of life on earth and, after one had passed through various difficulties and judgment in the Hall of Truth, a paradise which was a perfect reflection of one's life on earth. After the soul had been justified in the Hall of Truth it passed on to cross over Lily Lake to rest in the Field of Reeds where one would find everything that one had lost in life and could enjoy it eternally. In order to reach that paradise, however, one needed to know where to go, how to address certain gods, what to say at certain times, and how to comfort oneself in the land of the dead; which is why one would find an afterlife manual extremely useful.    The Book of the Dead originated from concepts depicted in tomb paintings and inscriptions from as early as the Third Dynasty of Egypt (c. 2670 - 2613 BCE). By the 12th Dynasty (1991 - 1802 BCE) these spells, with accompanying illustrations, were written on papyrus and placed in tombs and graves with the dead. Their purpose, as historian Margaret Bunson explains, "was to instruct the deceased on how to overcome the dangers of the afterlife by enabling them to assume the form of several mythical creatures and to give them the passwords necessary for admittance to certain stages of the underworld". They also served, however, to provide the soul with fore-knowledge of what would be expected at every stage. Having a Book of the Dead in one's tomb would be the equivalent of a student in the modern day getting their hands on all the test answers they would ever need in every grade of school. At some point prior to 1600 BCE the different spells had been divided in chapters and, by the time of the New Kingdom (1570 - 1069 BCE), the book was extremely popular. Bunson notes, "These spells and passwords were not part of a ritual but were fashioned for the deceased, to be recited in the afterlife". If someone were sick, and feared they might die, they would go to a scribe and have them write up a book of spells for the afterlife. The scribe would need to know what kind of life the person had lived in order to surmise the type of journey they could expect after death. Prior to the New Kingdom, The Book of the Dead was only available to the royalty and the elite. The popularity of the Osiris Myth in the period of the New Kingdom made people believe the spells were indispensible because Osiris featured so prominently in the soul's judgment in the afterlife.  As more and more people desired their own Book of the Dead, scribes obliged them and the book became just another commodity produced for sale. Bunson writes, "The individual could decide the number of chapters to be included, the types of illustrations, and the quality of the papyrus used. The individual was limited only by his or her financial resources"       It continued to vary in form and size until c. 650 BCE when it was fixed at 190 uniform spells but, still, people could add or subtract what they wanted to from the text. Other copies of the book continued to be produced with more or less spells depending on what the buyer could afford. The one spell which every copy seems to have had, however, was Spell 125. so what was spell 125 you ask, well we'll tell you.       Spell 125 is actually pretty cool and it's a story that spans other religious texts in different forms. It is essentially the judging of a person at the gates of the afterlife. In this case it is the judging of the heart of the deceased by the god Osiris in the Hall of Truth. As it was vital that the soul pass the test of the weighing of the heart in order to gain paradise, knowing what to say and how to act before Osiris, Thoth, Anubis, and the Forty-Two Judges was considered the most important information the deceased could arrive with. When a person died, Anubis would guide that person to the Hall of Truth so that they could make the Negative Confession. This was a list of 42 sins the person could honestly say they had never indulged in. Once the Negative Confession was made, Osiris, Thoth, Anubis, and the Forty-Two Judges would confer and, if the confession was accepted, the heart of the deceased was then weighed in the balance against the white feather of Ma'at, the feather of truth. If the heart was found to be lighter than the feather, the soul passed on toward paradise; if the heart was heavier, it was thrown onto the floor where it was devoured by the monster goddess Ammut and the soul would cease to exist. wow… Crazy! The reason that this spell is included in every book is fairly obvious. One needed to know the different gods' names and what they were responsible for but one also needed to know such details as the names of the doors in the room and the floor one needed to walk across; one even needed to know the names of one's own feet. As the soul answered each deity and object with the correct response, they would hear the reply, "You know us; pass by us" and could continue. The spell finished up with a summary of what to wear and even what to offer. It read as follows: "The correct procedure in this Hall of Justice: One shall utter this spell pure and clean and clad in white garments and sandals, painted with black eye-paint and anointed with myrrh. There shall be offered to him meat and poultry, incense, bread, beer, and herbs when you have put this written procedure on a clean floor of ochre overlaid with earth upon which no swine or small cattle have trodden."   There were quite a number of slips the soul might make, however, between arrival at the Hall of Truth and the boat ride to paradise. The Book of the Dead includes spells for any kind of circumstance but it does not seem one was guaranteed to survive these twists and turns. Not every detail described above was included in the vision of every era of Egyptian history. In some periods the modifications are minor while, in others, the afterlife is seen as a perilous journey toward a paradise that is only temporary. At some points in the culture the way to paradise was very straightforward after the soul was justified by Osiris while, in others, crocodiles might thwart the soul or bends in the road may prove dangerous or demons might appear to trick or even attack. In these cases, the soul needed spells to survive and reach paradise. Spells included in the book include titles such as "For Repelling A Crocodile Which Comes To Take Away", "For Driving Off A Snake", "For Not Being Eaten By A Snake In The Realm Of The Dead", "For Not Dying Again In The Realm Of The Dead", "For Being Transformed Into A Divine Falcon", "For Being Transformed Into A Lotus""For Being Transformed Into A Phoenix", “For being transformed into more than meets the eye” and so on. The Book of the Dead, as noted, was never used for magical transformations on earth; the spells only worked in the afterlife. The claim that The Book of the Dead was some kind of sorcerer's text is as wrong and unfounded as the comparison with the Bible. The Egyptian Book of the Dead is also nothing like The Tibetan Book of the Dead, although these two works are often equated as well.    The information about the Egyptian book of the dead was taken from a great article on worldhistory.org It's a great resource for anything historical!   And speaking of the Tibetan Book Of The Dead, let's see what that's all about! Although in Tibet there is no single text directly referred to as the Tibetan Book of the Dead, this English work is the primary source for Western understandings of Tibetan Buddhist conceptions of death. These understandings have been highly influenced by Western spiritualist movements of the 20th and 21st centuries, resulting in efforts to adapt and synthesize various frameworks of “other” religious traditions, particularly those from Asian societies that are viewed as esoteric or mystical, including tantric or Tibetan Buddhism. Isn't Tantric sex about having an intense orgasm without having intercourse? It's also a great band. This has resulted in creative forms of appropriation, reinterpretation, and misrepresentation of Tibetan views and rituals surrounding death, which often neglect the historical and religious realities of the tradition itself. The Tibetan Book of the Dead is a prime example of such a process. Despite the lack of a truly existing “book of the dead,” numerous translations, commentaries, and comparative studies on this “book” continue to be produced by both scholars and adherents of the tradition, making it a focal point for the dissemination and transference of Tibetan Buddhism in the West.   The set of Tibetan block prints that was the basis for the original publication of the Tibetan Book of the Dead in 1927 by Walter Y. Evans-Wentz (1878–1968) consisted of portions of the collection known in Tibetan as The Great Liberation through Hearing in the Intermediate State or Bardo Thödol (Bar do thos grol chen mo). This work is said to have been authored by Padmasambhava in the 8th century CE, who subsequently had the work buried; it was rediscovered in the 14th century by the treasure revealer (gter ston) Karma Lingpa (Kar ma gling pa; b. c. 1350). However, as a subject for literary and historical inquiry, it is nearly impossible to determine what Tibetan texts should be classified under the Western conceptual rubric of the Tibetan Book of the Dead. This is due partly to the Tibetan tendency to transmit textual traditions through various redactions, which inevitably change the content and order of collected works. Despite this challenge, the few systematic efforts made by scholars of Tibetan and Buddhist studies to investigate Bardo Thödol literature and its associated funerary tradition have been thorough, and the works produced by Bryan Cuevas and Donald Lopez Jr. are particularly noteworthy.   The Bardo Thödol is essentially a funerary manual designed to guide an individual toward recognizing the signs of impending death and traversing the intermediate state (bar do) between death and rebirth, and to guide one's consciousness to a favorable next life. These instructions provide detailed descriptions of visions and other sensory experiences that one encounters when dying and during the post-mortem state. The texts are meant to be read aloud to the deceased by the living to encourage the consciousness to realize the illusory or dreamlike nature of these experiences and thus to attain liberation through this recognition. This presentation is indicative of a complex and intricate conceptual framework built around notions of death, impermanence, and their soteriological propensities within a tantric Buddhist program developed in Tibet over a millennium, particularly within the context of the Nyingma (rNying ma) esoteric tradition known as Dzogchen (rDzogs chen). Tibet and other tantric Buddhist societies throughout the Himalaya have developed a variety of technologies for practically applying Buddhist understandings of death, and so this particular “book” is by no means the only manual utilized during the dying and post-mortem states, nor is it even necessarily included in all Tibetan or Himalayan funerary traditions. Nevertheless, this work has captured the interests of Western societies for the past century and has unofficially become the principal introduction not only to Tibetan death rites but also to Tibetan Buddhism in general for the West. Information in this summary was taken from the Oxford Research Encyclopedia website.     To go along with these, there is also the lesser known Texan book of the dead. This one is followed by a certain group of people in the Americas. There are some interesting passages in it and they read as follows:    you say you want to go to heaven? Well, I got the plans Kinda walks like Sasquatch But it breeds like kubla khan In original dialect, it's really quite cryptical   Following this it says:   It's given me powers but kept me low Many have scorned this Modern day pharisees fat with espressos   Interesting… It continues:   you want to know paradise Do you want to know hell? Want to drink that cool clear liquor? Better dig a little deeper in the well  It goes on to reveal the mantra you need to recite to move on in the afterlife:           Do you want that mantra? Well, here you go   One for the money, two for the show And a knick knack paddy whack Give the lord a handicap Ooh ee ooh ah ah Twing twang walla walla bing bang Oh ee ooh ah ah Twing twang walla walla bing bang, oh yeah Ooh eee ooh ah ah B-I-N-G-O Ooh eee ooh ah ah E-I-E-I-O   It finishes with an emphatic phrase to remind you that on the afterlife, you're not running shots anymore, it reads:   "It is written, I have spoken So put this in your pipe and smoke it"   Ok so if you made it through that with us you probably surmised that it was a bunch of hogwash. Texan book of the dead is actually a song by the band clutch but we figured we'd have some fun.  Some think the song has a deeper meaning referring to the ridiculousness of trendy ideas about spirituality and the process of life and death.    https://www.digitaltrends.com/movies/necromicon-movies-book-of-the-dead/ BECOME A PRODUCER! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors

AiPT! Comics
Comedy and comics: Jordan Morris talks the hilarious ‘Bubble'

AiPT! Comics

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 86:28


NEWSMarvel Solicitations for October are in!Marvel reveals new ‘Amazing Spider-Man' #75-77 cover artMarvel announces ‘Marvel's Voices: Community (Comunidades)' #1Marvel reveals Eternals vs. Avengers of 1,000,000 BCE in ‘Eternals: Celestia' #1Marvel announces ‘Luke Cage: City of Fire' for October 2021Marvel reveals “The Last of the Marvels” to bring back Captain Marvel's son Genis-VellComiXology announces ‘The All-Nighter' comics series for 2022Heavy Metal Magazine gets Boulet Brothers takeover this HalloweenOctober 2021 Image Comics solicitations: Gunslinger Spawn, Saga box set and moreImage announces murder mystery ‘A Righteous Thirst for Vengeance' #1Projected comics sales for June 2021 by ComichronMarvel and Gallery Books partner for Marvel non-fiction titles in 2022Plus, the big winners at the 2021 Eisner Awards!Our Top Books of the WeekDave:Superman and the Authority #1 (Grant Morrison, Mikel Janin)Thor (2020) Annual #1 (Aaron Kuder, Cam Smith, Chris O'Halloran, backup by MacKay, Juan Ferrerya)Nathan:Superman and The Authority #1 (Grant Morrison, Mikel Janin)Superman Red and Blue #5 (Various)Standout KAPOW moment of the week:Nathan - Moon Knight #1 (Jed McKay, Steve McNiven)Dave - Moon Knight #1 (Jed McKay, Alessandro Cappuccio)TOP BOOKS FOR NEXT WEEKDave: The Other History of the DC Universe #5 (W: John Ridley: A: Layouts by Giuseppe Camuncoli, Finishes by Andrea Cucchi)Nathan: Superman: Son of Kal-El #1 (Tom Taylor, John Timms)JUDGING BY THE COVER JR.Dave: Symbiote Spider-Man: Crossroads #1 (del Mundo variant)Nathan: Beta Ray Bill #5 (Daniel Warren Johnson)Segment: Interview: Jordan Morris - podcaster at Jordan Jessie Go!, writer at @Midnight and Unikitty, Bubble of course!Friday at 5:30 ESTJordan, thank you for joining the AIPT Comics podcast______ Bubble is an incredible achievement, not only for its podcast but now comic and soon animated film, just to start, how has it been to get a brand new response from comics fans?How did this adaptation with First Second come about?I understand Bubble was created in response to the election in 2016 and the series sprouted from the idea of a Portland-y hipster biosphere, can you talk a little bit about if or how the comic differs from the podcast?You're joined by Sarah Morgan and Tony Cliff, what was the collaboration process like in adapting Bubble?Colin Moon, who reviewed Bubble at AIPT, asks: I'm really curious how the writing went from podcast script to comic script--what was cut to work better for each media type, how the scripting differs between two projects, etc.You've written for numerous shows now like @Midnight, came up from UCB, I wanted to ask, how did your career start? Did you go to school for screenwriting? What's your writing background like?The descriptions for each of the creatures are so unique and fun. Any chance of a Bubble Sourcebook in the future?Music plays a huge part in this story and the character's personalities. Morgan is seen listening to several playlists throughout the book. Do you listen to any particular music to get you in the zone?I guess what we really want to know is: How do you really feel about 311?Do you have an itch to write more comics?What comics are you reading right now?Off Topic Top Shelf: Jordan Morris MODOK - Spider-Man: Miles Morales

The History of Egypt Podcast
146: Restoration III, Tut'ankhamun in Opet

The History of Egypt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 86:18


Amun, Mut, Khonsu, and the King. Once a year, the city of Waset (Thebes / Luxor) hosted an enormous celebration. The Beautiful Festival of Opet honoured the great gods Amun-Ra, Mut, and Khonsu. The deities would emerge from their secret shrines, and ride in procession through the city and on the river. King Tut'ankhamun would lead these events, renewing the power of the gods and his right to rule...This is a big episode, probably best consumed over several sittings. Enjoy!Episode DetailsDate: c. 1336 BCE.Music by Keith Zizza.Music by Ancient Lyric.Music by Jeffrey Goodman.Sound interludes by Luke Chaos.Special voiceover work by vorob1003.Read the full publication of Tut'ankhamun's Opet reliefs in The Epigraphic Survey, Reliefs and Inscriptions at Luxor Temple - Volume I: The Festival Procession of Opet in the Colonnade Hall (Chicago, 1994). PDF available free from the University of Chicago.See other shows from the Agora Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History of the World podcast
Vol 3 Ep 78 - SUMMARY - The Classical World, Part Three

History of the World podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021 35:32


100 BCE - 200 CE - The emergence of the Silk Road saw the rise and fall of four great global empires and the spread of trade encouraged the spread of philosophy and religion across the whole of the Eurasian landmass.

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe
Grape Therapy: Bachelorette Recap (and roast) with Nikki Glaser

Off The Vine with Kaitlyn Bristowe

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 72:57


Recaps are back, baby! The hilarious Nikki Glaser is joining KB to recap the premiere of Katie's Bachelorette season and give all her honest opinions on Katie's lineup of men. Nikki came prepared with notes and she is not afraid to share her thoughts on men who love their moms (maybe a little too much) and Katie's kissing style (which she describes with an expression so explicit that we'll save it for the pod). Kaitlyn and Tayshia may have entered the episode looking like full-on witches in mourning who were ready to cast a spell, but Nikki was all for the new format of this season. The two also talk about the realities of spray tans, their not-so-secret aspirations of becoming pop stars, and which of Katie's men gave them BDE (or shall we say BCE: big cat energy). Tune in to Grape Therapy next week for more on Katie's season! HELIX - Helix is offering up to $200 dollars off all mattress orders AND two free pillows for OTV listeners at HelixSleep.com/vine GEICO - Go to geico.com and in 1 5 minutes you could be saving 15% or more on car insurance HYUNDAI - Learn more at hyundai.com SEED PROBIOTICS - Visit seed.com/VINE and use code VINE to redeem 20% off your first month of Seed's Daily Synbiotic GOODY'S - To purchase, go to Amazon and use code 1VINE to receive $1 off of a 4 count 6 pack! MEUNDIES - To get your 15% off your first order and free shipping go to MeUndies.com/VINE OXICLEAN - Visit OxicleanCoupons.com now where a coupon is waiting for you