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Bishop of higher rank in many Christian denominations

  • 1,129PODCASTS
  • 2,884EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 25, 2022LATEST
Archbishop

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Best podcasts about Archbishop

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Latest podcast episodes about Archbishop

Saint of the Day
Our Father among the Saints Gregory the Theologian, Archbishop of Constantinople (389)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 3:13


This light of the Church is one of only three holy Fathers whom the Church has honored with the name "the Theologian" (the others are St John the Evangelist and Theologian, and St Symeon the New Theologian).   He was born in 329 in Arianzus in Cappadocia to a pious and holy family: his father Gregory, mother Nonna, brother Caesarius and sister Gorgonia are all counted among the Saints of the Church. His father later became Bishop of Nazianzus. He studied in Palestine, then in Alexandria, then in Athens. On the way to Athens, his ship was almost sunk in a violent storm; Gregory, who had not yet been baptized, prayed to the Lord to preserve him, and promised that henceforth he would dedicate his entire life to God. Immediately the storm ceased.   In Athens, Gregory's fellow students included St Basil the Great and the future Emperor Julian the Apostate. The friendship between Gregory and Basil blossomed into a true spiritual friendship; they were loving brothers in Christ for the rest of their lives. After completing their studies, Sts Gregory and Basil lived together as monks in hermitage at Pontus. Much against St Gregory's will, his father ordained him a priest, and St Basil consecrated him Bishop of Sasima (in the Archdiocese of Caesarea, over which St Basil was Archbishop).   In 381 the Second Ecumenical Council condemned Macedonius, Archbishop of Constantinople, and appointed St Gregory in his place. When he arrived in the City, he found that the Arians controlled all the churches, and he was forced to "rule" from a small house chapel. From there he preached his five great sermons on the Trinity, the Triadika; these were so powerfully influential that when he left Constantinople two years later, every church in the City had been restored to the Orthodox.   St Gregory was always a theologian and a contemplative, not an administrator, and the duties of Archbishop were agonizing to him. In 382 he received permission from a council of his fellow-bishops and the Emperor to retire from the see of Constantinople. He returned to Nazianzus (for which reason he is sometimes called St Gregory of Nazianzus). There he reposed in peace in 391 at the age of sixty-two.   His writings show a theological depth and a sublimity of expression perhaps unsurpassed in the Church. His teaching on the Holy Trinity is a great bastion of Orthodox Faith; in almost every one of his published homilies he preaches the Trinity undivided and of one essence.

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann
#260 Shareholder power, Serbian threats and Anglican anxiety

The Week Unwrapped - with Olly Mann

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 41:52


Do investors (including anyone with a pension) have more power than they realise? Is Bosnia on the verge of breaking up? And how will the next Archbishop of Canterbury be chosen? Olly Mann and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days. With John Stepek, Joe Evans and Leaf Arbuthnot

Global News Podcast
Former Pope Benedict accused of failing to act over child abuse cases

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 31:05


Report claims he failed to act to prevent abuse when he was Archbishop of Munich. Also, the ICRC is targeted by cyber hackers and, the first aid flights arrive in Tonga.

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
Why Rutilio Grande's Struggle with Mental Health Matters

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 40:26


This Saturday, January 22, Father Rutilio Grande, SJ – along with laymen Manuel Solórzano and Nelson Rutilio Lemus – will be beatified in San Salvador, El Salvador. All three men are martyrs, killed in 1977. Fr. Grande, though, was the first priest assassinated before the Salvadoran Civil War began. And, he was a close friend of Archbishop and saint, Óscar Romero. Fr. Arturo Sosa – the superior of the Society of Jesus – wrote about Fr. Grande and his upcoming beatification: “Father Grande, born in the small town of El Paisnal on 5 January 1928, was a Jesuit of unsuspected religious and human depth. In his weakness he found his greatness. He lived much of his life in the silence and humility of those who are becoming, step by step, companions of Jesus.” Fr. Sosa goes on to describe the circumstances in El Salvador during Grande's time: “The growing awareness of the need to promote a transformation of the inhuman circumstances of life of the peasant majority, a situation caused by the unjust structures of Salvadoran society, sparked the social and political struggles of this convulsive period in the history of this Central American country. Many members of the ecclesial communities participated actively in the social and political struggle. For Father Rutilio, his team, and his close collaborators, who were committed because of their faith to the struggle for the justice of the Gospel, there was a clear distinction between pastoral work and partisan political militancy.” Finally, Fr. Sosa writes: “The Church, in recognizing the martyrdom of Rutilio, Manuel, and Nelson, judges that their lives were taken because of the faith that gave their lives meaning, the faith to which they gave witness by shedding their blood.” Today, to help commemorate the life and legacy of Fr. Rutilio Grande, author and poet and Jesuits.org columnist, Cameron Bellm, is back on the podcast. She's just finished a new devotional entitled, “No Unlikely Saints: A Mental Health Pilgrimage with Sacred Company.” In it, she devotes a chapter to Fr. Grande and his struggles with mental health. She shares what she learned about him in preparing this book, as well as why it's important to weave this part of his story into his lasting legacy. Find her book here: https://brickhouseinthecity.com/product/no-unlikely-saints-a-mental-health-pilgrimage-with-sacred-company/

Restore The Glory Podcast
Healing and Leadership (Part 2) w/ Archbishop Alexander Sample

Restore The Glory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 56:03


Jake and Bob welcome a very special guest onto the podcast from Portland, OR: Archbishop Alexander Sample. Appointed a Bishop at the young age of 45, Archbishop Sample has served over 15 years in the episcopate and has recently embarked on a journey of healing that has totally transformed his approach to spiritual fatherhood of priests. Together with Jake and Bob, Archbishop Sample shares some key childhood wounds and healing in parts of his story, demonstrating how healing helps unite us to Christ and those we lead.   Guiding Quote: It's not the critic who counts… The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood. - Theodore Roosevelt   Key points: How the Archbishop began his healing journey about two years ago The Archbishop shares vulnerably about father wounds and bullying he experienced as a young boy Jake affirms strength in vulnerability and the safety it creates How brokenness has affected Archbishop Sample and his leadership, particularly in his relationship as a spiritual father to his priests How healing has impacted the Archbishop's spiritual fatherhood and relationship with the priests in his Archdiocese The importance of having people in your life who are instruments of healing How a leader's healing and transparency can lead to healing in the people he leads    Practical Application: Ask yourself, “Am I willing to do what I ask of others?” What are some parts of your story that you aren't ready to tell yet? Might you need more healing in these areas?  Write an encouraging letter to a priest or bishop in your diocese. We often only reach out to them when we have a bone to pick!    Resources:  Archbishop Sample's bio with the Archdiocese of Portland, OR Archbishop Sample's Twitter: @ArchbishpSample Forty Weeks to Healing and Transformation for Priests (book) Be Healed (book) Man in the Arena quote from Theodore Roosevelt   Connect with Restore the Glory: Instagram: @restoretheglorypodcast  Twitter: @RestoreGloryPod Facebook: Restore the Glory Podcast   Never miss out on an episode by hitting the subscribe button right now! Help other people find the show and grow in holiness by sharing this podcast with them individually or on your social media. Thanks!

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Fathers Athanasius the Great (373) and Cyril (444), Patriarchs of Alexandria

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 4:32


Saint Athanasius, pillar of Orthodoxy and Father of the Church, was born in Alexandria in 275, to pious Christian parents. Even as a child, his piety and devotion to the Faith were so notable that Alexander, the Patriarch of the city, took Athanasius under his protection. As a student, he acquired a thorough education, but was more interested in the things of God than in secular learning, and withdrew for a time into the desert to sit at the feet of Saint Anthony (January 17), whose disciple he became and whose biography he later wrote. On returning to Alexandria, he was ordained to the diaconate and began his public labors for the Church. He wrote his treatise On the Incarnation, when he was only twenty. (It contains a phrase, still often quoted today, that express in a few words some of the depths of the Mystery of the Incarnation: God became man that man might become god.)   Just at this time Arius, a priest in Alexandria, was promoting his enticing view that the Son and Word of God is not of one essence with the Father, but a divine creation of the Father. This view, which (as Athanasius realized) strikes at the very possibility of mankind's salvation, gained wide acceptance and seemed for a time to threaten the Christian Faith itself. In 325, the Emperor Constantine the Great convoked a Council of the Church at Nicaea to settle the turmoil that the Arian teaching had spread through the Church. Athanasius attended the Council, and defended the Orthodox view so powerfully that he won the admiration of the Orthodox and the undying enmity of the Arians. From that time forth his life was founded on the defense of the true consubstantiality (homoousia) of the Son with the Father.   In 326, not long before his death, Patriarch Alexander appointed Athanasius to be his successor, and Athanasius was duly elevated to the patriarchal throne. He was active in his pastoral role, traveling throughout Egypt, visiting churches and monasteries, and working tirelessly not only to put down the Arian heresy, but to resolve various schisms and moral declines that affected his territory.   Though the Arian heresy had apparently been condemned once and for all at Nicea, Arius had many powerful allies throughout the Empire, even in the Imperial court, and Athanasius was soon subjected to many kinds of persecution, some local, some coming from the Imperial throne itself. Though he was Patriarch of Alexandria for more than forty years, a large amount of that time was spent in hiding from powerful enemies who threatened him with imprisonment or death. Twice he fled to Rome for protection by the Pope, who in the early centuries of the Church was a consistent champion of Orthodoxy against its various enemies. From his various hiding places, Athanasius issued tracts, treatises and epistles which helped to rally the faithful throughout Christendom to the Orthodox cause.   In 366, the Emperor Valens, fearing a revolt of the Egyptians on behalf of their beloved Archbishop, officially restored Athanasius to favor, and he was able to spend the last seven years of his life in peace. Of his forty-seven years as Patriarch, about seventeen were spent in hiding or exile. He reposed in peace in 373, having given his entire adult life, at great suffering, to the defense of the Faith of Christ.

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
WM22 – Vatican II – Lumen Gentium part 1 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 31:28


Join Archbishop George Lucas and Kris McGregor as they begin a conversation on the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church. Discerning Hearts Podcast The post WM22 – Vatican II – Lumen Gentium part 1 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

No Bad Ideas
The Archbishop's TikTok

No Bad Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 32:54


We're back! Sarah kicks us off with a Belgian church in a bind, and we turn it into a sensational scandal that might be the miracle that bring the flock back. Then Zach introduces us to the Squirrel Board and we take the concept of keeping squirrels as pets and turn it into a heartwarming tale of an unusual friendship between man and monster.  Plus: Benedetta's viral marketing campaign, an animal arms race, lovely British sitcoms, metaphors for community, and several hot priests.  Today's Bad Ideas™:  Idea #1 Idea #2 Support the show: http://patreon.com/NoBadIdeas See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Sava (Sabbas), Enlightener and first Archbishop of Serbia (1236)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 2:46


This best-loved Saint of the Serbian people was born in 1169, the son of Stephen Nemanja, Grand Prince of Serbia. He was named Rastko by his parents. At the age of fifteen he was appointed governor of the province of Herzegovina, but worldly power was of no interest to him, and he began to wish to give himself more fully to God. He secretly left home and traveled to Mount Athos, where he became a novice at the Monastery of St Panteleimon. His father learned where he had gone and sent soldiers to bring him back, but before the soldiers could claim him, he was tonsured a monk with the name of Sabbas (Sava), after St Sabbas the Sanctified (December 5).   In time, under the influence of his son, Stephen Nemanja abdicated his kingship, and in 1196 he became a monk under the name of Symeon, traveling to the Holy Mountain to join his son. Symeon was quite old, and unable to endure all the ascetic labors of long-time monks, so his son redoubled his own ascetical struggle, telling his father, "I am your ascesis." The two monks together founded the Chilander Monastery, which became the center of Serbian piety and culture. Saint Symeon reposed in 1200, and his body soon began to exude a miracle-working myrrh; thus he is commemorated as St Symeon the Myrrh-streaming (February 13).   Saint Sava retired to a hermit's life in a cell on the Holy Mountain, but was compelled to return to the world: his two brothers were at war with one another, causing much bloodshed in Serbia. The Saint returned home with his father's holy relics, mediated between his brothers, and persuaded them to make peace with one another over their father's tomb, restoring peace the Serbian land. At the pleas of the people, St Sava remained in Serbia thereafter. He persuaded the Emperor and the Patriarch of Constantinople to grant autocephaly to the Church in Serbia. Against his will, he was ordained first Archbishop of his land in 1219. He labored tirelessly to establish the Orthodox Faith, for, though his father had been a Christian, many of the people were still pagan. In old age he resigned the episcopal throne and went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. While returning from his pilgrimage, he fell asleep in peace in 1236.

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast
Quantum 181 - Who Guards the Guardians? Bread of Heaven

Quantum - The Wee Flea Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 35:28


This week we look at Boris's apology; the VIP lane; the infantilisation of society;  Johnny Cash; Inflation; Myanmar; Twitter in Nigeria; Flo RIda; the Gay Cake Case; Disability and Abortion;Eminem and Ed Sheeran; Indiana Jones; Rewriting Enid Blyton;  Welsh Government, Speech and Singing; Don't Look Up; Sydney Poitier;  Scottish Baptist Heresy; The Archbishop of Canterbury's New Year Address; The Decline of Church; Michael McIntyre; Bread of Heaven....

Holy Smoke
Why tradition is sacred: an interview with Archbishop Nikitas, leader of Britain's Greek Orthodox Church

Holy Smoke

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 26:55


In this episode of Holy Smoke, Archbishop Nikitas of Thyateira and Great Britain, leader of Britain's Greek Orthodox, defends sacred Christian tradition with a robustness I've never heard from a native British bishop.  The Florida-born Nikitas has exhilarating and controversial things to say on all sorts of topics: the Western Churches' cosy relationship with secularism, the devastating civil war between Moscow and Constantinople, and the essence of Orthodox mysticism.  Needless to say, I couldn't resist asking the Archbishop what he makes of Pope Francis's grim persecution of Latin Mass Catholics. Nikitas is generally a fan of Francis – but I doubt that the Vatican will be reassured by his wise and candid comments on this topic. 

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show
785: Cardinal Cupich Heckled at Chicago March for Life [Podcast]

Dr Taylor Marshall Catholic Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 56:40


Cardinal Blase Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago was booed and heckled at the Chicago March for Life for his weak stance regarding the President and life issues. Watch this new podcast episode by clicking here: Or listen to the audio mp3 here: If you'd like to order a copy of Taylor's new book Infiltration: The Plot […] The post 785: Cardinal Cupich Heckled at Chicago March for Life [Podcast] appeared first on Taylor Marshall.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, January 9, 2022

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022


Full Text of ReadingsThe Baptism of the Lord Lectionary: 21All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Adrian of CanterburyThough Saint Adrian turned down a papal request to become Archbishop of Canterbury, England, Pope Saint Vitalian accepted the rejection on the condition that Adrian serve as the Holy Father's assistant and adviser. Adrian accepted, but ended up spending most of his life and doing most of his work in Canterbury. Born in Africa, Adrian was serving as an abbot in Italy when the new Archbishop of Canterbury appointed him abbot of the monastery of Saints Peter and Paul in Canterbury. Thanks to his leadership skills, the facility became one of the most important centers of learning. The school attracted many outstanding scholars from far and wide and produced numerous future bishops and archbishops. Students reportedly learned Greek and Latin and spoke Latin as well as their own native languages. Adrian taught at the school for 40 years. He died there, probably in the year 710, and was buried in the monastery. Several hundred years later, when reconstruction was being done, Adrian's body was discovered in an incorrupt state. As word spread, people flocked to his tomb, which became famous for miracles. Rumor had it that young schoolboys in trouble with their masters made regular visits there. Reflection Saint Adrian spent most of his time in Canterbury not as bishop, but as abbot and teacher. Often the Lord has plans for us that are obvious only on hindsight. How often have we said no to something or someone only to end up in much the same place anyway. The Lord knows what's good for us. Can we trust him? Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Catholic Family News's Podcast
Weekly News Roundup 01/07/2022

Catholic Family News's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 65:43


Our stories this week include: (1) Cardinal Blase Cupich's Christmas gift to traditional Catholics; (2) a circus performance held at the Vatican for Pope Francis, as well as more subtle digs at traditionalists by the Pope; (3) the Archbishop of Dublin's claim that "[r]adical change is coming to the Church" via "the synodal pathway" of Pope Francis; (4) a courageous sermon given by a Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter (FSSP) priest regarding COVID; and (5) Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò's response to the Congregation for Divine Worship's contrived "Responsa ad Dubia" concerning the implementation of Traditionis Custodes.

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles
The Greatest Reset Is Coming

TRUNEWS with Rick Wiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 62:52


The world's elite has a plan underway that they have been working on for centuries, a global reset of banking, money politics, and even humanity itself. Jesus Christ has another plan: The Greatest Reset. On this edition of TruNews, Doc Burkhart welcomes Matt Skow as they talk about this latest ministry production. Airdate 1/6/22

Israel Collective
Why is the UN Erasing Jewish and Christian History?

Israel Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 49:31


Josh and Raj discuss problems with a recent UN resolution, the plight of Christians in the Middle East, the Archbishop of Canterbury's offensive "Christmas" message, the reason Israel's government donated vaccines and computers to Africans, and more.

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά
Archbishop Makarios test positive on COVID-19 - Θετικός στο νέο κορωνοϊό ο Αρχιεπίσκοπος Μακάριος

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:19


Archbishop Makarios of Australia has been diagnosed positive for the new coronavirus. - Θετικός στο νέο κορωνοϊό διαγνώστηκε ο Αρχιεπίσκοπος Αυστραλίας Μακάριος.

South Sudan In Focus  - Voice of America
South Sudan in Focus - January 04, 2022

South Sudan In Focus - Voice of America

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:00


South Sudan's Transitional National Legislative Assembly has nominated leaders to head specialized committees in the parliament; Authorities in the Lakes State's Awerial County have detained more than ten Internal Displaced Persons for taking part fighting between the supporters of the dismissed Bishop Ruben Akurdid and Archbishop and Primate Justin Badi.

Your Brain on Facts
Very New Year

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 18:58


Happy new year!  Or is it?  It depends on which calendar you're using. Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website.   On Monday this December 30th past, I clocked in at my retail jobs, put on my headset, and played the morning messages.  There was one from my manager telling us what to expect in terms of sales volume that day and one from corporate welcoming us to the first day of 2020.  The didn't get their dates mixed up.  December 30th 2019 was the first day of 2020 in a way that once crashed Twitter for hours.  My name…   When we think of the calendar, we think of it as singular and exclusive.  “The” calendar.  Sure, there were other calendars, but those were for old-timey people in old-timey times.  If you've ever listened to the show before, you'll know I'm about to disabuse you of that notion; it's kinda my schtick.  The calendar we think of as the end all and be all of organizing time into little squares is the Gregorian calendar, but it's just one of many that have been used and still are used today.   For example, at the time of this recording, it's currently the 27th day of the month of Tevet in the year 5782 for those who follow the Hebrew calendar.  The Hebrew calendar, also known as the Jewish calendar, was originally created before the year 10 CE.  It first used lunar months, which will surprise no one who has had to google when Passover or Easter are each year.  A standard Jewish year has twelve months; six twenty-nine-day months, and six thirty-day months, for a total of 354 days.  This is because the months follow the lunar orbit, which is on average 29.5 days.  Due to variations in the Jewish calendar, the year could also be 353 or 355 days.  It also used standard calendar years, but these two methods don't line up perfectly, and this posed a problem.  As time went on, the shorter lunar calendar would result in holy days shifting forward in time from year to year.  That simply wouldn't do as certain holidays have to be celebrated in a certain season, like Passover in the spring, Tu B'Shevat, the Jewish 'New Year for Trees,' which  needs to fall around the time that trees in the Middle East come out of their winter dormancy, or Sukkot, the festival that calls adherents to build and live in huts in their yard to commemorate Isrealites taking shelter in the wilderness, which is meant to fall in autumn.  So a thirteenth month had to be added every 3 to 4 years in order to make up for the difference.  Such a year is called a shanah meuberet ("pregnant year") in Hebrew; in English we call it a leap year, and it makes up all the lunar calendar's lost days.  The month is added to Adar, the last of the twelve months. On leap years we observe two Adars — Adar I and Adar II.  Today, the Hebrew calendar is used primarily to determine the dates for Jewish religious holidays and to select appropriate religious readings for the day.   Similar in usage is the Hijri calendar, or Islamic calendar.  It's based on lunar phases, using a system of 12 months and either 354 or 355 days every year.  The first Islamic year was 622 CE when the prophet Muhammad emigrated from Mecca to Medina, meaning today is the Jumada I 28, 1443 .  The Hijri calendar is used to identify Islamic holidays and festivals.  The Islamic New Year marks the journey of the prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Medina.  However, the occasion and the sacred month of Muharram are observed differently by the two largest branches of Islam, Shiite and Sunni.  Shiite pilgrims journey to their holiest sites to commemorate a seventh-century battle, while Sunnis fast to celebrate the victory of Moses over an Egyptian pharaoh.  Also known as the Persian calendar, it's the official calendar used in Iran and Afghanistan, and it's the most accurate calendar system going, but more on that later.   Further east you'll encounter the Buddhist calendar, which is used throughout Southeast Asia.  This uses the sidereal year, the time it takes Earth to orbit the sun, as the solar year.  Like other systems, the calendar does not try to stay in sync with this time measurement, but unlike the others, no extra days or months have been added, so the Buddhist calendar is slowly moving out of alignment at a pace of around one day every century.  Today, the traditional Buddhist lunisolar calendar is used mainly for Theravada Buddhist festivals, and no longer has the official calendar status anywhere. The Thai Buddhist Era, a renumbered Gregorian calendar, is the official calendar in Thailand.  The Buddhist calendar is based on an older Hindu calendar, of which there are actually three -- Vikram Samvat, Shaka Samvat, and Kali Yuga.  The Vikram Samvat is used in Nepal and some Indian states, and uses lunar months and the sidereal year to track time.  Sidereal means based on fixed stars and constellations, rather than celestial things on the move, like planets.  The Shaka Samvat, used officially in India and by Hindus in Java and Bali, has months based around the tropical zodiac signs rather than the sidereal year.  The Kali Yuga is a different sort of calendar altogether.  It meters out the last of the four stages (or ages or yugas) the world goes through as part of a 'cycle of yugas' (i.e. mahayuga) described in the Sanskrit scriptures. The Kali Yuga, began at midnight (00:00) on 18 February 3102 BCE,  is the final cycle within the 4-cycle Yuga era. The first cycle is the age of truth and perfection, the second cycle is the age of emperors and war, the third stage is the age of disease and discontent, and the third stage (the Kali Yuga) is the age of ignorance and darkness.  If you're worried because you already missed 5,000 years of the Yuga, don't fret; you have upwards of 467,000 years left.     You've probably heard of Chinese New Year, so you won't be surprised that there is a Chinese calendar.  According to this system, each month begins on the day when the moon is in the "new moon" phase. The beginning of a new year is also marked by the position of the moon and occurs when the moon is midway between the winter solstice and spring equinox.  China uses the Gregorian calendar for official things, but still uses the Chinese calendar is used to celebrate holidays.   You might be surprised to learn about the Ethiopian calendar.  The Ethiopian calendar is quite similar to the Julian calendar, the predecessor to the Gregorian calendar most countries use today.  Like the other calendars we've discussed, it's intertwined with the faith of the people.  The first day of the week for instance, called Ehud, translates as ‘the first day‘ in the ancient Ge'ez language, the liturgical language of the Ethiopian church.  It is meant to show that Ehud is the first day on which God started creating the heavens and the earth.  The calendar system starts with the idea that Adam and Eve lived in the Garden of Eden for seven years before they were banished for 5,500 for their sins.  Both the Gregorian and Ethiopian use the birthdate of Jesus Christ as a starting point, what Eddie Izzard called “the big BC/AD change-over,” though the Ethiopian Orthodox Church believes Jesus was born 7 years earlier than the Gregorian calendar says.  The Ethiopian calendar has 13 months in a year, 12 of which have 30 days. The last month, called Pagume, has five days, and six days in a leap year.   Not only do the months have names, so do the years.  The first year after an Ethiopian leap year is named the John year, and is followed by the Matthew year, then Mark, then Luke.  Sept. 11 marks the day of the new year in Ethiopia.  By this time, the lengthy rainy season has come to a close, leaving behind a countryside flourishing in yellow daisies. That's fitting because Enkutatash in Amharic, the native language of Ethiopia, translates to “gift of jewels.” To celebrate New Year's, Ethiopians sing songs unique to the day and exchange bouquets of flowers. Of course, there is plenty of eating and drinking, too.   So what about this Gregorian calendar I keep mentioning?  The Gregorian calendar was created in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, who made some changes to the previously used Julian calendar.  Okay, so what was the Julian calendar?  It should shock no one that the Julian calendar was ordered by and named after Julius Caesar.  By the 40s BCE the Roman civic calendar was three months ahead of the solar calendar.  The Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes, introduced the Egyptian solar calendar, taking the length of the solar year as 365 1/4 days.  The year was divided into 12 months, all of which had either 30 or 31 days except February, which contained 28 days in common (365 day) years and 29 in every fourth year (a leap year, of 366 days).  That 29th day wasn't February 29th, it was February 23rd a second time.  What a mess that would make, though that conflagration of confusion probably paled in comparison to to what Caesar did to align the civic and solar calendars--he added days to the year 46 BCE, so that it contained 445 days.  Unsurprisingly when you try to make such a large change to the daily lives of so many people in the days before electronic communication, it took over fifty years to get everybody on board.   Sosigenes had overestimated the length of the year by 11 minutes 14 seconds.  11 minutes doesn't mean much in a given year, but after, say, 1500 years, the seasons on your calendar no longer line up with the seasons of reality.  That matters when your most important holy day needs to happen at a certain time of year.  Enter Pope Gregory XIII, who wanted to stop Easter, which had been celebrated on March 21, from drifting any farther away from the spring Equinox.  Aloysus Lilius, the Italian scientist who developed the system Pope Gregory would unveil in 1582, realized that the addition of so many February 23rds made the calendar slightly too long. He devised a variation that adds leap days in years divisible by four, unless the year is also divisible by 100. If the year is also divisible by 400, a leap day is added regardless. [OS crash noise] Sorry about that.  While this formula may sound confusing, it did resolve the lag created by Caesar's earlier scheme—almost; Lilius' system was still off by 26 seconds.  As a result, in the years since Gregory introduced his calendar in 1582, a discrepancy of several hours has arisen.  We have some time before that really becomes an issue for the average person.  It will take until the year 4909 before the Gregorian calendar will be a full day ahead of the solar year.   Maths aside, not everyone was keen on Pope Gregory's plan.  His proclamation was what's known as a papal bull, an order that applies to the church by has no authority over non-Catholics.  That being said, the new calendar was quickly adopted by predominantly Catholic countries like Spain, Portugal and Italy, major world players at the time.  European Protestants, however, feared it was an attempt to silence their movement, a conspiracy to keep them down.  Maybe by making it hard to remember when meetings and protests were supposed to be, I'm not sure.  It wasn't until 1700 that Protestant Germany switched over, and England held out until 1752.  Those transitions didn't go smooth.  English citizens didn't take kindly to the act of Parliament that advanced their calendars from September 2 to September 14, overnight.  There are apocryphal tales of rioters in the streets, demanding that the government “give us our 11 days.” However, most historians now believe that these protests never occurred or were greatly exaggerated.  Some countries took even longer than Britain--the USSR didn't convert to the Gregorian calendar until 1918, even later than countries like Egypt and Japan.  On the other side of the Atlantic from the British non-protests, meanwhile, Benjamin Franklin welcomed the change, writing, “It is pleasant for an old man to be able to go to bed on September 2, and not have to get up until September 14.”   When Julius Caesar's reformed the calendar in 46 B.C., he established January 1 as the first of the year.  During the Middle Ages, however, European countries replaced it with days that carried greater religious significance, such as December 25 and March 25 (the Feast of the Annunciation).  I didn't google that one.  After my mom listens to this episode, she'll send me a gloriously incorrect speech-to-text message explaining it.  Different calendars mean different New Years days even now, and the ways in which people celebrate as as splendidly diverse as the people themselves.   The Coptic Egyptian Church celebrates the Coptic New Year (Anno Martyrus), or year of the martyrs on 11th of September. The Coptic calendar is the ancient Egyptian one of twelve 30-day months plus a "small" five-day month—six-day in a leap year.  The months retain their ancient Egyptian names which denote the gods and godesses of the Egyptians, and the year's three seasons, the inundation, cultivation, and harvest, are related to the Nile and the annual agricultural cycle.  But the Copts chose the year 284AD to mark the beginning of the calendar, since this year saw the seating of Diocletian as Rome's emperor and the consequent martyrdom of thousands upon thousands of Egypt's Christians.  Apart from the Church's celebration, Copts celebrate the New Year by eating red dates, which are in season, believing the red symbolises the martyrs' blood and the white date heart the martyrs' pure hearts.  Also, dates are delicious.    Bonus fact: You know that guy, Pope Francis?  He's not actually the pope.  The pope's proper title, according to the Vatican's website, is Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Primate of Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province, Sovereign of the State of Vatican City, Servant of the Servants of God.  'Pope' comes from the Italian 'papa.'  Francis is the Sancta Papa, the Holy Father.  The title of pope belongs to the head of the Coptic church.  So if anyone uses the rhetorical question “Is the pope Catholic?” to imply a ‘yes' answer, you have my authorization to bring the conversation to a screeching halt by saying “No.  No, he's not.”  Double points if you simply walk away without explaining yourself.

Uncommon Sense
A New Chesterton Academy in Iraq - Archbishop Warda

Uncommon Sense

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 23:52


Learn about the Archbishop's exciting vision to save Christianity in post-ISIS Iraq by serving families who courageously remain in their homeland. From the Annual Chesterton Conference in July, 2021 Lisle, IL chesterton.org

Creedal Catholic
E96 The Latin Mass: It's Not About the Liturgy w/Larry Chapp

Creedal Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 54:16


Today on the show, my friend Larry Chapp joins me for our monthly conversation, this time to talk about the latest communique from the Vatican on the suppression of the Latin Mass. We talk about whether or not the move really is about the liturgy, why Francis isn't entirely wrong in his assumptions, why bluntly wielding an authoritarian hammer is not the right way to go about things, and a certain US cardinal who has been all to eager to seize the moment. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/uSh337o43Hc Links: Shaun Blanchard's original essay: https://churchlifejournal.nd.edu/articles/traditionis-custodes-was-never-merely-about-the-liturgy/ Larry's recent blog post: https://gaudiumetspes22.com/blog/pope-francis-vs-the-traditionalists-it-was-never-about-the-liturgy "A Manifesto of the New Traditionalism": https://gaudiumetspes22.com/blog/a-manifesto-of-the-new-traditionalism St. John Cantius' response to the Archbishop of Chicago: https://www.cantius.org/post/statement-traditiones-custodes St. Sabina "Faith Community" Christmas Mass: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0RRWJNNos0

The Common Good Podcast
Kevin Grillot discusses the upcoming March for Life Chicago, Brian and Aubrey honor Betty White and Desmond Tutu, and they reflect on an encouraging message from Dr. Tony Evans - January 3, 2022

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 57:34


(00:00-8:15): Brian and Aubrey discussed the following news stories: “U.S. rings in New Year with Covid surge, scaled back celebrations and travel woes” “Illinois enters 2022 with record-high COVID cases, full hospitals, evolving risks and some hope” (8:15-16:43): Kevin Grillot, Executive Director of weDignify, joined Brian and Aubrey to talk about the March for Life Chicago on Saturday January 8th.  Learn more about the March for Life Chicago at marchforlifechicago.org Learn more about weDignify at wedignify.org (16:43-25:17): Brian and Aubrey discussed Colleen Kane's Chicago Tribune article, “Chicago sports communities — from the Bears to the Cubs' Jed Hoyer — and NFL figures help raise more than $1 million for the son of late ESPN reporter Jeff Dickerson.”  (25:17-32:32): Brian and Aubrey reflected on the life of Betty White. “Betty White's legacy goes far beyond the screen” “Betty White on why she wasn't afraid of dying” (32:32-40:11): What are your prayers for the new year? Brian and Aubrey talked about this and unpacked Dennae Pierre's Christianity Today article, “Ten Prayers for the New Year.” (40:11-48:26): Brian and Aubrey reflected on the life of Desmond Tutu.   “Desmond Tutu, Archbishop and Apartheid Foe, Dies at 90” (48:26-57:34): Brian and Aubrey shared encouragement from “Tony Evans' New Year's Message for 2022.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Finding the good

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 164:13


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by checking in with listeners about how they're doing as Omicron spreads in the new year. Mike Deehan updates listeners on the state of the governor's race, including potential Democratic and Republican candidates, after Governor Charlie Baker announced he will not be running for reelection. Deehan covers the statehouse for GBH News. Charlie Sennott discusses the latest international news, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu's funeral and the state of the Taliban in Afghanistan. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Jim Aloisi and Stacy Thompson talk about Mayor Michelle Wu's transit agenda, including free fare pilot programs, and the problems with parking in the city. Aloisi is the former Massachusetts transportation secretary, a member of the Transit Matters board and contributor to Commonwealth Magazine. Thompson is executive director of Livable Streets. The Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III discuss Tutu's legacy in helping end South African apartheid following the Archbishop's funeral Saturday. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the inaugural dean of Africana studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Sara Jensen Carr tells stories of how epidemics throughout history have shaped geographic landscapes, including in the Boston area. Carr is an assistant professor of architecture, urbanism and landscape at Northeastern University. Her new book is “The Topography of Wellness: How Health and Disease Shaped the American Landscape.” We end the show by asking listeners about their new years resolutions, if they're setting them at all.

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
WM21 – Vatican II – Dei Verbum part 2 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:06


Join Archbishop George Lucas and Kris McGregor as they continue their conversation on the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation. Discerning Hearts Podcast The post WM21 – Vatican II – Dei Verbum part 2 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

City Arts & Lectures
From the Archives: Archbishop Desmond Tutu

City Arts & Lectures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 67:09


This week, we present an archival City Arts & Lectures program recorded in 2010 with the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter, the Reverend Mpho Tutu, in conversation with Roy Eisenhardt. Nobel Peace Prize winner Desmond Tutu dedicated his life to fighting for basic civil and human rights for all. Born a teacher's son in South Africa, Tutu followed his father's path and taught for several years before studying theology.  From there, he became the first Black general secretary of the South African Council of Churches, and then the Archbishop of Cape Town.  In 1997, Nelson Mandela asked him to chair the Truth and Reconciliation Commission after the abolition of apartheid.   Archbishop Tutu presided over the ordination of his daughter Mpho Tutu into the Anglican priesthood in 2004.  This program, recorded at Davies Symphony Hall on March 17, 2010, was just after the publication of a book they wrote together, “Made for Goodness, And Why This Makes All the Difference”.   Desmond Tutu died on December 26, 2021, at the age of 90.

All Things Considered
Archbishop Andrew

All Things Considered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 27:38


New Year, new archbishop... Roy Jenkins speaks to the Most Reverend Andrew John, the fourteenth head of the Church in Wales, to find out more about the man, and some of the issues he faces, as he leads a church that has been the subject of some painful headlines in recent months.

HESEDIM
Episode 94: THE ARCHBISHOP

HESEDIM

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 12:56


*What are the lessons learnt from the career and influence of Desmond Tutu Archbishop conscience and spiritual leader of South Africa? Are there lessons that we can use for 2022 and for Jamaica?* The New Year's message is discussed in Episode 94: THE ARCHBISHOP of the Hesedim Podcast by Reverend Dr. Garnett Roper.

Theomagination With Phil Aud
Being Christian: A Sermon on Baptism (featuring Fr. Paul Paino)

Theomagination With Phil Aud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 32:56


In the last two episodes we explored a Pentecostal theology of baptism in Andrew Ray Williams' new book, Washed in the Spirit. Here,  Fr. Paul Paino gives a teaching on baptism at the church where he serves as Rector, Sanctuary Church in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Fr. Paul beautifully unpacks former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams' work from his book Being Christian. To hear the other three parts of this series, check out Sanctuary Church's podcast here. PodrollFor more info on the courses mentioned at the beginning of the podcast, check out The People's Seminary.

Global News Podcast
South Africa bids farewell to Desmond Tutu

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 28:41


President Cyril Ramaphosa described the late Archbishop as the country's spiritual father. The veteran anti-apartheid campaigner and Nobel Peace Prize winner died a week ago. He was 90. Also: a Nigerian state closes all camps for displaced people – despite the ongoing threat of Jihadist violence. And a Chinese man who was abducted as a child more than thirty years ago has been reunited with his biological mother after drawing a map of his childhood village.

All Met Sports Talk
Episode 38 - Tyheil Peterson (Archbishop Spalding)

All Met Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 23:55


Happy New Year to all of our listeners, new and old! May 2022 be healthier, brighter, and better for all of us! On this episode, Coach Sherm sits down with Archbishop Spalding combo-guard, Tyheil Peterson ('22). The two discuss: - Tyheil's AAU experience - Choosing Spalding over other schools - Playing for Coach Pratt and with Cam Whitmore - The early success of this season - The struggles of the recruitment process during a global pandemic We'd like to wish Ty and his Spalding teammates luck as they continue their season. Ty is a great young man, in the classroom, on the court, and off. Remember to follow us on social media: FB/IG: All Met Sports Talk Twitter: @allmettalk Email: allmetsportstalk@gmail.com Thanks as always to Preston Suggs for the music. You can find him on IG @kingpsuggs

KentOnline
Podcast: Ramsgate couple deny harassment campaign against former neighbour in east London

KentOnline

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 14:22


A couple, who now live in Ramsgate, have denied carrying out a campaign of harassment against a former neighbour. The pair have been accused of over-watering plants to flood an alleyway and setting up props and dolls. We have the details of what's happened in court. Also in today's podcast, we're being urged to get a Covid test before heading out to celebrate the new year in Kent tonight. But it's thought more people will be seeing in 2022 at home - hear from the Night Time Industries Association who say it's been an incredibly tough time. The Archbishop of Canterbury's urging us to think more about each other. Justin Welby has a new year message for people in the county. And, Gillingham are finally back in football action this weekend after their Christmas fixtures were postponed because of Covid outbreaks. Hear from manager Steve Evans ahead of their trip to MD Dons.

Save America Ministries on Oneplace.com
ARCHBISHOP WARNS of PAPAL CONSPIRACY

Save America Ministries on Oneplace.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 54:50


To support this ministry financially, visit: https://www.oneplace.com/donate/549/29

Super Saints Podcast
Saint Thomas Becket plus Saints More and Fisher

Super Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 59:34


Saint Thomas Becket - Martyr of the Middle Ages (1118-1170)Thomas Becket was born on the Feast Day of St. Thomas the Apostle, in 1118.  He lost both his parents when he was twenty one.  He was educated with the Canons regular.  At twenty-four, he obtained a position in the home of the Archbishop of Canterbury.  He received minor orders; the Archbishop was so fond of him, Thomas obtained many favors.  He was ordained deacon, in 1154, and then the Archbishop appointed him Archdeacon of Canterbury.  Now, this was an important position, second only to that of a Bishop or Abbot.  The Archbishop entrusted his most delicate affairs to him to manage, seldom doing anything without asking his advice.  He sent him to Rome on a very important mission.  Thomas Becket never gave the Archbishop cause to regret the confidence he placed in him. English Martyrs Collection Journeys of Faith Bob and Penny Lord's StoreJourneys of Faith Blog Subscribe to our Free Blog Easy PeasyBob and Penny Lord TV Channel Miracles of the Eucharist, Apparitions of Mary, and lives of the Saints videos on demand.Support the show (https://bobandpennylord.store/pages/we-need-your-help)

On This Day In History
Archbishop Thomas Becket Was Murdered

On This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 1:38


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Daybreak
Daybreak for December 29, 2021

Daybreak

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021


Fifth Day of Christmas Optional Memorial of St. Thomas Becket, 1118-1170; originally a friend of King Henry II, as Archbishop of Canterbury he opposed Henry’s intrusion into Church affairs; slain in Canterbury Cathedral by four of King Henry’s knights Office of Readings and Morning Prayer for 12/29/21 Gospel: Luke 2:22-35

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
WM20 – Vatican II – Dei Verbum part 1 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 32:21


Join Archbishop George Lucas and Kris McGregor as they begin their conversation on the Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation. Discerning Hearts Podcast The post WM20 – Vatican II – Dei Verbum part 1 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

What It Takes
Best of - Archbishop Desmond Tutu: The Power of Faith

What It Takes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 39:07


Desmond Tutu was the moral force that helped bring down Apartheid in South Africa. As a young priest, he was not very political, despite the fact that he'd grown up under the most brutal form of segregation. But his theology evolved, he says, and he realized it was a divine calling to fight for justice. Archbishop Tutu died on December 26th, 2021.  In his honor, we are replaying this episode from December of 2015. In it, you'll hear Archbishop Tutu describe his personal, spiritual and political journey -- including the Nobel Peace Prize and chairmanship of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. You'll also hear his passionate explanation of why humans are essentially good, no matter how often the facts seem to suggest otherwise. 

Sermons from Saint Christopher's By-the-Sea, Portland Texas
Being "God-Bearers": A Sermon for the First Sunday after Christmas with a Reflection on the Life of The Most Rev'd Desmond Tutu

Sermons from Saint Christopher's By-the-Sea, Portland Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 17:53


This morning, the world learned the news that The Most Rev'd Desmond Tutu, the former Archbishop of Cape Town died at the age of 90 on the Day after Christmas. One of the phrases that "The Arch" used in his sermons and talks was that we are all "God-bearers", people made in the image of God. How does that square with celebrating the second day of Christmas? In this morning's sermon, Father Blackburn explores what the preparations for Christmas looked like, but also what our role is now. The Scripture Reference for today is Isaiah 61:10-62:3. May Desmond rest in peace and rise again in glory.

Newshour
Anti-apartheid hero Desmond Tutu dies

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 49:29


Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate who helped end apartheid in South Africa, has died aged 90. In 1986, Tutu became the first black Archbishop of Cape Town, which he used to great effect to help tear down apartheid. The current holder of that archbishopric, Thabo Makgoba, remembers his friend on Newshour. Also on the programme: Archbishop Desmond Tutu was a member of The Elders, which was set up by Nelson Mandela. The Elders Chair and former President of Ireland, Mary Robinson, recalls working beside him, recounting his commitment for causes from Palestinian rights to ending child marriage. And, Desmond Tutu's international campaign against apartheid opened the way for the ANC - the African National Congress - to come to power. We speak to a former ANC cabinet member. (Photo: Archbishop Desmond Tutu makes a point as he addresses a meeting March 16, 2001 to raise awareness for World Tuberculosis Day. REUTERS/Mike Hutchings/File Photo)

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά
'Let us admit our mistakes', the Christmas Message of His Eminence Archbishop Makarios of Australia - «Nα αποδεχτούμε τα λάθη μας, να σπάσουμε το φράγμα του εγώ»

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 4:57


The Christmas Message of His Eminence Archbishop Makarios of Australia  - Το Χριστουγεννιάτικο μήνυμα του Αρχιεπισκόπου Αυστραλίας, κ Μακαρίου. 

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast
Cardinal Blase Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago: Renew My Church, Christmas Message of Peace

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021


Cardinal Blase Cupich, Archbishop of Chicago, joins WGN Radio's Dave Plier to talk about ‘Renew My Church', his Christmas Message of Peace, reducing the violence on our city streets and a reflection on the joy this Christmas season.

TODAY
December 24: Cardinal Dolan on the holiday season. Christmas at the White House. Rockefeller Center's Christmas tree journey.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 28:33


Archbishop of New York Cardinal Dolan stops by Studio 1A to reflect on the spirit of the holidays and wishes for the new year. Plus, President Biden and First Lady Dr. Jill Biden are celebrating their first Christmas at the White House — the theme for this year's decorations are “Gifts From The Heart.” Also, a behind-the-scenes look at how this year's Rockefeller Center Christmas tree got from Maryland to New York City.

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Father Paul, Archbishop of Neocaesarea (4th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 1:17


This holy bishop was so revered that he was summoned by the Emperor Licinius himself, who attempted to turn him from the Faith. When this failed, the Emperor ordered that molten metal be poured on the bishop's hands, which left them paralyzed and horribly disfigured. Years went by, Christianity was legalized by Constantine the Great and, when the Council of Nicaea was summoned, St Paul was among those bishops who were called to attend. Many of the bishops who attended bore in their bodies the marks of the Lord Jesus (Gal. 6:17): noses, ears or eyes lost, scars and burns from their trials for Christ. At the Council, the Emperor Constantine knelt before St Paul and kissed his hands as holy relics, saying 'I will never tire of kissing these hands which have lost their life for the sake of my Christ.' After the Council, the holy bishop served in Neocaesarea for several more years, then reposed in peace.

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
WM19 – Vatican II – Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy part 2 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 33:05


Join Archbishop George Lucas and Kris McGregor as they continue their conversation on the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy. Discerning Hearts Podcast The post WM19 – Vatican II – Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy part 2 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

Traditional Catholic Audiobooks
Open Letter to Confused Catholics - Archbishop Lefebvre

Traditional Catholic Audiobooks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 394:33


A popular study of the crisis in the Church written for all to understand. Covers the Mass, Sacraments, Priesthood, the New Catechisms, Ecumenism, etc., and demonstrates the new spirit in the Church which has caused doubt and confusion among the faithful. Has served as a beacon for thousands; certain to become a classic. Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcG733oDZ58 (SSPX YouTube)

ON AIR
Ep 66 feat. TIM PENNINGTON, OLENTANGY BERLIN & KEVIN BERRY, ARCHBISHOP ALTER

ON AIR

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 55:19


A pair of head coaches of teams that won their first six games of the season - Olentangy Berlin's Tim Pennington and Kevin Berry of Archbishop Alter - join us as we talk about the southern teams in the OHSAA (Capital Hockey Conference & Southwest Ohio High School Hockey League).

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Dionysius the New of Zakinthos (1624)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 2:24


He was born to pious and wealthy parents on the island of Zakinthos. Early in life he renounced his wealth and worldly honors to enter monastic life. His virtue became so well known that he was appointed Archbishop of Aegina, where he served for many years. In time, in order to retire to a life of solitude and struggle, he resigned and returned to his homeland where he entered a monastery in the mountains. Here he received the grace of performing miracles, and worked many healing and saving wonders among the people of Zakinthos.   A story from the Synaxarion reveals his character as one truly united to Christ: "He excelled above all in love of neighbour and in meekness. One day the murderer of the Saint's own brother, fleeing the law and the members of his victim's family, arrived at the monastery and begged Dionysius for asylum, little knowing to whom he was speaking. On gathering the reason for his flight and that his own brother was the victim, the man of God resisted with all his strength his natural grief and the temptation to avenge the crime. Imitating Christ, who pardoned his enemies and prayed for his persecutors, he received the fugitive with compassion, comforted him, exhorted him to repent and hid him in an out-of-the-way cell. When his pursuing kinsmen reached the monastery with the dreadful news, the Saint did not reveal that he knew it already, but did his best with words of peace to allay the wrath of his relatives and their desire for vengeance. As soon as they moved off, he let out the murderer (who was amazed and terror-struck before such superhuman goodness) and having provided him with victuals and money for his journey, he sent him away to work freely at the salvation of his soul."   The holy bishop reposed in 1622 after a long and painful illness. He has continued to work signs and miracles and to appear from time to time to the people of Zakinthos, who venerate him as their protector and patron.

Brexitcast
Disappointing the Archbishop

Brexitcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 33:08


The Archbishop of Canterbury tells Adam, Laura and Chris that he was disappointed to see a photo of Conservative activists having what looked like a party at Tory headquarters last Christmas. Justin Welby also says leaders need to be honest, admit mistakes and stick to the rules. And he reveals what it was like to do a jigsaw with the Queen at Sandringham. We get the latest on record Covid figures from Fergus Walsh too. Today's episode of Newscast was made by Danny Wittenberg and Sally Abrahams. The assistant editor is Alison Gee and Jonathan Aspinwall is the editor.

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts
WM18 – Vatican II – Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy part 1 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast

Discerning Hearts - Catholic Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 26:24


Join Archbishop George Lucas and Kris McGregor as they begin a conversation on the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy. Discerning Hearts Podcast The post WM18 – Vatican II – Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy part 1 – Why it Matters: An Exploration of Faith with Archbishop George Lucas Podcast appeared first on Discerning Hearts Catholic Podcasts.

Pints With Aquinas
Archbishop Gomez Vs Wokeism

Pints With Aquinas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:20


Read the address here: https://archbishopgomez.org/blog/reflections-on-the-church-and-americas-new-religions