Podcasts about popes

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Best podcasts about popes

Latest podcast episodes about popes

Chapel Perilous
The Fall of Man with Bear Quattlebaum

Chapel Perilous

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 63:59


Welcome back to the Chapel sweet, sweet Popes! The Shaman hosts of Chapel Perilous have been fighting retarded time demons in the Nethervoid so we weren't able to release fresh episodes of your favorite podcast. UNTIL NOW!!! From the void we bring you another great podcast with friend of the show Denver comedy legend Bear Quattlebaum! We talked about how great the depression really was, chinese pubic hair, and the Pepsi/Coke challenge. Its a fun one. (the official soft drink of chapel perilous podcast is dr.pepper because they have the correct number of flavors.)   click here for the video Follow us and do as we command: Bear Quattlebaum is @that1pothead on insta @alanbromwell @coreyjcooley @osheebaugus theperilouspodcast.com alanbromwell.com When the Saints Go Marching In-Louis Armstrong Fall of Man(live)-Holy Sons

No Redeeming Qualities
Episode 212 - Where They Keep All The Dead Popes

No Redeeming Qualities

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 60:28


This week on NRQ, Zipp and some skeletons sword fight, Bob rants about the Catholic Church, and both make callous and horrible jokes about a murder victim.  If you wanna be a part of the raffle in December, make sure to join the NRQ Facebook group! This episode is brought to you in part by Load Boost! Use the promo code NRQ10 and get your bottle today!

On This Day In History
Clement The 5th Became First Of The Avignon Popes

On This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 1:59


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Morning Air
Fr. Marcell Taillon, What Does Papal Infallibility Really Mean; Bruce Lachenauer, The Great Reawakening in the Job Market

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 49:24


Fr. Marcel answers why some Popes are referred to as “Great” and tackles some misconceptions about papal infallibility, noting that the last time it was invoked was for the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception. Bruce reveals that there are 2 million job openings in America today and that now is a great time to switch […] All show notes at Fr. Marcell Taillon, What Does Papal Infallibility Really Mean; Bruce Lachenauer, The Great Reawakening in the Job Market - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

The Counsel of Trent
#527 – Antiochian popes, Santa, Calvinism, and crucifix concerns (Open mailbag)

The Counsel of Trent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 23:34


In this “open mailbag episode” Trent answers his patron's questions about a wide variety of subjects from deep theological questions to controversial issues like Santa or “pineapple on pizza?”.

Things Worth Considering
Bonfire of the Celts

Things Worth Considering

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 55:15


October 31st – We had it cancelled last year, but this year, it leads us to ask where did this evening of Halloween begin? We must admit it is a very strange event, quite apart from anything else we see on our calendars of holidays and celebrations. From a celebration of Celtic lore that celebrated the harvest until the Catholic Church got involved, with at least two Popes adding new dimensions to the evening and the days that followed. The inclusion of the saints and those that had passed on heightened the supernatural element. From Mexico's Day of the Dead to Canada's and America's Halloween, although influenced by the Church, it remains a very secular celebration of spirits, ghosts and goblins, oh and Candy! The Celts calendar was divided into 2 seasons, the light season and the dark season and this is the start of the dark season. It is also the time that they say the veil between the living world and the next world is at its thinnest. Communication between the 2 worlds is strongest at this time of the year. That notion and the human's love of being frightened blends nicely to create today's scenario of the darkness, with the unseen world pushing up to a thin veil and with scared humans dressed up in all sorts of imaginative disguises to fool the spirits, you have the makings of a magically terrifying evening called Halloween. You have to love us humans, imaginations vaster than the sky above. Join us on Thursday at 8 PM as we have fun with the many facets of the up coming evening.

Gregg's Guide to New Music

Gregg's Guide to New Music: Episode 332 Gregg highly recommends checking out and supporting the following bands and musicians. Links to find more from them and purchase their music are posted below. Maraton – https://maratonofnorway.bandcamp.com/ The Hawkins – https://thehawkinsband.com/, https://thehawkinsband.bandcamp.com/ Ice Nine Kills – https://iceninekills.com/ Katatonia – https://katatonia.com/ Fotoform – https://fotoform.bandcamp.com/ Smiley & the Underclass – https://smileyandtheunderclass.bandcamp.com/ Popes of Chillitown – https://popesofchillitown.com/, https://popesofchillitown.bandcamp.com/ The Sensitives – http://thesensitives.net/ The Burnt Tapes – https://burnttapes.bandcamp.com/ Scotty Saints and the True Believers – https://scottysaintsandthetruebelievers.bandcamp.com/

Pod Bash
Episode 332

Pod Bash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:02


Gregg's Guide to New Music: Episode 332 Gregg highly recommends checking out and supporting the following bands and musicians. Links to find more from them and purchase their music are posted below. Maraton – https://maratonofnorway.bandcamp.com/ The Hawkins – https://thehawkinsband.com/, https://thehawkinsband.bandcamp.com/ Ice Nine Kills – https://iceninekills.com/ Katatonia – https://katatonia.com/ Fotoform – https://fotoform.bandcamp.com/ Smiley & the Underclass – https://smileyandtheunderclass.bandcamp.com/ Popes of Chillitown – https://popesofchillitown.com/, https://popesofchillitown.bandcamp.com/ The Sensitives – http://thesensitives.net/ The Burnt Tapes – https://burnttapes.bandcamp.com/ Scotty Saints and the True Believers – https://scottysaintsandthetruebelievers.bandcamp.com/

The Return to Order Moment
May God Be Pleased To Send Us Another Great Pope Gregory

The Return to Order Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:08


Today, the Return to Order Moment is honored to bring you two essays written by the founder of the international TFP Movement, Professor Plinio Corrêa de Oliveira. Both essays describe the virtues and actions of Popes named Gregory. However, their names, their loyalty to the Catholic Faith, and the fact that both occupied the Throne of Saint Peter are all that these two men have in common. Four Hundred years separated them, and the problems that they faced were very different. The first is Pope Gregory the First, usually known as Saint Gregory the Great. Pope Saint Gregory the Great was so influential that fifteen subsequent popes took his name. Not all of them lived up to his example, but one in particular did. He was also canonized a saint, Gregory the Seventh. Pope Saint Gregory the Seventh was born about the year 1015. He was Pope for twelve years – from 1073 to 1085. Professor Plinio summed up his importance in the title of an essay that he wrote in 1972, Saint Gregory the Seventh, the Pope Par Excellence. One quick note, in two places Professor Plinio refers to Pope Paul the Sixth, who was pope at the time this essay was written. Certainly, it takes little imagination to substitute Pope Francis's name, for the situations that Professor Plinio describes still exist today.

The Meaning of Catholic
Against Greek Schismatics (and some Popes?): Schools of Thought in Catholicism

The Meaning of Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


Access patron-only shows. Music: “Laetatus Sum” Vivaldi’s Motet (RV 607) performed by the Grammy award winning San Francisco Girls Chorus and Voices of Music. Recording from the Berkeley Early Music Festival, June 2018. The San Francisco Girls Chorus directed by Valérie Sainte-Agathe; Voices of Music directed by Hanneke van Proosdij and David Tayler. SFGC: https://www.sfgirlschorus.org​ […]

WSOU: The Kinship of Catholics and Jews
Popes and Nuclear Weapons

WSOU: The Kinship of Catholics and Jews

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 29:22


Fathers Lawrence Frizzell and Brian Muzás talk about various Pope's views on nuclear weapons. Fr. Muzás is Assistant Professor of Diplomacy and International Relations in Seton Hall's School of Diplomacy and International Relations. His research interests include international security, defense systems, and ethics, and he is currently exploring how religious cultural heritage has influenced nuclear decisions in the past in order to better understand similar issues today.

Jordan, Jesse, GO!
Ep. 708: Faux Popes with Yeardley Smith

Jordan, Jesse, GO!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 100:39


Yeardley Smith (The Simpsons, Small Town Dicks Podcast) joins Jordan and Jesse for a discussion of Yeardley's favorite Lisa Simpson merch, how she deals with the weight of doing a true-crime podcast, and the magical food that she made on her cooking show, Oil and Water that made her feel like a sorcerer. Plus, we find out if more clergy members or school principals listen to the show! Check out Yeardley's true-crime podcast Small Town DicksAnd her cooking show Oil and Water!

Working Over Time
“Game of Popes” - The Renaissance Roots of the Modern Architect

Working Over Time

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 86:25


For much of human history, finding shelter was something everyone did on their own, to survive. But with increasing labor specialization in complex societies, the act of designing and building structures evolved into a distinct blend of art and science, becoming the discipline we know today as architecture.  But when did this job, as such, become a thing? Today's guest, Viviano Villarreal-Bueron, has a ripping good take on that, replete with drama, intrigue, and bruised egos aplenty. So - hard hats on - we're headed to the eternal magnificence of Renaissance Rome.

Lectio et Oratio
Episode 88 -- Life of St Philip VIII.88 -- Giving Indirect Commands Gently

Lectio et Oratio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:25


We read about the obedience St Philip was able to win from his spiritual sons. But St Philip rarely gave direct commands. Instead he won the affection of his sons. He gained their trust. He would use indirect suggestions, humour, and tact. He was able to guide these men in whatever way the Lord suggested. How we need to pray for genuine love for the brethren! Last episode we read about the way the future Oratorians lived in 1564. We read about the family connections that Tarugi had to various Popes. In his early years of manhood, Tarugi was very close to the future Pope Clement VIII. Gallonio gives wonderful descriptions of the authority of the Pope. May we always honour and respect the office of chief shepherd, the office of Peter, the Bishop of Rome.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.59. History of the Mongols: Franco-Mongol Alliance

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 23:37


    The Mongols were famous for their ultimatums of destruction and submission. No shortage of thirteenth century states received demands for their unconditional surrender to the Great Khan granted divine mandate to rule by Eternal Blue Heaven. Initially, the Mongol imperial ideology was extremely black and white: you could submit to Mongol rule, or face total annihilation. There was no room for other relationships, for the Great Khan had no allies, only subjects. But as the thirteenth century went on and the dream of Chinggisid world hegemony slipped away as the divisions of the Mongol Empire went their separate ways, the Mongol Khans in the west began to seek not the capitulation, but the cooperation of western Europe to aid in their wars against Mamluks. For the Ilkhanate's sixty-year struggle against the Mamluk Sultanate, the Il-Khans sought to bring the Popes and Monarchs of Europe to a new crusade to assist in the defeat of the Mamluks, an ultimately fruitless endeavour, and the topic of today's episode. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       The first Mongol messages to the Kings of Europe came in the late 1230s and 40s, accompanying Batu and Sube'edei's western invasion, asking the Hungarians how they possibly could hope to flee the grasp of the Mongols. We know the Mongols sent a number of envoys to European monarchs and dukes, and employed a variety of peoples in this enterprise, including at least one Englishman. Over the 1240s and 50s, European envoys like John de Plano Carpini or William of Rubrucks to the Mongol Empire returned from Karakorum with orders for the Kings and Popes to come to Mongolia and submit in person.While Rus' and Armenian lords and kings did do so, there is little indication that European rulers even responded to these demands. For the Mongols, who seemed poised to dominate everything under the Eternal Blue Sky, there was little reason to adopt more conciliatory language. From their point of view, the Europeans were only stalling the inevitable: soon Mongol hoofbeats would certainly be heard in Paris and Rome. The Mongols treated the European states as their diplomatic inferiors, subjects basically in a state of rebellion by fact that they had not already submitted. Cruel, threatening and demanding letters were the norm, and it's safe to say any future efforts at alliance were greatly hampered by this opening salvo. The rare diplomatic exception was an embassy sent to King Louis IX of France during his stay in Cyprus in 1248 just before the 7th Crusade. There, messengers came from the Mongol commander in the west, Eljigidei, an ally to the reigning Great Khan, Guyuk. Headed by two Christians in Eljigidei's service, the embassy bore letters from Eljigidei. These letters called Louis ‘son,' and had no demand of submission, but mentioned Mongol favouritism to Christians, urged the French King not to discriminate between Latin and non-Latin Christians as all were equal under Mongol law, and wished him well in his crusade. The two Christian representatives of Eljigidei asserted that he was a Christian and that Guyuk himself had already been baptised. The urged Louis to attack Egypt, and prevent its Ayyubid prince from sending forces to aid the Caliph in Baghdad, who the Mongols were soon to attack.     Louis, is should be noted, almost certainly had not been anticipating any cooperation from the Mongols; he had  been well aware of their attacks on Hungary only a few years before, learned of Mongol demands and treatment of foreign powers from travellers like Carpini, and apparently received Mongol ultimatums for his submission in 1247. Further, a devout Christian, it is unlikely he would have gone looking for allies among “pagans,” even for fighting against Muslims. Still, he reacted well to Eljigidei's messengers and sent a return embassy with gifts with them back to Eljigidei which were to be sent on to Guyuk, while the initial letter was forwarded back to France and ultimately to King Henry III of England. Ultimately, it was for naught. Guyuk was dead even before Louis received Eljigidei's letter, and  Eljigidei himself was soon put to death in the following political turmoil. Little is known of the embassy Louis sent back with Eljigdei's representatives, but from the little heard of it through William of Rubruck a few years later, it seems to have achieved nothing beyond meeting Guyuk's widow and the regent, Oghul Qaimish, who portrayed Louis' gifts as tokens of the French King's submission.  Following the meeting on Cypress, Louis IX suffered a humiliating defeat in Egypt at Mansura, captured and was ransomed by the newly emerging Mamluks. By the time he returned to France and received Oghul Qaimish's reply, not only was she dead, but the responding letter was essentially another demand for his surrender. This first non-threatening Mongol embassy succeeded only in making the King of France feel like he had been tricked, especially since the new Great Khan, Mongke, sent a letter back with William of  Rubruck that disavowed Eljigidei's embassy. It has been speculated that Eljigidei was using the embassy to spy on Louis, as he was wary of the sudden arrival of Louis' army in Cyprus, and a desire to find out his military intentions, rather than any genuine interest in cooperation at this point.  His hope may have been to ensure that this new army attacked Mongol enemies, rather than get in the way of the Mongols.       The halting of the Mongol advance at Ayn Jalut by the Mamluks, and fracturing of the Empire into independent Khanates after Great Khan Mongke's death left the new Ilkhanate in a precarious position. Surrounded by enemies on all sides, the only direction they could expand not at the expense of fellow Mongols was against the Mamluks, who fortified their shared border with the Ilkhans. Even a small raid could trigger the arrival of the full Mamluk army, a dangerous prospect against such deadly warriors. Yet the Ilkhans could not bring their full might to bear on the shared border with the Mamluks in Syria, as it would leave their other borders open to attacks from the Golden Horde, Chagatais or Neguderis, in addition to the trouble of provisioning an army in the tough, hot and dry conditions of the Levantine coastline, a route the Mamluks secured and fortified. Opening a new front against the Mamluks was necessary, and there were already convenient beachheads established  in the form of the remaining Crusader States.   A shadow of their former selves, the Crusader states were represented by a few major coastal holdings like Antioch, Tripoli, and Acre, and inland fortifications like Krak de Chevaliers and Montfort, as well as the Kingdom of Cyprus, whose ruler, Hugh III of Cyprus, took the title King of Jerusalem in 1268. The Crusader States had shown neutrality to the Mongols, or even joined them such as the County of Tripoli did in 1260 after the Mongols entered Syria. In early 1260, the papal legate at Acre sent an embassy to Hulegu, most likely to discourage him from attacking the Crusader holdings. Along with information from the Kings of Armenian Cilicia, their most important regional vassals, the Mongols would have had a vague knowledge of western Europe and their crusading history. The Ilkhanate's founder, Hulegu, sent the first letter to the west in 1262, intended once more for King Louis IX, though this embassy was turned back in Sicily. This letter was friendlier terms than most Mongol missives, but still contained threats, if rather subdued. Pope Urban IV may have learned of the attempt, and the next year sent a letter to Hulegu, apparently having been told that the Il-Khan had become a Christian.  Delighted at the idea, the Pope informed Hulegu that if he was baptised, he would receive aid from the west. In reality, Hulegu never converted to Christianity, and died in 1265 without sending any more letters.       His son and successor, Abaqa, was the Il-Khan most dedicated to establishing a Franco-Mongol alliance and came the closest to doing so. Due to conflict on his distant  borders with the Golden Horde and Chagatayids, as well as the troubles of consolidating power as new monarch in a new realm, for the 1260s he was unable to commit forces to the Mamluk frontier. As a good Mongol, Abaqa was unwilling to allow the enemy total respite, and made it his mission to encourage an attack from the west on the Mamluks. His first embassy was sent in 1266, shortly after becoming Il-Khan, contacting the Byzantines, Pope Clement IV and King James I of Aragon, hoping for a united Christian front to combine efforts with the Mongols against the Mamluks, inquiring which route into Palestine the Christian forces would take. The responses were generally positive, Pope Clement replying that as soon as he knew which route, he would inform Abaqa.       Abaqa sent a message again in 1268, inquiring about this progress. James of Aragon found himself the most motivated by the Il-Khans requests, encouraged by the promises of Abaqa's logistical and military support once they reached the mainland. James made his preparations, and launched a fleet in September 1269. An unexpected storm scattered the fleet, and only two of James' bastard children made it to Acre, who stayed only briefly, accomplishing little there.        Not long after, King Louis IX set out for Crusade once more, making the inexplicable choice to land in Tunis in 1270. Despite his well planned efforts, the Crusade was an utter disaster, and Louis died of dysentery outside the walls of Tunis in August 1270. Prince Edward of England with his army landed in Tunis shortly before the evacuation of the crusaders, and disgusted by what he saw, set his fleet for the Holy Land, landing at Acre in May 1271, joined by Hugh of Lusignan, King of Cyprus.  Edward's timing was good, as Abaqa had returned from a great victory over the Chagatai Khan Baraq at Herat in July 1270, though had suffered a major hunting accident that November.       The Mamluk Sultan Baybars was campaigning in Syria in spring 1271, the famous Krak des Chevaliers falling to him that April. Tripoli would have fallen next, had Baybars not retreated back to Damascus hearing of the sudden arrival of a Crusader fleet, and was wary of being caught between European heavy cavalry and Mongol horse archers. Soon after landing Edward made his preparations for an offensive, and reached out to Abaqa. Abaqa was delighted, and sent a reply and orders for Samaghar, the Mongol commander in Anatolia, to head to Syria. Edward did not wait for Abaqa's reply, and there is no indication he ever responded to Abaqa's letter. He set out in mid-July, ensuring his army suffered the most from the summer heat, while missing the Mongols who preferred to campaign in the winter. Suffering high casualties and accomplishing little, he withdrew back to Acre. In mid-October Samaghar arrived with his army, raiding as far as to the west of Aleppo while an elite force of Mongols scouted ahead, routing a large group of Turkmen between Antioch and Harim, but was soon forced to retreat with the advance of the Mamluk army under Baybars.       Missing Samagahr by only a few weeks, in November Edward marched south from Acre at the head of a column of men from England, Acre, Cyprus, with Templars, Hospitallers and Teutonic Knights. They ambushed some Turkmen on the Sharon plain, forced the local Mamluk governor to withdraw, but with the arrival of large Mamluk reinforcements the Crusaders fled, losing their prisoners and booty.  That was the closest the Mongols and the Franks came to proper coordination. Edward helped oversee a peace treaty between the Mamluks and the Kingdom of Jersualem, but the heat, difficulties campaigning, political infighting and an assassination attempt on his life permanently turned him off of crusading. By September 1272, Edward set sail for England. A  few weeks after his departure the Mongols again invaded, besieging al-Bira but were defeated by the Mamluks in December.        Edward's brief effort in Syria demonstrated the difficulties prefacing any Mongol-Frankish cooperation. The Mamluks were a cohesive, unified force, well accustomed to the environment and working from a well supplied logistic system and intelligence network, while the Franks and Mongols were unable to ever develop a proper timetable for operations together. The European arrivals generally had unrealistic goals for their campaigns, bringing neither the men, resources or experience to make an impact.       Abaqa continued  to organize further efforts, and found many willing ears at the Second Council of Lyons in France in 1274, a meeting of the great powers of Christendom intended to settle doctrinal issues, the division of the Catholic and Orthodox Churches, and plan the reconquest of the Holy land. Abaqa's delegation informed the Council that the Il-Khan had secured his borders, that peace had been achieved between all the Mongols Khanates, and he could now bring his full might against the Mamluks, and urged the Christian powers to do likewise. The current Pope, Gregory X, fully supported this and made efforts to set things in motion, but his death in 1276 killed whatever momentum this process had had. Abaqa sent another round of envoys, who reached the King of France and the new King of England, Edward. The envoys brought the Il-khan's apologies for failing to cooperate properly during Edward's crusade, and asked him to return. Edward politely declined. This was the final set of envoys Abaqa sent west. Perhaps frustrated, he finally organized a proper invasion of Syria, only an army under his brother Mongke-Temur to be defeated by the Mamluks at Homs, and Abaqa himself dying soon after in 1282. His successors were to find no more luck that he had.        The most interesting envoy to bring the tidings of the Il-Khan to Europe did not originate in the Ilkhanate, but in China: Rabban Bar Sawma, born in 1220 in what is now modern day Beijing, was a Turkic Nestorian priest who had set out on a pilgrimage to Jerusalem before being conscripted to act as a messenger for the Il-Khan, in a journey which is a fascinating contrast to that of his contemporary Marco Polo. Even given him his own dedicated episode in this podcast series, but we'll give here a brief recount of his journey. Writing his accounts down upon his return to Baghdad later in life, he described how he brought messages and gifts to the Byzantine Emperor Andronicos II Palaiologus, marvelled at the Hagia Sophia, then landed in Sicily and made his way to Rome, having just missed the death of Pope Honorius IV. Travelling on to France, he was warmly welcomed by King Phillip IV, and then on to Gascony where he met the campaigning King Edward of England, who again responded kindly to the Il-khan's envoy.  On his return journey, he met the new Pope Nicholas IV in 1288 before returning to the Ilkhanate.    Despite the generous receptions Rabban Sauma was given by the heads of Europe, and despite the Il-khan's promises to return Jerusalem to Christian hands, the reality was there was no ruler in the west interested, or capable of, going on Crusade. By now, the act of Crusading in the Holy land had lost its lustre, the final crusades almost all disasters, and costly ones at that. With the final Crusader strongholds falling to the Mamluks in the early 1290s, there was no longer even a proper beachhead on the coast for a Crusading army. The sheer distance and cost of going on Crusade, especially with numerous ongoing issues in their own Kingdoms at hand, outweighed whatever perceived benefit there might have been in doing so. Further, while Rabban Sauma personally could be well received, the Mongols themselves remained uncertain allies. From 1285 through to 1288, Golden Horde attacks on eastern Europe had recommenced in force. Even the new Khan of the Golden Horde, Tele-Buqa, had led an army into Poland. For the Europeans, the distinctions between the Mongol Khanates were hard to register; how could messages of peace from some Mongols be matched with the open war other Mongols were undertaking? All evidence seems to suggest that the western Franks did not understand that the Golden Horde and Ilkhanate were separate political entities. Recall earlier the conflicting letters Louis IX had received in the 1240s, where one Mongol general offered friendship, only to be tricked in seemingly submitting to the Mongols and then receive letters in the 1250s telling him to discount the previous envoys. Together these encouraged unease over perceiving the Mongols as allies, and served to further dampen interest to pursue these alliances.       In contrast, the Mamluks had somewhat greater success in their own overseas diplomacy: in the 1260s Baybars initiated contact with the Golden Horde, ruled by the Muslim Berke Khan, encouraging him to keep up his warfare with his Ilkhanid cousins. Sultan Baybars also kept good relations with the Byzantine Empire and the Genoese, allowing him to keep the flow of Turkic slave soldiers from the steppes of the Golden Horde open, the keystone of the Mamluk military. There is also evidence they undertook some limited diplomacy with Qaidu Khan during the height of his rule over Central Asia and the Chagatayids. While the Mamluks and Golden Horde never undertook any true military cooperation, the continuation of their talks kept the Ilkhanate wary of enemies on all borders, never truly able to bring the entirety of its considerable might against one foe least another strike the Il-Khan's exposed frontiers. But, did the Golden Horde, in the 1260s, perceive this as an alliance? We only have Mamluk accounts of the relationship, but scholarship often supposes that the Golden Horde Khans perceived this as the submission of the Mamluks, and any cooperation was the cooperation between overlord and subject. As many of the Mamluk ruling class were Qipchaqs, so the Mongols had come to see as their natural slaves, it may well be that Berke saw the submission of the Mamluks as a natural part of their relationship, especially since he already ruled the Qipchaq homeland. This alliance, alongside never resulting in direct cooperation, was also never always amicable. When the Jochid Khans grew annoyed with the Mamluks, they would halt the trade of Qipchaq slaves and threaten to deprive the Mamluks of their greatest source of warriors. During the long reign of Mamluk Sultan al-Nasir Muhammad, a daughter of the Golden Horde Khan Ozbeg was wed to him, in an effort to cement the relationship after a rocky start to the 1300s. Al-Nasir soon accused her of not actually being a Chinggisid, insulting her and infuriating Ozbeg. Yet the relationship survived until the invasions of Emir Temur at the close of the fourteenth century, when the Mamluks and Golden Horde once again took part in a doomed west-Asian effort to ally against Temur.       Ilkhanid-European contacts continued into the 14th century, but with somewhat less regularity after Rabban bar Sawma's journey. An archbishopric was even founded in the new Ilkhanid capital of Sultaniyya in 1318, and Papal envoys would travel through the Ilkhanate to the Yuan Dynasty in China until the 1330s. A few envoys came from the Il-Khans still hoping to achieve military cooperation; Ghazan Il-Khan continued to send them before his invasions, including the only one that actually defeated the Mamluk army and led to a brief Mongol advance down the coast, occupying Damascus. News of Ghazan's successes did spread rapidly, for the Spanish Franciscan Ramon Llull learned of it and promptly sailed all the way across the Mediterranean, hoping to be among the first missionaries to land in the newly reclaimed Holy Land. But upon arriving in Cypress, Llull learned of Ghazan's equally quick withdrawal. The combined news of a Mongol victory followed by sudden Mongol withdrawal must have only affirmed the opinion of many of the futility of taking part in any more crusades with the Mongols.  Military operations against the Mamluks mostly ceased after Ghazan's death, until a formal peace was achieved between them and the Ilkhanate at the start of the 1320s. Naturally, no further messages for alliances with the powers of Europe were forth coming, and consequently putting an almost total end to European interest and contacts with the Middle East for the next five centuries. European-Mongol relations would continue for some time longer in the territory of the Golden Horde, where the attention of our podcast moves next, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast for more. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue bringing you great content, then consider supporting us on Patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.   

The Jann Arden Podcast
Flying Popes & Diet Cokes

The Jann Arden Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 43:26


Jann is joined by friend and musician, Rose Cousins, to chat about exercise and staying healthy. In the second half of the show, Jann, Caitlin and Adam talk about Adele, wedgies, and our favourite seasons.

Revelations Radio Network
RESET RUMORS OF WARS

Revelations Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Canary Cry News Talk #399 - 10.08.2021 RESET, RUMORS OF WARS: Battle of Sci, Tech, Social, Pol, Econ, Militia, Edu, Spiritual - CCNT 399 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com EVERYTHING ELSE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel: Ravel Podcast Facelikethesun Resurrection YouTube channel Truther Dating experiment INTRO 1:15 Episode 400 prep Candace Owens says we are in WW3 [New Arms Race] Clip: Another Biden speech went really well FLIPPY 9:34 Robot arm that finds lost items, fuses data from cameras and antennae (MIT Edu)   CHINA 19:30 11 injured, US Nuke Submarine collides with “unknown object” South China Sea (DailyMail)   SPACE POPE REPTILIAN 25:37 Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race]   MONEY 35:01 NatWest, a bank in Britain, pleads guilty for money laundering (Reuters) Leak reveals Twitch Streamer earnings, millions (Fortune) Amazon secured $670 million in tax breaks, says watchdog (CBS NEWS) Note: Official, George Soros is trading Bitcoin (Yahoo) Note: Senator Cynthia Lummis reveals $100K purchase of Bitcoin (NBC) Moderna founders debut on Forbes' top 400 richest Americans (NY Post) Clip: Implications of “Little Guy” who front ran Institutions, Alex Machinsky Celsius Network CEO   I AM WACCINE 55:08 WHO backs first malaria waccine for children (CNN) Not mention on CNN: Gavi, leading the way (Global Fund) Sanofi says positive results from first high dose flu + C19 booster shot (Sanofi Press)   BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons 1:06:28 Clip: How surveillance advertising is tracking you   COVID 19/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:43:52 Clip: Dr. Leanna Wen, US should be more like Canada Clip: Trudeau introduces mandate, no more testing? Clip: Newfoundland presser for mandate…squirt squirt Clips: Alex Jones exposes video from 2019, Fauci planning pandemic marketing (New Rescue) Clip: Fauci, 1 and 2 Clip: LA passes mandate, people push back BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups 2:22:24   POLITICS 2:54:05 Abortion law on hold, Basil was right (CNN) Biden to sign bill to raise debt ceiling (The Hill) Kamala Harris to “Stop the Steal” (The Atlantic)   ADDITIONAL STORIES San Fransisco to list mask mandates on Oct. 15 (SF Chron) Elon Musk to move Tesla HQ to Texas (AP) 18 former NBA players arrested for defrauding health care system (NBC) Chimeric injections in CRISPR reduces tumors (BioRxiv) Facebook renews ambitions to connect world (Wired) What Biden needs to say about Surveillance Tech and Foreign Policy (Just Security) Clip: Ethics professor pushes back on mandates, get's fired Note: Study finds waccinated people more susceptible to variant than unwaxxed (MedRxiv) Clip: Klaus says Henry Kissinger influence, Rockefeller admits recruiting Kissinger Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Quotes: The world needs more waccine, less war (American Mag) [New Arms Race] Priest absolved abuse, hours after addressing French Church abuse cases (DailyMail) Fact Check: Sweden “bans”…halts all Moderna SpikeVax (Newsweek) Man who killed pharmacist brother was enraged about waccine (USA Today) European Parliament opposes AI mass surveillance (PC Mag)   PRODUCERS ep. 399: Derek R**, Rachelle, Aaron J, Arnold W, Liz D, Veronica D, Juan A, Ethan N, Sean D, HeatheRuss, Morv, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, Mark D, Dominick R, JC, Child of God, Sir Sammons the Knight of the Fishes, Malik, Scott K, Gail M, DrWhoDunDat, Brandt W, Runksmash, Ciara, Douglas P   TIMESTAMPS: Rachel C JINGLES: LearBag3000 ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N LivingTeaBill

The Cordial Catholic
130: How to Make the Mass Great (w/ Dr. Denis McNamara)

The Cordial Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 73:51


In this episode of The Cordial Catholic, I'm joined by Dr. Denis McNamara, associate professor and Director of the Center for Beauty and Culture at Benedictine College to talk about Pope Francis's Motu Proprio on the celebration of the Mass, Traditionis Custodes  and how we can make the Mass great again. We dig into how to. understand the parallel forms of the Mass: the Extraordinary (Latin Mass) and Ordinary Forms, what the Popes intended when allowing (and then restricting) the celebration of both, and how each of these forms can inform and improve the other. This is a fantastic conversation all about how we can celebrate the Mass better – and exactly what that means – with one of my favourite liturgists and human beings of all time, Dr. Denis McNamara. For more, visit The Cordial Catholic. Send your feedback to cordialcatholic@gmail.com. Sign up for our newsletter for my reflections on  episodes, behind-the-scenes content, and exclusive contests! To watch this and other episodes please visit (and subscribe to!) our YouTube channel.Please consider financially supporting this show! For more information visit the Patreon page.  All patrons receive access to exclusive content and if you can give $5/mo or more you'll also be entered into monthly draws for fantastic books hand-picked by me.If you'd like to give a one-time donation to The Cordial Catholic, you can visit the PayPal page.Thank you to those already supporting the show!Please check out Hallow, the #1 Catholic audio prayer app. Pray the rosary, novenas, listen to Bishop Robert Barron's homilies and join the 30-day Gospel Reading Challenge by listening to the Gospel as read by Jonathan Roumie who plays Jesus in The Chosen. The app is free but visit hallow.com/cordialcatholic for a 30-day trial of the extra, in-depth features! Thanks to this week's co-producers, part of our Patreon Producers community: Stephen, Eli, Tom, Kelvin, Susan, and Eyram.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cordialcatholic)

Leadership and the Environment
516: Geoengineering: Prologue or Epilogue for Humanity?

Leadership and the Environment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 48:30


Here are the notes I read from, responding to this op-ed piece and this review for a book I've talked to the author about but haven't read.Geoengineering Prologue or Epilogue for Humanity?Introduction, contextGeoengineering is becoming a more common topic as people feel more desperate. The common theme is that when things get serious, we have to put everything on the table, even things that may not work. The problem isn't if they'll work on their intended goal, but everything else. Over and over again in history, the unintended side-effects dwarf the intended ones. In fact, the story of oil, plastics, and most of our environmental problems today, since nobody chose to pollute but did try to improve people's lives despite side-effects they hoped would be small, geoengineering continues that story. Each time people thought they would solve. Each time it exacerbated and here we are.What got us into this mess won't get us out. It will get us deeper.Two recent pieces on geoengineering: Gernot Wagner book and David Keith NY Times editorial. Both results of months of just writing based on years of research and dedicated practice. I've met Gernot in person. Haven't read book but got some of it vocally. Don't know Keith but mutual friends.David Keith invited to engage by Twitter, which I think is disaster and one of our main problems today. People trying to checkmate each other in 160 characters, as he did in saying, please provide data.I will provide data, but not the kind he thinks. As you'll see, I believe history proves his approach disastrous.Both present unassailable perspective: we have to study, not dismiss out of hand, though I think they miss many have studied and out of thoughtful consideration and with difficulty but confidence reject.With 7.9 billion people, no objection to some studying. Plenty of resources.I don't say don't read the article or book. Besides that I haven't read the book, they mean well and want to save humanity from ecological catastrophe. Both value stopping emissions as primary.I'm not saying don't read them, but I recommend other works first. I'd startI may be misinterpreting, but I see them as approaching in two ways: at science and engineering level, understanding the situation, both the state of nature and the state of our technology, and innovating solutions. At the decision-making level, figuring out what we should do.I have a PhD in physics, I helped launch satellites with NASA and ESA to observe atmospheres, I've invented and patented several inventions, brought them working to the world, raising millions to do it. I also ran businesses, got an MBA, and coach executives at some of the world's largest and most prominent organizations, so I'm not a babe in the woods in these areas.How to look at itWhat data do I suggest and what do I suggest reading first, before their works?While tempting to look at it as engineering issue, I see it as high-stakes decision-making where we don't have the luxury of not responding somehow, can't possibly have all the information we want, and sections of global economy including millions to billions of lives affected, even human extinction in play.There is precedent, which is the data and history to learn from.Caveat: nothing is perfectly relevant. We are in uncharted territory. In all comparisons, more differences than similarities. But we have no alternate universes to practice on, only history of huge decisions. I don't like situation either, but agree on research.Each comparable itself could be studied forever in infinite detail. None had control groups or alternative realities. But like Gernot and Keith, I believe more study. At end I'll get to where lines of research I prefer could lead.Comparables and resourcesVietnamMcNamara and best and brightest from Harvard, etc.Data was last war. Sought numbers in kill ratio, etc.But underlying model was Domino Theory, we're huge and they're third-world, we beat HitlerJohnson focused on domestic agenda, where he was master, and just wanted this to go away. Didn't face it.Military said we have solutions. Believed they could overpower, had to overpower because of Domino Theory.Domino Theory was wrong, without basis. Numbers distracted from hearts and minds.Simple, enjoyable resource on decision-making: Path to War, "Television critic Matt Zoller Seitz in his 2016 book named Path to War as the 6th greatest American TV-movie of all time"Also Fog of War about McNamara's reflections looking backSpace shuttleSome data but not relevant so had to extrapolate. People felt desperate and scared not to act.Lots of ways to interpret. There always will be. In this case they made the wrong choice. They knew if they chose otherwise, people could always second guess and say they were wrong.Resource: One of Harvard's case studies of conflicting interests. As physicist, Richard Feynman's stories of decision-making morass.Building highways into cities, Robert Moses, Jane JacobsRobert Moses always had the data and always got the funding. But data and projections were based on a model as flawed and unfounded as the Domino Theory, that traffic implied demand and more roads would lower congestion. Opposite happened most of the time. We have to live with results for centuries, including today's climate and pollution.By contrast, look at Amsterdam, especially channel called Not Just Bikes. Amsterdam could have looked like Houston does today. Imagine Houston looked like Amsterdam and was as livable.Resources: The Power Broker and Death and Life of Great American Cities.D-Day and EisenhowerTo launch or not launch invasion where weather is difficult to predict, can make all the difference, and if you don't go one day, moon and tides mean next time might be a month or never. Hundreds of thousands of men's lives at stake, or all of Europe and free world.Resource: Ike: Countdown to D-Day starring Tom Selleck for focusing on the decision-making and teamwork amid civilization-in-the-balance stress.Green Revolution and Norman BorlaugFaced with people dying immediately, he did what he could to save them. Mid-career he saw the consequences. He enabled more population growth. He used the term "population monster". If anyone knew population, the consequences of its growth, and balancing saving people now and risking bigger problems later and facing the systemic problems now, he did.He spent the latter half of his career talking about the population monster, helping the Population Media Center, for example.Resource, his own quote: The green revolution has won a temporary success in man's war against hunger and deprivation; it has given man a breathing space. If fully implemented, the revolution can provide sufficient food for sustenance during the next three decades. But the frightening power of human reproduction must also be curbed; otherwise the success of the green revolution will be ephemeral only.Most people still fail to comprehend the magnitude and menace of the “Population Monster”. . . Since man is potentially a rational being, however, I am confident that within the next two decades he will recognize the self-destructive course he steers along the road of irresponsible population growth…We haven't acted, his prediction is happening, and geoengineering will at least repeat the problem, more likely augment it. At least it seems a close comparison.Also, recent PBS American Experience on him.Cuban Missile CrisisJoint Chiefs of Staff said situation was serious and we had to act before missiles were armed.Even JFK thought negotiation wouldn't work. It did. We didn't invade.We learned decades later that the warheads were armed, Castro had approval. If he expected to be killed, he could have launched missiles to kill tens of millions and start WWIII.Data suggested invading was best option.Resource: Movie 13 Days. I haven't yet read the book.CVS Drugs -> HealthAll advice was to keep selling their top profit line. If they didn't, anyone could walk a few steps to another store.Within twelve months they reached former profit levels.Big case: the abolitionists pushing to end slavery in the British Empire. 1807.Their model and mineI think they see situation like we're heading to a cliff and have to stop the car. They say best solution is to take foot off gas, which is pollution and greenhouse gases, but that doesn't stop the car. Their solutions are more like putting chemical in gas tank to stop engine.I'll grant that view, but only looking at climate misses full situation. Our environmental problems are more than just temperature. If they see the cliff in front and rapidly approaching, I think they see it like the end of Thelma and Louise, broad, flat, lots of space. Not cops behind.But more than climate. It's more like we're on a thin promontory or like thin pier over since there are many other dangers. To the right might be biodiversity loss, which could doom us too. To the left, pollution. About 10 million people a year die from breathing air. But we need more dimensions we could fall off so maybe there are land mines, which represent deforestation, and huge storms representing ocean acidification, and we have to construct more things to represent overpopulation, overfishing, running out of minerals, depleting aquifers, depleting topsoil, and you've seen the headlines and know many more, few of which geoengineering would help and most of which it would exacerbate, not buy us time.So geoengineering is more like we're headed toward a cliff, already with cliffs immediately to our left and right, and more, and geoengineering is like slashing the tires or causing the engine to seize violently, which might possibly keep us from the cliff in front, but first causing us to lose control. Here the analogy is too small because it could cause us to fall off both the left, right, and other dimensions, hit a land mine, get hit by lightning, roll over and crash, and so on.But their version of the Domino Theory and self-confidence blinds them from seeing anything other than one problem and all the other side-effects and the line of thinking that got us here.LessonsActing out of desperation, helplessness, and hopelessness, even when desperate, produces poor decisions.Don't have to ignore long-term to act on short-term. We can regret wrong decisionsStudy leadership and decision-making. Rarely do technical solutions to social problems solve them.Look for social solutions to social problems. Look at Mechai Viravaidya in Thailand, Population Media Center.Expect unintended side-effects to be greater than effects, as Norman Borlaug eventually realized.Then there's how to learn any performance-based skill: practice. Want to get to Carnegie Hall, Wimbledon, or NBA finals? Practice. If you haven't practiced, you haven't developed the skills. Want to live sustainably? Try! If you pollute more than the average, you probably don't know many solutions that work. Just spoke with James Rebank, a bestselling author, a farmer who started path to industrial. When he tried regenerative things he couldn't have imagined worked.Watch Fog of War to see how McNamara saw how flawed their process was. For that matter, the term fog of war comes from Von Clausewitz. I'm in the middle of reading his work, but listen to my episode with Marine Corps General Von Riper, who cleaned up the floor with the US military in the millennium challenge, playing a woefully under-resourced red team.Solutions?My goal here is not to be comprehensive, just some quick thoughts since I don't want to take too long to respond to David Keith's tweets.There is a solution that works. Not full solution but major part: live sustainably, as humans have for about 300,000 years. The knee-jerk response is, "but we live differently today." Yes, how we live is what we have to change. The longer we wait, the harder.I just recorded a conversation with a guy who lost his legs to flesh-eating disease. Would you rather live sustainably or lose both legs? Because if you prefer living sustainably, well he was minutes from death, but just returned from Tokyo with a silver medal and shared how lucky his life and great he's made it. He points out everyone suffers and we all face challenges often we didn't ask for. If he can with the choice you don't want, we can do so with the preferable choice. Only we'll eat more vegetables and live closer to family. Mostly life improvements.They downplay the possibility. Listeners to this podcast know I lived like the average American, probably polluting more, but dropped 90 percent. It was as hard for me as everyone, but once committed, doable. Once done, fun, freedom, joy, and better, because living by universal values. Actually, still going as skills develop.Engaging people we disagree with, who think there's no problem, who see population as impossible to changePope and evangelicalsFollowing domination to stewardship transformation (and Earth not center), grains of sand prophecy interpretation.Contraception: I haven't had vasectomy, but if you can imagine colonizing Mars, I can imagine an implant that can stop and start flow of sperm. Nearly half of pregnancies accidental. Nearly 300,000 years of human history was replacement level and endured. I can imagine a similar device for women. I can even imagine Popes endorsing.When we change our values we innovate just as much, but in direction of new values, which I propose to be stewardship and increasing Earth's ability to sustain life.We can come up with more solutions if we try. Few people are innovating by those values, certainly not in Silicon Valley, Washington DC, or academia. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History of Christianity
Episode 46 – The “Popes” of the First Two Centuries

History of Christianity

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 12:14


One of the most important leaders in the Church today is that of the Pope. But where did the popes come from? They have been in the background all through our narrative. In this episode, we go back and look at the “popes” or bishops of Rome from the first

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Erik Giles - Antichrist Code Broken

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 41:29


Erik Giles - Antichrist Code Broken - The Apollyon Intercepts - There's been a lot of talk about the Mayan Long Calendar and what its end on Dec. 21 may portend for the world, but are you aware of the equally ancient Prophecy of the Popes and the biblical book of Revelation? All three prophecies are converging in their end stages, says fraud strategist Erik Giles, And when he digs through the numbers, he finds a disturbing pattern. Erik Giles has spent his career as a fraud analyst - specializing in preventing identity theft - because he has a unique skill set when it comes to pattern recognition, analyzing data and creating rules for it. He graduated from Penn State with a bachelor's in telecommunications and from Case Western Reserve University with an MBA. - www.threeprophecies.com listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

So It's Come To This: A Simpson's Family Podcast
Episode 48: The Mysterious Voyage of Homer Simpson or The Popes of Chilitown vs. the Chilitown Popes

So It's Come To This: A Simpson's Family Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 108:49


In this episode Homer stumbles upon a Chili Cookoff where he eats some insanity peppers that cause him to hallucinate. During his trip he meets a spiritual guide voiced by the late great Johnny Cash and heads out on a quest to find his soulmate. Along the way the Budnik Scarupa family welcomes in friend of the family Don Johnson, no not that Don Johnson, Buffalo's own Don Johnson. They discuss Chris Pratt (again) and Brenden is obsessed with bringing up the newly announced Mario Bros. movie and needless to say he is not too happy about it. Cori lets us in on a little secret and Brenden shocks them all with the realization that there is a connection to oranges and smoking cigarettes. Don really helps to bring the laughs on this one and we hope that you enjoy it! So grab your chili eating spoon, put on that Time for Chili hat and strap yourself in for a wild ride! Please check out Don Johnson on his podcast Bourbon Legends at the link below or wherever you find your podcasts: https://open.spotify.com/show/0Z7xzfRATI7ZDsQ3RWfEJm?si=i4gs0OqYTv6YnPpxqyVrDg&dl_branch=1 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Catholic Gentleman
Chivalry In The Modern World

The Catholic Gentleman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 73:44


In this episode of The Catholic Gentleman, Sam and John meet with the one and only Charles Coulombe to discuss modern chivalry. They discuss the death of chivalry and how society is in desperate need of more chivalrous men. They go into how an allegiance to the Church and all her teachings is at the essence of authentic knighthood and masculinity. In this episode we discuss; The demise of modern society 12 books on chivalry every man should know How men are called to be knights for our time The history of knighthood The effects of poor leadership And More Charles Coulombe, is an American author, historian, and lecturer. He has appeared on Fox, ABC, BBC, National Catholic Register, Catholic Herald, and dozens of other notable locations. He is the author of 15 books including Vicars of Christ: A History of the Popes, Blessed Emperor Charles: the Legacy of a Holy monarch, and A Catholic quest for the Holy Grail.  He can be found regularly on Tumblar House on both the website and Youtube Channel. Enjoy his weekly show “Off The Menu”. Tumblar House - https://www.tumblarhouse.com Off the Menu - https://www.youtube.com/c/TumblarHouse Go to our site to find all 12 books discussed on the show - https://catholicgentleman.com/2021/09/chivalry-in-the-modern-world/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Catholic Gentleman
Chivalry In The Modern World

The Catholic Gentleman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 73:44


In this episode of The Catholic Gentleman, Sam and John meet with the one and only Charles Coulombe to discuss modern chivalry. They discuss the death of chivalry and how society is in desperate need of more chivalrous men. They go into how an allegiance to the Church and all her teachings is at the essence of authentic knighthood and masculinity. In this episode we discuss; The demise of modern society 12 books on chivalry every man should know How men are called to be knights for our time The history of knighthood The effects of poor leadership And More Charles Coulombe, is an American author, historian, and lecturer. He has appeared on Fox, ABC, BBC, National Catholic Register, Catholic Herald, and dozens of other notable locations. He is the author of 15 books including Vicars of Christ: A History of the Popes, Blessed Emperor Charles: the Legacy of a Holy monarch, and A Catholic quest for the Holy Grail.  He can be found regularly on Tumblar House on both the website and Youtube Channel. Enjoy his weekly show “Off The Menu”. Tumblar House - https://www.tumblarhouse.com Off the Menu - https://www.youtube.com/c/TumblarHouse Go to our site to find all 12 books discussed on the show - https://catholicgentleman.com/2021/09/chivalry-in-the-modern-world/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The First Lady of Nutrition Podcast with Ann Louise Gittleman, Ph.D., C.N.S.
The Hidden History of Homeopathy – Episode 89: Dana Ullman

The First Lady of Nutrition Podcast with Ann Louise Gittleman, Ph.D., C.N.S.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:57


Dana Ullman, also known as ‘Mr. Homeopathy', is one of America's leading advocates for homeopathy. As a bestselling author and brilliant educator on the topic, Dana has been certified in classical homeopathy by the leading organization in the U.S. for professional homeopaths. Join Ann Louise and Dana is they discuss the history of homeopathy in the United States – including the dark past of the American Medical Association in its effort to crush homeopathy in the early 1900s.  Dana also discusses the amazing efficacy of homeopathy and fascinating facts including how The British Royal Family has used homeopathic medicines since the 1830s, and how homeopathic medicines have also been used by 11 American Presidents, 7 Popes, esteemed scientists such as Charles Darwin, successful businessmen such as John D. Rockefeller, as well as Beethoven and Chopin, Tina Turner and Paul McCartney, and others.  Ullman's website https://homeopathic.com/ offers invaluable resources and his famous eBook is choke-full of practical clinical information on how to use homeopathic medicines for 100+ common ailments. Last but not least, Dana shared the three top homeopathics for Americans and Nux Vomica headed the list! The post The Hidden History of Homeopathy – Episode 89: Dana Ullman appeared first on Ann Louise Gittleman.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.56. History of the Mongols: Mongol-Mamluk Wars

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 35:29


“Ket Buqa Noyan kept attacking left and right with all zeal. Some encouraged him to flee, but he refused to listen and said, “Death is inevitable. It is better to die with a good name than to flee in disgrace. In the end, someone from this army, old or young, will reach the court and report that Ket Buqa, not wanting to return in shame, gave his life in battle. The padishah should not grieve over lost Mongol soldiers. Let him imagine that his soldiers' wives have not been pregnant for a year and the mares of their herds have not folded. [...]The life or death of servants like us is irrelevant.” Although the soldiers left him, he continued to struggle in battle like a thousand men. In the end his horse faltered, and he was captured. [...] After that, Ket Buqa was taken before Quduz with his hands bound. “Despicable man,” said Quduz, “you have shed so much blood wrongfully, ended the lives of champions and dignitaries with false assurances, and overthrown ancient dynasties with broken promises. Now you have finally fallen into a snare yourself.”[...]     “If I am killed by your hand,” said Ket Buqa, “I consider it to be God's act, not yours. Be not deceived by this event for one moment, for when the news of my death reaches Hülägü Khan, the ocean of his wrath will boil over, and from Azerbaijan to the gates of Egypt will quake with the hooves of Mongol horses. They will take the sands of Egypt from there in their horses' nose bags. Hülägü Khan has three hundred thousand renowned horsemen like Ket Buqa. You may take one of them away.”       So the great Ilkhanid vizier and historian Rashid al-Din records the heroic, and certainly greatly dramatized, account of Kitbuqa Noyan's final stand at the battle of Ayn Jalut in September 1260. This was the famous Mongol defeat at the newly established, and rather fragile, Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt. The Mongols however, did not see it as an irreversible cataclysm, but the defeat of a small force which would soon be avenged, for Heaven demanded nothing less. The  defeat of the Mongols at Ayn Jalut in 1260 was not the end of the war between the Mongols and the Mamluks, and over the next 50 years Hulegu's successors, the Ilkhans, tried repeatedly to avenge their losses only to be halted by the Mamluks' valiant resistance.  Here, we will look at the efforts by the Mongol Ilkhanate to bring their horses to the Nile. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.       First, we should note that for anyone wishing to read more about the war between the Mongols and the Mamluks, the most detailed work on the subject can be found in Reuven Amitai-Preiss' Mongols and Mamluks: The Mamluk-Ilkhanid War, released in 1995. No other work details the entire conflict and its sources so fully, and is an absolute must read for anyone desiring the most effective overview on the subject possible.       With the death of Grand Khan Mongke in 1259, the Mongol Empire was irrevocably broken: while Hulegu and his successors stayed on good terms with his brother Khubilai, the nominal Great Khan, Hulegu was independent, ruler of  vast domain stretching from Anatolia to the Amu Darya, known as the Ilkhanate. Hulegu's cousins in the neighbouring Golden Horde, Chagatai Khanate and the Neguderis were almost immediately antagonistic to the Ilkhans, who found themselves defending their distant frontiers from all three, in addition to internal revolts. For the Ilkhans, the Mamluks were but one frontier amongst several, one they could turn to only when the threat from the other Khanates was low. More often than not, this simple fact prevented any great Ilkhanid invasion of the Mamluk state.   For the Mamluks though, their border with the Ilkhanate along the Euphrates river was of utmost importance. In the aftermath of Ayn Jalut, the Mamluk Sultan Qutuz was assassinated by the energetic Baybars, who had fought alongside Qutuz against Kitbuqa. We introduced Baybars back in episode 30 of this podcast. While much credit can be given to Qutuz and the quality of the Mamluk soldiery for the victory at Ayn Jalut, the reason for continued Mamluk successes against the Mongols can be attributed to Baybars. A Qipchaq from the great Eurasian steppe, as a young boy Baybars had been sold into slavery to the Ayybuid Sultan of Egypt. There, Baybars was converted to Islam and received extensive training in all matter of military affairs. An excellent soldier, coupled with  immense ambition, endurance and drive, Baybars understood clearly the danger the Mongols posed, and set up his entire kingdom to defend against them.    The new Sultan greatly expanded the Mamluk regiments, encouraging good relations with the Golden Horde, Genoese and Byzantine Empire to keep up the flow of Turkic slave soldiers from the Eurasian steppe, over the Mediterranean to the ports of Egypt. He established a sophisticated intelligence network to inform him on the Ilkhanate and spread misinformation within it, supported by a system of signal towers, messenger pigeons, improved roads, bridges and relay stations to rapidly send messages. This was the barid, which served as the Mamluks' answer to the Mongol yam system. Its riders reported directly to the Mamluk Sultan.  Frontier fortifications along the Euphrates River like al-Bira and al-Rahba were strengthened, and they served as the first line of defence when the armies of the Ilkhanate advanced. When messengers raced down from Syria to Egypt with news of a Mongol assault,  Baybars would immediately march with an army from Cairo to meet them head on. More often than not, the Mongol attack party would return to the Ilkhanate rather than face Baybars head on. His swift reaction kept border officials loyal, feeling their Sultan would soon be there to assist them, or to punish defections. Rather than face the Mongols in battle, garrisons of cities in Syria past the Euphrates border were ordered to withdraw and regrouped at designated locations during invasions, facing the Mongols with united forces or awaiting the Sultan.  Baybars would not allow the Mongols to overrun his empire piecemeal, as they had the Khwarezmian Empire some forty years prior.   Baybars cultivated relations with bedouin nomads across Syria, who provided valuable auxiliaries, intelligence and also to keep them from allying with the Mongols.  Finally, he strengthed his position domestically, controlling the economy and  appointing his own Caliphs to legitimize himself, presenting himself as the defender of Islam. Baybars prepared his entire kingdom for Mongol attacks, a highly effective system the Ilkhanate struggled against. For the Ilkhans, the theater with the Mamluks was a sideshow, one to attack only when other frontiers were secured. The Mamluk Sultanate itself had no hope of conquering the Ilkhanate or seriously threatening it, so the various Ilkhans felt no great rush to overwhelm the Mamluks. In contrast, for the Mamluks the Ilkhanid border was of utmost importance: Baybars had to levy almost entirety of the Mamluk army to repel the Mongols, and thus not even a single defeat could be afforded for it would allow the Mongols to overrun Egypt, and the remainder of the Islamic west. Thus did Baybars finetune a system that proved remarkably successful at defending against the house of Hulegu, although it demanded great personal ability on the part of the monarch, and Baybars' successors struggled to compare to his vision.    Soon after Ayn Jalut in September 1260, a Mongol force of about 6,000 returned to Syria that December. Commanded by Baydar, an officer of Kitbuqa who had escaped Qutuz and Baybars' great advance earlier that year, it was a serious threat. At that time Sultan Baybars had not tightened his hold over Syria, attacks by the Crusader states had wrought further confusion, and some of Qutuz's loyalists had rebelled against Baybars' rule, one of whom even declared himself sultan. There is implication in the Mamluk sources that the attack was not launched on Hulegu's order, but Baydar's own initiative to avenge Kitbuqa. As his army marched, they found that the garrisons of Syria had retreated before them. Placing a governor in Aleppo and other major cities, as the Mongols neared Homs they found the combined garrisons of Homs, Hama and Aleppo had retreated there and rallied before them. Greatly outnumbering the Syrian forces, perhaps 6,000 troops under Baydar to 1,400 under the Syrians, Baydar was ultimately defeated in battle, the Syrians aided by thick fog and the timely flanking of local Bedouin. Coincidentally, it was fought near the grave of Khalid ibn al-Walid, the great commander of the early Islamic conquests and victor at Yarmouk, which earned it double the symbolic value. This first battle of Homs, as it was to become known, strengthened the feeling that the Mongols were not invincible. The Mongol army outnumbered the Mamluk garrisons, and keenly demonstrated the importance of unified defense rather than each garrison hiding behind city walls. For many Mamluk writers, it was the first battle of Homs that stood as the great victory over the Mongols, rather than Ayn Jalut. It was also the last major Mongol offensive into Syria in the 1260s.    Hulegu spent the next years fighting with Berke Khan of the Golden Horde over the valuable territory of Azerbaijan, which Berke believed belonged to the house of Jochi. With Hulegu's death in February 1265, he was succeeded by his son Abaqa, who was distracted by Jochid attacks and the efforts of setting up a new empire. By then, the most entrenched Sultan Baybars could solidify his defences, and turn to the isolated Crusader strongholds. By this time, little remained of the former Crusader Kingdoms, baring some coastal cities like Antioch, Tripoli and Acre and a few inland fortresses like Krak des Chevaliers and Montfort. The Crusader States had shown neutrality to the Mongols, or even joined them such as the County of Tripoli in 1260 after the Mongols entered Syria. Their neutrality or allegiance to the Mongols, in addition to the possibility of them acting as a foothold to further European troops, meant that the Mamluks would unleash bloody vengeance on them whenever the opportunity arose. From February to April 1265 in the immediate aftermath of Hulegu's  death, Baybars conquered Caesarea, Haifa, Arsuf, Galilee and raided Cilician Armenia, the vassals of the Ilkhanate. In 1268 Baybars took Antioch, and in 1270-71 when Abaqa was fighting with Chagatayid and Neguderi armies in the far east, Baybars took the fortresses of Krak des Chevaliers and Montfort, and planned to attack Tripoli, another Ilkhanid vassal. Though it remains popular in some circles to portray the Mamluk conquest of the Crusader holdouts as titanic clashes, they were side affairs, undertaken by the Mamluks whenever the Ilkhans were occupied.  Such was the slow and humiliating coup de grace which ended the Crusader states.   The Mamluks' ending of the Crusader kingdoms certainly served them strategically, for it was the most effective way to prevent any link up between European and Mongol forces. Hulegu and his successors sent letters to the Kings and Popes of Europe, encouraging them to take up crusade against the Mamluks and together defeat them, offering to return Jerusalem and other holy sites back into Christian hands, but this almost always fell on deaf ears or were greeted with empty promises. Louis IX's highly organized crusades had resulted in utter debacles at Mansura in 1250 and Tunis in 1270, which dampened whatever minor enthusiasm for crusade was left in Europe. Few European monarchs ever seriously took up Mongol offers at military alliances, with two exceptions. King James I of Aragon found himself the most motivated by the Il-Khan Abaqa's requests, encouraged by the promises of the Ilkhanate's logistical and military support once they reached the mainland. James made his preparations, and launched a fleet in September 1269. An unexpected storm scattered the fleet, and only two of James' bastard children made it to Acre, who stayed only briefly, accomplishing little there before departing. This was soon followed by the arrival of prince Edward of England, the future King Edward I, at Acre in May 1271 with a small force, and Abaqa sent an army under Samaghar, the Mongol commander in Rum, to assist him: but Samaghar's force withdrew with the arrival of Baybars. Edward's troops performed poorly on their own minor raids, and set sail for England in September 1272.    One of the commanders who took part in Samaghar's raid was Mu'in al-Din Sulaiman, better known as the Pervane, from sahib pervana, the keeper of the seals, though it literally means “butterfly.” The Pervane was the dominant figure of the rump state of the Seljuqs of Rum: when the previous Mongol installed Seljuq Sultan, Kilij Arlan IV, had challenged the Pervane, he succeeded in getting Abaqa to execute the Sultan and instate Arslan's young son, a toddler enthroned as Ghiyath al-Din Kaykhusraw III. Thus did the Pervane, in coordination with Samaghar Noyan, act as the master of Anatolia. Essentially co-governors, Samaghar and the Pervane had a stable relationship, enriching themselves along the way. But when Abaqa appointed his younger brother Ejei to oversee the Pervana and Samaghar. The Pervane chafed under the increased financial burden and supervision, and asked Abaqa to recall his brother, claiming Ejei was in cooperation with Baybars. Abaqa promised to recall him, but delayed. In his frustration, the Pervane himself  reached out to Baybars. The Sultan's curiosity was piqued, but didn't commit; by the time his response reached the Pervane in 1274, Ejei and Samaghar had been replaced by Toqa Noyan, and the Pervane didn't respond. Under Toqa Noyan, Mongol pressure was even greater in Anatolia, and the Pervane's powers were more limited than ever.    What followed was a terrible mess of political machinations. The Pervane got Toqa Noyan removed, Ejei was reinstated, the Pervane's efforts to remove Ejei again frustrated Abaqa, who removed Ejei, killed some of his followers and reinstated the Pervane and Toqa Noyan. In November 1275, the Mongols besieged al-Bira, but Baybars had learned of it in advance allegedly due to contacts with the Pervane. After this, the Pervane was careful to rebuild trust with Abaqa, bringing him the Seljuq Sultan's sister to wed. At the same time, with or without the Pervane's support a group of Rumi amirs met with Baybars in July 1276, urging him to attack. Judging there was enough support in Rum for him he agreed, and Baybars mobilized his army over winter 1276, setting out in February 1277.   As Baybars sped up the Levantine coast, the Pervane rapidly lost control of Rum as various Turkmen rebelled and a new Mongol army under Tudawan cracked down on the amirs who had contacted Baybars. In Syria, Baybars sent a diversionary force from Aleppo over the Euphrates, while his main army entered Anatolia in early April. After pushing off a Mongol advance force of 3,000 in the Taurus Mountains, news reaches Baybars that Tudawun was camped close by on a plain near the town of Abulustayn (Elbistan) and set out for them, the armies meeting on the 15th of April 1277.   Tudawan's army was about 14,000 Mongols, Turk and heavily armoured Georgian cavalry was joined by an army of Rumi troops similar size under the Pervane, but Tudawan distrusted them, and kept them away from his lines. Tudawan's scouts had failed to judge the size of the Mamluk army, which he believed to be smaller and lacking Baybars. In reality, the Mamluks outnumbered the Mongols by a few thousand. As the Mamluks entered the plain at the narrow end they were unable to properly form up, and their centre was positioned before their left wing.  The Mongol left flank began the battle, sending arrows into the Mamluk standard bearers in the centre before charging them. The Mamluk centre buckled under the charge, and the more exposed Mamluk left wing was similarly pounded by the Mongol right.   The situation was critical for the Mamluks: likely at this stage, their bedouin irregulars fled. Baybars sent in his reserve, the garrison of Hama, to reinforce his left, and succeeded in forcing back the Mongols. A brief respite allowed the Mamluks to better deploy their lines, and counterattack. The Mongols fought fiercely, but the greater number of the Mamluks made the difference. Gradually forced back over the course of the day, their horses exhausted and unable to access remounts, the Mongols dismounted, signalling they were fighting to the death. With great struggle, the Mamluks defeated them and killed their commanders. The Rumi army took little part in the battle and dispersed, the Pervane escaping, with one of his sons captured by Baybars. The next day the Mamluk Sultan marched for Kayseri, reaching it on April 20th.   Baybars ordered the Pervane and the Seljuq Sultan to him, but the Pervane held out in his own castle. Both realized that Baybars would not be able to hold this position, deep in enemy territory, supplies low and the rest of his kingdom unprotected while a furious Abaqa rallied his army. 5 days after entering Kayseri, Baybars was en route back to Syria and though his vanguard deserted to the Mongols, by June he was in Damascus. Abaqa arrived in Rum too late to catch Baybars, and in his fury was only narrowly persuaded out of massacring everything between Kayseri and Erzerum, while the summer heat kept him from invading Syria. He was able to catch the Pervane though, and put him to death: allegedly, his flesh was eaten by Abaqa and the senior Mongols.   Thus ended one of Baybars' most skillfully executed campaigns: lightning quick and devastating, creating a terrible mess for the Ilkhanate, though in itself brought no strategic gain or shift in the status quo. It was a great shock when the Lion of Egypt suddenly died at the beginning of July 1277 soon after his return. Baybars had hoped to establish a dynasty: he was seamlessly succeeded by his older son, named al-Sa'id Berke. The new Sultan quickly antagonized the Mamluk emirs through his efforts to limit their powers, and was forced to abdicate in favour of his younger brother, the 7 year old Sulamish. The boy was nothing but a puppet, and his guardian, one of the late Baybars' Mamluks named Qalawun, soon forced the boy out and took power himself in November 1279.  Like Berke, Qalawun had been taken from the Qipchap steppe and sold as a Mamluk. He had loyally served Baybars and proven himself an able commander, though something of a schemer. Though Qalawun's line came to dominate the Mamluk Sultanate for essentially the next century, initially Qalawun faced stiff opposition in attempting to assert his authority.    This disruption in the Sultanate was a golden opportunity for Abaqa, who decided it was time to press the Mamluk frontier. To this, he decided to put his younger brother Mongke-Temur to the task. Prince Mongke-Temur first  raided Syria in November 1280 with King Lewon III of Armenian Cilicia, Bohemond VII of Tripoli and a contingent of Knights Hospitaller. In September 1281, Mongke-Temur returned again, a large force of perhaps 40-50,000 Mongols, Armenians under Lewon III, Georgians, Franks and troops from Seljuq Rum. Abaqa initially followed with another army, but may have been forced to hold due to rumours of an attack by the Golden Horde at Derbent.   The Mongol invasion provided a common enemy to unite the Mamluk factions fighting for power, and under Qalawun they advanced, reinforced by Syrian garrisons and bedouins. They reached Homs a few days before the Mongols in late October, giving Qalawun's troops a chance to dig in and rest on the plain north of the city. Their preparations were improved as a Mongol defector informed them of Mongke-Temur's battle plan. Most of the Mongol army was to be placed in the center with the right wing also strong, intending to overpower the Mamluk left and centre where the Sultan's banners would be. Qalawun thus reinforced his left wing, and positioned himself on a hill behind the vanguard to oversee the battle and act as reserve.    Marching through the night, the Mongols arrived early on the 29th of October, 1281. It was a massive front, over 24 kilometres in length due to the size of both armies. The wings of both forces, so far apart, had little knowledge of what was occurring on the other side. While tired from the night march, the Mongols were eager: the battle was initiated when the Mongol right under Alinaq charged forth. The Mamluk left and part of their centre crumpled  and routed under the onslaught. Alinaq continued his pursuit, and here Mongke-Temur's inexperience and the scale of the battlefield began to tell. Proper communication with the command seemingly absent, Alinaq pursued the fleeing Mamluks off the battlefield, as far as the Lake of Homs where they dismounted to rest, evidently anticipating the rest of the army would soon arrive.   A similar charge by the Mongol left wing lacked the numbers of the Mongol right, so the Mamluk right and centre were able to hold and counterattack. Qalawun's actual role in this counterattack isn't clear: some sources have him personally lead the attack, while in others he kept his position hidden, not even raising his banners so as to avoid Mongol arrows. The Mamluks pushed back the Mongol right and the bedouin came around to hit the Mongol flank. The Mongol right fell back to the centre, which under Mongke-Temur was being held in reserve. In the resulting confusion, perhaps thrown by his horse, Mongke-Temur was injured and unable to command. Most of the Mongols then dismounted to make a final stand around the prince, and ultimately routed under the Mamluk assault.    The Mamluks chased the fleeing Mongols right to the border with the Ilkhanate, many drowning in the Euphrates or dying in the desert: so deadly was this rout that  Mamluk authors said more Mongols were killed in flight than in the actual battle. Qalawun and a small guard remained on the battlefield: they were forced to hide their banners and stay silent when the Mongol right wing finally returned to the battlefield, too late to turn the tide. It seems it was able to take an orderly retreat back into the Ilkhanate.       Abaqa was furious at this loss, and intended to return the next year, but died in April 1282. As we have covered in our previous episodes, Abaqa's successors were not blessed with his same longevity or stability, and until 1295 the Ilkhanate saw a succession of short lived monarchs and infighting, internal revolts and renewed attacks by the Golden Horde. Though the succeeding Ilkhans continued to demand Mamluk submission, send threatening letters and continue to attempt an alliance with European powers, nothing materialized beyond border raids and skirmishes in both directions. For the time being, the immediate Mongol threat to the Mamluks had ended, and Sultan Qalawun turned to the remaining Frankish strongholds, all possible beachheads for European armies coming to assist the Ilkhans. Armenian Cilicia was pillaged, remaining inland Crusader strongholds were taken, and in April 1289 the Mongols' vassal Tripoli fell. After the death of Abaqa's son Arghun Il-Khan in March 1291, the Mamluks used the resulting distraction in the Ilkhanate to take the final major Frankish city in the Holy Land, Acre, leaving them with but miniscule holdings which fell in the following years. So ended 200 years of Crusader Kingdoms.       Following Qalawun's death in 1290, he was succeeded by his son al-Ashraf Khalil. A fearsome military commander, it was he who led the push to seize Acre and the final Crusader holdings of note. Yet he did not long to enjoy the throne, and was assassinated in the last days of 1293 due to his efforts to curb the power of the existing Mamluk emirs. With his assassination, the Mamluks entered a period of political instability over the Sultanate. Initially his younger brother al-Nasir Muhammad was placed on the throne, still a child and without any real power. After a year as Sultan he was forced out by his guardian and regent, a Mamluk named, of all things, Kitbuqa. Apparently of Mongol origin, he had been taken captive by the Mamluks at the first battle of Homs in 1260, and made in turn a Mamluk, that is, a slave soldier. Kitbuqa's reign as Sultan was not particularly notable, mostly marked by intense political infighting and machinations. There was, however, a large body of Oirats who deserted the Ilkhanate to join the Mamluks Sultanate. Kitbuqa's generous treatment of this body of nomadic troops, with whom it appeared he shared kinship, angered a number of the other Mamluk emirs and undermined his power. He was soon forced to flee as one of al-Ashraf Khalil's assassins, the Emir Lajin, seized power. When Lajin was murdered in 1299, al-Ashraf Khalil's young brother al-Nasir Muhammad was recalled to take the throne. Only 14 years old, al-Nasir Muhammad had no real power and was still a puppet for the emirs competing for power.   In comparison, 1295 saw the beginning of the reign of the powerful Ghazan Khan, son of Arghun. Ghazan, as we have covered, was not the first Muslim Ilkhan but by his reign a majority of the Mongols within the Ilkhanate had converted, and made the Ilkhanate an Islamic state. Ghazan consolidated his position early on, executing a number of potential challengers to the throne and restabilizing the  Ilkhanid economy, though you can listen to our episode dedicated to Ghazan for more on the internal matters of his reign. While Ghazan was a Muslim, this did not change Ilkhanid policy to the Mamluk. He continued to send letters to western Europe urging them to land an army behind enemy lines. In late 1298, while Mamluk armies ravaged the Ilkhan's vassal Cilician Armenia, the na'ib of Damascus, Sayf al-Din Qibjaq and a few other top Mamluks deserted to the Ilkhanate during a particularly violent stretch within the Sultanate. Fearing for their lives, they inform Ghazan of Sultan Lajin and his vice-Sultan Manketamur's purges and unstable positions. Then in summer 1299 a Mamluk raid into the Ilkhanate sacked Mardin, violating Muslim women and descretating a mosque during Ramadan. Ghazan was thus able to easily obtain a fatwa against the Mamluks for this, presenting himself not as an invader, but a holy warrior coming to avenge atrocities against Islam to encourage dissent among Mamluk ranks. Indeed, the ruler of Hama, a top Mamluk ally, believed the accusations.        By December 1299, Ghazan and his army of Mongols, Georgians and Armenians under their King Het'um II, had crossed the Euphrates. By then, Sultan Lajin had been replaced by a al-Nasir Muhammad who was nearly toppled by the Oirat refugees to the Sultanate. Ghazan bypassed Aleppo and Hama, and hunted for the Mamluk army. While encamped on the edge of the Syrian desert, Ghazan learned the Mamluks were gathering at Homs, where they had defeated Mongke-Temur 18 years prior. Rather than fall into their trap, Ghazan chose to outflank them, crossing the Syrian desert and coming out onto a stream some 16 kilometres north of Homs on the 22nd of December. To the Mamluks, it appeared that Ghazan was retreating, and advanced out of their favourable position to pursue. In a reverse of the 2nd Battle of Homs, now the Mamluks were forced to cross the desert, exhausting themselves to reach Ghazan early the next morning, while his own troops rested, quenched their thirst and formed up. Crucially, the Ilkhanid army was under the firm control of Ghazan and his commander Qutlugh-Shah, while the young al-Nasir Muhammad could not control his senior emirs.        On the morning of December 23rd, 1299, the Mamluks found Ghazan's army was drawn up. Ghazan commanded the centre, while his general Qutlugh-Shah commanded the right.  Qutlugh-Shah's beating of  war drums made the Mamluks believe Ghazan to be located there, and to him they charged, forcing the Mongol right back. Ghazan led the counterattack against them, and Qutlugh-Shah rallied what forces he could and rejoined the Il-Khan. From 11 a.m until nightfall, the battle raged, but finally the Mamluks broke and fled.  Ghazan pursued them past Homs before encamping, not wishing to be drawn into a false retreat in the dark. Homs surrendered without a fight and Ghazan took the Sultan's treasure, distributing it among his nokod, keeping for himself a sword, the title deeds to the Mamluk Sultanate and the muster roll of its army. Next Ghazan marched onto Damascus, which also surrendered without a fight, though its citadel held out. It seems almost the entire Mamluk garrison of Syria had retreated, perhaps recalled to defend the capital. Mongol raiding parties were making it as far as Gaza, with one source reporting they even entered Jerusalem, and the Sultanate seemed poised to fall.       But on February 5th, 1300, Ghazan withdrew from Damascus, returning to the Ilkhanate. Qutlugh-Shah had been left to take the Citadel of Damascus, but he soon followed the Il-Khan. By the end of May, the Mamluks had retaken Syria. Exactly why Ghazan withdrew is unclear: possibly reports of a Neguderi invasion in the east of his realm demanded his attention, or he feared there would not be sufficient pasturage for his large army to make the trip to Egypt: the Mamluks were known to burn grassland and destroy supply depots on the routes they suspected the Mongols to take.  Likely he was unaware of how dire the situation really was for the Mamluks, and suspected further armed resistance along the route would make the already treacherous crossing over the Sinai even harder on his army. Whatever the reason, Ghazan had lost the greatest chance to destroy the Mamluks. Ghazan did cross the Euphrates at the end of December 1300, reaching as far as Aleppo, but heavy rains rendered military operations untenable. In 1303 Ghazan ordered Qutlugh-Shah back into Syria, but he was defeated at Marj al-Suffar near Damascus in April. Ghazan's death the next year, only 34 years old, prevented his next assault. His brother and successor, Oljeitu, ordered the final Ilkhanid attack on the Sultanate, an embarrassing effort in winter 1312 which saw the army retreat not from the Royal Mamluks, but the stiff resistance of ordinary townsfolk. Oljeitu's son, Abu Sa'id, ultimately organized peace with the Mamluks in the early 1320s, ending the sixty years of warfare between the Mongols and the Mamluks. The Ilkhanate did not long outlive this treaty. Abu Sa'id death in 1335 without an heir saw the Ilkhanate torn apart by regional commanders -the Jalayirids, Chobanids, Muzaffarids and Injuids, among others- who appointed their own puppet Khans or abandoned the pretense entirely.       For the Mamluks, they were unable to take advantage of the Ilkhanate's disintegration as when al-Nasir Muhammad died in 1341, they entered their own period of anarchy: 8 of al-Nasir's children and 4 of his grandsons would in turn become Sultan between 1341 and 1382, a period which culminated in the rise of the Circassian Burji Mamluk Dynasty. Whereas the Sultans from Qutuz, Baybars through Qalawun and his descendants were men of Qipchaq-Cuman or even Mongol origin,  over the late thirteenth and first half of the fourteenth century a growing number of the Mamluks were sourced no longer from the Qipchaq steppe, but Circassia, a region along the Black Sea's northeastern coastline. With the end of the Qalawunid Dynasty, Mamluks of Circassian origin took power and established their own dynasty. The Bahri and Burji distinction refers to the parts of Cairo each Mamluk garrison had been based. It was this Mamluk dynasty who would face the wrath of Temur-i-lang at the beginning of the fifteenth century.       These post-Ilkhanid events will be the topic for a forthcoming episode, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals podcast to follow for that. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue bringing you great content, please consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson.  I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one. 

How They Love Mary
Episode 106: Pope St. Pius V's Influence on Catholicism with Professor Roberto de Mattei

How They Love Mary

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 17:44


The feast of Our Lady of the Rosary (formerly Our Lady of Victory) resulted when Pope St. Pius V called for the world to pray during the Battle of Lepanto. Pope St. Pius V also made other valuable contributions to Catholic life. Discover the saintly legacy of this pope during Fr. Edward Looney's conversation with Professor Roberto de Mattei. Buy the book- https://www.sophiainstitute.com/products/item/saint-pius-v Get your holy socks from Sock Religious and support the podcast! https://www.sockreligious.com/?rfsn=5170834.c28065

CCAirwaves
CCA Welcomes The Legion of Mary- Northern Ohio members as we pray The Rosary in preparation for CCA's Walk To Remember on October 3rd

CCAirwaves

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 11:40


Join us at CCA as we welcome members of The Legion of Mary- Northern Ohio, an organization committed to the spiritual formation of its members, who in turn reach out to the world through spiritual works of mercy.The Legion of Mary is the largest apostolic organization of lay people in the Catholic Church, with well over 3 million active members in about 170 countries of the world. The Legion of Mary is an organization committed to the spiritual formation of its members, who in turn reach out to the world through spiritual works of mercy. The Legion of Mary recently celebrated its centennial anniversary. The first meeting of the Legion of Mary took place in Myra House, Frances Street, Dublin, Ireland, on September 7th, 1921. The Legion of Mary has been active in the United States since 1931, has been approved by the last 8 Popes, and was endorsed by the Second Vatican Council. The main purpose of the Legion of Mary is to give glory to God through the sanctification of its members.Active members meet once a week for prayer, planning and discussion. Then they do two hours of assigned work each week under the guidance of their spiritual director. Members recite the Catena Legionis prayer daily.The Legion of Mary is open to all Catholics who faithfully practice their religion, who are animated by the desire to participate in the Church's evangelistic mission through membership in the Legion, and who are prepared to fulfill each and every duty which active membership in the Legion involves.For more information, visit www.legionofmarynorthernohio.org.

Relevant History
Episode 33 - The Original Martin Luther

Relevant History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 92:56


When Bohemian priest Jan Hus begins preaching some novel theological concepts, he thinks he's engaging in mere academic expression. Instead, he gets sucked into an ecclesiastical war between three Popes and an emperor. Against these forces, he fails. But the legacy of Jan Hus would spread beyond Bohemia. Over the next century, he would become a symbol of church reform, and his teachings would form the backbone that would change Christianity forever. Also, I apologize for my inconsistency in the pronunciation of “Sigismund” and “Hussite.” I am an American. SUBSCRIBE TO RELEVANT HISTORY, AND NEVER MISS AN EPISODE! Relevant History Patreon: https://bit.ly/3vLeSpF Subscribe on Apple Music (iTunes): https://apple.co/2SQnw4q Subscribe on Google Music: https://bit.ly/30hUTRD Subscribe on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/38bzOvo RSS feed: https://bit.ly/2R0Iosz Relevant History on Twitter: https://bit.ly/3eRhdtk Relevant History on Facebook: https://bit.ly/2Qk05mm Relevant History SubscribeStar: https://www.subscribestar.com/relevant-history Official website: https://bit.ly/3btvha4 Music credit: Sergey Cheremisinov - Black Swan

Great Lives
Dorothy Byrne on Catherine of Siena

Great Lives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 27:33


The president of Murray Edwards College, Cambridge and former Channel 4 editor champions the life of a 14th-century mystic. Like Dorothy Byrne, famous for her scathing attacks on broadcasting executives in the 2019 MacTaggart Lecture, Catherine of Siena stood up to powerful men. She lobbied Popes, attacked corruption in the Catholic church, and played an active role in the troubled Italian politics of the late 14th century. Alongside Francis of Assisi, she is one of two patron saints of Italy. Carolyn Muessig, Chair of Christian Thought at the University of Calgary, provides the expert analysis. Presented by Matthew Parris and produced for BBC Audio in Bristol by Chris Ledgard

Debates on SermonAudio
Boston College Debate Smack Down: James White & Rob Zins Prove Popes are a Fraud

Debates on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 67:00


A new MP3 sermon from Christian Answers of Austin is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Boston College Debate Smack Down: James White & Rob Zins Prove Popes are a Fraud Speaker: Larry Wessels Broadcaster: Christian Answers of Austin Event: Debate Date: 9/8/2021 Bible: John 14:6; Romans 3:23 Length: 67 min.

Minority Podcast
โดนตัวไหนมา Ep70 : What If ? / The Two Popes / Logan Lucky

Minority Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 75:01


ทดลองไลฟ์ทาง Facebook Page Minority ครั้งแรก แล้วลง Podcast เลย (ไม่จึ้ง! ไม่ปัง! กราบขออภัย) ต่อไปใครอยากฟังสดๆ เม้นต์คุยกันได้ แกงกันได้ เชิญที่เพจของเราได้เลยนะจ๊ะ Ep.นี้ มีเม้าท์แบทเทิลของ 2 พระ (ที่ไม่ใช่พระมหาในไทย) ส่งการบ้าน Logan Lucky ปิดท้ายที่มีคนดู Marvel's What If ? มาซักที #โดนตัวไหนมา #MinorityPodcast #รีวิว #LoganLucky #WhatIf #TheTwoPopes

Mother of All Peoples
MARY LIVE 2.0 - Mariology Without Apology - 5. Mary Co-redemptrix is Here to Stay, Part 2: Popes

Mother of All Peoples

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 35:20


“Mary Live with Dr. Mark Miravalle” offers a weekly commentary of contemporary news event in the Church and in the world, but from a uniquely Marian perspective.

3rd Person
Record 01, Entry 40: The Two Popes

3rd Person

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 188:09


Hey, y'all - Joel here. Just wanted to give a shout-out this week to our producer, Lukas. Thanks for everything you do, buddy. These episodes always sound so good. BEST CONSUMED THROUGH HEADPHONESFollow @3rdPersonPodwww.Patreon.com/3rdPersonPodwww.3rdPersonPod.com

Hackberry House of Chosun
Scarlet Threads, 19

Hackberry House of Chosun

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 16:00


The first -real- Popes, per historians. And the way Popes and Emperors ride in harmony with one another. We've seen this phenomenon in Revelation 17.

Wine for Normal People
Ep 388: The Greats - Vino Nobile di Montepulciano

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 44:06


Photo: Consorzio del Vino Nobile di Montepulciano The Nobile Wine of Montepulciano is a wine based on a clone of Sangiovese and from a small hillside town in Tuscany called Montepulciano. It is, indeed, one of the great wines of the world. Although often overshadowed by its neighbors – Brunello di Montalcino and Chianti Classico – and confused with a grapey, high yielding producer in Abruzzo (the Montepulciano grape), this wine has class, style, and a legacy of greatness to back it up.   After ups and downs over nearly 2000 years of winemaking, Vino Nobile is experiencing a quiet revival and it's one of my favorite wines in Italy. Moderate in body with an interplay of fruit, herb, and brooding tea and forest-y aromas and flavors, this is a wine that those in the know (you!) will immediately fall in love with. With its latest comeback, Vino Nobile di Montepulciano is back and better than ever. And who doesn't love a comeback story? Photo: Getty Images Here are the show notes: We discuss where exactly this hillside town is: in Tuscany, southeast of Siena, 40 minutes east of Montalcino We talk about the specific regulations the region has built into law to try to improve the wines: Grapes must grow on the slopes to qualify for the Vino Nobile DOCG 70-100% Sangiovese or 30% other red varietals (Colorino, Canaiolo Nero, Mammolo, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, other local grapes) and up to 5% Malvasia and other whites You can find all the laws here, as well as the requirements for aging. Here is the official page from the Consorzio del Vino di Montepulciano with the latest rules on aging, yields, etc. They also have proposed Pieve, as of 2021. We address the elephant in the room: Montepulciano IS not the grape, this wine is from the PLACE called Montepulciano!!! We get you squared away on the difference between these two wines – Montepulciano is a grape that makes an US$8-$10 wine. Vino Nobile di Montepulciano is the noble wine made from Sangiovese in the Tuscan town of Montepulciano. It is based on a clone Sangiovese – Prugnolo Gentile History The wine has been noted since 55 AD. Montepulciano has been praised by merchants, authors, Popes, and politicians like Thomas Jefferson Phylloxera, mildews, World Wars, the Depression, and then an emphasis on quantity versus quality put the wines of Montepulciano in a real funk. It got lumped in with Chianti, lost its status, and that was a real setback for the region In 2017, six like-minded Montepulciano winemakers created a small association called Alliance Vinum to show the purest expression of single-vineyard Sangiovese/Prugnolo Gentile. The group calls these wines Nobile instead of Vino Nobile di Montepulciano to avoid confusion with the southern Italian grape. Here are the wines of this group: Avignonesi: Nobile Poggetto di Sopra Boscarelli: Costa Grande Cantine Dei: Madonna della Querce La Braccesca, an estate of the Antinori family: Podere Maggiarino Poliziano: Le Caggiole after a 20-year pause, Salcheto: Salco Vecchie Viti Photo: Getty Images Other wines we mention… Rosso di Montepulciano  Vin Santo    We review Pairing Suggestions with Vino Nobile di Montepulciano: Antipasti --Grilled Vegetables, fresh cheeses, cured meats like prosciutto, salami Pasta with tomato, truffle, Bolognese, mushrooms sauces Risottos with mushrooms Pizza, lasagna, eggplant Braised and roasted game, red meats. Stews. Portabella mushrooms Ribollita Hard cheeses Photo: Getty Images ______________________________________________ Thanks for our sponsors this week: Wine Access: Access to the best wines for the best prices! For 15% off your next order, go to www.wineaccess.com/normal   To become a member of Patreon go to www.patreon.com/winefornormalpeople   To register for an AWESOME, LIVE WFNP class with Elizabeth go to: www.winefornormalpeople.com/classes

Chapel Perilous
Puttin' On The Ritz with Indiana Danahue

Chapel Perilous

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 86:24


Indiana Danahue joins the Popes once again to talk about the venerable Chris Chan and several other things and groups of people. Anyway I've been awake for 23 hours and I can't keep slmsok tho clampet monder.   click here for the video Follow us and do as we command: @alanbromwell @coreyjcooley @osheebaugus theperilouspodcast.com alanbromwell.com Putting on the Ritz-Fred Astaire Ouroboros-Dax Riggs

Super Saints Podcast
Pope Saint Pius X

Super Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 71:06


Pope Saint Pius X “Born poor and humble of heart,“Undaunted champion of the Catholic Faith,“Zealous to restore all things in Christ,“Crowned a holy life with a holy death”[1]Who was Pope Saint Pius X?This is the story of a Pope who refused to stay buried in the annals of history.  The boy who became Pope always worked with the image of Mother Church and her founder Jesus Christ before him, leading the way, as if on a path, beckoning him to follow.  He never ceased being the boy who worked and struggled endlessly to keep alive the true teachings of the Church!How long we have waited to know more about Pope Pius X!  It is awesome and a little more than exciting to discover how many Popes have succeeded St. Peter, to whom Our Lord gave the keys of His Church, making him our first Pope.  I cannot help feeling my heart swell as our research brings us to the road our Pope Pius X trod, along with those who preceded him and those who faithfully followed after him.  When we attempt to explain that our Church has had an uninterrupted history dating back to when Jesus walked the earth, commissioning the Apostles to carry on and spread the Good News that He is with us till the end of the world, we need only turn to the unbroken, unending succession of our Popes. Allow us to bring you the story and life of Pope Pius X, the 257th Pope to fill St. Peter's Chair as Pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church, serving at a crucial and disturbing time from 1903-1914.  Pope Pius X was the first Pope, since the Counter-Reformation Pope Pius V (1566-72) to be canonized.  As his story commences, we pray you will see why Mother Church chose to so honor him.  We must say, we are greatly humbled to have the great privilege to write the story of so special a Pope, who did so much to bring about reforms, which are still enriching our Church till today. Journeys of Faith Bob and Penny Lord's StoreJourneys of Faith Blog Subscribe to our Free Blog Easy PeasyBob and Penny Lord TV Channel Miracles of the Eucharist, Apparitions of Mary, and lives of the Saints videos on demand.Support the show (https://bobandpennylord.store/pages/we-need-your-help)

History of the Germans
Episode 28 - Three Popes with One Stone

History of the Germans

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 34:30


In 1046 Henry III finally has time to go to Rome and claim the imperial crown. All he wants is get in, get crowned and get out before the Malaria season. He encounters a problem when he finds out that the current pope Gregory VI has bought the papacy for cold hard cash, a sin that could invalidate his coronation. Henry III gets involved, deposes all three competing popes and inadvertently starts a chain of events that ends in what Norman Cantor calls "the first of the three world revolutions". Homepage with maps, photos and blog: www.historyofthegermans.com Facebook: @HOTGPod  Twitter: @germanshistory Instagram: history_of_the_germans Reddit: u/historyofthegermans Patroon: https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true (https://www.patreon.com/Historyofthegermans?fan_landing=true) Support this podcast

Keys of the Kingdom
8/14/21: "Commanded"

Keys of the Kingdom

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 60:00


Home churches; Like early Church or Pharisees?; When God won't hear you; Christ's commanded organization; Mark 6; Protestant; Popes; Calling no man father; Ten family groups; Synagogue; Early Christians were Jews; Ex 18:25; Lk 12:15; Understanding covetousness; Gambling; Wanting gain at others' expense; Rebuttal of HHC article "Commanded"; No coveting!; Make-believe freedom; Mark 6:40; Simplicity of charity; Luke 9:14; Tithings/symposia; Groupings of Ten in history/languages; Doing what Christ said; Interconnecting groups; Importance of the meaning of words; Pure Religion unspotted by government; Exercising authority; Do you?; Mt 20:25; Mark 10:42; Lk ?; Daily Ministration is caring for needy; Public religion; "Benefactor"; Bread sacrificed to idols vs Christian charity; Home "church" social clubs; Good tax men?; Helping you with your unbelief; Romans 13; Exousia; The Higher Liberty.

Dictators
Tyrannical Popes: Leo X Pt. 1

Dictators

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 50:34


Giovanni de' Medici was a shrewd strategist who became pope before the age of 40. As a cardinal, he ended the Medicis' exile in Florence, returning the dynasty to their seat of power. As pope, he would nearly bankrupt the Vatican — and upend the Christian world.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

This Connected with Catholic.dad
EP 99: MOTU PROPRI-OHH!

This Connected with Catholic.dad

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 78:47


Episode 99: Motu Proprio - Tradutionis CustodesTwo young adults joins us on the podcast, Jo Deleon and Jesus Jacobo to talk to us about the recent Motu proprio by Pope Francis.  They share their concerns, worries about the Popes recent edict. They share why they love the TLM and share much wisdom to you our listeners.https://www.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/motu_proprio/documents/20210716-motu-proprio-traditionis-custodes.htmlSupport the show -Promoting the podcast, encouraging listeners to share and inviting them to become patrons.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/ThisConnected)Promoting the podcast, encouraging listeners to share and inviting them to become patrons.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/ThisConnected)

Barnhardt Podcast
Barnhardt Podcast #152: Twisties, Jabbies and Apostasies

Barnhardt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 100:48


In this episode we discuss mental health and pharmacology in the Olympics, whether a bishop wearing white can bar someone — anyone — from attending a Mass because they didn't get The Death Jab, reminisce about the good old days when Popes wrote clear encyclicals with solid Catholic teaching, and address an “Ask Ann” question with possibly the shortest answer yet. The storm clouds aren't on the horizon — they are almost overhead now! — but the ending has been foretold: the victory is His and we can take part in the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart if want, and act on that desire. Links, Reading, and Video: Saint Dominic: the O.G. O.P. Simone Biles says ‘I have to focus on my mental health' after pulling out of team final Kerri Strug final vault in 1996, planting the landing on one leg Shohei Otahni: pitcher, slugger, speedy baseball freak Humanum Genis (on Freemasonry): Encyclical by Pope Leo 13th Quod Apostolici Muneris (on Communism/Socialism): Encyclical by Pope Leo 13th The Original Vatican 2 Schemas Pastor Aeternus: Dogmatic Constitution on the Church of Christ Father Gruner on the Canonizations of John 23rd and John Paul 2nd Biden warns cyber attacks could lead to a “real shooting war”   Feedback: please send your questions, comments, suggestions, and happy news item to podcast@barnhardt.biz Supernerd Media produces the Barnhardt Podcast; if you got some value from this podcast — or even just Ann's website — and would like to return some value to support the technical effort, please visit SupernerdMedia.com — where the PayPal option is now back!

Uncovered Cinema Podcast
Would you sell your soul for what you want? Film Breakdown: Two Popes | Revolution of our Times discussion

Uncovered Cinema Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 70:35


When ambition and duty tangle, which one is the victor? Would you give up your dream job, your one ambition in life, because you were living a lie? Greed inside the human heart is something mankind has fought with for all of time, and two popes tackle that very topic in an interesting way. Join Brian and Will as they discuss the way the film portrays the catholic church and the pope, as well as; Tech Corner: Speaking on some differences between LED and Tungsten Lights Chinese documentary on the protests in Hong Kong And so much more Come join the family on our Reddit r/UncoveredCinema Post memes, get updates, join the conversation around the upcoming film featured in the following weeks podcast Credits Hosted by: Brian (@brdpro) and Will (@WillhooverTV) Created by: Brian Palmer, Will Hoover Directed by: Jailene Jimenez Branding by: Azeemanjum @idesigngfx Business Inquiries: uncoveredcinema@gmail.com Check out our socials and join in on the conversation: @uncoveredcinema

Morning Air
Vocation Wednesday, Keaton Douglas, iThirst, spiritual recovery for addicts/Ashley Noronha, Rome Report/Coach Will Rey, how basketball can “lift us up to the heavens”

Morning Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 50:49


Vocation Wednesday, Keaton Douglas tells us about iThirst, a program that helps with the spiritual recovery for addicts.   Ashley Noronha brings Rome to home and gives an update on the Popes recovery from surgery as well as the Holy Fathers message on grandparents and the elderly.   Basketball has always been one of America’s […] All show notes at Vocation Wednesday, Keaton Douglas, iThirst, spiritual recovery for addicts/Ashley Noronha, Rome Report/Coach Will Rey, how basketball can “lift us up to the heavens” - This podcast produced by Relevant Radio

Dictators
Tyrannical Popes: Julius II Pt. 1

Dictators

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 46:10


Later nicknamed ‘The Warrior Pope,' Giuliano della Rovere had always nurtured visions of personal glory. As a young man and newly elected cardinal, he believed he could obtain that glory on the battlefield. But he was constantly embroiled in feuds off the battlefield, too — rivalries with family members, former allies, and power-grabbing popes.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Fatherhood Arise Podcast

Welcome to the Fatherhood Arise Podcast!  This week Aires and Ray talk about the lawn maintenance, getting hurt while hiking, and the joys of fatherhood before diving into the main topic of the day: Popes! They discuss Pope Francis' recent surgery and the Catholic approach to the popes. Join them in prayer for Pope Francis' recovery!   

Pod of Wonder
S06E06 - Screaming Robot Popes

Pod of Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 55:58


 ArticlesHarry R. TrumanHead VIMillennium ParkFollow us on the social medias!http://twitter.com/podofwonder & podofwonder at gmail dot comDanny: http://twitter.com/dannyplaysrpgs & http://dannymakesrpgs.itch.ioMorgan: http://instagram.com/morganthefae & http://twitter.com/morgan_the_faeEddie: http://instagram.com/monstersbyed & http://strangebuttruegames.com

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast
PEL Presents NEM#150: Josh Caterer (Smoking Popes): Punk + 40s Melodies (+ Occasional Jesus)

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 73:29


Josh released three albums and some EPs in the 90s with his brothers as the Chicago-area punk band Smoking Popes, then became a Christian and released an album and a half as Duvall, then reformed the Smoking Popes to release three more albums since 2008. He's also released some religious material as a solo artist, and his new album is composed of live covers of classic songs and reworkings of his own material. We discuss "Need You Around," originally from Born to Quit (1995) and re-arranged for The Hideout Sessions (2021). We then turn to the Popes' "Amanda My Love" from Into the Agony (2018) and Duvall's "Taking Me Home" from Volume & Density (2003), and we conclude with another new recording, "My Funny Valentine" (Rodgers/Hart). Intro: "Megan" from Destination Failure (1997). Hear more Nakedly Examined Music. Like our Facebook page. Support us on Patreon. Sponsor: Visit HelloFresh.com/14pretty and use code 14pretty for up to 14 free meals with free shipping.

Called to Communion
Called to Communion - 06/08/2021 - When Your Kids Lose Their Faith In College

Called to Communion

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 30:00


What to do when your kids lose their #faith in college, what did #Christ command the #Apostles to do?, what is the sacrifice of the #mass?, what is Papal infallibility and why do #Popes exercise it?, and why do #Catholics have images of the Saints? #Jesus #Catholicism #Christianity