Podcasts about vatican ii

Roman Catholic ecumenical council held in Vatican City from 1962 to 1965

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The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
First Things: Vatican II and the World

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023


On this episode, Geoerge Weigel joins Mark Bauerlein to discuss his new book, “To Sanctify the World: The Vital Legacy of Vatican II.”

First Things Podcast
Vatican II and the World

First Things Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 30:17


On this episode, George Weigel joins Mark Bauerlein to discuss his new book, "To Sanctify the World: The Vital Legacy of Vatican II."

Explaining the Faith with Fr. Chris Alar
Vatican II: An Easy Way to Understand It

Explaining the Faith with Fr. Chris Alar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 95:13


Each week, Fr. Chris Alar, MIC, director of the Association of Marian Helpers, examines in-depth an essential element of faith and morals that Catholics are called to proclaim, live, and celebrate. With wisdom, wit, and infectious enthusiasm, Fr. Chris digs deep into the richness, beauty, and truth of the faith that continues to transform hearts and lead people to God. May this podcast encourage your love of our Lord and love of your neighbor, especially of your brethren in the Church.Support our Ministries here. Are you a Marian Helper? Join our spiritual benefit society and start sharing in the graces of all the daily Masses, prayers, and good works of Marian priests and brothers all over the world. Sign up is free and easy: simply visit MICPrayers.org. Thank you and God bless you.

The Prodigal Life
Ep52. Vatican II and the Controversial Results

The Prodigal Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 41:12


In this episode we talk about the Second Vatican Council and the results that created huge changes within the Church. Beginning with the origins of the councils themselves, we discuss the unfortunate outcomes of Vatican II, the importance of liturgical diversity, why the Extraordinary Form is still vital, and much more. Join us as we dive into the Vatican II controversies. Episode 52 SHOW HOSTS: Deacon Harold Burke Sivers Nick De La Torre Ellen Holmes Steeves LeBlanc SUPPORT our show: theprodigallife.com SHOW PAGE: https://www.awakencatholic.org/the-prodigal-life/vatican-2-and-the-controversial-results Catholic Gifts - https://catholic.store/collections/prodigal-life-deacon-dan-sivers-gift-guide Catholic SWAG - https://catholicmerch.store THE AWAKEN APP: http://theawakenapp.io Bring the AWAKEN MISSION to your parish! https://www.awakencatholic.church/mission

TRADCAST: The Traditional Roman Catholic Podcast

TRADCAST EXPRESS - Episode 168 Topics covered: Yet another big Francis interview. Brother Alexis Bugnolo organizes 'conclave' to elect successor to Benedict XVI. Vatican dicastery speaks of "equality" of traditions and spiritualities of various religions. Francis' message for World Youth Day in Lisbon. The Remnant wants to take Vatican II "away from the heretics." Links: Associated Press Interview with Francis (Jan. 25, 2023) Antipope Francis, Address to Participants in Liturgical Course, Vatican.va (Jan. 20, 2023) "Br. Alexis Bugnolo's Narrative collapses as Benedict XVI returns to Vatican City", Novus Ordo Wire (Apr. 20, 2019) Alexis Bugnolo, "Ordo Militaris Inc. seeks investment to defend Pope Benedict XVI", FromRomeInfo (June 19, 2020) Steven O'Reilly, "The Bugnolan 'conclave' begins January 30, 2023 at a Rome airport hotel!", Roma Locuta Est (Jan. 24, 2023) Alexis Bugnolo, "Within a Month, the Catholic Church will have a new Roman Pontiff", FromRomeInfo (Jan. 3, 2023) Press Release of the Vatican Dicastery for Interreligious Dialogue (Jan. 24, 2023) Transcript of Francis' Video Message for World Youth Day in Lisbon, Portugal (Jan. 20, 2023) Antipope Francis, Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium (Nov. 24,, 2013) Robert Morrison, "The 'Hermeneutic' of Correction and Rejection: Taking Vatican II Away from the Heretics", The Remnant (Jan. 23, 2023) Sign up to be notified of new episode releases automatically at tradcast.org. Produced by NOVUSORDOWATCH.org Support us by making a tax-deductible contribution at NovusOrdoWatch.org/donate/

The Michael J. Matt Show
MOCKING DAVOS: Can the World Economic Forum Recover?

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 37:24


Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Why are so many powerful people mocking WEF 2023? What is going on? For the first time, the Vatican didn't even bother sending an official representative to Davos, and 6 out of 7 G7 leaders were conspicuous by their absence. In this edition of The Remnant Underground, Michael Matt talks about signs of hope, as New Zealand's Young Globalist Leader, Jacinda Ardern, steps down, Governor DeSantis doubles down, and an independent journalist in Davos chases Klaus Schwab around downtown. Plus, Michael blasts Minnesota's new abortion bill which, in terms of sheer luciferin brutality, surpasses the laws of Communist China and North Korea. Finally, as Vanity Fair mocks Our Lady of Sorrows and Pope Francis gets ready to bury the Latin Mass,  Charlie Kirk brings in an exorcist to stand against the demons of the New World Order. CRISIS in UKRAINE: What's REALLY Going Onhttps://remnant-tv.com/video/555/crisis-in-ukraine-what-s-really-going-on?channelName=RemnantTV PUTIN'S WAR: Biden, Soros, and the Ghost of John McCain https://remnant-tv.com/video/559/putin-s-war-biden-soros-and-the-ghost-of-john-mccain?channelName=RemnantTV Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989  

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast
Building Bridges Between Jews and Catholics With Philip Cunningham and Adam Gregerman

AMDG: A Jesuit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 64:40


A disturbing trend over the past couple of years has been the rise of antisemitism. The Anti-Defamation League, which tracks antisemitic incidents, says 2021 was the worst year in decades and that 2022 will look similar once the numbers are tabulated. We're in a five-year upswing overall. Let's not give any more oxygen to acts of hate. Instead, we are thrilled to be sharing this conversation host Mike Jordan Laskey recently had with Dr. Phil Cunningham and Dr. Adam Gregerman, two scholars who have devoted their careers to building bridges between Jews and Catholics. Phil and Adam lead the Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations at Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. The institute was founded in 1967 in response to the Second Vatican Council. Phil is Catholic and Adam is Jewish, and their shared leadership models the type of engagement the institute is all about. You'll see this sort of collaboration on display throughout the episode. Mike asked them for a brief historical overview of the relationship between Catholics and Jews, and why the promulgation of the Vatican II document Nostra Aetate was such an important turning point. Adam and Phil also talked about the work they're doing today, and how we can build relationships across religious divides without erasing each faith's uniqueness. Institute for Jewish-Catholic Relations: https://www.sju.edu/college-arts-and-sciences/ijcr Council of Centers on Jewish-Christian Relations: https://ccjr.us/ AMDG is a production of the Jesuit Conference of Canada and the United States. www.jesuits.org/ www.beajesuit.org/ twitter.com/jesuitnews facebook.com/Jesuits instagram.com/wearethejesuits youtube.com/societyofjesus

Member Supported Restoration Radio
The Catholic Home, Episode 14: Cataclysm Survivalism – Stocking the Bookshelves!

Member Supported Restoration Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 69:59


St. Jerome says that when we pray we speak to God; but when we read, God speaks to us. St. Ambrose of Milan says the same: "We address him when we pray; we hear him when we read." St. Bernard of Clairvaux tells us that "spiritual reading and prayer are the arms by which hell is conquered and paradise won." What exactly should we be reading during this spiritual and moral worldwide-cataclysm? First and foremost are the best spiritual books we can find and religious writings that help us see through the darkness amidst this post-Vatican II decimation. Sacred Scripture is a given. Dom Gueranger's, “The Liturgical Year” set also speaks volumes (all fifteen of them). Most of you would also be familiar with gems such as, “Imitation of Christ,” and “The Sinner's Guide.” Therefore, this episode won't be covering any of these, nor other commonly-known spiritual books, but will bring to the table some less well known, yet likewise indispensable writings. Hostess Theresa - who attends Mary Help of Christians (Melbourne) mission, that provides the Traditional (Tridentine) Latin Mass to faithful Catholics throughout Australia - welcomes back Jacinta, and they are joined by Mike and Matthew, to rave about some special books that comprise a little piece of their Catholic homes. Episode Notes: The Importance of Spiritual Reading - St. Alphonsus Liguori: http://www.catholicapologetics.info/morality/general/read.htm Original Air Date: April 12, 2016 Show Run Time: 1 hour 9 minutes Show Guest(s): Jacinta, Mike, Matthew Show Host(s): Theresa Season 5 Sponsor: Novus Ordo Watch novusordowatch.org/ Episode: https://www.truerestoration.org/season-5-the-catholic-home-episode-14-cataclysm-survivalism-stocking-the-bookshelves/ The Catholic Home: www.truerestoration.org/category/radi…atholic-home/ Subscribe: www.truerestoration.org/member-signup/ The Catholic Home℗ is a production of the Restoration Radio Network. Copyright 2016. All Rights are Reserved.

Catholic Answers Live
#10990 Challenges to Vatican II - Michael Lofton

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023


Questions Covered: 09:16 – Are Catholics finding it difficult to argue for certain moral issues since the issuance of Vatican II documents that emphasize the primacy of conscience? 17:47 – I think if we followed what the Council said things would be a lot better, and fewer people would receive Communion unworthily. 19:59 – Do you think we can get back to what the documents of the council truly say? 24:15 – If we believe in the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, why did Vatican II change the way of receiving communion to the hand? 32:16 – Why would anyone become Catholic if we teach ecumenism? 35:06 – Why were Protestants involved in Vatican II? 39:10 – How can Lumen Gentium 16 be true since the Muslims deny the Trinity? 45:57 – The faithful never received what the bishops voted on at the Council. So it's hard to discern the fruits of the council. 49:04 – Why do all the Vatican II popes have all these ecumenical events with other world religions, like the Assisi events, that are explicit violations of the first commandment? …

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture
WOF 369: Was Vatican II a Failure?

The Word on Fire Show - Catholic Faith and Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 31:01


Friends, we just marked the 60th anniversary of the opening of Vatican II, the Second Vatican Council. Six decades later, can we say the Council was a success? A failure? Something in between? On today's episode of “The Word on Fire Show,” Brandon Vogt discuss a provocative pair of op-eds published in the New York Times by Ross Douthat, who argues that the Council was both necessary and a failure, and yet cannot be undone. A listener asks, if God is without form, then at the Transfiguration, what was Jesus transformed into? Links “How Catholics Became Prisoners of Vatican II” – Ross Douthat “How Vatican II Failed Catholics—and Catholicism” – Ross Douthat The Word on Fire Vatican II Collection The Paschal Mystery: Reflections for Lent and Easter (Word on Fire Lent booklet) NOTE: Do you like this podcast? Become a patron and get some great perks for helping, like free books, bonus content, and more. Word on Fire is a non-profit ministry that depends on the support of our listeners…like you! So be part of this mission, and join us today!

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, January 14, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the First Week in Ordinary Time Lectionary: 310The Saint of the day is Saint Gregory NazianzenSaint Gregory Nazianzen's Story After his baptism at 30, Gregory gladly accepted his friend Basil's invitation to join him in a newly founded monastery. The solitude was broken when Gregory's father, a bishop, needed help in his diocese and estate. It seems that Gregory was ordained a priest practically by force, and only reluctantly accepted the responsibility. He skillfully avoided a schism that threatened when his own father made compromises with Arianism. At 41, Gregory was chosen suffragan bishop of Caesarea and at once came into conflict with Valens, the emperor, who supported the Arians. An unfortunate by-product of the battle was the cooling of the friendship of two saints. Basil, his archbishop, sent him to a miserable and unhealthy town on the border of unjustly created divisions in his diocese. Basil reproached Gregory for not going to his See. When protection for Arianism ended with the death of Valens, Gregory was called to rebuild the faith in the great see of Constantinople, which had been under Arian teachers for three decades. Retiring and sensitive, he dreaded being drawn into the whirlpool of corruption and violence. He first stayed at a friend's home, which became the only orthodox church in the city. In such surroundings, he began giving the great sermons on the Trinity for which he is famous. In time, Gregory did rebuild the faith in the city, but at the cost of great suffering, slander, insults, and even personal violence. An interloper even tried to take over his bishopric. His last days were spent in solitude and austerity. He wrote religious poetry, some of it autobiographical, of great depth and beauty. He was acclaimed simply as “the Theologian.” St. Gregory Nazianzen shares the celebration of his liturgical feast with St. Basil the Great on January 2. Reflection It may be small comfort, but post-Vatican II turmoil in the Church is a mild storm compared to the devastation caused by the Arian heresy, a trauma the Church has never forgotten. Christ did not promise the kind of peace we would love to have—no problems, no opposition, no pain. In one way or another, holiness is always the way of the cross. Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

The John-Henry Westen Show
'Panzer Pope'? Vatican Insider Cardinal Arinze Actually Reveals Truth of Benedict XVI

The John-Henry Westen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 29:22


Cardinal Francis Arinze speaks with John-Henry Westen in an exclusive tell-all interview about the true nature and attitude of Pope Benedict XVI that the mainstream media gets wrong. Discover first-hand from Cardinal Arinze the truth about Pope Benedict XVI, particularly his reputation as master theologian in the tumultuous aftermath of Vatican II. Was he a truth-seeking father or stern judge, a 'panzer pope' or gentle shepherd? What will be the lasting legacy of the true Pope Benedict XVI... and how will Church leadership manipulate his memory? Don't let the mainstream media hijack Pope Benedict XVI's legacy. Cardinal Arinze speaks.FIGHT FOR THE CULTURE OF LIFE ASAP! https://give.lifesitenews.comFAITH-BASED FINANCIAL INVESTING IS HERE! CHECK IT OUT! https://www.stjosephpartners.com/lifesite-silver-roundSHOP ALL YOUR FUN AND FAVORITE LIFESITE MERCH!https://shop.lifesitenews.com/Follow us on social media: LifeSite: https://linktr.ee/lifesitenewsJohn-Henry Westen: https://linktr.ee/jhwesten Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Crisis Point
Conservative Catholics and Traditional Catholics: Similarities and Differences (Guest: Roland Millare)

The Crisis Point

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 63:27


The two main sources of criticism for what has happened in the Church since Vatican II are the conservative ("Reform of the Reform") and traditionalist camps. How are they similar and how are they different?

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: January 13, 2023 - Hour 3

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 51:10


Encore from 01/09/23  Patrick answers questions about the chalk epiphany prayer, bibles being made in China, Vatican II, baptism, and the Liturgy of the Hours New York reaped $48 million from unused gift cards in 2022 Sam - Even though parents disciplined well, it always seems like one of their kids goes away from the Church. Monica – How do I do the chalk epiphany prayer in my house? Jerry - Is it okay that I bought a bible that was made in China? Kevin – I saw a young couple receive communion, but I know they are not married. What should I tell them? What is “Vatican II?” Was there a “Vatican I?” Patrick responds to an email regarding a marriage act question in which the married couple can no longer be intimate but they still want to express their love for each other Ryan - If my wife doesn't go to heaven, will that affect my salvation? Robert - Why does the Church think that baptism is necessary for salvation? Patrick - How does the Liturgy of the Hours work?

Our Lady Of Lourdes Podcast
Our Response to Christ's Arrival | Epiphany of the Lord | 01.08.2023 | Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk

Our Lady Of Lourdes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 12:22


Feast of the Epiphany | January 8, 2023 | Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk Tomorrow is the end of the Christmas Season—the Baptism of the Lord, when Jesus Christ begins his ministry.—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk “You can leave your decorations up until February 2nd! This was the tradition before Vatican II, and I do it. You can do it as well.”—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk Gold: Means God is King Frankincense: God is the God Man sent to us here on earth to be worshiped “In Christian symbolism, frankincense can represent Christ's sacrifice.” Myrrh: An oil used in the preparation of death—used in embalming Two different responses of Christ's arrival: King Herod: Terrified. Not sane. He was a puppet who was also afraid to lose his crown. He killed his wife and several children, and many years later, on his death bed, he ordered thousands of his best servants and ministers to be led into a stadium and slaughtered. He did so to ensure mourning upon his death. The Magi: Came to pay homage. They came with great rejoicing. Instead of protecting and coveting their treasures, they gave it all to God. Whenever Christ enters our lives—which He does every day—we must choose in whose steps we must follow. Are we afraid to do God's will or do we rejoice? Pope Benedict XVI's inaugural homily: “Are we all not perhaps afraid in some way? If we let Christ enter fully into our lives, if we open ourselves totally to him, are we not afraid that he might take something away from us? Are we not perhaps afraid to give up something significant, something unique, something that makes life so beautiful? No. If we let Christ into our lives, we lose nothing. Nothing. Absolutely nothing of what makes life free, beautiful, and great. Only in this friendship are the doors of life opened wide; only in this friendship is the great potential of human existence; and only in this friendship do we experience beauty. And so, today, with great strength and great conviction, on the basis of long, personal experience of life, I say to you, do not be afraid of Christ.” https://www.vatican.va/content/benedict-xvi/en/homilies/2005/documents/hf_ben-xvi_hom_20050424_inizio-pontificato.html#:~:text=Are%20we%20not%20perhaps%20all,that%20makes%20life%20so%20beautiful%3F Why did Herod try to destroy Jesus, but the Magi tried to worship him? One major difference: Humility —Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk “To become more like the Magi, we must know ourselves. We must know the level of our selfishness, because then we will be able to kneel before the Lord, and give him our gifts and sacrifices.”—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk “When potential opposition shows up, do we do what Herod did? Do we try to stop any obstacle? When things don't go my way, do I explode like Herod?”—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk “When the Magi arrived in Jerusalem, the star suddenly disappeared, so their plans were foiled. What did they do? They looked for another solution. They persevered in doing good, and this is how God wants us to act. We need to learn to trust God in all circumstances—whatever happens in our lives. He's in charge. He is God. He is wise and all understanding.”—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk “Today, after Holy Communion, let's ask God for the strength to fight against the Herod in our hearts—to have the courage and perseverance of the Magi. The Mass should change something in you.”—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk ‘If you come close to God, and if you really pay him homage, you really have to change.”—paraphrased from many saints “It's about changing your life for better.” —Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk “Let's ask ourselves today, ‘Do I really do anything? Do I really change my life? And if I don't, let's ask God to help. I don't want to be Herod—I don't want to kill you in my life, I really want to listen to you, because you are the King.”—Fr. Witold Kaczmarzyk

The Michael J. Matt Show
SPIRITUAL HOLOCAUST: Wisconsin Bishop 'just following orders'

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 34:42


In this episode of the Remnant Underground, Michael Matt comments on the good news that NFL football star, Damar Hamlin, has resumed consciousness. So now is it okay to ask a few questions? The Bishop of La Crosse, Wisconsin shuts down the most thriving community in his diocese. Why? Because the pope told him to, and he's just “following orders.” But haven't we heard that excuse before? Meanwhile, the personal secretary of Pope Benedict XVI confirms that Pope Francis's Davos-pleasing crackdown on faithful Catholics “broke Pope Benedict's heart.” Given that many bishops had no problem ignoring Pope Benedict's motu proprio Summorum Pontificum – which freed the Latin Mass – why couldn't a good bishop today just ignore Francis's motu proprio Traditionis Custodes – which seeks to cancel it?  Finally, yet another scandal rocks the Vatican, and the pope gets caught honoring a disgraced Jesuit priest credibly accused of having sexually abused several religious sisters.  Once again, Michael calls on good bishops to open their eyes to what's really going on here: If you want to build a New World Order you've got to crush the old one first. With the help of Francis the Globalist, that's exactly what's happening. The question is: Will the bishops do anything to stop it?   Whether you're Catholic or not, what's happening inside the Vatican right now will impact your world for years to come.  Will no one try to stop Pope Francis's Great Reset of Christianity? Order Michael Matt's Great-grandfather's New Book Here: https://shop.remnantnewspaper.com/index.php/remnant-shop/remnant-shop/league-of-the-sacred-heart/letters-to-a-protestant-friend-detail Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: January 09, 2023 - Hour 2

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 51:10


Patrick answers questions about the chalk epiphany prayer, bibles being made in China, Vatican II, baptism, and the Liturgy of the Hours New York reaped $48 million from unused gift cards in 2022 Sam - Even though parents disciplined well, it always seems like one of their kids goes away from the Church. Monica – How do I do the chalk epiphany prayer in my house? Jerry - Is it okay that I bought a bible that was made in China? Kevin – I saw a young couple receive communion, but I know they are not married. What should I tell them? What is “Vatican II?” Was there a “Vatican I?” Patrick responds to an email regarding a marriage act question in which the married couple can no longer be intimate but they still want to express their love for each other Ryan - If my wife doesn't go to heaven, will that affect my salvation? Robert - Why does the Church think that baptism is necessary for salvation? Patrick - How does the Liturgy of the Hours work?

The Tom Woods Show
Ep. 2261 The Significance of Pope Benedict XVI (1927-2022)

The Tom Woods Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 34:42


Catholic and non-Catholic listeners alike requested an episode on Pope Benedict XVI, so I invited Catholic publisher Roger McCaffrey to discuss what his pontificate meant in the context of the post-Vatican II church.

The Patrick Madrid Show
The Patrick Madrid Show: January 05, 2023 - Hour 3

The Patrick Madrid Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 51:06


Patrick answers questions about praying the Rosary, Vatican II, do dogs go to Heaven, and what happens when Catholic parents don't baptize their kids? Steve - While praying the Rosary, instead of saying the mystery, can we say a prayer of our own or another little prayer in between the decades? Edward - Does the Council of Florence, specifically Cantate Domino, contradict the Vatican II decree of Echumenism? Is Vatican II in error? Mary - Will I see my dog again in Heaven? John - What happens if someone doesn't know that there is no salvation outside the church. Would I be in jeopardy if I didn't tell them? Phil - Question about papal authority, to what extent do we pay obedience to the Pope on issues that are not regarding morals. For example: liturgy, traditions, etc. John - What happens to Catholic parents who don't baptize their kids?

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!
B16 on the Traditional Mass - NFL Heart Attacks - House of Rep in Turmoil

Catholic Drive Time: Keeping you Informed & Inspired!

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 119:59


Catholic Drive Time - 877-757-9424 Date – Wednesday, January 4, 2023 – Memorial of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton INTRO – Did Traditionis Custodes break Pope Benedict XVI's heart? Was he disappointed? Archbishop Gänswein shares his insight! And – What nearly killed Damar Hamlin? A heart attack... yes but, Was it the vax? Was it the tackle? Mark Houck weighs in. Also – Rep. McCarthy has lost 3x … will he win? first multi-ballot speaker election in 100 years... Brent Haynes gives us some perspective. Quick News - - The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized a rule change on Tuesday that expands the availability of abortion pills at both physical and online pharmacies. - the Department of Justice (DOJ) said in a legal opinion on Tuesday The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) can continue to deliver abortion pills across the United States even after the Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade in June 2022 - 38-year-old Uche Nwaneri, who played for the Jacksonville Jaguars in the National Football League (NFL) dies suddenly at 38. - A youth mental health charity called stem4 released A study about the impacts of social media found that three out of four children as young as 12 “dislike their bodies and are embarrassed by the way they look,” Join Email list! GRNonline.com/CDT GRN to 42828 What's Concerning Us? – B16's broken Heart! Guido Horst, Chief Editor of the German Catholic weekly Die Tagespost Guido Horst: Pope Benedict's lifting of restrictions on the celebration of the extraordinary form of the Roman Rite according to the 1962 missal did not last as long as he intended: as Pope Emeritus, he witnessed the promulgation of Pope Francis' Motu Proprio Traditionis Custodes. Was he disappointed? Archbishop Gänswein:it hit him very hard. I think it broke Pope Benedict's heart to read the new Motu Proprio, because his intention was to help those who had simply found a home in the old Mass find inner peace, liturgical peace, away from Lefebvre. And if we think for how many centuries the ancient Mass has been a source of spiritual life and nourishment for many people, including many saints, it is impossible to imagine that it no longer has anything to offer. And let us not forget that many young people who were born after Vatican II and who do not fully understand all the drama of the Council - that these young people, while knowing the new Mass, have nonetheless found a spiritual home, a spiritual treasure even in the old Mass. Taking this treasure away from people... well, Guest Seg. - Mark Houck – What nearly killed the Bills player? Vax? The Tackle? - The Buffalo Bills said in a statement during the early morning hours on Tuesday that safety Damar Hamlin's frightening collapse on the field was triggered by cardiac arrest. - “The Central Catholic High School community is praying for the well-being and swift recovery of Damar Hamlin, ‘16 (Buffalo Bills). May the Lord be with him and his family during this most difficult time,” - In the statement that was also amplified by the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS), McCullough described the tragic event as “a classical cardiac arrest,” which was later confirmed to be accurate by the Buffalo Bills, and expressed solidarity in prayer with the entire nation for Hamlin's “complete recovery.” Robert W Malone MD, MS - Watching this all play out in the media and on-line, I do have some thoughts. First, I think it is irresponsible for the state-sponsored press Joe Social Media IG: @TheCatholicHack Twitter: @Catholic_Hack Facebook: Joe McClane YouTube: Joe McClane Rudy Social Media IG: @ydursolrac Youtube: Glad Trad Podcast Adrian Social Media IG: @ffonze Twitter: @AdrianFonze Facebook: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Adrian Fonseca YouTube: Catholic Conversations Visit our website to learn more about us, find a local GRN radio station, a schedule of our programming and so much more. http://grnonline.com/

Catholic Fragments Podcast
Episode 34: Pope Francis and the Universal Call to Holiness

Catholic Fragments Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 27:46


This episode considers the divine call for each one of us to become holy by God's grace. With special reference to the writings of Pope Francis and the Second Vatican Council, our vision of holiness comes into clearer view. To read Pope Francis' 2018 apostolic exhortation on the call to holiness in today's world, Gaudete et exsultate, see: https://www.vatican.va/content/francesco/en/apost_exhortations/documents/papa-francesco_esortazione-ap_20180319_gaudete-et-exsultate.html To read the Vatican II document quoted in this podcast episode, Lumen gentium, go to: https://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_const_19641121_lumen-gentium_en.html To watch an inspiring video about holiness by the Bible Project, see: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9vn5UvsHvM&t=8s To access Dr. Wallenfang's 2021 book iGod, see: https://www.amazon.com/iGod-Fragmentary-Autobiography-Donald-Wallenfang-ebook/dp/B09QGT77YL/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1672238240&sr=8-4 To access Dr. Wallenfang's 2021 book on the work of Emmanuel Levinas, see: https://www.amazon.com/Emmanuel-Levinas-Variations-God-Us-ebook/dp/B09V39ZXKB/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= For Dr. Wallenfang's 2021 book on Carmelite spirituality, see: https://www.amazon.com/Shoeless-Carmelite-Spirituality-Disquieted-World-ebook/dp/B098BD814F/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1670392231&sr=8-1 To access Dr. Wallenfang's 2022 book on outreach in today's culture, Motown Evangelization, see: https://www.amazon.com/Motown-Evangelization-Sharing-Detroit-Perspectives-ebook/dp/B0B81DVLSJ/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1672775251&sr=8-1 For more rich content in Catholic theology, philosophy and spirituality, visit https://www.myinteriorcastle.com/store Follow us on Social Media- Facebook at "Donald Wallenfang" Twitter- @septimasmoradas Instagram- myinteriorcastle313 YouTube at "Donald Wallenfang" or @myinteriorcastle313

The Michael J. Matt Show
ENOUGH ALREADY! New Year No Fear

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 38:18


In this episode of The Remnant Underground, Michael J. Matt looks at the growing dissatisfaction with the global elites and their utterly insane Agenda 2030. From Alberta to Tampa and from Ron DeSantis to Bill Maher, the cross section of society that has had quite enough is becoming more vocal every day. Even Australia is backing down, with Novak Djokovic getting set to play the Open even through he is not vaccinated. Meanwhile, influential content creators such as Joe Rogan are openly mocking Klaus Schwab and the entire Reset of Stupidity. Michael's prediction? 2023 will see an increase in worldwide resistance to the elites and their medical dictatorship. Time to go on offense! Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts:SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989Stay Connected to RTV:Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today

Interior Integration for Catholics
103 Your Anger, Your Body and You

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 90:44


Summary  In this episode, Dr. Peter reviews the limitations of current Catholic resources on anger, and then reviews secular resources, including interpersonal neurobiology and the structural theory of dissociation.  We examine the role of the body in anger responses, and discuss more wholistic ways of working constructive with parts that experience anger, rather than trying to dismiss anger, suppress it or distract from it.   Lead-in William Blake, A Poison Tree: I was angry with my friends; I told my wrath, my wrath did end. I was angry with my foe: I told it not, my wrath did grow.  We've all experienced anger and we've all experienced angry people  We know it's a problem.  And global data suggest that it's getting worse.   Gallup world poll from 2021: 140 countries  Did you experience the following feelings during a lot of the day yesterday? How about anger?  17% of US respondents agreed 26% of women worldwide up from 20% from 10 years ago  20% of men -- flat from 10 years ago.   Harm can come from anger Mark Twain “Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured.”  CCC 2302  By recalling the commandment, "You shall not kill," our Lord asked for peace of heart and denounced murderous anger and hatred as immoral. Anger is a desire for revenge. "To desire vengeance in order to do evil to someone who should be punished is illicit," but it is praiseworthy to impose restitution "to correct vices and maintain justice." If anger reaches the point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity; it is a mortal sin. The Lord says, "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."   "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."  And who hasn't been angry -- including Jesus himself?.  We have got to unpack this There is so much misunderstanding about anger in the Catholic world, so much of the way that Catholics have approached anger has been limited, misinformed, and misguided When I think about why the Catholic Church in the US, in Canada, in Europe and Australia, in the entire Western World, there are many factors.   Brandon Vogt  New Stats on Why Young People Leave the Church  based on his book Return:  How to Draw Your Child Back to the Church One critical factor is that cradle Catholics, especially young Catholics do not believe that the Church can help them with their problems.  Diocese of Springfield Exit Surveys (2014)  68% – Spiritual needs not met67% – Lost interest over time Only 7% of Millennials raised Catholic still actively practice their faith today (weekly Mass, pray a few times each week, say their faith is “extremely” or “very” important) 6.5 people leave the Catholic Church for every one that joins 66% of “nones” agree that “religion causes more problems than it solves” That's why so many fall away from the Faith.  The Church doesn't seem relevant to them because she doesn't seem like she has the answers to the real issues they face. 10% of American adults are former Catholics Nearly half of those who fall away from the Church become "nones"  And another quarter become Evangelical Christians.   79% of former Catholics leave the Church before age 23.   50% of Millennials raised Catholic no longer identify as Catholic today  And it's about topics like anger -- we are not doing a good job meeting the needs that Catholics have today, human formation needs.   Intro I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, a.k.a. Dr. Peter, clinical psychologist, trauma therapist, podcaster, blogger, cofounder and president of Souls and Hearts -- but most of all I am a beloved little son of God, a passionate Catholic who wants to help you to taste and see the height and depth and breadth and warmth and the light of the love of God, especially God the Father and  Mary our Mother, our spiritual parents, our primary parents.  To really absorb your identity as a little child of God and Mary.   I want you to enter much more deeply into an intimate, personal, loving relationship with the three Persons of the Trinity and with our Lady. That is what this Interior Integration for Catholics podcast is all about, that is what Souls and Hearts is all about – all about shoring up the natural foundation for the spiritual life of intimacy with God, all about overcoming the natural human formation deficits and obstacles to contemplative union with God our Father and our Lady, our Mother  We are on an adventure of love together. And one thing, one major, big, huge thing that gets in the way of being loved by God and Mary and loving in return is anger.  Anger.   This is Episode 103 of Interior Integration for Catholics.  Interior Integration for Catholics is part of Souls and Hearts, our online outreach, check us out at soulsandhearts.com.   Anger: one of the seven deadly sins, one the lethal vices that can kill your soul.  Anger.   So much confusion about anger.  The Burden of Anger:  June 10, 2021 Catholic-daily-reflections.com The first level of sin is simply to be “angry” interiorly. The sin of anger is an interior attitude of disgust toward another. Jesus says that the consequence of having anger toward another is that you will be “liable to judgment.” Humility.  I could be wrong.    The offerings from Five Catholic writers on anger are a case in point.   The most popular book Fr. T.G. Morrow, Overcoming Sinful Anger  303 Amazon Review, mostly positive, #16  on the list of bestsellers in Catholic Theology, put out by Sophia Press in 2015 And it's not very good.  I can't recommend it.   First off, Fr. Morrow admits that he doesn't understand why people get angry We've all encountered people who explode when they feel angry. It baffles me how often the sort of anger rears its ugly head in marriages – even in allegedly Christian marriages. (p. 9).   I am often surprised to discover Christians who pray ardently, receive the sacraments regularly, we've and attend Mass daily, and yet have an anger problem. (p. 10) Presumes a homogeneous, single personality.   Easy to explain with part.   Why do people explode in anger? There are many reasons, but I think the top three are power and control, a refusal to take responsibility, and habit. (p. 13). Very simplistic view of psychology, and no consideration of neurology, traumatology,  Confusion about the causal chain in anger.  Where anger fits in a sequence of events  Little genuine interest in anger.  Anger is something to essentially get rid of.   Not much consideration of the unconscious and unconscious anger.  Acknowledges that suppressing anger is problematic, but there still is an assumption that if I'm not feeling anger, it's not there.  Disconnect.   "Irrational anger"   Very focused on the will and will training -- naïve assumptions about sympathetic arousal. Nike Spirituality -- Just do it.   Romans 7:15:  I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.   Spiritual Bypassing  Definitions John Welwood: American clinical psychologist, psychotherapist, teacher, and author, known for integrating psychological and spiritual concepts  Using “spiritual ideas, words and practices to sidestep or avoid personal, emotional ‘unfinished business,' to shore up a shaky sense of self, or to belittle basic needs, feelings, psychological wounds and developmental tasks.”  Blogger Rose Hahn:  Spiritual Bypassing: What It Is & How To Avoid It  Bypassing occurs when spiritual ideals get elevated to the realm of absolute truth in such a way that our real, lived experience is somehow denied. Rather than doing the work of healing deep wounds, we may use these ideals to deny, devalue, or avoid meeting our more human needs – such as emotional bonding, love, and esteem. In other words, rather than risk opening ourselves to real human connection, and possibly get hurt, we adopt a more enlightened, spiritual way of relating to the world that doesn't rely on human relationship.  Not a lot from a specifically Catholic perspective, but this is from Katharina, who styles herself "The Bohemian Catholic" We are supposed to uplift each other, and treat each other with love and respect - like icons of Christ, as God's creation… BUT if you find yourself trying to tell someone that their faith should keep them "happy" all the time, then you aren't helping them.  Using spiritual words, spiritual means, spiritual concepts -- all to whitewash or put a Band-Aid on significant psychological or emotional problems in the natural realm  Bypassing the natural realm and going to the spiritual realm.   Essentially saying -- You should not feel this way.  Which is what Fr. Morrow is saying.  He promises to "I will offer some ideas, which I consider quite novel, on how to avoid angry explosions." (p.4) Tips So, as a first step in overcoming passive-aggressive anger keep reminding yourself that you want to be a Christian, and therefore you can't take revenge anymore. (p. 9).  First, take the time to calm down and figure out why you're angry…. One of the tactics often recommended is to count to ten before deciding what to do. (p. 20).  Better still, say a short prayer before acting. The next step is to ask yourself if your angry feeling is been caused by something significant. Most angry fights in marriage are caused by trifling things. (p. 20).  Or perhaps use humor to make your point.(p. 20).  Offering your angry feeling as a sacrifice is not suppressing it but doing something with it. It is making a bad situation into a beneficial one. That is what it means to embrace the cross. (p. 23-24).  If we can forgive others, we can pull the rug out from beneath our anger most of the time. Unforgiveness is the main culprit behind anger. (p. 25).  … Refocus your thoughts away from the things that made you angry to some very positive thoughts. For example, thank God for the beautiful weather for the ability to read or buy things you need. (p. 30).  I often encourage people with an anger problem to daily for humility. It works. (p. 36).  Chapter 7: Thanking God, praising God  Consider your future. One key way to change her behaviors to work on in your mind just what your life will be like if you don't change your angry behavior. (pp. 72-73)  If you struggle with an anger problem write on an index card all the negatives of continuing your anger and read that list several times a day. (p. 74).   Fr. Joseph Esper, Saintly Solutions to Life's Common Problems  99 reviews on amazon.  #138 in Roman Catholicism.  2001 Book -- First Chapter is on anger.   St. Thomas of Villanova: "Dismiss all anger and look into yourself a little." (p. 7) "St. Francis de Sales advises that, to avoid the sin of anger, you must quickly ask God to give peace to your heart when you're angered and then turn your thoughts to something else. Don't discuss the matter at hand or make decisions or correct other person while you're angry. When a person angers you, St. Francis advises, consider the person's good qualities rather than the words or actions you find objectionable." (p. 7) When we have to speak to someone with whom we are angry, we should first pray for the Lord's guidance and help. It's often more effective to speak in terms of asking favors, rather than making demands or giving orders…" (p. 5-6) ...rehearse possible responses and evaluate which ones which might help you. (p. 7) Tommy Tighe St. Dymphna's Playbook: A Catholic Guide to Finding Mental and Emotional Well-Being 2021 book,  #57 in Christian Pastoral Counseling, 66 reviews, mostly positive.   Doesn't discuss anger.  Discusses irritability as a symptom of depression and resentment as a problem in relationships "However, the more I have experienced depression in my own life and in my work as a clinician, the more I have seen the symptoms of irritability and anger is predominant features of depression." (p. 13).  That's one way, not the only way.   So often depression results from  Recommendations "…go for a walk, take some time to meditate, watch or read something that lightens our mood. (p. 13)  "Keeping a diary of our emotions and reactions to those emotions is a great place to start… Look back on a situation, slow it down, and examine what exactly happened….We might ask ourselves: What is it that has led to my irritability? Is it because I'm depressed and trying to stuff that feeling down rather than address it? What am I thinking in that situation? (p. 15).  "We draw this all out on paper, examine what was really behind our emotional response, and then explore ways of thinking that will restructure our reactions and response. And we write these down! Simply thinking about these things isn't going to help. The whole point is to get them out of our head and onto paper so that we can work them out. Consider it an emotional "show your work" kind of exercise." (p. 15).  Then, after a really brief introspective process, we can catch that the real reason for our irritability is our depressed mood, and we can interject coping skills for depression to stave off our irritability. (p. 16).  Changing the focus of our thinking is key when we try to battle against depression and irritability that inevitably rears its ugly head. You've probably heard people suggest keeping a gratitude list to help you feel more positive, much along the same lines as St. Paul's advice. It works. (p. 18).   Steps in the process Visualize yourself from the perspective of compassionate observer.  Notice from the outside whole feelings xare upsetting you and how they are reflected in your appearance.  Try to let the warm feeling of compassion and desire to help arise within you.  Say to yourself: "It is understandable that you feel that way. You are experiencing a natural response to depressing thoughts. But I'm going to help you."  Visualize putting your hand on your shoulder or hugging yourself to soothe and comfort yourself. Give yourself a friendly smile.  Think about if there are other things you want to tell yourself that would energize and encourage you to cheer up.  Taking time to say those things. When you feel it is appropriate, begin saying goodbye to yourself and remind yourself that you come back anytime you want. (p. 16-17). For resentment: Active listening  Tommy Tighe: to fend off resentment, we have to communicate with things are important to us and why. We can't expect our partner to read her mind. We have to tell them the things we value, what things we have grown to expect in relationships because of our past experiences and we have to tell them why. (p 113)   Rhonda Chevrin Taming the Lion Within: 5 Steps from Anger to Peace 2017  16 ratings  is a Catholic author, international speaker and Professor of Philosophy. She is the author of over 60 books concerning the matters of Catholic thought, practice and spirituality,  Take a secure thought -- use your imagination to think of ways out of annoying or enraging situations   Avoid exceptionality.  Accept the averageMove your musclesHumor is your best friendF.I.S.T.  Feelings, Impulses, Sensations, Thoughts:  What it signifies is that we can control our immediate impulses and sensations when hurt or frustrated, but if we control our thoughts we can control her impulses.Put your mental health firstPeace over power:  Many times you can't win, and it doesn't matter if you lose.  It's not worth the effort to put up a fight.  They are not doing it to you; they're just doing it! – Much is not done on purposeNot a 911  Not everything is an emergency,.Be Group minded Anger at GodForgiveness  Fr. Spitzer Angry with God? Here's Fr. Spitzer's Advice on How to Overcome Anger God understands your anger.  Don't dwell on it.  Don't go there.   Choose instead to: Three step process in the YouTube clip Angry with God:   Stop comparing to the way you once were.   Stop comparing yourself to others.   Stop having expectations for your suffering.   Offer it up.  Stop the questioning.   Saints' behaviors  Meg Hunter-Kilmer - published on 09/28/17Aleteia September 28, 2017, What We Probably Don't Know about St. Jerome Is Just What We Need to Know St. Jerome was known to carry around a stone that he would hit himself with every time he lost his temper.     If these are helpful to you, great.  I don't want to put up roadblocks.  Might be helpful to many people.   As a Catholic psychologist, I am not comfortable recommending any of these Catholic sources Very simplistic view of psychology, and no consideration of neurology, traumatology,  Confusion about the causal chain in anger.  Where anger fits in a sequence of events  Little genuine interest in anger.  Anger is something to essentially get rid of.   Very focused on the will and will training -- naïve assumptions about sympathetic arousal.  And they don't get that anger has a protective function -- to protect us against shame.  Not one of those sources connects anger to shame.  And that's the primary connection we need to understand if we want to resolve anger, not just try to shoo it away.   What are we talking about when we discuss anger -- let's get into definitions of Anger Focused on vengeance secondary to a desire -- more than an emotion.   Written discussions of anger in the western canon go back as far as fourth-century BC in Greece when the philosopher Aristotle (384-322 B.C.) argued that anger is a rational and natural reaction to being offended and thus is closely associated with reason. In the Rhetoric (1991, p. 1380) he defined anger as “a belief that we, or our friends, have been unfairly slighted, which causes in us both painful feelings and a desire or impulse for revenge.” 1907 Catholic Encyclopedia:  Anger:  The desire of vengeance. Its ethical rating depends upon the quality of the vengeance and the quantity of the passion. When these are in conformity with the prescriptions of balanced reason, anger is not a sin. It is rather a praiseworthy thing and justifiable with a proper zeal. It becomes sinful when it is sought to wreak vengeance upon one who has not deserved it, or to a greater extent than it has been deserved, or in conflict with the dispositions of law, or from an improper motive. The sin is then in a general sense mortal as being opposed to justice and charity. It may, however, be venial because the punishment aimed at is but a trifling one or because of lack of full deliberation.  Likewise, anger is sinful when there is an undue vehemence in the passion itself, whether inwardly or outwardly. Ordinarily it is then accounted a venial sin unless the excess be so great as to go counter seriously to the love of God or of one's neighbor.   CCC 2302  By recalling the commandment, "You shall not kill," our Lord asked for peace of heart and denounced murderous anger and hatred as immoral. Anger is a desire for revenge. "To desire vengeance in order to do evil to someone who should be punished is illicit," but it is praiseworthy to impose restitution "to correct vices and maintain justice." If anger reaches the point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity; it is a mortal sin. The Lord says, "Everyone who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment."  Contradiction that aggression (or vengeance) and anger have to go together  Lot of research to tease about anger and aggression: Ephesians 4:26:  Be angry but do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger   APA Dictionary of Psychology: an emotion characterized by tension and hostility arising from frustration, real or imagined injury by another, or perceived injustice. It can manifest itself in behaviors designed to remove the object of the anger (e.g., determined action) or behaviors designed merely to express the emotion (e.g., swearing). Anger is distinct from, but a significant activator of, aggression, which is behavior intended to harm someone or something. Despite their mutually influential relationship, anger is neither necessary nor sufficient for aggression to occur.  Psychologist Paul Ekman. (1999). Basic emotions. In T. Dalgleish & M. J. Power (Eds.), Handbook of cognition and emotion (pp. 45–60). John Wiley & Sons Ltd  Due to its distinct and widely recognizable pattern of face expression, anger has always been included in the repertoire of basic emotions.   Benefits of Anger  Farzaneh Pahlavan Multiple Facets of Anger: Getting Mad or Restoring Justice?  Chapter 3:  The Neurobiology of RAGE and Anger & Psychiatric Implications with a Focus on Depression Daniel J. Guerra1, Valentina Colonnello and Jaak Panksepp As a basic emotion, anger emerges early in life and has a unique adaptive function in motivating, organizing, and regulating behavior. No other emotion can match the consistency and vigor of anger in mobilizing high-level energy and sustaining goal-directed activity. Anger serves a variety of regulatory functions in physiological and psychological processes related to self-defense as well as to interpersonal and societal behaviors. Through socialization processes, it plays an important role in the development of personality and individual differences in responding to environmental challenges, which can be more or less adaptive.  (p. v).   Aristotle:  Aristotle: Nichomachean Ethics: It is easy to fly into a passion – anybody can do that – but to be angry with the right person into the right extent and at the right time and with the right object in the right way – that is not easy, and it is not everyone who can do it  In themselves passions are neither good nor evil. They are morally qualified only to the extent that they effectively engage reason and will….It belongs to the perfection of the moral or human good that the passions be governed by reason. CCC 1767  CCMMP: Catholic-Christian Meta-Model of the Person  DMU Paul Vitz, William Nordling, Paul Craig Titus.    p. (294)  to remain in the virtuous middle ground requires being disposed to a righteous anger that will stand up to injustice, and use a good measure of anger in ways that are corrective of the evil, preventive of further injustice, and indicative of a balance to mean between extremes. Emotions are good when, as reactions antecedent to reasoning, they make us conscious of reality and prepare us for a more complete reaction and moral action. Emotion and choice then serve moral flourishing (e.g., when we have an appropriate spontaneous reaction of anger at injustice). Second, emotions are good as felt reactions that also follow the intellectual evaluation of the situation. Emotions can be expressive of rational decisions. Emotions can thus participate in our life of reason and will (Gondreau, 2013). For example, when we choose to rectify and injustice, a balanced expression of anger can help us to act decisively will being restrained enough that we do not overreact. Through a righteous or just expression of anger, we entered rectify injustice, will finding a just and rational mean between excessively weak or exceedingly strong emotional displays. (p. 650). Emotions are viewed as informing people about their cares and concerns. To prepare the body for action, directing our thoughts to ways that will appropriately address the issues at hand. They can signal and manipulate other people in ways that suit the person's emotional needs (Parrott, 2001). Being disconnected from emotional experience, therefore, means being cut off from adaptive information (Pos et al., 2003). (pp. 650-651). Digression into justification of secular sources Question may arise, "OK, Dr. Peter, as you already noted, anger has been recognized for a long time, going all the way back to Aristotle and way before that in Sacred Scripture.  You emphasize that you are a Catholic psychologist, so why are you even looking at these secular sources like the American Psychological Association? There is a lot about anger in Scripture, in the Church Fathers and the saints about anger in the spiritual life.   Discalced Carmelite Abbott Marc Foley in his excellent book The Context of Holiness: Psychological and Spiritual Reflections on the Life of St. Therese of Lisieux "One…misconception is that the spiritual life is an encapsulated sphere, cloistered from the realities of daily living….we have only one life composed of various dimensions.  Our emotional life, intellectual life, social life, work life, sex life, spiritual life are simple ways of speaking of the different facets of our one life.  (p. 1).  We have one life.  One life.  We don't have a spiritual life that is separate from our emotional life.  We have one life.  If we are angry, that affects our whole life.   The Church herself encourages us to look to all branches of knowledge and glean what is best from them in order to live our one life better.  From the CCC, paragraph 159  "Though faith is above reason, there can never be any real discrepancy between faith and reason. Since the same God who reveals mysteries and infuses faith has bestowed the light of reason on the human mind, God cannot deny himself, nor can truth ever contradict truth." "Consequently, methodical research in all branches of knowledge, provided it is carried out in a truly scientific manner and does not override moral laws, can never conflict with the faith, because the things of the world and the things of faith derive from the same God. The humble and persevering investigator of the secrets of nature is being led, as it were, by the hand of God in spite of himself, for it is God, the conserver of all things, who made them what they are." And from the Vatican II document, the Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World, paragraph 62 reads:  In pastoral care, sufficient use must be made not only of theological principles, but also of the findings of the secular sciences, especially of psychology and sociology, so that the faithful may be brought to a more adequate and mature life of faith. Remember that we are embodied beings -- we are composites of a soul and a body. The 17th Century Philosopher Rene Descartes' popularized what is called mind-body dualism.  Mind-body dualism is the idea that the body and the mind operate in separate spheres, and neither can be assimilated into the other.  And that is false.  Demonstrably false in a lot of ways, be we so often assume it to be true.  We have one life.   In the last several years we are realizing just how much of our mental life and our psychological well-being is linked in various ways to our neurobiology -- the ways that our nervous systems function.  And the relationship between our embodied brain and our minds is reciprocal -- each affects the other in complex ways that we are just beginning to understand.  In other words, brain chemistry affects our emotional states.  And our emotional states and our behaviors affect brain chemistry.  It's not just our minds and it's not just our bodies and it's not just our souls -- it's all of those, all of what makes me who I am, body, mind, soul, spirit, all of it.   And since Scripture, the Early Church Fathers, the Catechism and so on are silent on neurobiology, neurochemistry, neurophysiology and so many other areas that impact our minds and our well-being, as a Catholic psychologist I am going to look elsewhere, I'm going to look into secular sources.  I just don't think it's reasonable to expect the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops or the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in the Vatican to be experts in these areas -- it's not their calling, it's not their expertise.  St. John of the Cross in his  Prologue of Ascent of Mt. Carmel: "I will not rely on experience or science…[but] I will not neglect whatever possible use I can make of them.  Fr. Marc Foley, OCD : The Context of Holiness:  As St. Thomas wrote of St. Augustine's use of Platonic philosophy in the Summa: "whenever Augustine, who was imbued with the doctrines of the Platonists, found in their teaching anything consistent with the faith, he adopted it and those things which he found contrary to the faith he amended." (ST I, q. 84,a. 5) p.4 And St. Thomas himself drew on so much of Aristotle's thought in his writings, bringing it into his body of work.   Abbot Marc Foley.  In short, we should never swallow the school of thought whole; we should sift the wheat from the chaff, separate truth from falsehood. p.4 We want the best from all sources.   Emphasis on biological processes:   From Heidi Crockett Anger Management with Interpersonal Neurobiology  Discussed Interpersonal Neurobiology at length in  Episode 92 of this podcast Understanding and Healing your Mind through IPNB In interpersonal neurobiology, anger as an emotion is viewed from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. And cognitive neuroscience states that cognition and emotion are dynamically combined with physical arousal. When anger is induced as an emotion in humans, it can unconsciously affect physiological and neural resources. Affective states of anger are subsequently expressed in the brain as well as the body, and these neural and physiological changes can influence the cognitive processes. Many studies and resources have been expended on studying the emotions of happiness, sadness, and fear, which align with psychopathological states of hypomania, depression, and anxiety. Kathy Steele, Suzette Boon, Onno van der Hart:  Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation: A Practical, Integrative Approach:  Anger is an affect to derived from activation of the sympathetic nervous system, geared to energize the body for maximum effort to fend off perceived danger. Psychologically, it protects from awareness of vulnerability and lack of control, and therefore from shame. And fight mode, we are all primed to perceive cues of danger rather than cues of safety and relational connection. In such a heightened state of arousal, it is easy to misunderstand the intentions of others. (p.332). Polyvagal theory and anger  A critical period for experience-dependent development of the feelings of safety during early infancy: A polyvagal perspective on anger and psychometric tools to assess perceived safety  Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience July 2022 article   Andrea Poli, Angelo Gemignani, Carlo Chiorri and Mario Miccoli Brief primer here on some neurology.  Don't worry.  I will keep it simple.   Neurons are specialized cells that receive and send signals to other cells through fragile and thin cellular extensions called axons. Myelination:   a membrane or a sheath around the axons on neurons.   Myelinated axons often have a larger diameter Myelinated axons are insulated Myelination allows for much faster transmission of electric impulses Presence of safety during the critical period (first year of life).   Decreased unmyelinated/myelinated cardioinhibitory fibers ratio in adulthood Ventral Vagal complex is able to have a greater impact on reducing the Sympathetic Nervous System arousal -- decreasing anger  VVC is able to have a greater impact on reducing Dorsal Vagal Complex fear and shutdown responses -- the freeze response.   Greater capacity for self-regulation.   Absence of safety during the critical period  Increased unmyelinated/myelinated cardioinhibitory fibers ratio in adulthood Ventral Vagal complex has a lesser impact on reducing the Sympathetic Nervous System arousal -- less able to decrease sympathetic arousal, including anger  VVC has a lesser impact on reducing Dorsal Vagal Complex fear and shutdown responses -- less able to reduce the freeze response.   Less capacity for self-regulation.   Dampened VVC activity reduces the capacity of adaptive inhibition of SNS and DVC (Dorsal Vagal Complex), and emotional self-regulation. Hence, environmental detection of unsafety cues may preferentially trigger SNS-mediated anger in order to avoid DVC-mediated immobilization with fear. Young children exposed to five or more significant adverse experiences in the first three years of childhood face a 76% likelihood of having one or more delays in their language, emotional or brain development. (6) As the number of traumatic events experienced during childhood increases, the risk for the following health problems in adulthood increases: depression; alcoholism; drug abuse; suicide attempts; heart and liver diseases; pregnancy problems; high stress; uncontrollable anger; and family, financial, and job problems. (6) 7 ways childhood adversity changes a child's brain Donna Jackson Nakazawa Acestoohigh.com website September 8, 2016 Epigenetic Shifts  gene methylation, in which small chemical markers, or methyl groups, adhere to the genes involved in regulating our stress response, and prevent these genes from doing their jobs.  Size and Shape of the Brain stress releases a hormone that actually shrinks the size of the hippocampus, an area of our brain responsible for processing emotion and memory and managing stress.  Chronic neuroinflammation can lead to changes that reset the tone of the brain for life   Brain connectivity:  Dr. Ryan Herringa, neuropsychiatrist and assistant professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin, found that children and teens who'd experienced chronic childhood adversity showed weaker neural connections between the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus. Girls also displayed weaker connections between the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala. The prefrontal-cortex-amygdala relationship plays an essential role in determining how emotionally reactive we're likely to be to the things that happen to us in our day-to-day life, and how likely we are to perceive these events as stressful or dangerous. Including anger.   Wiring of the brain and nervous system matter -- they matter a lot Brain activation in anger  Distinct Brain Areas involved in Anger versus Punishment during Social Interactions  Olga M. Klimecki, David Sander & Patrik Vuilleumier Scientific Reports 2018. 25 men fMRI study anger induced in an in inequality game designed to be unfair.   In the present study, we found that the intensity of experienced anger when seeing the face of the unfair other was parametrically related to activations in amygdala, STS (superior temporal sulcus), and fusiform gyrus (related to facial recognition). The STS has been shown to produce strong responses when subjects perceive stimuli in research areas that facial recognition   Farzaneh Pahlavan Multiple Facets of Anger: Getting Mad or Restoring Justice?  Chapter 3:  The Neurobiology of RAGE and Anger & Psychiatric Implications with a Focus on Depression Daniel J. Guerra1, Valentina Colonnello and Jaak Panksepp Rage emerges when specific environmental stimuli arouse the neural circuitry of the RAGE system. Even if the anger-thoughts and the related expression are modulated and regulated by higher cortico-cognitive areas, the human basic circuitry of anger is still subcortical. Since the early description of rage in decorticated cats (Dusser De Barenne, 1920) and dogs (Rothmann, 1923) and their responses to inoffensive stimuli, it was clear that the rage expression is i) dependent on subcortical areas, i.e. the ancient regions play a crucial role more than the higher neocortical regions; ii) independent of an intact cortex. p. 11  Among the higher limbic regions of this network, the medial nucleus, the basal complex, and central and lateral nuclei of the amygdala play a key role in the modulation of RAGE.  p. 1   All this happens far away from the frontal cortex in the limbic system of your brain.   Kathy Steele, Suzette Boon, Onno van der Hart:  Treating Trauma-Related Dissociation: A Practical, Integrative Approach   Why of Chronic anger.   Anger is the primary emotion of the "fight" defense.  When (parts of) the patient become stuck in this defense, anger becomes chronic.  Thus, the first intervention is safety.  332 As long as a fight reaction remains unresolved, anger will remain chronic. (p.332).  Almost no one seems to understands that anger is a defense against fear and shame.  It's a way of trying to protect oneself.   There are several reasons that anger and hostility become chronic in dissociative patients. First, patients typically have been severely invalidated, ignored, heard, betrayed, and sometimes even tortured over extended periods of time, while helpless to stop it. In itself, this is enough to generate enormous rage in anyone as part of the naturally occurring fight defense. Second, as children, patients often had little to no help in learning how to regulate and appropriately express normal anger, much less how to cope with it. Often it was unacceptable for many patients to express any kind of anger as children, while the adults around them were uncontained and highly destructive with their anger. Others had no limit set on their angry behaviors. (p. 330). Angry dissociative parts are feared and avoided internally by most other parts, particularly those that function in daily life. After all, angry behaviors toward self and others may interfere with functioning in a variety of personal and social ways. An ongoing vicious cycle of rage and shame ensues internally: the more patients avoid their angry and destructive dissociative parts, the angry these parts become, and the more they shame other parts and are shamed by them. (p. 331). … Angry parts have a deep shame and are highly defended against the strong belief that they are very bad. Their defense is reinforced by the shame of patients that such parts of themselves even exist. These parts of the patient are terrified of attachment to the therapist and you the relationship is dangerous, mainly because they are afraid that the therapist will never accept them. (p. 331-332). Whether the anger is part of a fight response or not, it is often a secondary emotion that protects the patient from feelings of sadness, extreme powerlessness, shame, guilt, and loss. (p. 333).  (add grief) Parts of the patient that developed  controlling-punitive strategies will be angry with others to get what they need,  while those that have controlling-caregiving strategies will punish themselves for being angry or having needs. (p. 333).  This is often the case in hostile parts such as those of self-injure or encourage other parts to self-harm, prostitute themselves, abuse drugs or alcohol, or engage in other self-destructive behaviors. They are often stuck in destructive and harmful behaviors that are an "attack self" defense against shame. (p.333). Finally, the rage of the perpetrator is often an embodied experience from which patients cannot yet escape without sufficient realization and further integration. Some dissociative parts imitate perpetrators internally, repeating the family dynamics from the past with other parts in a rather literal way. (p.333). "Getting the anger out" is not really useful, as the problem is that the patient needs to learn how to effectively express anger verbally rather than physically, and in socially appropriate and contained ways, so the patient can be heard by others. It is less the fact that patients express anger, but how they do so and whether that expression allows him to remain grounded in the present, to retain important relationships, and to avoid being self-destructive. (p. 334). Expression of anger is not necessarily therapeutic in itself. It is how (parts of) the patient experience and express it that is important; whether it is within a window of tolerancex in a socially appropriate and safe. Therapist must learn when expression of anger is therapeutic and when containment of anger is more helpful. (p. 334). Working with anger an angry parts (p.335). Take the time to educate the patient as a whole about the functions of anger and angry parts. Although they may seem like "troublemakers," they can be understood as attempting to solve problems with ineffective or insufficient tools.  Encourage all parts of the patient understand, accept, and listen to angry parts, instead of avoiding them.  Make efforts to understand what provokes angry parts. There are many potential triggers.   Not direct quotes Do all parts feel the same way as the angry part?  If not, can those parts listen to and accept angry parts perspective?  Would the angry part be willing to listen to the other internal perspectives?  Invite other parts to watch and listen if possible.  Can set limits with the angry part  the angry part and all parts need to learn that healthy relationships do not include punishment, humiliation, or force  Use titration, helping the person experienced as a small amount of anger will remain grounded in the present   Parts and imitate a perpetrator often literally experience themselves in our experienced by other parts as the actual perpetrator. Thus they understandably induce fear and shame within a patient as a whole, and sometimes fearing the therapist. (p. 345). The functions of perpetrator-imitating parts are (1) protect the patient against threats of the perpetrator, which continue to be experienced as real in the present; (2) defend the patient against unbearable realizations of being helpless and powerless as a child, (3) re-enact traumatic memories from the perspective of the perpetrator, as mentalize by the child; (4) serve as a defense against shame through attacking the patient and avoiding inner experiences of shame; (5) provide an outlet for the patient's disowned sadistic and punitive tendencies; and (6) hold unbearable traumatic memories. (p. 346). Suzette Boon, Kathy Steele, Onno van der Hart 2011 book  Coping with Trauma-Related Dissociation: Skills Training for Patients and Therapists Destructive expressions of anger include persistent revenge fantasies or actions, hurting self or others, "taking it out" on innocent people (or animals), or destruction of property. (p. 265).  Dissociative parts of a person that are stuck in anger may experience this feeling as vehement and overwhelming, often without words. They may have irresistible urges to act aggressively and have great difficulty thinking and reflecting on their feelings before acting. Angry parts have not learned how to experience or express anger and helpful ways. There are two types of anger dissociative parts. The first are parts that are stuck in a defensive fight mode, ready to protect you. Their anger at original injustices may be legitimate and naturally accompanies a tendency to strike out and fight, which is an essential survival strategy. However, such parts have become stuck in anger, unable to experience much else. They rigidly perceived threat and ill-will everywhere and they react with anger and aggression as their only option of response. Although these parts of you may not yet realize it, anger is often a protection against vulnerable feelings of shame, fear, hurt, despair, powerlessness, and loss. The second type of angry part may seem very much like the original perpetrator. They imitate those who hurt them in the past, and they can be experienced internally as the actual perpetrator. This experience can be particularly frightening, disorienting, and shameful. But be assured this is a very common way of dealing with being traumatized. In fact, although these parts may have some similarities to those who hurt you, they also significant differences: they are parts of you as a whole person, who is trying to cope with unresolved traumatic experiences. (p. 267)   Tips for coping with anger (p, 269 to 271) recognize how to make distinctions among the many gradations of anger, from mild irritation to rage, so that you can intervene more rapidly.  Understand your tells around anger, which may include a tight or tense feeling in your body, clenched jaw's or fists, feeling flushed or shaky, breathing heavily, heart racing, a feeling of heat, a surge of energy.  Empathize with her angry parts, recognizing they have very limited coping skills, and very limited vision. They've been shunned by other parts, left alone with their hurt, fear, shame, in isolation. This does not mean you have to accept their impulses toward inappropriate behavior  Once you start feeling some compassion toward these parts you can begin to communicate with them, listening with an intention, with curiosity to understand what lies underneath the anger  Angry parts have a strength, that they could transferred to use and more positive ways  Become more curious about why anger is happening.  Try creative and healthy nonverbal ways of expressing your anger, such as writing, drawing, painting, making a collage  Physical exercise may help as an outlet for the physical energy generated by the physiology of anger  Work on understanding your anger, by reflecting on it, rather than just experiencing it, being immersed in it. You might imagine observing yourself from a distance, and getting curious about why you feel the way you do.  Give yourself a time-out, that is, walk away from the situation if you're getting too angry. Counseling to 10, or even 200 before you say or do something you might regret later.  Calm breathing may help  Listen to each part of you, about what might help that part with anger. You can have in her conversations with parts of yourself about anger and how to express it. Small and safe ways to express anger can be negotiated that are agreeable to all parts of you  Watch safe people in your life and seal they handle their own anger. Do they accept being angry? Are they are respectful and appropriate with her anger? Are there particular strategies that they use that you could practice for yourself?  Healthy anger can get positive strength and energy. It can help you be appropriately assertive, set clear boundaries, and confront wrongs in the world. Anger can pave the way to other emotions, leading to the resolution relational conflicts.  We learn the most common triggers of your anger. Once you learn these triggers, you can be more aware when they occur and more able to prevent an automatic reaction of anger. Establish intercommunication among parts of yourself to recognize triggers and negotiate possible helpful strategies to cope with them rather than just reacting.  You can try allowing yourself to experience just a small amount of anger from another part of yourself: a drop, a teaspoon, 1% or 2%. In exchange you can share with angry parts feelings of calm and safety.  Inner safe spaces can be very helpful for childlike parts that feel terrified   My parts Feisty Part-- defends against shame -- Melancholio.   Good Boy  Challenger  Creative-distracting me.   Closing Mark your calendars.  Next Live Experience of the IIC podcast will be on Friday, January 13, 2023 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM Eastern time on Zoom (repeat) -- All about Anger -- dealing with your anger.  Going beyond what books can do.  Experiential exercise.  Links to register have gone out in our emailed Wednesday Reflections.  Can get the link on the IIC landing page as well, SoulsandHearts.com/iic  December 28, 2022  Reflection at soulsandhearts.com/blog  From Rejecting to Embracing Aging Reach out to me Crisis@soulsandhearts.com  Conversation hours:  cell is 317.567.9594 conversation hours 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time Every Tuesday and Thursday.   Resilient Catholic Community -- you do not have to be alone.   Why a deep intimate personal relationship with God our Father, Mary our Mother -- spiritual parents   By claiming our identity as beloved daughters and sons of God the Father and Mary our Mother. Identity is freely given.   How By dealing with the natural level issues we have, the human formation issues we have that have spiritual consequences.  Grace perfects nature  So many spiritual problems have their roots in the natural realm, in human formation.   If this kind of exercise is helpful to you, we have nearly 100 of them in the Resilient Catholics Community.   120 Catholics like you already on board, already on the pilgrimage -- just had 47 apply for the December 2022 cohort, excited to get to know our new applicants.   Closed December 31 -- wait list should be up soon for the June 2023 Cohort.   Get to know your own parts Get to love your own parts If interested, contact me.   Crisis@soulsandhearts.com 317.567.9594 conversation hours 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM Eastern Time Every Tuesday and Thursday.    

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Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Sunday, January 1, 2023

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 Transcription Available


Full Text of ReadingsThe Octave Day of Christmas Solemnity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Mother of God Lectionary: 18The Saint of the day is Mary, Mother of GodThe Story of Mary, Mother of God Mary's divine motherhood broadens the Christmas spotlight. Mary has an important role to play in the Incarnation of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. She consents to God's invitation conveyed by the angel (Luke 1:26-38). Elizabeth proclaims: “Most blessed are you among women and blessed is the fruit of your womb. And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” (Luke 1:42-43, emphasis added). Mary's role as mother of God places her in a unique position in God's redemptive plan. Without naming Mary, Paul asserts that “God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law” (Galatians 4:4). Paul's further statement that “God sent the spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying out ‘Abba, Father!'” helps us realize that Mary is mother to all the brothers and sisters of Jesus. Some theologians also insist that Mary's motherhood of Jesus is an important element in God's creative plan. God's “first” thought in creating was Jesus. Jesus, the incarnate Word, is the one who could give God perfect love and worship on behalf of all creation. As Jesus was “first” in God's mind, Mary was “second” insofar as she was chosen from all eternity to be his mother. The precise title “Mother of God” goes back at least to the third or fourth century. In the Greek form Theotokos (God-bearer), it became the touchstone of the Church's teaching about the Incarnation. The Council of Ephesus in 431 insisted that the holy Fathers were right in calling the holy virgin Theotokos. At the end of this particular session, crowds of people marched through the street shouting: “Praised be the Theotokos!” The tradition reaches to our own day. In its chapter on Mary's role in the Church, Vatican II's Dogmatic Constitution on the Church calls Mary “Mother of God” 12 times. Reflection Other themes come together at today's celebration. It is the Octave of Christmas: Our remembrance of Mary's divine motherhood injects a further note of Christmas joy. It is a day of prayer for world peace: Mary is the mother of the Prince of Peace. It is the first day of a new year: Mary continues to bring new life to her children—who are also God's children. Enjoy this prayer for the New Year! Saint of the Day, Copyright Franciscan Media

Inside The Vatican
Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI dies at 95

Inside The Vatican

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 16:18


Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI died at 9:34 a.m. Rome time, today, Saturday, December 31st, 2022. On this special update episode of “Inside the Vatican,” veteran Vatican correspondent Gerard O'Connell joins host Colleen Dulle for a conversation on the emeritus pope's funeral arrangements, his legacy, and Gerry's memories of him. Joseph Ratzinger was elected pope and took the name Benedict XVI in 2005 after the long papacy of John Paul II. In 2013, Benedict XVI became the first pope in 600 years to resign voluntarily from his office, which made it possible for future popes to resign if they should find their mental or physical health failing or the weighty burden of office too much for them to bear. Benedict lived as an emeritus pope for almost 10 years, a period longer than he was pope.  This evening at the Vatican, Pope Francis said of his predecessor, “With emotion we remember his person so noble, so kind. And we feel in our hearts so much gratitude: gratitude to God for having given him to the Church and to the world; gratitude to him, for all the good he accomplished, and especially for his witness of faith and prayer, especially in these last years of his retired life. Only God knows the value and strength of his intercession, of his sacrifices offered for the good of the Church.” Read more on the life and legacy of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI at americamagazine.org. Links from the show: Pope Benedict XVI, defender of orthodoxy defined by historic resignation, dies at 95 Pope Benedict's theological legacy: An Augustinian at heart who influenced the course of Vatican II and beyond Pope Benedict XVI's devotion to the Eucharist: A key to understanding his life and theology Pope Francis will preside at Benedict's funeral in St. Peter's Square on Jan. 5 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Michael J. Matt Show
GLOBALISM'S GOD COMPLEX: Fake News on Steroids

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 36:14


After months of fake news about how Volodymyr Zelenskyy is giving the Russians a sound thumping in Ukraine, it turns out that Vladimir Putin didn't get memo. Putin may be a dictator, but he is not a fool, and he just tripled down. Suddenly the purveyors of fake news have changed their tune, and they are calling for negotiations for peace in Ukraine. (With several million views, Michael Matt's series on Ukraine is as timely today as it was nine months ago: CRISIS in UKRAINE: What's REALLY Going On: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYtcXS9zJXo PUTIN'S WAR: Biden, Soros, and the Ghost of John McCain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhCKNSnWzeg The NEW WORLD OVER? (Why Resets Fail): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=803gQZ1m5ck) So this latest current thing is being exposed, but that does not mean there won't be another. The lunatics in Davos are meeting in January 2023 to once again to plot the next crisis. In this episode of the Remnant Underground, Michael Matt discusses a strategy that, if it were to gain momentum, could cripple the globalists' ability to lock us down over again. Plus, in England, they have already initiated pilot programs whereby residents will not be allowed to move about freely in their own city, apart from by bicycle and on foot. Looks like the electronic vehicle campaign is also fake news, designed to coax us into turning our automobiles over to Big Brother in exchange for a mythical Greener planet. As Michael points out, they don't actually believe that EV's will do much of anything to save the planet. So, what's really going on here? Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Please support RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts: SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0 APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today

Catholic
Kresta In The Afternoon - 2022-12-27 - Countdown 2022 Pt.8

Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 113:36


Al addresses the “Difficulty Doctrine” of Heaven and Hell and Sheldon Stern gives us an inside look at the Cuban Missile Crisis. In this hour of the Countdown we take a deep dive into Vatican II with George Weigel and Msgr. Hilary Franco, who was there!

Revue de presse française
À la Une: Taïwan pourra-t-elle tenir tête à la Chine?

Revue de presse française

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 4:04


Question posée par Le Figaro. « Ce week-end encore, pointe le journal, la Chine a déployé 71 avions de combat lors de manœuvres autour de l'île démocratique, dont 60 avions de chasse – une de ses plus grandes incursions. » Pour sa part, « Taïwan muscle sa défense avec l'appui des États-Unis, pour dissuader Pékin. Le Congrès américain vient d'autoriser une nouvelle batterie de ventes d'armes à hauteur de dix milliards de dollars d'ici 2027, date d'une possible invasion chinoise, selon le Pentagone. Soit deux milliards par an d'ici là, pour doter l'île d'un arsenal de pointe, et d'une panoplie asymétrique capable de tenir en respect le "dragon" continental, en reprenant les recettes à l'œuvre en Ukraine ». Toutefois, cela sera-t-il suffisant ? « Taïwan sera-t-elle l'Ukraine de l'Asie ? », s'interroge Le Figaro. « Xi Jinping a placé [ce qu'il appelle] la "réunification" au cœur de son projet de renaissance chinoise. Dirigeant le plus autoritaire et le plus puissant depuis Mao, il espère laisser une trace dans l'histoire et a juré de faire mieux que le Grand Timonier en reprenant "par tous les moyens" l'ex-Formose pendant son règne. » Le petit dragon qui indispose Xi Jinping D'autant, pointe Le Figaro, que « Taïwan commence à faire tache dans l'horizon totalitaire du dictateur […]. Le petit dragon asiatique s'est hissé au rang de 15e puissance économique et s'est imposé comme une démocratie modèle depuis ses réformes politiques des années 1980. Il contredit ainsi la thèse de Xi selon laquelle les sociétés confucéennes sont inadaptées à la démocratie. » ► À lire aussi : Taïwan: le Premier ministre accuse Pékin de violer les règles de l'OMC Alors Taïwan « aura-t-elle assez de souffle pour tenir tête à la Chine ?, s'interroge encore Le Figaro. Taïwan […] se prépare à affronter seul le rouleau compresseur chinois… Mais avec une aide militaire massive de Washington, mieux ciblée grâce aux leçons de la guerre en Ukraine : moins de navires et d'équipements lourds, plus de missiles pour tenir à distance l'Armée populaire. Le petit dragon n'est pas près de renoncer : comme pour Kiev, il y va de sa survie. » La descente aux enfers des femmes afghanes À la Une également, les femmes en Afghanistan rabaissées au rang d'objets… « Depuis ce samedi, relève Sud Ouest, les Afghanes ne peuvent plus travailler dans les ONG, mais avant cela, elles avaient été bannies des universités, privées d'études secondaires aussi. Encore avant cela, elles avaient été exclues des emplois d'État, expulsées des parcs, des jardins, des séries télévisées, des films, des bains publics ou des salles de sport, et puis avant cela encore, elles avaient été [re]soumises à la tutelle d'un parent pour ne serait-ce que sortir dans la rue. Il ne s'agit pas d'une invisibilisation, s'exclame Sud Ouest, c'est une négation. » Le Monde s'indigne : « Les femmes afghanes ne peuvent être ainsi abandonnées, même si, pour leur plus grand malheur, il est pour l'instant illusoire d'espérer qu'une réaction internationale d'ampleur contraigne les talibans à mettre un terme à cette guerre intérieure. Un sursaut est pourtant d'autant plus nécessaire qu'il n'y a, hélas, rien à attendre des pays musulmans, pointe encore Le Monde, qui pourraient au moins tenter de faire entendre raison aux talibans à propos de l'usage dévoyé qu'ils font de la religion. Leur silence est une fois de plus assourdissant. » L'Église catholique dans la tourmente Enfin, « l'Église catholique française en pleine crise existentielle : c'est cata pour les cathos », lance Libération en première page. « Que disent les fidèles ? Que derrière les révélations sur les innombrables abus sexuels commis au sein de l'Église se cachent des abus de pouvoir au sein de l'institution. Car si la dernière grande révolution interne, celle de Vatican II, a ouvert les portes à une certaine modernité, elle n'a pas transformé l'organisation du pouvoir au sein de l'Église. Il reste donc encore trop vertical, opaque et masculin. À sa manière, l'air de rien, en misant sur un peu de plus de décentralisation, le pape François s'y essaye, relève Libération. Mais les résistances sont vives. La structuration du pouvoir au sein de l'institution catholique n'explique évidemment pas tout de la crise qu'elle traverse. Elle est aussi par exemple victime d'une pénurie des vocations, d'une crise de la ruralité, de l'individualisation croissante de la société. Il n'empêche, conclut Libération : c'est bien d'une vaste réforme de son organisation hiérarchique interne dont l'Église a besoin si elle veut ressusciter. »

Clarence Talk & Dippin' Sauce
#23: God speaks! (Dei Verbum)

Clarence Talk & Dippin' Sauce

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 66:53


"In the beginning was the Word..." (John 1). Merry Christmas!!! Today, we go through the Vatican II document on the Word of God, Dei verbum. Sacred Scripture is of critical importance to the life of a Christian because in it God reveals Himself to us. Dei verbum

The Empire Never Ended
165: You Can't Write 'SSPX' Without 'SS' (teaser)

The Empire Never Ended

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 1:28


TENE introduces The Society of Saint Pius X to their roster of freaks, Catholic fascists who rebelled against Vatican II in the '70s, and who themselves recently suffered their own absurd schism with even nuttier Nazis. Subscribe to  patreon.org/tenepod and twitter.com/tenepod.

The Michael J. Matt Show
Another Vatican Sex Scandal...just in time for Christmas

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 36:01


Donate to RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today The Remnant Christmas Offer: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/remnant-newspaper-gift-subscription Buy the New Book from Remnant Press: "Letters to a Protestant Friend": https://shop.remnantnewspaper.com/index.php/remnant-shop/remnant-shop/league-of-the-sacred-heart/letters-to-a-protestant-friend-detail In this episode of the Remnant Underground, Michael Matt discusses the parallels between our world today and that into which Jesus Christ was born over 2000 years ago. From a globalist Roman empire, to madmen on exalted thrones, to Christophobic baby-killers on a rampage – it really wasn't much different than our situation today. So no wonder people in those days also thought it must be the of the world. But look how wrong they were. And today? Michael offers hope by pointing to specific examples of Christian counterrevolution that are already paving the way for a massive Christian revival. From priests refusing to comply with corrupt Vatican orders, to the rebuilding of churches in the Midwest, to glorious new ones under construction in Virginia and Kansas, to an explosion of the homeschool movement---Pope Francis is right, Traditional Catholics do present a clear and present danger to the unsustainable New World Order project. Plus, fresh new Vatican scandals transform the pontificate of Pope Francis into something that looks a lot like the Biden Administration in terms of corruption and stupidity. This Christmas, Michael calls on the clans to unite in solidarity against the new pagan Rome, from the Tiber to the Potomac. Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts: SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0 APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989 Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today

Catholic Answers Focus
#464 Was Vatican II Merely Pastoral? - Michael Lofton

Catholic Answers Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022


Sometimes the Second Vatican Council gets a weak defense: “Well, it was just a pastoral council, so why worry about it?” Michael Lofton, from Reason and Theology, asks whether this defense is true? Is Vatican II really “just pastoral”? …

New Books in Intellectual History
Karma Ben-Johanan, "Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 63:33


Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II (Harvard University Press, 2022) by Dr. Karma Ben-Johanan presents a revealing account of contemporary tensions between Jews and Christians, playing out beneath the surface of conciliatory interfaith dialogue. A new chapter in Jewish–Christian relations opened in the second half of the twentieth century when the Second Vatican Council exonerated Jews from the accusation of deicide and declared that the Jewish people had never been rejected by God. In a few carefully phrased statements, two millennia of deep hostility were swept into the trash heap of history. But old animosities die hard. While Catholic and Jewish leaders publicly promoted interfaith dialogue, doubts remained behind closed doors. Catholic officials and theologians soon found that changing their attitude toward Jews could threaten the foundations of Christian tradition. For their part, many Jews perceived the new Catholic line as a Church effort to shore up support amid atheist and secular advances. Drawing on extensive research in contemporary rabbinical literature, Dr. Ben-Johanan shows that Jewish leaders welcomed the Catholic condemnation of antisemitism but were less enthusiastic about the Church's sudden urge to claim their friendship. Catholic theologians hoped Vatican II would turn the page on an embarrassing history, hence the assertion that the Church had not reformed but rather had always loved Jews, or at least should have. Orthodox rabbis, in contrast, believed they were finally free to say what they thought of Christianity. Jacob's Younger Brother pulls back the veil of interfaith dialogue to reveal how Orthodox rabbis and Catholic leaders spoke about each other when outsiders were not in the room. There Ben-Johanan finds Jews reluctant to accept the latest whims of a Church that had unilaterally dictated the terms of Jewish–Christian relations for centuries. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in Christian Studies
Karma Ben-Johanan, "Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 63:33


Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II (Harvard University Press, 2022) by Dr. Karma Ben-Johanan presents a revealing account of contemporary tensions between Jews and Christians, playing out beneath the surface of conciliatory interfaith dialogue. A new chapter in Jewish–Christian relations opened in the second half of the twentieth century when the Second Vatican Council exonerated Jews from the accusation of deicide and declared that the Jewish people had never been rejected by God. In a few carefully phrased statements, two millennia of deep hostility were swept into the trash heap of history. But old animosities die hard. While Catholic and Jewish leaders publicly promoted interfaith dialogue, doubts remained behind closed doors. Catholic officials and theologians soon found that changing their attitude toward Jews could threaten the foundations of Christian tradition. For their part, many Jews perceived the new Catholic line as a Church effort to shore up support amid atheist and secular advances. Drawing on extensive research in contemporary rabbinical literature, Dr. Ben-Johanan shows that Jewish leaders welcomed the Catholic condemnation of antisemitism but were less enthusiastic about the Church's sudden urge to claim their friendship. Catholic theologians hoped Vatican II would turn the page on an embarrassing history, hence the assertion that the Church had not reformed but rather had always loved Jews, or at least should have. Orthodox rabbis, in contrast, believed they were finally free to say what they thought of Christianity. Jacob's Younger Brother pulls back the veil of interfaith dialogue to reveal how Orthodox rabbis and Catholic leaders spoke about each other when outsiders were not in the room. There Ben-Johanan finds Jews reluctant to accept the latest whims of a Church that had unilaterally dictated the terms of Jewish–Christian relations for centuries. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books Network
Karma Ben-Johanan, "Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 63:33


Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II (Harvard University Press, 2022) by Dr. Karma Ben-Johanan presents a revealing account of contemporary tensions between Jews and Christians, playing out beneath the surface of conciliatory interfaith dialogue. A new chapter in Jewish–Christian relations opened in the second half of the twentieth century when the Second Vatican Council exonerated Jews from the accusation of deicide and declared that the Jewish people had never been rejected by God. In a few carefully phrased statements, two millennia of deep hostility were swept into the trash heap of history. But old animosities die hard. While Catholic and Jewish leaders publicly promoted interfaith dialogue, doubts remained behind closed doors. Catholic officials and theologians soon found that changing their attitude toward Jews could threaten the foundations of Christian tradition. For their part, many Jews perceived the new Catholic line as a Church effort to shore up support amid atheist and secular advances. Drawing on extensive research in contemporary rabbinical literature, Dr. Ben-Johanan shows that Jewish leaders welcomed the Catholic condemnation of antisemitism but were less enthusiastic about the Church's sudden urge to claim their friendship. Catholic theologians hoped Vatican II would turn the page on an embarrassing history, hence the assertion that the Church had not reformed but rather had always loved Jews, or at least should have. Orthodox rabbis, in contrast, believed they were finally free to say what they thought of Christianity. Jacob's Younger Brother pulls back the veil of interfaith dialogue to reveal how Orthodox rabbis and Catholic leaders spoke about each other when outsiders were not in the room. There Ben-Johanan finds Jews reluctant to accept the latest whims of a Church that had unilaterally dictated the terms of Jewish–Christian relations for centuries. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Jewish Studies
Karma Ben-Johanan, "Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Jewish Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 63:33


Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II (Harvard University Press, 2022) by Dr. Karma Ben-Johanan presents a revealing account of contemporary tensions between Jews and Christians, playing out beneath the surface of conciliatory interfaith dialogue. A new chapter in Jewish–Christian relations opened in the second half of the twentieth century when the Second Vatican Council exonerated Jews from the accusation of deicide and declared that the Jewish people had never been rejected by God. In a few carefully phrased statements, two millennia of deep hostility were swept into the trash heap of history. But old animosities die hard. While Catholic and Jewish leaders publicly promoted interfaith dialogue, doubts remained behind closed doors. Catholic officials and theologians soon found that changing their attitude toward Jews could threaten the foundations of Christian tradition. For their part, many Jews perceived the new Catholic line as a Church effort to shore up support amid atheist and secular advances. Drawing on extensive research in contemporary rabbinical literature, Dr. Ben-Johanan shows that Jewish leaders welcomed the Catholic condemnation of antisemitism but were less enthusiastic about the Church's sudden urge to claim their friendship. Catholic theologians hoped Vatican II would turn the page on an embarrassing history, hence the assertion that the Church had not reformed but rather had always loved Jews, or at least should have. Orthodox rabbis, in contrast, believed they were finally free to say what they thought of Christianity. Jacob's Younger Brother pulls back the veil of interfaith dialogue to reveal how Orthodox rabbis and Catholic leaders spoke about each other when outsiders were not in the room. There Ben-Johanan finds Jews reluctant to accept the latest whims of a Church that had unilaterally dictated the terms of Jewish–Christian relations for centuries. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/jewish-studies

New Books in Religion
Karma Ben-Johanan, "Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 63:33


Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II (Harvard University Press, 2022) by Dr. Karma Ben-Johanan presents a revealing account of contemporary tensions between Jews and Christians, playing out beneath the surface of conciliatory interfaith dialogue. A new chapter in Jewish–Christian relations opened in the second half of the twentieth century when the Second Vatican Council exonerated Jews from the accusation of deicide and declared that the Jewish people had never been rejected by God. In a few carefully phrased statements, two millennia of deep hostility were swept into the trash heap of history. But old animosities die hard. While Catholic and Jewish leaders publicly promoted interfaith dialogue, doubts remained behind closed doors. Catholic officials and theologians soon found that changing their attitude toward Jews could threaten the foundations of Christian tradition. For their part, many Jews perceived the new Catholic line as a Church effort to shore up support amid atheist and secular advances. Drawing on extensive research in contemporary rabbinical literature, Dr. Ben-Johanan shows that Jewish leaders welcomed the Catholic condemnation of antisemitism but were less enthusiastic about the Church's sudden urge to claim their friendship. Catholic theologians hoped Vatican II would turn the page on an embarrassing history, hence the assertion that the Church had not reformed but rather had always loved Jews, or at least should have. Orthodox rabbis, in contrast, believed they were finally free to say what they thought of Christianity. Jacob's Younger Brother pulls back the veil of interfaith dialogue to reveal how Orthodox rabbis and Catholic leaders spoke about each other when outsiders were not in the room. There Ben-Johanan finds Jews reluctant to accept the latest whims of a Church that had unilaterally dictated the terms of Jewish–Christian relations for centuries. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in History
Karma Ben-Johanan, "Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II" (Harvard UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 63:33


Jacob's Younger Brother: Christian-Jewish Relations after Vatican II (Harvard University Press, 2022) by Dr. Karma Ben-Johanan presents a revealing account of contemporary tensions between Jews and Christians, playing out beneath the surface of conciliatory interfaith dialogue. A new chapter in Jewish–Christian relations opened in the second half of the twentieth century when the Second Vatican Council exonerated Jews from the accusation of deicide and declared that the Jewish people had never been rejected by God. In a few carefully phrased statements, two millennia of deep hostility were swept into the trash heap of history. But old animosities die hard. While Catholic and Jewish leaders publicly promoted interfaith dialogue, doubts remained behind closed doors. Catholic officials and theologians soon found that changing their attitude toward Jews could threaten the foundations of Christian tradition. For their part, many Jews perceived the new Catholic line as a Church effort to shore up support amid atheist and secular advances. Drawing on extensive research in contemporary rabbinical literature, Dr. Ben-Johanan shows that Jewish leaders welcomed the Catholic condemnation of antisemitism but were less enthusiastic about the Church's sudden urge to claim their friendship. Catholic theologians hoped Vatican II would turn the page on an embarrassing history, hence the assertion that the Church had not reformed but rather had always loved Jews, or at least should have. Orthodox rabbis, in contrast, believed they were finally free to say what they thought of Christianity. Jacob's Younger Brother pulls back the veil of interfaith dialogue to reveal how Orthodox rabbis and Catholic leaders spoke about each other when outsiders were not in the room. There Ben-Johanan finds Jews reluctant to accept the latest whims of a Church that had unilaterally dictated the terms of Jewish–Christian relations for centuries. This interview was conducted by Dr. Miranda Melcher whose doctoral work focused on post-conflict military integration, understanding treaty negotiation and implementation in civil war contexts, with qualitative analysis of the Angolan and Mozambican civil wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Savona church in Port St Lucie
Radio Program: December 18 (Question on Vatican II Council; Catholic Tradition vs the Bible)

Savona church in Port St Lucie

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 60:21


Christian Humanist Profiles
Christian Humanist Profiles 239: Shaun C. Brown

Christian Humanist Profiles

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2022 65:45


Some intellectuals are famous, and some are intellectual-famous. N.T. Wright appeared on The Colbert Report, and Reinhold Niebuhr testified before Congress, and Cornel West was in a couple Matrix movies. George Lindbeck didn’t do any of those, as far as I know, but in certain circles of Christian theologians, he’s indisputably intellectual-famous, opening up possibilities for ecumenical engagement and influencing Stanley Hauerwas and attending Vatican II and such. My own engagement with Lindbeck has been almost exclusively with his 1984 book The Nature of Doctrine, so when I got a chance to read Shaun C. Brown’s recent book George Lindbeck: A Biographical and Theological Introduction, I came away seeing his work in that book as a chapter in a rich and rightly intellectual-famous career. Christian Humanist Profiles is glad to welcome the Doctor Reverend Brown to the show.

The Commonweal Podcast
Ep. 93 - A Flock without Shepherds?

The Commonweal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 30:46


Last month saw the election of Archbishop Timothy Broglio as leader of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops—a choice seen by many as a reactionary rebuke to Pope Francis and his synodal agenda.  On this episode, regular Commonweal contributor Massimo Faggioli joins editor Dominic Preziosi to discuss what Archbishop Broglio's leadership might mean for the U.S. Church. They touch on a number of other topics, including how Catholics voted in the midterms, the sixtieth anniversary of Vatican II, and the ongoing fallout from the abuse crisis.  And, in anticipation of the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, Natalia Imperatori-Lee, professor of religious studies at Manhattan College, explains how the art and activism of Yolanda López can help us recognize the holiness of lo cotidiano, the everyday.  For further reading:  ‘No Longer the Bishops' Church?” Massimo Faggioli ‘The Art of Activism,” Nicole-Ann Lobo ‘Encounters Between Equals,' Timothy Matovina

Reason and Theology Show – Reason and Theology
Did Vatican 2 Teach Heresy? Some Implications to Consider

Reason and Theology Show – Reason and Theology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022


Michael Lofton goes over the claim that Vatican II taught heresy and draws out the implications of this position.

Clerically Speaking
E199: Outdoor Weddings / Vatican II / Burnt Out & Angry

Clerically Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 60:20


E199: Outdoor Weddings / Vatican II / Burnt Out & Angry by Fr. Harrison & Fr. Anthony

The Michael J. Matt Show
THE DEVIL'S TRIUMPH: America's War on Marriage & Family

The Michael J. Matt Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 37:27


World War III in Ukraine – who are the baddies and who are the goodies? Well, that's the question.   In this episode of The Remnant Underground, Michael J. Matt breaks down Chuck Schumer's “Respect for Marriage Act” which, according to Senator Ted Cruz, will lead to outright persecution of Christian politicians, parents, and priests in America.   Funny thing is, Michael doesn't first and foremost blame the Democrats (or the Republican turncoats) for their not-so-veiled assault on Christian Americans. Michael blames the colossal failure of Pope Francis to defend Christian morality as laid out in the official catechisms of the Catholic Church.   Can we seriously blame homosexuals for being deceived by the Vatican's massive disinformation campaign?   And Chuck Schumer? Well, his white privilege is showing again. While millions of Americans are having difficulty feeding their families this winter, old Chuck is positively obsessed with canceling Christian morality. Could this creepy old geezer possibly be any more out of touch?   Meanwhile back in the real world, England and Wales are no longer Christian majority countries, as Christianity continues to be euthanized all over the world. And Pope Francis says the greatest crisis the world faces today is climate change. I rest my case.      Is there any hope left? Of course there is, but it's coming from some pretty unexpected places.   Sign up for Michael Matt's Weekly E-Letter: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today/free-remnant-updates   Follow Michael Matt on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Michael_J_Matt   Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today   Please support RTV: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/donate-today   Listen to Michael Matt's podcasts: SPOTIFY: https://open.spotify.com/show/1AdkCDFfR736CqcGw2Uvd0 APPLE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-michael-j-matt-show/id1563298989   Stay Connected to RTV: Subscribe to The Remnant Newspaper, print and/or digital versions available: https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/subscribe-today