Podcasts about critically

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Latest podcast episodes about critically

Hadar Institute Online Learning
R. Elie Kaunfer on Parashat VaYishlach: Dressing for Prayer

Hadar Institute Online Learning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 7:40


Ya'akov is preparing to encounter God directly through sacrifice, an analog to our experience of prayer. It has been decades since Ya'akov actually encountered God in this way, and now he is preparing for this transition back into direct relationship. Critically, Ya'akov prepares by asking everyone to purify themselves and to change their clothes. What is the significance of changing clothes?

Surfing the Nash Tsunami
S3-E57.1 - Veronica Millers on Traversing from the HIV Forum to the Liver Forum

Surfing the Nash Tsunami

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 13:12


The Liver Forum aims to advance the regulatory sciences for the treatment of NAFLD/NASH and liver fibrosis by providing a neutral, independent venue for ongoing multi-stakeholder dialogue. Their work facilitates the best science-based decisions on how to study efficacy and safety in real-time by using collective knowledge and experience with therapies for advancing liver disease. In this conversation, Executive Director Veronica Miller describes how she arrived to the field of NAFLD and the history of the Liver Forum.Veronica begins by sharing the story of her background, originating in primary research in immunology. This led to her landing in Washington DC to assume leadership of the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research. Veronica recalls this experience as setting precedent for the potential that a forum could be and accomplish. The idea of the HIV Forum was for all stakeholders - patients, drug developers, physicians, investors, regulators and government agencies - to convene for a collaborative approach to research in a safe, egalitarian environment. For Veronica, it was a major switch from presenting her own data to masterminding and leading this collective approach to deal with addressing research gaps. Notably, the role required her to bring disparate groups together, including HIV patient activists, who were extremely knowledgeable and at times challenging. Critically, the forum experience leant patient voice to the arena for the first time. Within a few years, that same approach was expanding to other disease areas, including Hepatitis C. Through the Hepatitis C Forum, Veronica worked to resolve the issue of creating a clinical trial without standard controls. After attending a meeting at FDA about clinical trial endpoints, she ventured into the field of Fatty Liver disease. The session concludes with her note that NAFLD is unique from other diseases in that Fatty Liver does not have a pathogen to target.

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Basis of executive functions in fine-grained architecture of cortical and subcortical human brain networks

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.12.01.518720v1?rss=1 Authors: Assem, M., Shashidhara, S., Glasser, M. F., Duncan, J. Abstract: Theoretical models suggest executive functions are supported by both domain-general and domain-specific processes. While some brain imaging studies claim executive tasks recruit a domain-general multiple-demand (MD) brain system, many studies argue the spatially coarse results of traditional imaging methods have blurred fine-grained functionally fractionated domain-specific systems into one. To address this challenge, we scanned participants using the high spatial resolution multimodal MRI approach of the Human Connectome Project while they performed tasks targeting executive demands of updating, shifting and inhibition. The results show that different executive activations overlap, at the single subject level, within MD regions. Critically, each task's topography shifts within MD regions to form a unique intersection with adjacent fine-grained resting-state networks. In this intersection, the strongest activations arise at neurobiologically defined network borders. Outside cerebral cortex, matching results are seen in circumscribed regions of the caudate nucleus, thalamus and cerebellum. Using precise imaging methods, these results suggest a novel framework whereby partially-specialised networks recruit neighbouring MD areas to generate distinct executive functions. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
20-YEAR-OLD Female IDF Soldier Critically Injured in Car Ramming

HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 14:27


In a ramming attack on highway 60 yesterday, an IDF soldier was seriously injured. The Islamic Jihad terrorist organization is threatening to assassinate Itamar Ben-Gvir. There was a breakthrough in the negotiations between the Likud and Religious Zionist parties. And a man miraculously survived the bus bombing last week by simply carrying a book of Psalms.

Calm The Hell Down
Changing How We Approach Food (and thinking more critically about who is trying to sell you stuff) with Paola Atlason

Calm The Hell Down

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 37:55


What diet is best for you? How do you compose the ideal plate? And what's the deal with intermittent fasting? In this episode, Laura chats with Paola Atlason, who left a successful career as a fashion designer at 39 to become a Certified Health and Nutrition Coach. They discuss how we can think more critically about who is trying to sell us products, how we can eat in a way that truly supports us, and how looking at nature can help us understand how we're supposed to eat.Follow Paola on Instagram and check out her website.Follow Calm The Hell Down on Instagram: @calmthehelldowncoSign up for our weekly newsletter where we share what's calming us down. Think puppy GIFs, great new songs, interesting articles, pottery videos, and calming products: https://www.calmthehelldown.co/newsletter On a different note, need digital marketing support? Check out Laura's website or email her at laurasmaurer@gmail.com.

HomeSchool ThinkTank! Live & Learn Your Way with Jackie Wheeler

In this episode, you'll learn more about how thinking rationally can help you overcome challenges and achieve your goals. You can apply these concepts to both challenges in homeschooling and other problems in your life. Learn more about THRIVE!  This is our program for homeschooling parents. https://homeschoolthinktank.com/thrive/

Circulation on the Run
Circulation November 29, 2022 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 25:17


This week, please author Gemma Figtree and Associate Editor Nicholas Mills as they discuss the Frontiers article "Noninvasive Plaque Imaging to Accelerate Coronary Artery Disease Drug Development." Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to this November 29th, 2022 issue of Circulation On the Run. I am one of your hosts, Dr. Greg Hundley, director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Peder Myhre: I am Dr. Peder Myhre from Akershus University Hospital and University of Oslo in Norway. Dr. Greg Hundley: Well, Peder this week's feature discussion very interesting. It is a state of the art review and it involves noninvasive plaque imaging and really how we might assess plaques to evaluate whether coronary artery disease is accelerating. Very important information by a large group of clinician scientists that will develop programs that, maybe, can be used in therapeutic drug development. Dr. Peder Myhre: That's so interesting, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Right. A great group of individuals all put together, but before we get to that interesting feature discussion how about we grab a cup of coffee and start with some of the other articles in the issue? How about this week I go first? Dr. Peder Myhre: Go ahead Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Peder, these authors led by Marianna Fontana from University College London Medical School sought to characterize changes in the clinical phenotype of 1,967 patients with a diagnosis of transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis over the last 20 years enrolled and participating in the National Amyloidosis Center from 2002 to 2021. Dr. Peder Myhre: Oh yes, Greg, please. This cardiac amyloidosis we have to learn more about it. Please, tell me what did they find. Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Peder. First, there's been a substantial increase in the number of patients diagnosed with transthyretin amyloid in recent years. This is associated with greater proportions of patients referred following cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy scans. Second, transthyretin amyloid patients are often now being diagnosed much earlier in their disease process, as evidenced by a shorter duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis, milder stages of disease, and more favorable structural and functional echocardiographic changes at the time of diagnosis. Then, finally, mortality in these transthyretin amyloids patients has improved substantially in recent times aside from any potential benefits from disease modifying treatment or participation in clinical trials. Dr. Peder Myhre: Wow. Greg, over the course of 20 years we have seen some differences in the diagnosis or cardiac ATTR amyloidosis, so what would you say are the take home messages from this paper, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Peder. Transthyretin amyloid is now often diagnosed earlier in the disease process with improved prognosis. I think, more data needed to guide decisions on in whom and when to initiate treatment and then which treatments should be used at each stage of the disease. Peder, along with this article there's an excellent editorial by Doctors Patel and Maurer entitled “The Future for Patients with Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloid is, It's Looking Brighter.” Dr. Peder Myhre: Okay. Greg, I'm going to continue in the field of clinical research and this paper actually describes a new ablation technique for ventricular tachycardia. Isn't that exciting? Dr. Greg Hundley: Absolutely. Dr. Peder Myhre: The paper comes to us from corresponding author Miguel Valderrabano from Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas and is entitled “Substrate Ablation by Multi-vein, Multi-balloon Coronary Venous Ethanol for Refractory Ventricular Tachycardia and Structural Heart Disease.” Ablation of ventricular tachycardia, VT, in the setting of structural heart disease often requires extensive substrate elimination, which is not always achievable by endocardial radiofrequency ablation and epicardial ablation is not always feasible. The left ventricle venous circulation allows vascular access to reach intramural substrates of VT in the context of myocardial infarction or non-ischemic scar, where radiofrequency ablation has limited success. Greg, in this study the authors enroll patients with ablation refractory VT and used phonography and epicardial mapping to perform a double balloon venous ethanol ablation. That is, by blocking flow with one balloon and injecting ethnol via this second balloon. Dr. Greg Hundley: Peder, what a beautiful description and very interesting strategy to address this situation. What did they find? Dr. Peder Myhre: Greg, after the venous ethanol ablation vein maps and epicardial maps showed elimination of abnormal electrograms of the VT substrate an intracardiac echocardiography demonstrated increased intramural echodensity at the target lesions of the 3D maps and at one year of follow up VT recurrence occurred in seven patients, which translates into a success rate of 84%. The authors conclude that multi-balloon multi-vein intramural ablation by venous ethanol ablation can provide effective substrate ablation in patients with ablation refractory VT in the setting of structural heart disease over a broad range of left ventricular locations. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Peder. What a beautiful description. Excellent. Well, this next paper Peder comes to us from the world of preclinical science and these authors led by Professor Christine Sideman from the Harvard Medical School evaluated alpha-kinase 3. Now, alpha-kinase three is a muscle specific protein in which loss of function variants cause cardiomyopathy with distinctive clinical manifestations in both children and adults. At presence the muscular functions of alpha-kinase 3 remain poorly understood, so to address this dilemma these investigators explored the punitive kinase activity of alpha-kinase 3 and the consequences of damaging variants using isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. Mice and human patient tissues. Dr. Peder Myhre: Okay, Greg. This sounds like impressive basic science work, so what did the authors find. Dr. Greg Hundley: Right, Peder. Damaging variance in alpha-kinase 3 encoding an abundant muscle specific protein caused both neonatal and adult onset cardiomyopathies and led to both ventricular dilation and hypertrophy. Now, although alpha-kinase three contain an alpha kinase domain the team showed that it lacks catalytic activity and is really a pseudo kinase. Then finally, Peder, alpha-kinase 3 localizes to both the nuclear envelope of cardiomyocytes and the M-band of the sarcomere where it regulates the expression and localization of myomesins, myomesin 1 and myomesin 2, and additional M-band proteins important for sarcomere protein turnover. Dr. Peder Myhre: That is a beautiful summary, Greg. Since you did so well at summarizing this difficult topic, I'm not going to ask you what a clinical implications, but rather to take home messages here. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Glad you asked Peder. First, alpha-kinase 3 cardiomyopathy may cause impaired contractility and ventricular dilation due to miss localization and dysregulation of myomesin proteins which are critical for force buffering in cardiomyocytes. Next, alpha-kinase 3 cardiomyopathy may cause hypertrophy due to dysregulation of key M-band proteins, which are important for sarcomere protein turnover. Then finally, therapeutic strategies to restore cardiomyocyte force buffering functions and sarcomere protein turnover may ameliorate disease phenotypes in patients with alpha-kinase three cardiomyopathy. Dr. Peder Myhre: Thank you Greg. The next paper is also from the field of preclinical science and it is about the Hippo-YAP signaling pathway which maintains sinal atrial node homeostasis. It comes to us from the corresponding author Jun Wang from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Greg, this paper is not about hippos, but it is about the Hippo signaling pathway, which is known to control organ size and growth in animals and humans. These authors sought to investigate this pathway in relation to the sinal atrial node, i.e. The sinus node. As you know Greg, the sinal atrial node functions as the pacemaker of the heart initiating rhythmic heartbeats. Despite its importance the sinal atrial node is one of the most poorly understood cardiac entities, because of its small size and complex composition and function. To uncover the function of Hippo signaling in sinal atrial node the authors use knockout mice and a series of physiological and molecular experiments including telemetry, electrocardiogram recording, echochoreography, calcium imaging, immunostaining, ANA scope, quantitative real time PCR, and western blotting. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Peder, that sounds like quite an extensive series of experiments. What did they find? Dr. Peder Myhre: Deletion of essential Hippo kinases caused increased fibroblast proliferation and fibrosis in the sinal atrial node. They also found evidence suggesting that Hippo signaling regulates calcium hemostasis in pacemaker cells and that may be partially mediated by the regulation of genes and coding key calcium handling proteins such as RYR2. Finally, the demonstrated that deletion of Hippo effectors in the sin atrial node can rescue the defect previously described. Greg, the take home messages is that Hippo signaling was found to be an important regulator of the sinal atrial node homeostasis and that this provide insights applicable to the treatment of patients with sinus node dysfunction. Dr. Greg Hundley: Ah, beautifully done Peder. Beautifully done. We've got some other articles in this issue. Let me tell you about a Research Letter. It's from Professor Nazer entitled “Targeted Screening for Transthyretin Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.” Then Tracy Hampton has a whole series of cardiology news highlighting first that primary cilia are critical for exercise induced muscle hypertrophy. This is from the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Next, there's a discussion of whole body reperfusion techniques to restore function in pig organs after death, that comes to us from nature. Then lastly, there's a final article scientists identify diverse pathogenic gene variants that lead to heart failure from the journal science. Dr. Peder Myhre: Thank you, Greg. Finally, there is one Perspective piece by Dr. Rajiv Agarwal from Indiana University School of Medicine entitled “Hydrochlorothiazide versus Chlorthalidone: What is the difference?” Now, let's move on to the feature discussion that I know you are very excited about, Greg, to learn more about the non-invasive plaque imaging in our frontiers of medicine.   Dr. Greg Hundley: You bet. Well listeners, welcome to this feature discussion today on November 29th and we have with us Dr. Gemma Figtree from Sydney, Australia and our own associate editor, Dr. Nick Mills from Edinburgh, Scotland. Welcome to you both. Listeners, this is a really interesting feature discussion. It's one of our Frontiers articles that combines where we are in the past, but also where we want to move in the future and a very nice comprehensive review with many articles. Gemma, can you describe for us the genesis really of this article and what you've been working on? Dr. Gemma Figtree: Thanks so much, Greg. Look, I think it's very exciting times at the moment and it's a really important time for all of our community to actually get together in this space. We are driven by trying to make a more efficient process for drug discovery and translation to occur and to basically move into humans in the space of coronary artery disease. We've actually known, obviously, for a long time that the underlying process driving heart attack, but we've not been able to image and treat the actual underlying disease. What this article focuses on is how we actually merge top current technology with policy and approval of drugs. We are very excited about the team of over 20 different institutes around the world trying to work on the best measures of corona artery disease as the disease itself. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Now, help us understand different techniques and why is this a frontier? Dr. Gemma Figtree: Look, I think it's a mixture of the fact that, obviously, we're getting great advances in noninvasive imaging techniques that allow us to actually measure plaque burden, but also plaque characteristics. In the case of drug translation this is an absolutely fundamental piece. You can transform a clinical trial where you can look at the underlying pathology and be able to enrich trials or be able to look at the effect of trials of a new drug in humans. It's really important to acknowledge the fact that humans are really the only animal on the planet that get corona artery disease itself. To be able to translate some of the exciting new drugs that target the plaque itself and work synergistically with some of our agents on cholesterol, and blood pressure, et cetera, we really need to have these measures of coronary artery disease itself. It's a combination of the technology, but also how we apply it to a clinical trial and then how do we work with our regulatory authorities and policy advisors around getting this into humans. We really aiming to try to accelerate the development of drugs that can try to tackle our greatest burden of cardiovascular disease around the world. Dr. Greg Hundley: I'm hearing cardiovascular disease, I also heard in their imaging and lots of different modalities, and then I heard regulatory bodies. Are you thinking maybe we need standards? Dr. Gemma Figtree: That's exactly right. I think, importantly, whilst there's a lot of exciting technology and a lot of us are pursuing potentially different avenues of this we also need to be able to coordinate and develop a simple and harmonized approach that's able to be applied across the world in an equitable fashion. Whilst we, obviously, have developing exciting new toys we have to make sure that a measure that we want to work with regulatory authorities is able to be applied in all of our countries around the world to make sure that the drug development is applied in an equitable fashion. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well listeners, next we're going to turn to our associate editor, Dr. Nick Mills. Nick, you evaluate many manuscripts. What attracted you to this particular paper? Also, help us put it in the context of why you think it's a new frontier that is emerging or needs to emerge in cardiovascular disease. Dr. Nick Mills: Yeah, thanks Greg. Three things, the expertise of this group, the focus and novelty of the topic, and the fact that it's a really timely issue Gemma just outlined. Gemma a phenomenal job bringing together people from all over the world to tackle this area that includes imaging expertise, drug development expertise, industry that gives it a very balanced and diverse range of views and marks it out from other reviews that focus on particular imaging modality. Novelty's really important, but timeliness as well. We've seen in the last five years major breakthroughs in the treatment of diabetes and heart failure. But, drug development of coronary heart disease is stalling. I cannot remember the last time I went to a really exciting late breaking trial on a new development for coronary heart disease that has changed the outcomes for patients. We do need to rethink. Gemma's absolutely right, that requires us to work with regulators to stimulate industry involvement in drug discovery, and delivery, and testing. This is occurring at a time where we've got more fabulous imaging modalities then we've ever had before. Critically, they're noninvasive. They're easy for patients, they're easy for serial testing, and that really opens up many opportunities. It's the fact that it's timely, novel, great expertise, and also really exciting area for cardio of medicine. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well listeners, we're going to go back to Gemma. Gemma, what do you think are some of the next research studies that we need to perform to support what we're trying to indicate today in this Frontiers article? Dr. Gemma Figtree: Yeah. Thanks very much, Greg. I think, ultimately, the features that need to be taken into consideration for a surrogate endpoint to be approved by our regulatory authorities need to be considered. There are many drug companies, but also individual investigators with ideas of drugs to take forward. What we need to do is make sure for all those studies that we're actually working together and ideally having a harmonized endpoint for use there. I think, working early with regulatory authorities is going to be key. I think, if you actually, within the tables that are presented in the paper we demonstrate very clearly that these measures of plaque, particularly, the CT coronary angiography measures of low attenuation plaque are pretty ready for consideration by regulatory authorities. I think, agents that we already know work to reduce mortality, such as statins, we know that they actually have direct effects on plaque both from a pathophysiological perspective, but also from these imaging studies. We know that that change in the plaque characteristics and volume predict the outcomes. In a sense, we've got a fabulous array of data already. In fact, new agents that have come through have also demonstrated effects on these measures. I think, by bringing all of this together in this article we're already in a position to work with regulatory authorities to see what is needed next. I think, listening to that's going to be very important. I do think that the next steps are really going to be working with effectively, I guess, our colleagues to make sure that we don't continue to rapidly advance the measures whilst losing the opportunity to work with regulatory authorities. In answer your question about the research side of things, I think, as we gather more and more information about this we have to make sure that phase two studies are then linked and we can retrospectively see how they predict the outcomes in phase three studies, but I firmly believe that we're in a position that over the next couple of years we should be able to do harmonized approaches at phase two studies and then as a whole community be able to look at how that predicts outcome and work with our regulatory authorities to get more confidence in these endpoints as key. This is all driven by my clinical observations and interest in people who look up and say, "Why me" when they're having a heart attack? In our community where we're getting very good primary prevention we see up to 25% of our heart attack patients having plaque events and catastrophic heart attacks without those traditional risk factors that would've worn them. Part of this is also opening up avenues for driving new diagnostic tools that can pick up the disease itself. Picking up... Treating coronary disease as the disease and using that for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, I think, is a great opportunity to tackle this great burden that we're currently not winning with. Dr. Greg Hundley: With the group that you had assembled were there any primary suggestions on how to unite some of these efforts on a global scale? I really liked, very early in our conversation today, you mentioned that and I wondered what this collective you assembled may have suggested. Dr. Gemma Figtree: Yeah. Look, I think at the moment it is a collection of experts. I haven't quite figured out the name for such a thing, but we are also working with some of the leading organizations now to try to also make sure we get their auspicing of the concepts and how to best do that. I think, by not coming out of one particular organization and evolving from the members itself, and in particular, having industry and regulatory authorities involve and drug discovery experts right from the beginning has been fantastic. Also, making sure that we have that pragmatic approach and that consideration of equitable access. Particularly, making sure that any phase two trial can be done or enrichment for phase three trial can be applied right around the globe and make sure we get diversity of patients enrolled in these studies. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Coming back to you, Nick, any additional thoughts to build on Gemma's comments here? Dr. Nick Mills: Well, to say as someone who's worked in the field of cardiac biomarkers for many years and felt that we could tackle this with the regulators and drug delivery, but I've seen inflammatory biomarkers, lipoproteins come and go without changing. I think, it's just a really exciting opportunity that we now have the ability to phenotype an image, coronary artery disease noninvasively, but a highly specific surrogate endpoint that we've never had before. It's why I'm starting to do research into DT. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well listeners, we want to thank Dr. Gemma Figtree from Sydney, Australia and our own associate editor, Dr. Nick Mills for bringing us this really provocative Frontiers article highlighting a new strategy. Bringing together regulators, leading researchers, and industry to advance new methodologies and trying to tackle globally how we might address atherosclerosis. Well, on behalf of Peder, Carolyn, and myself we want to wish you a great week and we will catch you next week on The Run. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, please visit ahajournals.org.

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience
Long-term, multi-event surprise enhances autobiographical memory

PaperPlayer biorxiv neuroscience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022


Link to bioRxiv paper: http://biorxiv.org/cgi/content/short/2022.11.27.517985v1?rss=1 Authors: Antony, J. W., van Dam, J., Barnett, A. J., Bennion, K. A. Abstract: Neurobiological models of learning emphasize the importance of prediction errors (surprises) for memory formation. These effects have focused on memory for information surrounding a momentary surprising event; however, it is less clear whether surprise that unfolds across multiple events and timescales impacts memory. We asked basketball fans about their most positive and negative autobiographical memories of individual plays, games, and seasons, allowing surprise measurements spanning seconds, hours, and months. We used advanced analytics on National Basketball Association play-by-play data and betting odds spanning 17 seasons, greater than 22K games, greater than 5.6M plays to compute and align the estimated surprise values of each memory. We found that surprising events biased positive memories on the scale of seconds and months and negative memories across all three timescales. Critically, game and season memories could not be explained by surprise at shorter timescales, suggesting that long-term, multievent surprise influences memory. These results expand the role of surprise in models of learning and reinforce its relevance in real-world domains. Copy rights belong to original authors. Visit the link for more info Podcast created by Paper Player, LLC

Mold Avoidance with Bryan Rosner
Thinking Critically About Mold Avoidance Clues

Mold Avoidance with Bryan Rosner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2022 6:35


The knee-jerk reaction of most people is just the opposite of what is truly logical when it comes to mold avoidance. This podcast takes a quick look at one of the great ironies we face as mold avoiders. 

Paediatric Emergencies
Intubating the Critically Unwell Infant - Paediatric Emergencies 2022

Paediatric Emergencies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 34:02


Dr Christopher Flannigan talking about Intubating the Critically Unwell Infant. This talk is part of the Paediatric Emergencies 2022 event. To get your CME certificate for listening to this podcast please visit https://www.paediatricemergencies.com/conference/paediatric-emergencies-2022/

Date Forever
Understanding attention seeking behaviours for a Better Relationship with Melissa and Iain Roberts

Date Forever

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 61:38


It's human nature to crave attention, it can be the validation that soothes, distracts, stimulates, creates pleasure or reduces pain. Attention seeking can be a wide range of behaviours and understanding when yourself or others are seeking attention can empower you to see the cycle, know the root cause and gain clarity. Today's guests, Melissa & Iain Roberts, join us to share about their own relationship from long distance to newlywed, the gum ball love framework and how attention seeking has impacted their lives and relationships. We chat Critically looking at yourself and unpacking your behaviours The 8 flavours of attention Avoiding attention seeking behaviours in a relationship.    8 flavours of attention- Attention Seeking (validation seeking) v's Connection Seeking1. Red - Arouse me (turn me on)2. Orange - Fight me (drama)3. Yellow - Entertain me (never happy - complainer)4. Green - Compete for me (envy - there is always someone else in the picture)5. Blue - Pity me (Feel sorry for me, always want a problem not a solution, people pleasers fall for Pity me)6. Purple - Idolise me (centre of attention, talks to everyone else at the party)7. Pink - Chase me (reaches out, doesn't make plans)8. White - Convince me (Superiority, “all women are XYZ - make me think otherwise") Better Relationships We empower couples to create thriving relationships so that they can play all out in life, set big goals and put plans in place to actually achieve them. Better World Many research studies have shown that great relationships are associated with better health, greater happiness, and even a longer life. If more of us had thriving, healthy, happy romantic relationships, we know we would have a better world. That's why, every time someone works with us, via our partnership with Buy1Give1 we also help someone else in the world. Yep a stranger, someone you'll never meet. Connect with Sammi & Nathan Jaeger  Website - https://www.fuelcollective.com.au/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/thefuelcollective Facebook Group - https://www.facebook.com/groups/thrivingcouples/ Instagram - Date Forever - https://www.instagram.com/dateforever/ Instagram - Fuel Collective - https://www.instagram.com/fuelled.up.life/ Instagram - Nath - https://www.instagram.com/nathjaeger/ Instagram - Sammi - https://www.instagram.com/sammisomewhere/ Connect with Melissa and Iain Roberts Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/melissajaneroberts/ Website - www.GumballLove.comFacebook - www.facebook.com/coachMelissaLeger

Applying Scripture
"Thinking Critically" - Stand in the Gap

Applying Scripture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 21:09


Have you ever heard the phrase "stand in the gap"? Usually, it is used in a leadership context. Where an old testament passage is quoted, and the speaker is attempting to persuade men to be leaders and to fill the void. It is true that we need more leaders. However, is that what this text is speaking about? Let's examine Ezekiel 22:30 together. Support the show

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla
Corroborating eyewitness testimony of space slavery on Ceres and Mars

EXOPOLITICS TODAY with Dr. Michael Salla

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 67:06


In 1982, at age 10, Tony Rodrigues began 20 traumatic years as a slave owned by an Illuminati family that inducted him into multiple programs that included child sex trafficking, drug trade, and secret space programs. The final 15 years of his ordeal was spent on Mars and Ceres as a slave. In early 2022 Tony released his book, Ceres Colony Cavalier, which detailed his harrowing experiences. After reading Tony's book, Dr. Courtney Brown from the Farsight Institute set out to confirm the truth of Tony's incredible claims by having four world class remote viewers investigate key incidents from Ceres Colony Cavalier. The remote viewers corroborated Tony's eyewitness testimony of having served on a slave colony on Ceres, and having briefly served on Mars as an auxillary fighter to lure native insectoids into ambushes by Mars colony supersoldiers. In this ground breaking Exopolitics Today interview, Tony joins Dr. Michael Salla to discuss the Farsight Institute's remote viewing investigation. Critically, they also discuss Tony's experiences with a French secret space program supersoldier, Jean Charles Moyen who met Tony four years prior to his 1982 child abduction. Jean Charles involvement with a joint US French Secret Space Program and with a Galactic Federation suggests that Tony was also a starseed performing a covert mission. The startling possibiity that Tony was part of a sting operation conducted by the Galactic Federation against the Illuminati is discussed in the interview. Ceres Colony Cavalier is available on Amazon.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/exopolitics/support

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Defending Healthcare Organizations. Why It's Critically Important. Sponsored By Conceal.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 22:39


In this episode of Cybercrime Radio, host Steve Morgan is joined by Gordon Lawson, CEO at Conceal, and Paul Connelly, Vice President and Chief Information Security Officer at HCA Healthcare, a Fortune 100 company and one of the nation's leading providers of healthcare services. Together, they discuss why it's critically important to defend healthcare organizations from cyberattacks, why the nation's hospitals continue to be targeted by malicious ransomware actors, and more. To learn more about our sponsor, visit https://conceal.io

The PR Week
Can Corporate Purpose Survive Recession? In partnership with Bully Pulpit Interactive

The PR Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 27:59


Since the COVID-19 pandemic brought us to a halt, business and society have collided like never before, generating an increase in brands' commitments to their communities. This dramatic rise in corporate purpose happened against a backdrop of significant economic growth and progress. BPI President Andrew Bleeker explains the pressure purposeful leaders face amid the looming economic, political, and regulatory landscape. Critically, we discuss how to connect purpose initiatives to business ROI before budgets are cut. Follow us on Twitter: @PRWeekUSReceive the latest industry news, insights, and special reports. Start Your Free 1-Month Trial Subscription To PRWeek www.prweek.com

The Bottom Shelf
How Bad Is Super Mario Bros from 1993?

The Bottom Shelf

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 68:22


In 1993, Bob Hoskins and John Leguizamo took up the mantle of Mario Mario and Luigi Mario. Critically this movie failed. Some would say it’s an insult to childhood joy. Join the crew of The Bottom Shelf are joined by special guest Jonathan Gilbert to ask, “Is Super Mario Bros better than what the critics … Continue reading How Bad Is Super Mario Bros from 1993? →

Kickin' It With KoolKard Show
Ep. 153. Maranathan Academy: Saving Critically At-Risk Youth w/Founder Donna Dukes

Kickin' It With KoolKard Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 72:46


In this episode we interview Founder Donna Dukes of the Maranathan Academy to talk about the major difference between at-risk and critically at-risk youth. Donna is rerouting futures and has impacted the lives of over 1,500 individuals, who are critically at- risk, and graduated more than 300 students from Maranathan Academy. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/koolkard/support

Verdict with Ted Cruz
Who Is To Blame For The GOP Losing The Senate? We Explain WHY We Must Delay The Senate Leadership Elections And Why The GA Runoff Is Still Critically Important!

Verdict with Ted Cruz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 34:18


RNZ: Morning Report
Man critically injured after assault in Bexley

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 2:41


A man has been critically injured in an assault in Bexley in Christchurch. Police say they were called to the scene on Pages road about 6.20am on Monday. Reporter Adam Burns spoke to Corin Dann from the cordon.

Was It Chance?
#27 - Steve Silverman: "Go Home and Write, Steve"

Was It Chance?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 64:03


Critically acclaimed, award-winning writer/director/producer Steve Silverman's work has been called ‘Sly' by the Los Angeles Times, which is his all-time favorite single-word review. Theatre includes All About Steve, not a one-man show but a twist on the classic film All About Eve, his horror comedy 666 Westbourne Drive, and his musical mashups Jesus Christ Super Star Wars & The King and I Know What You Did Last Summer. Speaking of the force, he's the force behind the one-woman show festivals 15 Minutes of FEM and the standup comedy show Slideshow. To eat and get health insurance, Steve is an award-winning writer/producer/director in the world of on-air promotions where he's worked for FOX, ABC, CBS, NBC, Bravo, several ad agencies, and most recently, Hulu. He's directed Whoopi Goldberg, Reba McEntire, Mindy Kaling, Zooey Deschanel, the original Fab Five from Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, and more … Steve's just finished the first draft of a new novel, a ‘cozy' murder mystery, and you can hear him weekly on his podcast, World Gone Good where he talks to everyday people making good here on planet Earth including our very own Heather Vickery. Since our episode was recorded, Steve has left Twitter but you can still catch him on Instagram or check out his website Worldgonegoodpodcast.com. For info on his upcoming play. Happy Birthday, McKenna visit HBMPLAY.COM here.  Make sure to follow this podcast everywhere you find podcasts, leave a rating and a review, and slip into our Instagram DMs at @wasitchance. More about Heather via @vickeryandco on Instagram, @Braveheather on TikTok, and listen to The Brave Files More about Alan via @theatre_podcast on Instagram and listen to The Theatre Podcast with Alan Seales EPISODE TAKEAWAYS Steve is a regular guy who knows a lot of cool people and hosts a feel good podcast. His first BIG intentional risk was turning down a paying job, right out of college, to become an unpaid intern for soap opera, General Hospital. Steve is the “king” of quitting! Really it's just getting new information and making a different decision. Adults can be bullies. But you don't have to accept that bullshit. Trust your instincts - the universe has your back. When people tell you who they are, believe them. Steve's podcast, “A World Gone Good” came about because the world was falling apart and he really wanted to put some joy back into the world. Be willing to take action in the moment. Be open and willing - there's so much to be excited about.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Applying Scripture
"Thinking Critically" - Biblical Modesty

Applying Scripture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 27:31


Often times, passages of scripture can be weaponized in a manner that is quite harmful. Pulling a verse out of context in order to justify your standards and bind them on others, can be quite destructive. Perhaps no one has "suffered" the affects of this more and more often than our women, and young ladies. Let's stop that cycle, and think critically about what Biblical modesty is. It may not be what you think. Support the show

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Portrait of John Hume to be unveiled in Westminster

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 4:05


Critically acclaimed painter, Colin Davidson, discusses his portrait of John Hume.

Needs No Introduction
Mouth open, story jump out: The power and purpose of storytelling in these times – Part two

Needs No Introduction

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 67:10


In part two of this special two-part episode of the Courage My Friends podcast ‘Mouth Open, Story Jump Out: The Power and Purpose of Storytelling in These Times,' we continue our conversation with storyteller, actor, playwright and filmmaker, Rhoma Spencer; storyteller and teacher, Lynn Torrie; and storyteller, teacher and founder of Queers in Your Ears, Rico Rodriguez. Speaking to the origins of Carnival and the meaning of stories for the formerly colonized and enslaved, Spencer reflects: “Stories [are] indeed a part of resistance. These are stories that my mother talked about. Some she would've experienced and some that would've been passed on to her..These are stories that was told to me. Carnival as manifested through the post-emancipated African was a form of resistance. When we were emancipated in 1834, we took to the streets to celebrate our emancipation, and we did so by mimicking our colonizer.”  According to Torrie, stories are a vehicle to deal with even the most sensitive of subjects: “What I find is sensitive topics like addiction, people have strong opinions about them. And sometimes when you approach them directly, people shut down, it's hard to listen; either because they've been personally touched by the issue or because they have strong opinions about how the issue should be dealt with … Sometimes if you approach something in the context of a story, it's easier to listen to than if you speak to the issue directly. A story gives people room to listen to the feelings and perspectives of the characters involved rather than getting stuck on one side or the other of an issue.” Reflecting on the need to be included in stories and storytelling communities, Rodriguez says: “When we grew up as queers, we're sitting around the table and the stories that are being told are stories that are gonna shape our lives sometimes, even if they're fairy tales, personal stories. Stories that are told at Thanksgiving or big family events or family reunions. Stories are being told around the table, they're not queer affirming … And I think that's what led me to tell more of my personal stories, especially with Queers in Your Ears, is that I wanted to create that dinner table for queers where they came and listened and they got affirmed.” About the storytellers Rico Rodriguez is a storyteller and a teacher who specializes in Latinx tales and writing and telling personal and fictional stories that are infused with equity and social change themes. He founded “Queers in Your Ears” a 2SLGBTQI storytelling event. Rico has facilitated workshops on the art of storytelling in educational settings and community and health promotion agencies. He has told in schools, theatres, libraries, festivals, pubs and conferences as well as on CBC Radio in Canada and on National Public Radio in the U.S. His story credits include: Do The Best You Can In the Place Where You Are And Be Kind, Your Value Does Not Decrease Based On Someone's Inability To See Your Worth, When A Flower Doesn't Bloom, You Do Not Fix The Flower, You Fix The Environment In Which The Flower Can Grow. Rhoma Spencer is an actor, playwright, docu/filmmaker, director and comedian. When not doing all of the above she can be seen at her Sweethand Delights turning a random pot of gastronomic pleasures. Critically acclaimed by the Globe and Mail, Toronto Star and NOW Magazine, her works include: Biomyth Mono Digiplay and Login Password Logout ( Aluna Theatre, Caminos Festiva, 2021). Her film, My Execution will be Televised recently won the Impact Award at the Caribbean Tales International Film Festival and her film, A Pile of Dirt will premiere at the Regent Park Film Festival in December. Rhoma can be seen in the award-winning Canadian film, Scarborough. Lynn Torrie is a Toronto storyteller with a passion for traditional folk tales and Canadian history.  Her original adaptations have been performed at the Toronto Storytelling Festival, The Word on the Street, StoryFusion Cabaret, the Ottawa Signature Series and Guelph's Tea 'n Tales. She is a member of the York storytelling Guild and a regular host at both Storytelling Toronto's Storytent and 1001 Friday Nights of Storytelling. She designed and taught over 100 workshops to teachers and educational assistants with the Toronto District School Board and is currently the project co-ordinator for Storytellers of Canada's workshop series and teaches “The Art of Storytelling” at Toronto Metropolitan University, Continuing Education. Since COVID 19, Lynn has travelled the virtual world, hosting, teaching and telling on Zoom. Teagan de Laronde is Métis and a citizen of Red Sky Métis Independent Nation. A graduate of the University of Toronto Teagan was president of the Indigenous Studies Student Union, co-founder/VP for 'BIPOC in Politics', and serves on various committees focused on Truth and Reconciliation including the Victoria College (Re)Conciliation; The Truth is not Fully yet Told". She is currently a project manager with UofT's Department of Religion on the "Relations on the Land" project.  In August 2022, she worked with the City of Toronto and Indigenous partners to Decolonize Museums. Teagan works as a First Story Storyteller, a community-based project that researches, preserves, and shares Indigenous history and perspectives within what is now known as ‘Toronto.' An avid jigger (dancer) and beader, Teagan's work can be viewed at @birchbeadwork on Instagram.  Richardo Keens-Douglas M.B.E is an award winning actor, playwright, author, storyteller and proud Grenadian-Canadian. From drama, dance, and comedy, to musical theatre, storytelling, and directing, Richardo also hosted national radio storytelling show Cloud 9 and Sunday Arts Entertainment on CBC television in Canada and was the host of the television hit Who Wants to be A Millionaire Caribbean. He has appeared on a variety of stages in North America and the Caribbean, including Stratford, Canadian Stage, Factory Theatre, TWP, and Theatre Fountainhead in Canada. His play The Nutmeg Princess won the Dora Mavor Moore Award for Outstanding New Musical of 1999. In 2003, Richardo was inducted into the Caribbean Hall of Fame for Excellence in Theatre. Dan Yashinsky is a storyteller, writer, and community animator.  His books include Suddenly They Heard Footsteps - Storytelling for the Twenty-first Century, and Swimming with Chaucer - A Storyteller's Logbook. In 1999 he received the Jane Jacobs Prize for his work with storytelling in the community.  His pandemic project was to record 16 folktales with his donkey Eysele. You can see them on Youtube by searching for The Storyteller's Ass. Info: www.tellery.com. Transcript of this episode can be accessed at georgebrown.ca/TommyDouglasInstitute.  Image: Rico Rodriguez, Rhoma Spencer, Lynn Torrie, Teagan de Laronde, Richardo Keens-Douglas, Dan Yashinsky (photo by Jacob Zavitz),  / Used with Permission Music: Ang Kahora. Lynne, Bjorn. Rights Purchased Intro Voices: Ashley Booth (Podcast Announcer); Bob Luker (voice of Tommy Douglas); Kenneth Okoro, Liz Campos Rico, Tsz Wing Chau (Street Voices)  Courage My Friends Podcast Organizing Committee: Chandra Budhu, Ashley Booth, Resh Budhu.  Produced by: Resh Budhu, Tommy Douglas Institute and Breanne Doyle, rabble.ca Special Thanks to: Debra Baptiste (Executive Director, Storytelling Toronto), Audrey Rochette (Director, Indigenous Initiatives, George Brown College) Host: Resh Budhu

Celt In A Twist
Celt In A Twist November 6 2022

Celt In A Twist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 59:39


Talisk - Dystopia INST Jesse Malin & Eugene Hutz - If I Should Fall From Grace With God The Paperboys - Someplace, Somewhere CANCON The Real McKenzies -  The Cremation Of Sam McGee CANCON Yoko Pwno - The Old Lightbulb INST The Mahones - Holloway Jack CANCON Oysterband - Streams Of Innocence Kolonien - Till Skogen Emily Smith - Take You Home Aoife O'Donovan - Phoenix Trio Svin - Misty King Derek Warfiled and The Young Wolfe Tones - The Fields Of Athenry Pat Chessell - Girl From Boston CANCON Old Blind Dogs - Gaelic Song Lunasa - Donogh and Mike's INST Celtic on tour and on your radio! Critically-acclaimed Scots trio, Talisk play up and down the west coast and a new take on an old favorite from Derek Warfild & The Young Wolfe Tones, November 10th at the Queen E in Vancouver.   59:39   

Justin Riddle Podcast
#31 – Geometry of Mind: lattices, quasicrystals, and hyperbolic hallucinations

Justin Riddle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 39:06


In episode 31 of the Quantum Consciousness series, Justin Riddle discusses the role of geometry in our understanding of the universe. The discussion begins looking at the manifestation of geometric forms in the world around us in the form of crystals. Crystals are a cornerstone of modern technology as they increase the controllability of the physical world around us through their structure. Many researchers studying quantum biology theorize that when highly ordered structures, often by the creation of a lattice, might enable subtle quantum properties to be magnified. Other researchers look to geometry in their pursuit of a mathematical theory of everything. If only we could understand all of the driving forces in the universe, then we could build more advanced technologies. Surely, a theory of everything must be quite complex. In this pursuit, some researchers postulate that multidimensional geometric forms are the solution. For example, Klee Irwin claims the so-called E8-lattice serves as a unification of all forces and that all things are a projection from this higher dimensional system into our lower 3-dimensional reality. From this perspective, every superposition is a decision between multiple projections that could be selected. Critically, with the same unifying E8-lattice behind the scenes, humans are able to communicate and understand each other by virtue of a shared universal form underlying each of our expressions. My experience of love is the same as your experience of love, because love is a complex geometric form in the E8-lattice. But this has to make you wonder, can love be a geometric shape? Third, I highlight some of the inspiring work from Andres Gomez-Emilsson mapping out the stages of a DMT trip from the standpoint of geometry. During a breakthrough experience, trippers report a direct firsthand experience of viewing hyperbolic geometric objects. Hyperbolic geometry appears to be continuously folding outward. Look up some visualizers as these shapes are inherently bizarre. Could this geometric form explain the bizarreness of these altered states of consciousness? Furthermore, the experience of hyperbolic geometry in firsthand experience suggests that there might be a shift in the mental-space from which we are viewing the object. If we posit that the mind is quantum computer, then this may correspond to a warping of the geometric structure of the Hilbert space of our wave-function mind (the Hilbert space is the multidimensional probability distribution of a quantum system). There are a lot of thought-provoking theories presented in this episode – all of which utilize the principles of geometry as a fundamental aspect of physical reality, mathematics, or our inner experience.

Milestones: Deep Dive Analyses of Landmark Albums with Angélika Beener
50th Anniversary of Freddie Hubbard's Straight Life

Milestones: Deep Dive Analyses of Landmark Albums with Angélika Beener

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 54:09


Critically-acclaimed trumpeter and newly published author, Jeremy Pelt, joins Angélika Beener to discuss Freddie Hubbard's 1971 release, Straight Life, from the CTI label. Together they discuss the state of the music at the top of the 1970s, and how Hubbard's under-explored yet highly influential release would shape things to come for other trumpeters and for the music called jazz. Straight Life (1971): Freddie Hubbard (tp), Joe Henderson (ts), Herbie Hancock, (keyboards), Ron Carter (b), Jack DeJohnette (d), Weldon Irvine and Richie Landrum (percussion), Creed Taylor (producer), Chuck Stewart (photography), Rudy Van Gelder (engineer).

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Two people dead and one critically injured in Monaghan crash

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 3:18


Aaron McElroy, a reporter based in Monaghan, discusses a road crash involving two cars and a lorry in Castleblayney.

Critically Complained
Critically Reviewed: Black Adam

Critically Complained

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 51:07


Adam combats his crippling loneliness by rambling about the latest and far-from-greatest entry in the DCEU: Black Adam!

Rethinking Politics
106: Critical Theory Is Critically Flawed

Rethinking Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 68:02


Everyone has heard about the rise of CRT or Critical Race Theory which is often vaguely defined as the "Woke" version of viewing racism. But there is much more to Critical Theory than just the race aspect. It is in fact a much broader umbrella with a surprisingly lengthy origin story and many iterations that have crept into almost every nook and cranny of the modern western world. We discuss the flaws in its methods that will help you deal with critical theory wherever you find it. Music: Beauty Flow by Kevin Macleod Photo: GR Stocks on Unsplash

The Bike Shed
359: Serializers

The Bike Shed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 44:10


Chris Toomey is back! (For an episode.) He talks about what he's been up to since handing off the reins to Joël. He's been playing around with something at Sagewell that he enjoys. At the core of it? Serializers. Primalize gem (https://github.com/jgaskins/primalize) Derek's talk on code review (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJjmw9TRB7s) Inertia.js (https://inertiajs.com/) Phantom types (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/modeling-currency-in-elm-using-phantom-types) io-ts (https://gcanti.github.io/io-ts/) dry-rb (https://dry-rb.org/) parse don't validate (https://lexi-lambda.github.io/blog/2019/11/05/parse-don-t-validate/) value objects (http://wiki.c2.com/?ValueObject) broader perspective on parsing (https://thoughtbot.com/blog/a-broader-take-on-parsing) Enumerable#tally (https://medium.com/@baweaver/ruby-2-7-enumerable-tally-a706a5fb11ea) RubyConf mini (https://www.rubyconfmini.com/) where.missing (https://boringrails.com/tips/activerecord-where-missing-associations) Transcript: JOËL: Hello and welcome to another episode of The Bike Shed, a weekly podcast from your friends at thoughtbot about developing great software. I'm Joël Quenneville. And today, I'm joined by a very special guest, former host Chris Toomey. CHRIS: Hi, Joël. Thanks for having me. JOËL: And together, we're here to share a little bit of what we've learned along the way. So, Chris, what's new in your world? CHRIS: Being on this podcast is new in my world, or everything old is new again, or something along those lines. But, yeah, thank you so much for having me back. It's a pleasure. Although it's very odd, it feels somehow so different and yet very familiar. But yeah, more generally, what's new in my world? I think this was probably in development as I was winding down my time as a host here on The Bike Shed, but I don't know that I ever got a chance to talk about it. There has been a fun sort of deep-in-the-weeds technical thing that we've been playing around with at Sagewell that I've really enjoyed. So at the core of it, we have serializers. So we take some data structures in our Ruby on Rails code base, and we need to serialize them to JSON to send them to the front end. In our case, we're using Inertia, so it's not quite a JSON API, but it's fine to think about it in that way for the context of this discussion. And what we were finding is our front end has TypeScript. So we're writing Svelte, which is using TypeScript. And so we're stating or asserting that the types like, hey, we're going to get this data in from the back end, and it's going to have this shape to it. And we found that it was really hard to keep those in sync to keep, like, what does the user mean on the front end? What's the data that we're going to get? It's going to have a full name, which is a string, except sometimes that might be null. So how do we make sure that those are keeping up to date? And then we had a growing number of serializers on the back end and determining which serializer we were actually using, and it was just...it was a mess, to put it lightly. And so we had explored a couple of different options around it, and eventually, we found a library called Primalize. So Primalize is a Ruby library. It is for writing JSON serializers. But what's really interesting about it is it has a typing layer. It's like a type system sort of thing at play. So when you define a serializer in Primalize, instead of just saying, here are the fields; there is an ID, a name, et cetera, you say, there is an ID, and it is a string. There is a name, and it is a string, or an optional string, which is the even more interesting bit. You can say array. You can say object. You can say an enum of a couple of different values. And so we looked at that, and we said, ooh, this is very interesting. Astute listeners will know that this is probably useless in a Ruby system, which doesn't have types or a compilation step or anything like that. But what's really cool about this is when you use a Primalize serializer, as you're serializing an object, if there is ever a type mismatch, so the observed type at runtime and the authored type if those ever mismatch, then you can have some sort of notification happen. So in our case, we configured it to send a warning to Sentry to say, "Hey, you said the types were this, but we're actually seeing this other thing." Most often, it will be like an Optional, a null sneaking through, a nil sneaking through on the Ruby side. But what was really interesting is as we were squinting at this, we're like, huh, so now we're going to write all this type information. What if we could somehow get that type information down to the front end? So I had a long weekend, one weekend, and I went away, and I wrote a bunch of code that took all of those serializers, ran through them, and generated the associated TypeScript interfaces. And so now we have a build step that will essentially run that and assert that we're getting the same thing in CI as we have committed to the codebase. But now we have the generated serializer types on the front end that match to the used serializer on the back end, as well as the observed run-time types. So it's a combination of a true compilation step type system on the front end and a run-time type system on the back end, which has been very, very interesting. JOËL: I have a lot of thoughts here. CHRIS: I figured you would. [laughs] JOËL: But the first thing that came to mind is, as a consultant, there's a scenario with especially smaller startups that generally concerns me, and that is the CTO goes away for a weekend and writes a lot of code... CHRIS: [laughs] JOËL: And brings in a new system on Monday, which is exactly what you're describing here. How do you feel about the fact that you've done that? CHRIS: I wasn't ready to go this deep this early on in this episode. JOËL: [laughs] CHRIS: But honestly, that is a fantastic question. It's a thing that I have been truly not struggling with but really thinking about. We're going to go on a slight aside here, but I am finding it really difficult to engage with the actual day-to-day coding work that we're doing and to still stay close to the codebase and not be in the way. There's a pattern that I've seen happen a number of times now where I pick up a piece of work that is, you know, one of the tickets at the top of the backlog. I start to work on it. I get pulled into a meeting, then another meeting, then three more meetings. And suddenly, it's three days later. I haven't completed this piece of work that was defined to be the next most important piece of work. And suddenly, I'm blocking the team. JOËL: Hmmm. CHRIS: So I actually made a rule that I'm not allowed to own critical path work, which feels weird because it's like, I want to be engaged with that work. So the counterpoint to that is I'm now trying to schedule pairing sessions with each of the developers on the team once a week. And in that time, I can work on that sort of stuff with them, and they'll then own it and run with it. So it makes sure that I'm not blocking on those sorts of things, but I'm still connected to the core work that we're doing. But the other thing that you're describing of the CTO goes away for the weekend and then comes back with a new harebrained scheme; I'm very sensitive to that, having worked on; frankly, I think the same project. I can think of a project that you and I worked on where we experienced this. JOËL: I think we're thinking of the same project. CHRIS: So yes. Like, I'm scarred by that and, frankly, a handful of experiences of that nature. So we actually, I think, have a really healthy system in place at Sagewell for capturing, documenting, prioritizing this sort of other work, this developer-centric work. So this is the feature and bug work that gets prioritized and one list over here that is owned by our product manager. Separately, the dev team gets to say, here are the pain points. Here's the stuff that keeps breaking. Here are the things that I wish was better. Here is the observability hard-to-understand bits. And so we have a couple of different systems at play and recurring meetings and sort of unique ceremonies around that, and so this work was very much a fallout of that. It was actually a recurring topic that we kept trying a couple of different stabs at, and we never quite landed it. And then I showed up this one Monday morning, and I was like, "I found a thing; what do we think?" And then, critically, from there, I made sure I paired with other folks on the team as we pushed on the implementation. And then, actually, I mentioned Primalize, the library that we're using. We have now since deprecated Primalize within the app because we kept just adding to it so much that eventually, we're like, at this point, should we own this stuff? So we ended up rewriting the core bits of Primalize to better fit our use cases. And now we've actually removed Primalize, wonderful library. I highly recommend it to anyone who has that particular use case but then the additional type generation for the front end. Plus, we have some custom types within our app, Money being the most interesting one. We decided to model Money as our first-class consideration rather than just letting JavaScript have the sole idea of a number. But yes, in a very long-winded way, yes, I'm very sensitive to the thing you described. And I hope, in this case, I did not fall prey to the CTO goes away for the weekend and made a thing. JOËL: I think what I'm hearing is the key difference here is that you got buy-in from the team around this idea before you went out and implemented it. So you're not off doing your own things disconnected from the team and then imposing it from on high. The team already agreed this is the thing we want to do, and then you just did it for them. CHRIS: Largely, yes. Although I will say there are times that each developer on the team, myself included, have sort of gone away, come back with something, and said, "Hey, here's a WIP PR exploring an area." And there was actually...I'm forgetting what the context was, but there was one that happened recently that I introduced. I was like; I had to do this. And the team talked me out of it, and I ended up closing that PR. Someone else actually made a different PR that was an alternative implementation. I was like, no, that's better; we should absolutely do that. And I think that's really healthy. That's a hard thing to maintain but making sure that everyone feels like they've got a strong voice and that we're considering all of the different ways in which we might consider the work. Most critically, you know, how does this impact users at the end of the day? That's always the primary consideration. How do we make sure we build a robust, maintainable, observable system, all those sorts of things? And primarily, this work should go in that other direction, but I also don't want to stifle that creative spark of I got this thing in my head, and I had to explore it. Like, we shouldn't then need to never mind, throw away the work, put it into a ticket. Like, for as long as we can, that more organic, intuitive process if we can retain that, I like that. Critically, with the ability for everyone to tell me, "No, this is a bad idea. Stop it. What are you doing?" And that has happened recently. I mean, they were kinder about it, but they did talk me out of a bad idea. So here we are. JOËL: So you showed up on Monday morning, not with telling everyone, "Hey, I merged this thing over the weekend." You're showing up with a work-in-progress PR. CHRIS: Yes, definitely. I mean, everything goes through a PR, and everything has discussion and conversation around it. That's a strong, strong like Derek Prior's wonderful talk Building a Culture of Code Review. I forget the exact name of it. But it's one of my favorite talks in talking about the utility of code review as a way to share ideas and all of those wonderful things. So everything goes through code review, and particularly anything that is of that more exploratory architectural space. Often we'll say any one review from anyone on the team is sufficient to merge most things but something like that, I would want to say, "Hey, can everybody take a look at this? And if anyone has any reservations, then let's talk about it more." But if I or anyone else on the team for this sort of work gets everybody approving it, then cool, we're good to go. But yeah, code review critical, critical part of the process. JOËL: I'm curious about Primalize, the gem that you mentioned. It sounds like it's some kind of validation layer between some Ruby data structure and your serializers. CHRIS: It is the serializer, but in the process of serializing, it does run-time type validation, essentially. So as it's accessing, you know, you say first name. You have a user object. You pass it in, and you say, "Serializer, there's a first name, and it's a string." It will call the first name method on that user object. And then, it will check that it has the expected type, and if it doesn't, then, in our case, it sends to Sentry. We have configured it...it's actually interesting. In development and test mode, it will raise for a type mismatch, and in production mode, it will alert Sentry so you can configure that differently. But that ends up being really nice because these type mismatches end up being very loud early on. And it's surprisingly easy to maintain and ends up telling us a lot of truths about our system because, really, what we're doing is connecting data from many different systems and flowing it in and out. And all of the inputs and outputs from our system feel very meaningful to lock down in this way. But yeah, it's been an adventure. JOËL: It seems to me there could almost be two sets of types here, the inputs coming into Primalize from your Ruby data structures and then the outputs that are the actual serialized values. And so you might expect, let's say, an integer on the Ruby side, but maybe at the serialization level, you're serializing it to a string. Do you have that sort of conversion step as part of your serializers sometimes, or is the idea that everything's already the right type on the Ruby side, and then we just, like, to JSON it at the end? CHRIS: Yep. Primalize, I think, probably works a little closer to what you're describing. They have the idea of coercions. So within Primalize, there is the concept of a timestamp; that is one of the types that is available. But a timestamp is sort of the union of a date, a time, or I think they might let through a string; I'm not sure if there is as well. But frankly, for us, that was more ambiguity than we wanted or more blurring across the lines. And in the implementation that we've now built, date and time are distinct. And critically, a string is not a valid date or time; it is a string, that's another thing. And so there's a bunch of plumbing within the way you define the serializers. There are override methods so that you can locally within the serializer say, like, oh, we need to coerce from the shape of data into this other shape of data, even little like in-line proc, so we can do it quickly. But the idea is that the data, once it has been passed to the serializer, should be up the right shape. And so when we get to the type assertion part of the library, we expect that things are in the asserted type and will warn if not. We get surprisingly few warnings, which is interesting now. This whole process has made us pay a little more intention, and it's been less arduous simultaneously than I would have expected because like this is kind of a lot of work that I'm describing. And yet it ends up being very natural when you're the developer in context, like, oh, I've been reading these docs for days. I know the shape of this JSON that I'm working with inside and out, and now I'll just write it down in the serializer. It's very easy to do in that moment, and then it captures it and enforces it in such a useful way. As an aside, as I've been looking at this, I'm like, this is just GraphQL, but inside out, I'm pretty sure. But that is a choice that we have made. We didn't want to adopt the whole GraphQL thing. But just for anyone out there who is listening and is thinking, isn't this just GraphQL but inside out? Kind of. Yes. JOËL: I think my favorite part of GraphQL is the schema, which is not really the selling point for GraphQL, you know, like the idea that you can traverse the graph and get any subset of data that you want and all that. I think I would be more than happy with a REST API that has some kind of schema built around it. And someone told me that maybe what I really just want is SOAP, and I don't know how to feel about that comment. CHRIS: You just got to have some XML, and some WSDLs, and other fun things. I've heard people say good things about SOAP. SOAP seems like a fine idea. If anything, I think a critical part of this is we don't have a JSON API. We have a very tightly coupled front end and back end, and a singular front end, frankly. And so that I think naturally...that makes the thing that I'm describing here a much more comfortable fit. If we had multiple different downstream clients that we're trying to consume from the same back end, then I think a GraphQL API or some other structured JSON schema, whatever it is type of API, and associated documentation and typing layer would be probably a better fit. But as I've said many a time on this here, Bike Shed, Inertia is one of my favorite libraries or frameworks (They're probably more of a framework.) one of my favorite technological approaches that I have ever found. And particularly in buildings Sagewell, it has allowed us to move so rapidly the idea that changes are, you know, one fell swoop changes everything within the codebase. We don't have to think about syncing deploys for the back end and the front end and how to coordinate across them. Our app is so much easier to understand by virtue of that architecture that Inertia implies. JOËL: So, if I understand correctly, you don't serialize to JSON as part of the serializers. You're serializing directly to JavaScript. CHRIS: We do serialize to JSON. At the end of the day, Inertia takes care of this on both the Rails side and the client side. There is a JSON API. Like, if you look at the network inspector, you will see XHR requests happening. But critically, we're not doing that. We're not the ones in charge of it. We're not hitting a specific endpoint. It feels as an application coder much closer to a traditional Rails app. It just happens to be that we're writing our view layer. Instead of an ERB, we're writing them in Svelte files. But otherwise, it feels almost identical to a normal traditional Rails app with controllers and the normal routing and all that kind of stuff. JOËL: One thing that's really interesting about JSON as an interchange format is that it is very restrictive. The primitives it has are even narrower than, say, the primitives that Ruby has. So you'd mentioned sending a date through. There is no JSON date. You have to serialize it to some other type, potentially an integer, potentially a string that has a format that the other side knows how it's going to interpret. And I feel like it's those sorts of richer types when we need to pass them through JSON that serialization and deserialization or parsing on the other end become really interesting. CHRIS: Yeah, I definitely agree with that. It was a struggling point for a while until we found this new approach that we're doing with the serializers in the type system. But so far, the only thing that we've done this with is Money. But on the front end, a while ago, we introduced a specific TypeScript type. So it's a phantom type, and I believe I'm getting this correct. It's a phantom type called Cents, C-E-N-T-S. So it represents...I'm going to say an integer. I know that JavaScript doesn't have integers, but logically, it represents an integer amount of cents. And critically, it is not a number, like, the lowercase number in the type system. We cannot add them together. We can't -- JOËL: I thought you were going to say, NaN. CHRIS: [laughs] It is not a number. I saw a n/a for not applicable somewhere in the application the other day. I was like, oh my God, we have a NaN? It happened? But it wasn't, it was just n/a, and I was fine. But yeah, so we have this idea of Cents within the application. We have a money input, which is a special input designed exactly for this. So to a user, it is formatted to look like you're entering dollars and cents. But under the hood, we are bidirectionally converting that to the integer amount of cents that we need. And we strictly, within the type system, those are cents. And you can't do math on Cents unless you use a special set of helper functions. You cannot generate Cents on the fly unless you use a special set of helper functions, the constructor functions. So we've been really restrictive about that, which was kind of annoying because a lot of the data coming from the server is just, you know, numbers. But now, with this type system that we've introduced on the Ruby side, we can assert and enforce that these are money.new on the Ruby side, so using the Money gem. And they come down to the front end as capital C Cents in the type system on the TypeScript side. So we're able to actually bind that together and then enforce proper usage sort of on both sides. The next step that we plan to do after that is dates and times. And those are actually almost weirder because they end up...we just have to sort of say what they are, and they will be ISO 8601 date and time strings, respectively. But we'll have functions that know this is a date string; that's a thing. It is, again, a phantom type implemented within our TypeScript type system. But we will have custom functions that deal with that and really constrain...lock ourselves down to only working with them correctly. And critically, saying that is the only date and time format that we work with; there is no other. We don't have arbitrary dates. Is this a JSON date or something else? I don't know; there are too many date syntaxes. JOËL: I like the idea of what you're doing in that it sounds like you're very much narrowing that sort of window of where in the stack the data exists in the sort of unstructured, free-floating primitives that could be misinterpreted. And so, at this point, it's almost narrowed to the point where it can't be touched by any user or developer-written code because you've pushed the boundaries on the Rails side down and then on the JavaScript side up to the point where the translation here you define translations on one side or, I guess, a parser on one side and a serializer on the other. And they guarantee that everything is good up until that point. CHRIS: Yep, with the added fun of the runtime reflection on the Ruby side. So it's an interesting thing. Like, TypeScript actually has similar things. You can say what the type is all day long, and your code will consistently conform to that asserted type. But at the end of the day, if your JSON API gets in some different data...unless you're using a library like io-ts, is one that I've looked at, which actually does parsing and returns a result object of did we parse to the thing that you wanted or did we get an error in that data structure? So we could get to that level on the client side as well. We haven't done that yet largely because we've essentially pushed that concern up to the Ruby layer. So where we're authoring the data, because we own that, we're going to do it at that level. There are a bunch of benefits of defining it there and then sort of reflecting it down. But yeah, TypeScript, you can absolutely lie to yourself, whereas Elm, a language that I know you love dearly, you cannot lie to yourself in Elm. You've got to tell the truth. It's the only option. You've got to prove it. Whereas in TypeScript, you can just kind of suggest, and TypeScript will be like, all right, cool, I'll make sure you stay honest on that, but I'm not going to make you prove it, which is an interesting sort of set of related trade-offs there. But I think we found a very comfortable resting spot for right now. Although now, we're starting to look at the edges of the Ruby system where data is coming in. So we have lots of webhooks and other external partners that we're integrating with, and they're sending us data. And that data is of varying shapes. Some will send us a payload with the word amount, and it refers to an integer amount of cents because, of course, it does. Some will send us the word amount in their payload, and it will be a floating amount of dollars. And I get a little sad on those days. But critically, our job is to make sure all of those are the same and that we never pass dollars as cents or cents as dollars because that's where things go sad. That is job number one at Sagewell in the engineering team is never get the decimal place wrong in money. JOËL: That would be a pretty terrible mistake to make. CHRIS: It would. I mean, it happens. In fintech, that problem comes up a lot. And again, the fact that...I'm honestly surprised to see situations out there where we're getting in floating point dollars. That is a surprise to me because I thought we had all agreed sort of as a community that it was integer cents but especially in a language that has integers. JavaScript, it's kind of making it up the whole time. But Ruby has integers. JSON, I guess, doesn't have integers, so I'm sort of mixing concerns here, but you get the idea. JOËL: Despite Ruby not having a static type system, I've found that generally, when I'm integrating with a third-party API, I get to the point where I want something that approximates like Elm's JSON decoders or io-ts or something like that. Because JSON is just a big blob of data that could be of any shape, and I don't really trust it because it's third-party data, and you should not trust third parties. And I find that I end up maybe cobbling something together commonly with like a bunch of usage of hash.fetch, things like that. But I feel like Ruby doesn't have a great approach to parsing and composing these validators for external data. CHRIS: Ruby as a language certainly doesn't, and the ecosystem, I would say, is rather limited in terms of the options here. We have looked a bit at the dry-rb stack of gems, so dry-validation and dry-schema, in particular, both offer potentially useful aspects. We've actually done a little bit of spiking internally around that sort of thing of, like, let's parse this incoming data instead of just coercing to hash and saying that it's got probably the shape that we want. And then similarly, I will fetch all day instead of digging because I want to be quite loud when we get it wrong. But we're already using dry-monads. So we have the idea of result types within the system. We can either succeed or fail at certain operations. And I think it's just a little further down the stack. But probably something that we will implement soon is at those external boundaries where data is coming in doing some form of parsing and validation to make sure that it conforms to unknown data structure. And then, within the app, we can do things more cleanly. That also would allow us to, like, let's push the idea that this is floating point dollars all the way out to the edge. And the minute it hits our system, we convert it into a money.new, which means that cents are properly handled. It's the same type of money or dollar, same type of currency handling as everywhere else in the app. And so pushing that to the very edges of our application is a very interesting idea. And so that could happen in the library or sort of a parsing client, I guess, is probably the best way to think about it. So I'm excited to do that at some point. JOËL: Have you read the article, Parse, Don't Validate? CHRIS: I actually posted that in some code review the other day to one of the developers on the team, and they replied, "You're just going to quietly drop one of my favorite articles of all time in code review?" [laughs] So yes, I've read it; I love it. It's a wonderful idea, definitely something that I'm intrigued by. And sort of bringing dry-monads into Ruby, on the one hand, feels like a forced fit and yet has also been one of the other, I think strongest sort of architectural decisions that we've made within the application. There's so much imperative work that we ended up having to do. Send this off to this external API, then tell this other one, then tell this other one. Put the whole thing in a transaction so that our local data properly handles it. And having dry-monads do notation, in particular, to allow us to make that manageable but fail in all the ways it needs to fail, very expressive in its failure modes, that's been great. And then parse, don't validate we don't quite do it yet. But that's one of the dreams of, like, our codebase really should do that thing. We believe in that. So let's get there soon. JOËL: And the core idea behind parse, don't validate is that instead of just having some data that you don't trust, running a check on it and passing that blob of now checked but still untrusted data down to the next person who might also want to check it. Generally, you want to pass it through some sort of filter that will, one, validate that it's correct but then actually typically convert it into some other trusted shape. In Ruby, that might be something like taking an amorphous blob of JSON and turning it into some kind of value object or something like that. And then anybody downstream that receives, let's say, money object can trust that they're dealing with a well-formed money value as opposed to an arbitrary blob of JSON, which hopefully somebody else has validated, but who knows? So I'm going to validate it again. CHRIS: You can tell that I've been out of the podcasting game for a while because I just started responding to yes; I love that blog post without describing the core premise of it. So kudos to you, Joël; you are a fantastic podcast host over there. I will say one of the things you just described is an interesting...it's been a bit of a struggle for us. We keep sort of talking through what's the architecture. How do we want to build this application? What do we care about? What are the things that really matter within this codebase, and then what is all the other stuff? And we've been good at determining the things that really matter, thinking collectively as a group, and I think coming up with some novel, useful, elegant...I'm saying too many positive adjectives for what we're doing. But I've been very happy with sort of the thing that we decide. And then there's the long-tail work of actually propagating that change throughout the rest of the application. We're, like, okay, here's how it works. Every incoming webhook, we now parse and yield a value object. That sentence that you just said a minute ago is exactly what I want. That's like a bunch of work. It's particularly a bunch of work to convert an existing codebase. It's easy to say, okay, from here forward, any new webhooks, payloads that are coming in, we're going to do in this way. But we have a lot of things in our app now that exist in this half-converted way. There was a brief period where we had three different serializer technologies at play. Just this week, I did the work of killing off the middle ground one, the Primalized-based thing, and we now have only our new hotness and then the very old. We were using Blueprinter as the serializer as the initial sort of stub. And so that still exists within the codebase in some places. But trying to figure out how to prioritize that work, the finishing out those maintenance-type conversions is a tricky one. It's never the priority. But it is really nice to have consistency in a codebase. So it's...yeah, do you have any thoughts on that? JOËL: I think going back to the article and what the meaning of parsing is, I used to always think of parsing as taking strings and turning them into something else, and I think this really broadened my perspective on the idea of parsing. And now, I think of it more as converting from a broader type to a narrower type with failures. So, for example, you could go from a string to an integer, and not all strings are valid integers. So you're narrowing the type. And if you have the string hello world, it will fail, and it will give you an error of some type. But you can have multiple layers of that. So maybe you have a string that you parse into an integer, but then, later on, you might want to parse that integer into something else that requires an integer in a range. Let's say it's a percentage. So you have a value object that is a percentage, but it's encoded in the JSON as a string. So that first pass, you parse it from a string into an integer, and then you parse that integer into a percentage object. But if it's outside the range of valid percentage numbers, then maybe you get an error there as well. So it's a thing that can happen at multiple layers. And I've now really connected it with the primitive obsession smell in code. So oftentimes, when you decide, wait, I don't want a primitive here; I want a richer type, commonly, there's going to be a parsing step that should exist to go from that primitive into the richer type. CHRIS: I like that. That was a classic Joël wildly concise summary of a deeply complex technical topic right there. JOËL: It's like I'm going to connect some ideas from functional programming and a classic object-oriented code smell and, yeah, just kind of mash it all together with a popular article. CHRIS: If only you had a diagram. Podcast is not the best medium for diagrams, but I think you could do it. You could speak one out loud, and everyone would be able to see it in their mind's eye. JOËL: So I will tell you what my diagram is for this because I've actually created it already. I imagine this as a sort of like pyramid with different layers that keep getting smaller and smaller. So the size of type is sort of the width of a layer. And so your strings are a very wide layer. Then on top of that, you have a narrower layer that might be, you know, it could be an integer, or you could even if you're parsing JSON, you first start with a string, then you parse that into a Ruby hash, not all strings are valid hashes. So that's going to be narrower. Then you might extract some values out of that hash. But if the keys aren't right, that might also fail. You're trying to pull the user out of it. And so each layer it gets a richer type, but that richer type, by virtue of being richer, is narrower. And as you're trying to move up that pyramid at every step, there is a possibility for a failure. CHRIS: Have you written a blog post about this with said diagram in it? And is that why you have that so readily at hand? [laughs] JOËL: Yes, that is the case. CHRIS: Okay. Yeah, that made sense to me. [laughs] JOËL: We'll make sure to link to it in the show notes. CHRIS: Now you have to link to Joël blog posts, whereas I used to have to link to them [chuckles] in almost every episode of The Bike Shed that I recorded. JOËL: Another thing I've been thinking about in terms of this parsing is that parsing and serializing are, in a sense, almost opposites of each other. Typically, when you're parsing, you're going from a broad type to a narrow one. And when you're serializing, you're going from a narrow type to a broader one. So you might go from a user into a hash into a string. So you're sort of going down that pyramid rather than going up. CHRIS: It is an interesting observation and one that immediately my brain is like, okay, cool. So can we reuse our serializers but just run them in reverse or? And then I try and talk myself out of that because that's a classic don't repeat yourself sort of failure mode of, like, actually, it's fine. You can repeat a little bit. So long as you can repeat and constrain, that's a fine version. But yeah, feels true, though, at the core. JOËL: I think, in some ways, if you want a single source of truth, what you want is a schema, and then you can derive serializers and parsers from that schema. CHRIS: It's interesting because you used the word derive. That has been an interesting evolution at Sagewell. The engineering team seems to be very collected around the idea of explicitness, almost the Zen of Python; explicit is better than implicit. And we are willing to write a lot of words down a lot of times and be happy with that. I think we actually made the explicit choice at one point that we will not implement an automatic camel case conversion in our serializer, even though we could; this is a knowable piece of code. But what we want is the grepability from the front end to the back end to say, like, where's this data coming from? And being able to say, like, it is this data, which is from this serializer, which comes from this object method, and being able to trace that very literally and very explicitly in the code, even though that is definitely the sort of thing that we could derive or automatically infer or have Ruby do that translation for us. And our codebase is more verbose and a little noisier. But I think overall, I've been very happy with it, and I think the team has been very happy. But it is an interesting one because I've seen plenty of teams where it is the exact opposite. Any repeated characters must be destroyed. We must write code to write the code for us. And so it's fun to be working with a team where we seem to be aligned around an approach on that front. JOËL: That example that you gave is really interesting because I feel like a common thing that happens in a serialization layer is also a form of normalization. And so, for example, you might downcase all strings as part of the serialization, definitely, like dates always get written in ISO 8601 format whenever that happens. And so, regardless of how you might have it stored on the Ruby side, by the time it gets to the JSON, it's always in a standard format. And it sounds like you're not necessarily doing that with capitalization. CHRIS: I think the distinction would be the keys and the values, so we are definitely doing normalization on the values side. So ISO 8601 date and time strings, respectively that, is the direction that we plan to go for the value. But then for the key that's associated with that, what is the name for this data, those we're choosing to be explicit and somewhat repetitive, or not even necessarily repetitive, but the idea of, like, it's first_name on the Ruby side, and it's first capital N name camel case, or it's...I forget the name. It's not quite camel case; it's a different one but lower camel, maybe. But whatever JavaScript uses, we try to bias towards that when we're going to the front end. It does get a little tricky coming back into the Ruby side. So our controllers have a bunch of places where they need to know about what I think is called lower camel case, and so we're not perfect there. But that critical distinction between sort of the names for things, and the values for things, transformations, and normalizations on the values, I'm good with that. But we've chosen to go with a much more explicit version for the names of things or the keys in JSON objects specifically. JOËL: One thing that can be interesting if you have a normalization phase in your serializer is that that can mean that your serializer and parsers are not necessarily symmetric. So you might accept malformed data into your parser and parse it correctly. But then you can't guarantee that the data that gets serialized out is going to identically match the data that got parsed in. CHRIS: Yeah, that is interesting. I'm not quite sure of the ramifications, although I feel like there are some. It almost feels like formatting Prettier and things like that where they need to hold on to whitespace in some cases and throw out in others. I'm thinking about how ASTs work. And, I don't know, there's interesting stuff, but, again, not sure of the ramifications. But actually, to flip the tables just a little bit, and that's an aggressive terminology, but we're going to roll with it. To flip the script, let's go with that, Joël; what's been up in your world? You've been hosting this wonderful show. I've listened in to a number of episodes. You're doing a fantastic job. I want to hear a little bit more of what's new in your world, Joël. JOËL: So I've been working on a project that has a lot of flaky tests, and we're trying to figure out the source of that flakiness. It's easy to just dive into, oh, I saw a flaky Test. Let me try to fix it. But we have so much flakiness that I want to go about it a little bit more systematically. And so my first step has actually been gathering data. So I've actually been able to make API requests to our CI server. And the way we figure out flakiness is looking at the commit hash that a particular test suite run has executed on. And if there's more than one CI build for a given commit hash, we know that's probably some kind of flakiness. It could be a legitimate failure that somebody assumed was flakiness, and so they just re-run CI. But the symptom that we are trying to address is the fact that we have a very high level of people re-verifying their code. And so to do that or to figure out some stats, I made a request to the API grouped by commit hash and then was able to get the stats of how many re-verifications there are and even the distribution. The classic way that you would do that is in Ruby; you would use the GroupBy function from enumerable. And then, you would transform values instead of having, like, say; each commit hash then points to all the builds, an array of builds that match that commit hash. You would then thumb those. So now you have commit hashes that point to counts of how many builds there were for that commit hash. Newer versions of Ruby introduced the tally method, which I love, which allows you to basically do all of that in one step. One thing that I found really interesting, though, is that that will then give me a hash of commit hashes that point to the number of builds that are there. If I want to get the distribution for the whole project over the course of, say, the last week, and I want to say, "How many times do people run only one CI run versus running twice in the same commit versus running three times, or four times, or five or six times?" I want to see that distribution of how many times people are rerunning their build. You're effectively doing that tally process twice. So once you have a list of all the builds, you group by hash. You count, and so you end up with that. You have the Ruby hash of commit SHAs pointing to number of times the build was run on that. And then, you again group by the number of builds for each commit SHA. And so now what you have is you'll have something like one, and then that points to an array of SHA one, SHA two, SHA three, SHA four like all the builds. And then you tally that again, or you transform values, or however, you end up doing it. And what you end up with is saying for running only once, I now have 200 builds that ran only once. For running twice in the same commit SHA, there are 15. For running three times, there are two. For running four times, there is one. And now I've got my distribution broken down by how many times it was run. It took me a while to work through all of that. But now the shortcut in my head is going to be you double tally to get distribution. CHRIS: As an aside, the whole everything you're talking about is interesting and getting to that distribution. I feel like I've tried to solve that problem on data recently and struggled with it. But particularly tally, I just want to spend a minute because tally is such a fantastic addition to the Ruby standard library. I used to have in sort of like loose muscle memory transform value is grouped by ampersand itself, transform values count, sort, reverse to H. That whole string of nonsense gets replaced by tally, and, oof, what a beautiful example of Ruby, and enumerable, and all of the wonder that you can encapsulate there. JOËL: Enumerable is one of the best parts of Ruby. I love it so much. It was one of the first things that just blew my mind about Ruby when I started. I came from a PHP, C++ background and was used to writing for loops for everything and not the nice for each loops that a lot of languages have these days. You're writing like a legit for or while loop, and you're managing the indexes yourself. And there's so much room for things to go wrong. And being introduced to each blew my mind. And I was like, this is so beautiful. I'm not dealing with indexes. I'm not dealing with the raw implementation of the array. I can just say do a thing for each element. This is amazing. And that is when I truly fell in love with Ruby. CHRIS: I want to say I came from Python, most recently before Ruby. And Python has pretty nice list comprehensions and, in fact, in some ways, features that enumerable doesn't have. But, still, coming to Ruby, I was like, oh, this enumerable; this is cool. This is something. And it's only gotten better. It still keeps growing, and the idea of custom enumerables. And yeah, there's some real neat stuff in there. JOËL: I'm going to be speaking at RubyConf Mini this fall in November, and my talk is all about Enumerators and ranges in enumerable and ways you can use those to make the APIs of the objects that you create delightful for other people to use. CHRIS: That sounds like a classic Joël talk right there that I will be happy to listen to when it comes out. A very quick related, a semi-related aside, so, tally, beautiful addition to the Ruby language. On the Rails side, there was one that I used recently, which is where.missing. Have you seen where.missing? JOËL: I have not heard of this. CHRIS: So where.missing is fantastic. Let's assume you've got two related objects, so you've got like a has many blah, so like a user has many posts. I think you can...if I'm remembering it correctly, it's User.where.missing(:posts). So it's where dot missing and then parentheses the symbol posts. And under the hood, Rails will do the whole LEFT OUTER JOIN where the count is null, et cetera. It turns into this wildly complex SQL query or understandably complex, but there's a lot going on there. And yet it compresses down so elegantly into this nice, little ActiveRecord bit. So where.missing is my new favorite addition into the Rails landscape to complement tally on the Ruby side, which I think tally is Ruby 2.7, I want to say. So it's been around for a while. And where.missing might be a Ruby 7 feature. It might be a six-something, but still, wonderful features, ever-evolving these tool sets that we use. JOËL: One of the really nice things about enumerable and family is the fact that they build on a very small amount of primitives, and so as long as you basically understand blocks, you can use enumerable and anything in there. It's not special syntax that you have to memorize. It's just regular functions and blocks. Well, Chris, thank you so much for coming back for a visit. It's been a pleasure. And it's always good to have you share the cool things that you're doing at Sagewell. CHRIS: Well, thank you so much, Joël. It's been an absolute pleasure getting to come back to this whole Bike Shed. And, again, just to add a note here, you're doing a really fantastic job with the show. It's been interesting transitioning back into listener mode for the show. Weirdly, I wasn't listening when I was a host. But now I've regained the ability to listen to The Bike Shed and really enjoy the episodes that you've been doing and the wonderful spectrum of guests that you've had on and variety of topics. So, yeah, thank you for hosting this whole Bike Shed. It's been great. JOËL: And with that, let's wrap up. The show notes for this episode can be found at bikeshed.fm. This show is produced and edited by Mandy Moore. If you enjoyed listening, one really easy way to support the show is to leave us a quick rating or even a review in iTunes. It really helps other folks find the show. If you have any feedback, you can reach us at @_bikeshed, or reach me at @joelquen on Twitter, or at hosts@bikeshed.fm via email. Thank you so much for listening to The Bike Shed, and we'll see you next week. Byeeeeeeeeeee!!!!!!!! ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success.

Applying Scripture
Thinking Critically- "Never Eat Meat Again"

Applying Scripture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 32:31


Throughout much of my experiences within churches, I have seen 1 Corinthians 8:13 used as a "principle" for how to handle disagreements. Essentially, if someone doesn't like something or is offended by it, then you can't do it. Is that what Paul was really saying? Are we only allowed to operate in ways that everyone agrees with? Let's dive in and think critically together. Support the show

Anatomy Of Success
7 Reasons Why To Be More Connected With People Is Critically Important

Anatomy Of Success

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 9:16


Do you know how important it is to connect with people?  Here are 7 reasons why you need to make it a top priority and focus in life in order to level-up your success. Join host Steve Wohlenhaus on the ANATOMY OF SUCCESS podcast and dig deep into what actions you can take to find success in health, work, and relationships. Expect transparent candor and challenges that require action, all to help you define success on your own terms.

Out & About
A Friday Reboot ft. Judy Greer

Out & About

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 39:35 Very Popular


Critically acclaimed actress and absolute sweetheart Judy Greer joins the boys for this week's show. Her new show Reboot is airing now on Hulu so they discuss that and various roles throughout her career. They also have her rank her best red carpet looks AND introduce her to Leah's dog Buddy. Judy was absolutely lovely, this is a great one.

The San Francisco Experience
In conversation with Liz Nugent, Ireland's First Lady of Crime Fiction, Emerald Noir.

The San Francisco Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 36:14


Critically acclaimed author Liz Nugent talks about her body of work in the Emerald Noir subgenre and shares with us a preview of her upcoming book, "Strange Sally Diamond" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/james-herlihy/message

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
VA holding ‘all hands on deck' event to onboard critically needed hires more quickly

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 21:42


The Department of Veterans Affairs hired more employees in fiscal 2022 than at any point in recent history. But top VA officials say more action is needed to build up the agency's workforce, given a high rate of attrition and increasing healthcare demand from veterans. VA Undersecretary for Health Shereef Elnahal told reporters Wednesday that the agency needs to hire about 52,000 employees per year just to keep up with the rate of health care workers leaving the agency, as well as an increase in veterans entering the VA health care system.

Planet: Critical
Making Sense of the Meaning Crisis | John Vervaeke

Planet: Critical

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 70:32


John Vervaeke is a cognitive scientist at the University of Toronto and world renowned thinker, bridging science and spirituality in order to understand the experience of meaningfulness: how to cultivate it and why it's crucial for human beings.John joins me to discuss “the meaning crisis”—the global phenomenon of modern humans having access to so much, and yet so little profundity. Referencing neurobiology, faith and behavioural science, John explains the impact the meaning crisis is having on individuals all around the world, and what to do about it.We then explore its intersection with the metacrisis, and the historical traditions which are the root of our global energy, economic and climate crisis. Critically, John says we cannot solve the climate crisis without addressing the cultural forces driving the meaning crisisPlanet: Critical investigates why the world is in crisis—and what to do about it.© Rachel Donald Get full access to Planet: Critical at www.planetcritical.com/subscribe

SkyWatchTV Podcast
SkyWatch | God's Name on our DNA?

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 29:00


The world is headed toward a prophetic trajectory. Join us in this outspoken series over the next couple of weeks as we uncover where the world is headed, a reality where China and "Kings of the East" are fighting to impose a Communist world order, and expose hidden secrets of the ancient Hebrew language to help explain end-time prophecies throughout the Bible. Critically acclaimed, bestselling authors Thomas Horn, Terry James, Carl Gallups, and Bob Maginnis take you on a whirlwind tour through current global activity and ancient Bible prophecy to expose how today's societies and culture are increasingly saturated with evil, Genesis 6-level activity. Delusion and deception (deceivers and demonic influences) are preparing this generation for the Great Tribulation… AND IT IS COMING SOONER THAN MOST CAN EVEN IMAGINE! We are joined today by, e are joined today by, Carl Gallups who has been the senior pastor of Hickory Hammock Baptist Church in Milton, Florida since 1987. Using his pastoral experience and expertise, Gallups gives us insight into how God has placed his name into every strand of DNA in our body and exposes the knowledge and technology foretold by the prophet Daniel, and what it means for us as believers in Christ. We are also joined by Lt. Col. Robert McGinnis, Terry James, and Tom Moore. Be sure to subscribe so you do not miss out on the rest of this explosive, prophetic series! GET THE GLOBAL-ACCELERATION SPECIAL COLLECTION! A $60 VALUE FOR ONLY A $35 DONATION! TO ORDER VISIT: https://www.skywatchtvstore.com/collections/featured-products/products/the-global-acceleration-special-collection OR CALL 417-723-0148 or 844-750-4985 FOLLOW US! Facebook: @SkyWatchTV @SimplyHIS @EdensEssentials Instagram: @SkyWatchTV @SimplyHisShow @EdensEssentialsUSA TikTok: @SkyWatchTV @SimplyHisShow @EdensEssentials

New Books in Critical Theory
Josh Bowsher, "The Informational Logic of Human Rights" (Edinburgh UP, 2022)

New Books in Critical Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:44


What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication' of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up with questions regarding the broader political valences of human rights. In The Informational Logic of Human Rights (Edinburgh UP, 2022), Josh Bowsher resituates recent critiques of human rights within ongoing theoretical discussions concerning informational capitalism, digital culture and the politics of data. Critically analysing the contemporary human rights movement as an informational politics, Bowsher provides a new conceptual agenda for both exploring and overcoming the limits of human rights in an era shaped by the data flows, network infrastructures and informational logic of late capitalism. Louisa Hann recently attained a PhD in English and American studies from the University of Manchester, specialising in the political economy of HIV/AIDS theatres. She has published work on the memorialisation of HIV/AIDS on the contemporary stage and the use of documentary theatre as a neoliberal harm reduction tool. She is currently working on a monograph based on her doctoral thesis. You can get in touch with her at louisahann92@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/critical-theory

New Books in Sociology
Josh Bowsher, "The Informational Logic of Human Rights" (Edinburgh UP, 2022)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:44


What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication' of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up with questions regarding the broader political valences of human rights. In The Informational Logic of Human Rights (Edinburgh UP, 2022), Josh Bowsher resituates recent critiques of human rights within ongoing theoretical discussions concerning informational capitalism, digital culture and the politics of data. Critically analysing the contemporary human rights movement as an informational politics, Bowsher provides a new conceptual agenda for both exploring and overcoming the limits of human rights in an era shaped by the data flows, network infrastructures and informational logic of late capitalism. Louisa Hann recently attained a PhD in English and American studies from the University of Manchester, specialising in the political economy of HIV/AIDS theatres. She has published work on the memorialisation of HIV/AIDS on the contemporary stage and the use of documentary theatre as a neoliberal harm reduction tool. She is currently working on a monograph based on her doctoral thesis. You can get in touch with her at louisahann92@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Politics
Josh Bowsher, "The Informational Logic of Human Rights" (Edinburgh UP, 2022)

New Books in Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:44


What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication' of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up with questions regarding the broader political valences of human rights. In The Informational Logic of Human Rights (Edinburgh UP, 2022), Josh Bowsher resituates recent critiques of human rights within ongoing theoretical discussions concerning informational capitalism, digital culture and the politics of data. Critically analysing the contemporary human rights movement as an informational politics, Bowsher provides a new conceptual agenda for both exploring and overcoming the limits of human rights in an era shaped by the data flows, network infrastructures and informational logic of late capitalism. Louisa Hann recently attained a PhD in English and American studies from the University of Manchester, specialising in the political economy of HIV/AIDS theatres. She has published work on the memorialisation of HIV/AIDS on the contemporary stage and the use of documentary theatre as a neoliberal harm reduction tool. She is currently working on a monograph based on her doctoral thesis. You can get in touch with her at louisahann92@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/politics-and-polemics

New Books Network
Josh Bowsher, "The Informational Logic of Human Rights" (Edinburgh UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:44


What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication' of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up with questions regarding the broader political valences of human rights. In The Informational Logic of Human Rights (Edinburgh UP, 2022), Josh Bowsher resituates recent critiques of human rights within ongoing theoretical discussions concerning informational capitalism, digital culture and the politics of data. Critically analysing the contemporary human rights movement as an informational politics, Bowsher provides a new conceptual agenda for both exploring and overcoming the limits of human rights in an era shaped by the data flows, network infrastructures and informational logic of late capitalism. Louisa Hann recently attained a PhD in English and American studies from the University of Manchester, specialising in the political economy of HIV/AIDS theatres. She has published work on the memorialisation of HIV/AIDS on the contemporary stage and the use of documentary theatre as a neoliberal harm reduction tool. She is currently working on a monograph based on her doctoral thesis. You can get in touch with her at louisahann92@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Law
Josh Bowsher, "The Informational Logic of Human Rights" (Edinburgh UP, 2022)

New Books in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:44


What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication' of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up with questions regarding the broader political valences of human rights. In The Informational Logic of Human Rights (Edinburgh UP, 2022), Josh Bowsher resituates recent critiques of human rights within ongoing theoretical discussions concerning informational capitalism, digital culture and the politics of data. Critically analysing the contemporary human rights movement as an informational politics, Bowsher provides a new conceptual agenda for both exploring and overcoming the limits of human rights in an era shaped by the data flows, network infrastructures and informational logic of late capitalism. Louisa Hann recently attained a PhD in English and American studies from the University of Manchester, specialising in the political economy of HIV/AIDS theatres. She has published work on the memorialisation of HIV/AIDS on the contemporary stage and the use of documentary theatre as a neoliberal harm reduction tool. She is currently working on a monograph based on her doctoral thesis. You can get in touch with her at louisahann92@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/law

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society
Josh Bowsher, "The Informational Logic of Human Rights" (Edinburgh UP, 2022)

New Books in Science, Technology, and Society

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 51:44


What happens to the cultural politics of human rights when atrocities are rendered calculable, abuses are transformed into data, and victims become vectors? As human rights organizations have increasingly embraced information technologies this ‘datafication' of rights has become both a reality and a pressing concern, one inextricably tangled up with questions regarding the broader political valences of human rights. In The Informational Logic of Human Rights (Edinburgh UP, 2022), Josh Bowsher resituates recent critiques of human rights within ongoing theoretical discussions concerning informational capitalism, digital culture and the politics of data. Critically analysing the contemporary human rights movement as an informational politics, Bowsher provides a new conceptual agenda for both exploring and overcoming the limits of human rights in an era shaped by the data flows, network infrastructures and informational logic of late capitalism. Louisa Hann recently attained a PhD in English and American studies from the University of Manchester, specialising in the political economy of HIV/AIDS theatres. She has published work on the memorialisation of HIV/AIDS on the contemporary stage and the use of documentary theatre as a neoliberal harm reduction tool. She is currently working on a monograph based on her doctoral thesis. You can get in touch with her at louisahann92@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/science-technology-and-society

Dungeon Drunks
Distinguished Adventurers Wendrigod's Tower Ep 10 Critically Classy

Dungeon Drunks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 66:37


The epic finale of this saga! Will our heroes finally defeat the Spirit of the Hoard and claim this tower?  This is a post Campaign 1 stand alone adventure, featuring the Heralds of Greenest and a few extra friends! Find out more about our show:  Website: https://www.distinguishedadventurers.com  Twitter: https://twitter.com/DistinguishAdv  Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/DistinguishedAdventurers  Our Cast: Dungeon Master Lauren Urban (Twitter: @OboeLauren), Julia "Juls" (Twitter: @Giulia_Rossa) , John Sedlack (Twitter: @that_film_guy IG: @that_film_guy), Jonathan Serna (Twitter: @road_block, IG: @roadblockactual), Jack Edathil (Twitter: @jackedathil; IG: @jackedathil)  Special thanks to Idle Champions of the Forgotten Realms for the free electrum chest! Check them out: (codenameentertainment.com)   Art by Luke McKay (lukemckay.com), music by Linnea Boyev (taichiknees.com) with oboe performance by Lauren "Oboe" Urban, and Dungeons & Dragons 5e system by Wizards of the Coast

SkyWatchTV Podcast
SkyWatch | Trajectory Part 1- Carl Gallups, Lt. Col. Bob Maginnis & Terry James

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 29:00


The world is headed towards a prophetic trajectory. Join us in this outspoken series over the next couple of weeks as we uncover where the world is headed, a reality where China and "Kings of the East" are fighting to impose a Communist world order, and expose hidden secrets of the ancient Hebrew language to help explain end-time prophecies throughout the Bible. Critically acclaimed, bestselling authors Thomas Horn, Terry James, Carl Gallups, and Lt. Col. Robert Maginnis take you on a whirlwind tour through current global activity and ancient Bible prophecy to expose how today's societies and culture are increasingly saturated with evil, Genesis 6-level activity. Delusion and deception (deceivers and demonic influences) are preparing this generation for Great Tribulation… AND IT IS COMING SOONER THAN MOST CAN EVEN IMAGE! GET THE GLOBAL-ACCELERATION SPECIAL COLLECTION! A $60 VALUE FOR ONLY A $35 DONATION! VISIT https://www.skywatchtvstore.com/collections/featured-products/products/the-global-acceleration-special-collection OR CALL 417-723-0148 or 844-750-4985 Facebook: @SkyWatchTV @SimplyHIS @EdensEssentials Instagram: @SkyWatchTV @SimplyHisShow @EdensEssentialsUSA TikTok: @SkyWatchTV @SimplyHisShow @EdensEssentials

Applying Scripture
"Thinking Critically" - Matthew 18

Applying Scripture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 31:34


When we view the Bible as a set of rules and lists, we will see rules and lists when we examine the text. Sometimes that is helpful. Sometimes, it takes away from the true nature of the text that is in question. Join me today as we re-evaluate Matthew 18:17. What does it mean to treat someone like a tax collector and a gentile? Was Jesus teaching a "3 strikes and you're out" approach to handling conflict? Is there something more at work here? Let's dive in. Support the show

Learned Hands: The Official Podcast of the Westerosi Bar Association
Hands on HotD: Episode 8 - The Lord of the Tides - feat. Stanford Fraser

Learned Hands: The Official Podcast of the Westerosi Bar Association

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 133:23


In this eighth edition of Hands on HotD, Merry and Clint and Special Guest Hand Stanford Fraser cover Season 1 Episode 8 of HBO's niche arthouse property HOUSE OF THE DRAGON - The Lord of the TidesIn this episode we:Evaluate Vaemond Velaryon's suboptimal litigation strategy and general inability to read the room.Sing the praises of our twin Rogue Princes, Daemon and Aemond Targaryen, we are sure they'll get along great.Critically analyze the Big Prophecy Twist and ask whether this was at all necessary?Do a Westerosi CLE on the concepts of res judicata, ripeness, standing, testamentary capacity, holographic wills, and dying declarations. Appreciate the lawyerly skills of Rhaenys and Rhaenyra, two gunners who never stop gunning, ever.Talk about family, life, and heartbreak in the context of Viserys I Targaryen, the Most Mid King in Westerosi History.Supplemental reading:Learned Hands Officially Legally Correct (kind of) Line of SuccessionStanford's podcast the Hot Pod ExpressOutro music courtesy Sid Luscious & The Pants. None of this should be construed as legal advice OBVIOUSLY. Support the show

The Roundtable
"I'm Not a Comedian ... I'm Lenny Bruce" at The Mahaiwe

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 20:08


Critically-acclaimed actor Ronnie Marmo, with the blessings of Kitty Bruce (daughter of the late Lenny Bruce), along with the Lenny Bruce Foundation, present "I'm Not a Comedian… I'm Lenny Bruce," directed by Joe Mantegna.The one-person show chronicles the life and death of the most controversial comedian and undisputed legend of all time: Lenny Bruce. His personal pain, sharply funny social commentary and completely original, freestyle comedy left a lasting impact on today's poetry, politics, music, film – and of course – comedy. His unwavering commitment to, and passion for, free speech led to numerous obscenity charges and arrests. Bruce fought for freedom of speech all the way to the Supreme Court, and died of an accidental overdose in 1966 while out on appeal. Lauded by fans and former friends of Bruce, Marmo's crowd-shocking portrayal brings the notorious funnyman to life with all the electrifying, insightful and comedic brilliance as the one and only Lenny Bruce himself."I'm Not a Comedian ... I'm Lenny Bruce," will be performed at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, Massachusetts on October 14 and 15.

The Church of Tarantino
Reservoir Dogs 30th Anniversary Special

The Church of Tarantino

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 160:21


They were perfect strangers, assembled to pull off the perfect crime. Then their simple robbery explodes into a bloody ambush, and the ruthless killers realize one of them is a police informer. But which one? Critically acclaimed for its raw power and breathtaking ferocity, it's a brilliant new American gangster movie classic from writer-director Quentin Tarantino. So join the Reverend Scott K and his panel of dogs, Shon Wheeler (CEO Scare Flair Records/Host of Splatterhouse Podcast), Steve Smith (Host of The Way Past Cool Podcast/Co-Host of The Cheeky Basterds Podcast) & Petros Patsilivas (Host of The Caged In Podcast: Coppola Connections/Co-Host Getting Dafoe You Podcast), as they sit down to discuss, dissect and reminisce about one of the greatest debut films ever, Reservoir Dogs, as it celebrates it's 30th Anniversary. Check out the panel's podcasts & follow them on their socials: Shon Wheeler: Listen to the Splatterhouse Podcast: https://open.spotify.com/show/38MSH4gnr6BU0uSrw3SuT7?si=bb155e1a67d5404b Follow the Splatterhouse Podcast on their Socials: Facebook: @Splatterhousepodcast Instagram: @the_splatterhouse_podcast Twitter: @SplatterPodcast Steve Smith: FB & Instagram - @ixnayray Twitter - @IxnayrayWPC Listen to The Way Past Cool Podcast: mixcloud.com/ixnayray Listen to The Cheeky Basterds Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-cheeky-basterds-podcast/id1642499584 The Cheeky Basterds Podcast Socials: Facebook & Instagram: @CheekyBasterdsPodcast Twitter: @CheekyBasterds Petros Patsilivas: FB, Instagram & Twitter - @Cagedinpod Listen to Caged In: Coppola Connections Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/caged-in-coppola-connections/id1214524537 Getting Dafoe You Podcast Socials: Instagram & Twitter: @DafoeYouPod Cyn Electric: Website: mycrazy88.com Music: https://music.apple.com/us/album/my-crazy-88-ep/1640846586 Song: https://music.apple.com/us/album/love-song-of-vengeance/1640846586?i=1640846587 Socials: FB @cynelectric official Instagram & Twitter @cynelectric Become a member of The Church of Tarantino by following us on our socials: Facebook: @ChurchOfTarantino Instagram: @TheChurchOfTarantino Twitter: @TheChurchOfQTPod --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thechurchoftarantino/message

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast
”Shock and awe” - OPEC+ strategy will lift oil prices: The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

The MUFG Global Markets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 5:48


OPEC+ announced a production cut of two million barrels per day at its meeting this week – the largest such cuts from the group since the start of the Coronavirus in early 2020. What's unprecedented is that the group decided to take barrels off global markets amid one of the tightest oil markets on record and ahead of a potential decline in Russian exports later this year. Ehsan Khoman, Head of Commodities, ESG and Emerging Markets Research (EMEA) believes that the group's headline cut will result in a lower effective cut of the quantum of ~1.1m b/d due to adjustments to baseline levels of production allocated to producers. Critically, he views that the cuts will not only further tighten fundamentals – lending support to his bullish price forecasts – but also help remedy the large exodus of oil investors that has left prices underperforming both fundamentals and other cyclical asset classes. Disclaimer: www.mufgresearch.com (PDF)