Podcasts about Massachusetts

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State in the northeastern United States

  • 11,318PODCASTS
  • 27,666EPISODES
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  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST
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Best podcasts about Massachusetts

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Latest podcast episodes about Massachusetts

Sheologians
Feminism is Poison: Character Studies from the First Wave (Part Two)

Sheologians

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 65:26


This week Joy tells us the life story of Lucy Stone, the "Morningstar" of the Women's Rights movement. She was the first woman to graduate with a college degree in the state of Massachusetts. She was strongly against slavery, marriage, and contentment. Join us! The post Feminism is Poison: Character Studies from the First Wave (Part Two) appeared first on Sheologians.

I Like Beer The Podcast
Virtual Field Trip - Exhibit ”A” Brewing - Part 1

I Like Beer The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 37:36


The ILB Team goes back to the virtual world to welcome Matthew Steinberg, Co-founder/Head Brewer and Kelsey Roth, General Manager from Exhibit "A" Brewing in Framingham, Massachusetts who were kind enough to send the team some excellent beers to taste as they share their origin story about the brewery.

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast
TD159: All Trucking News; All The Time

Trucker Dump - A Trucking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 208:10


It's been over two months since the last episode, so we're skipping a main topic today to get caught up on a crap-ton of news. We've got several recalls, new emissions and inspection standards, autonomous and electric trucks, Teamster elections, the top 500 trucking companies, fixing the supply chain issues, tips for driving in bad weather or avoiding it altogether, and new places for truckers to park. We've also got big stories on the proposed vaccine mandate, lots of new legislation, and a trucker who got a major break on his sentence after a fiery wreck. And most importantly, we'll start the show with some hand signals every trucker should know to combat human trafficking. We'll point you to some good southern eatin' in the Trucker Grub segment, and in the Listener Feedback segment, we'll discuss everything from broken websites, to the future of trucking, to some clarification on the latest Hours of Service rules. This episode of Trucker Dump is sponsored by: Volvo Trucks - Check out the new D13TC engine in the Volvo VNL series. Porter Freight Funding - So many services to offer, including Factoring, Dispatching, Freight Brokering, Fuel Cards, Insurance, and Compliance. Call 855–943-3518 to learn more. Introduction: Universal hand signal for under duress from TikTok News segment: Western Star trucks recalled for electrical, steering issues from OverdriveOnline.com Great Dane trailers recalled over brakes issue from OverdriveOnline.com Great Dane recall hits 3,200 trailers from OverdriveOnline.com Power steering defect prompts recall of certain Mack trucks from OverdriveOnline.com Cummins recalls X12 diesel engines because of fire risk from FreightWaves.com Rear impact guards now included in annual DOT inspection checklist from OverdriveOnline.com Court reverses Obama-era trailer emissions standards from OverdriveOnline.com California Targets Heavy-Duty Vehicles With Roadside ‘Smog Check' Inspections from TheTruckersReport.com New York, Massachusetts to end diesel truck sales by 2035 from OverdriveOnline.com TuSimple claims success on 80-mile driverless Class 8 pilot in Arizona from FreightWaves.com Robots outnumber human workers in this autonomous truck yard north of Denver from cpr.org and Shaun Coit @ChatAssassin Independent Truck Driver Lobbyist Blasts Lawmakers Over Workforce Solutions from TheTruckersReport.com Why we need to eliminate the overtime exemption to the Fair Labor Standards Act to solve the driver shortage from ccjdigital.com White House Rolls Out Plan To Attract, Retain Truck Drivers from TheTruckersReport.com TD158: How Do We Attract The Next Generation In Trucking? from AboutTruckDriving.com Operators grade shippers, and the results get surprising from OverdriveOnline.com What do you think? Correcting the research record around retention/churn with the most important perspective from OverdriveOnline.com SCOTUS spikes Biden vaccine mandate but issue not fully put to bed from OverdriveOnline.com Vaccine mandate now in effect for cross-border truckers re-entering Canada from CTV News in Vancouver FMCSA extends COVID-19 emergency declaration's hours waiver through February from OverdriveOnline.com Congress approves $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill from FreightWaves.com What Truck Drivers Need to Know About $1 Trillion Infrastructure Package from TheTruckersReport.com DRIVE Safe Act becomes law: Here's what motor carriers need to know from OverdriveOnline.com Fatal crashes involving large trucks at highest level since 2005 from OverdriveOnline.com Study finds trucking accidents up after ELDs from OverdriveOnline.com FMCSA boss nominee Meera Joshi leaving post from OverdriveOnline.com America's Ports Problem Is Decades in the Making from the CATO Institute submitted by Joseph Genalo a.k.a Flatbed Joe Truckers tired of taking blame for congestion crisis at California ports from FreightWaves.com Port challenges/opportunities: Is the heyday sun setting on JIT as an inventory/freight model from OverdriveOnline.com Greater split-sleeper flexibility, infrastructure investment, clarified independent contractor status: Trucking groups' recommendations to improve supply chain from OverdriveOnline.com Low Teamsters election turnout may not be what it seems from FreightWaves.com Exclusive: Central Freight Lines to shut down after 96 years from FreightWaves.com FreightWaves Ratings unveils inaugural Top 500 for-hire list from FreightWaves.com TikTok video explaining the 110-year sentence from TikTok.com Millions Petition to Reduce Truck Drivers Excessive 110-Year Sentence from TheTruckersReport.com Colorado governor knocks a century off driver's 110-year sentence from OverdriveOnline.com Step up tire management in cold weather for better traction and tread life from OverdriveOnline.com Winter trucking tips that could actually save a life from OverdriveOnline.com Financial incentives almost always overrule safety instincts from ccjdigital.com Are truckers protected from retaliation for refusing to drive in bad weather? (3:13 video) from OverdriveOnline.com Ohio plans to repurpose two former weigh stations for truck parking from OverdriveOnline.com Four news Love's add 280 truck parking spaces from OverdriveOnline.com Love's adds more than 300 parking spaces with 3 new locations from OverdriveOnline.com Love's opens new Missouri location from OverdriveOnline.com Trucker Grub segment: Patty's Restaurant: Authentic Southern Eatery in Wildersville, TN 7 days a week, our winter hours are 11:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.  Listener feedback segment: Matt MacKellar @Mountain Matt wrote in to tell me that people from Michigan call themselves and informs me of a goof on my website. He also mentions how helpful the “The First 6 Months Of Trucking - Part 1 & 2” episodes were to a new driver coming into the industry. Links to both below. TD156: The First 6 Months Of Trucking - Part 1 from AboutTruckDriving.com TD157: The First 6 Months Of Trucking - Part 2 from AboutTruckDriving.com Nicholas Murphy, Jack Rickelmann, and Keith Butler all pointed out the website was borked beyond all recognition. Andrew Farmer writes in with his own BMW experience. David White a.k.a. Driver Dave wrote in for some Hours-of-Service clarification. Greg T has started a new YouTube channel called Greg's Trucking Weather & Road Channel and points us to over 30 minutes of big truck drag racing. Man, that's a lot of black smoke! Trucker Andy writes in to share all his social media stuff about trucking in the UK. Ken has a Class A CDL, but never really knew how to drive. What's the best way to get back into things and get a trucking job? I had some suggestions, but we're looking for your input too. George Heine sent an audio comment on how to pronounce his last name. Show info: You can email your comments, suggestions, questions, or insults to TruckerDump@gmail.com Join the Trucker Dump Podcast Facebook Group Join the Trucker Dump Slack Group by emailing me at TruckerDump@gmail.com Got a second to Rate and/or Review the podcast? Download the intro/outro songs for free! courtesy of Walking On Einstein

To Be Blunt: The Podcast for Cannabis Marketers
084 Baking Up The Future of Cannabis Tech and Adoption with Shanel Lindsey of Ardent

To Be Blunt: The Podcast for Cannabis Marketers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 55:00


“At the end of the day, cannabis businesses are just like any other businesses, right? They need all of the services and support that anyone needs. And obviously, our lane is in helping with consumption.” - Shanel LindsayWelcome back to the To Be Blunt podcast! In this episode, Shayda Torabi welcomes Shanel Lindsay, founder and president of Ardent Life, Inc., to discuss the bright future of cannabis made possible by technology, how her profession as a lawyer got her involved in legalization, the importance of homegrowing and testing, and empowering our customers through presenting the science.[00:01 – 04:46] Cannabis-infused home-baked goodies[04:47– 10:06] Shanel shares her mission in the Cannabis World[10:07 – 21:55] Framework in Massachusetts in Home Growing and Productization[21:56 – 32:50] Breaking Down the Decarboxylation Process[32:51 – 51:36] Biotech, Hardware, and Data Points as Springboards[51:37 – 55:01] Food for Thought: How do you go empower the consumer through data? Shanel Lindsay is an attorney, activist, and entrepreneur.  Founder and President of Ardent Life, Inc., a Boston-based biotech and consumer device company focused on improving the science and medicine of cannabis, Shanel is the creator of Nova Precision Decarboxylator, which regulates medical cannabis dosing, and the new Ardent FX, an all-in-one cooking, infusion and baking device. She has grown a global brand in Ardent Life and has received multiple patents for her inventions. A graduate of Northeastern University School of Law and the University of Pennsylvania, Shanel was an author of and spokesperson for the Massachusetts Marijuana Legalization Initiative (aka Question 4) and twice appointed to the Massachusetts Cannabis Advisory Board. She is also co-founder of Equitable Opportunities NOW! (EON), a non-profit that has successfully fought for equitable cannabis policies that benefit Black and Brown residents and communities disproportionately harmed by prohibition, as well as mentoring minority business owners entering the industry.Connect with Shanel Visit https://ardentcannabis.com/ and follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn @ardentllc Shayda Torabi has been called one of the most influential Women in WordPress and now she's one of the women leading the cannabis reformation conversation building one of Texas' premier CBD brands. She's currently the CEO and Co-Founder of RESTART CBD, a female-run education first CBD wellness brand. And has formerly held marketing positions at WP Engine and WebDevStudios. Shayda is the host of a podcast for cannabis marketers called To Be Blunt, where she interviews top cannabis brands on their most successful marketing initiatives. When Shayda's not building her cannabiz in Texas, you can find her on the road exploring the best hikes and spots for vegan ice cream. Follow Shayda at @theshaydatorabiKey Quote:“When you're not allowing people to test at home, like wait, just terrible policy, right? And you're also like, you're keeping patients in the dark, but it also benefits corporate operators…it's really important, like, never to suppress the data.” - Shanel Lindsay  SPONSORSHIP is brought to you by Restart CBD. Check them out for your CBD needsLEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to join me for episodes featuring some serious cannabis industry by sharing this episode or click here to listen to past episodes

Tactical Leadership
Unlock Your Potential and Step into Adventure

Tactical Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 41:14


“This idea of helping others, like, there's just something that is so satisfying in seeing other people improve.” - Sean Lake Welcome to another week of Tactical Leader! In today's episode, we have Sean Lake to share his adventure of a lifetime of finding himself along with his best friend, Navy SEAL Glen “BUB”  Doherty. He discusses how gratifying it is to discover your inner potential and help others unlock theirs through humanistic advocacy. Sean Lake grew up in Winchester, Massachusetts, before moving to Utah to become a professional snowboarder and general ski bum. Once he got that out of his system, he graduated from the University of Utah, using that degree to join Burton Snowboards, work as Shaun White's Team Manager, and land a  spot as the Director of Sports Marketing at DC Shoes. After decades in action sports marketing, Sean co-founded BUBS Naturals, a line of collagen peptides and other all-natural supplements that help athletes at all levels perform and feel their best.  Sean named BUBS Naturals after his childhood best friend Glen “BUB”  Doherty, a Navy SEAL who was killed in Benghazi, Libya on 9/11 in 2012. In addition to remembering Glen for the patriot he is, the BUBS ethos centers around the passionate and adventure-seeking life that Glen lived. Sean and the BUBS Naturals family further honor “Bub” by donating 10% of all profits to charities that support veterans.  A devoted husband, father, and fitness fanatic, Sean now lives in Encinitas,  California, where he can ride his bike to work and still do a quick surf check from the office.    [00:01 - 06:58] Opening Segment If you have a platform and you want to create content that DELIVERS, go over tohttp://knightly.productions/ ( knightly.productions)! I introduce Sean Lake Getting through the shift and dynamic parents would understand Being protective and closely built into the culture The path and expectations ingrained in all of us   [06:59 - 18:37] Experiencing the Adventure of a Lifetime Sean talks about Glen “BUB” Doherty They decided to move to the mountains to become professional athletes. Odd jobs for adventures Living the dream Being able to cultivate relationships and travel the world became the end goal. It became the question of - what are we going to do with the rest of our lives? Mapping out a life path Sean landed in the sports industry while Glen pursued the navy seals. [18:38 - 34:14] The Shifts and Tests to Realize Your Capacity Getting into fitness Competition can bring out the best in us. Sean justifies not paying for a gym membership by becoming a coach. We're not getting any younger Starting the brand It is a way to help special operators and their families transition out of active duty to civilian life. Purpose-driven business   [34:15 - 41:15] Closing Segment   The legacy Sean wants to create: There's an opportunity in everyone to unlock that human potential Connect with Sean (links below)  Visit his website, Linkedin, and more!  Join us for Tactical Friday!   Key Quote/s:  “You don't know what you're capable of until you are tested.” - Sean Lake Connect with Sean Follow him on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter at @bubsnaturals.   Did you love the value that we are putting out in the show? LEAVE A REVIEW and tell us what you think about the episode so we can continue on putting out great content just for you! Share this episode and help someone who wants to expand their leadership capacity or clickhttps://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/tactical-leadership/id1498567657 ( here) to listen to our previous episodes.   Tactical Leadership is brought to you by Knight Protection Services. A veteran-owned and operated company, with extensive experience in risk assessment and crime prevention. Find out more by visiting https://knightprotectionllc.com/ ( https://knightprotectionllc.com/)   If you want

Mastering Midlife Podcast
Climbing Ladders: Leaving Corporate America to Start a Gutter-Cleaning Business with Andy Brennan

Mastering Midlife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 24:56


Andy Brennan is the Founder and Co-owner of the Cape Cod Gutter Monkeys and its parent company, the American Gutter Monkeys, which are both gutter cleaning and installation companies. Alongside his college roommate, Dennis Siggins, Andy founded the company in 2014 after a 35-year stint in the corporate world. Since then, the American Gutter Monkeys has grown and expanded with two locations in the South Shore and South Coast of Massachusetts. In addition to its dedication to delivering excellent customer service, the company hopes to help individuals shift their careers by offering franchise opportunities. Andy joins us today to share what he has learned from running his own company after working 35 years in corporate America. He discusses his decision to start a business and explains how having a business partner helped him navigate entrepreneurship. He also describes how starting his own business changed him and offers advice to people who want to shift from corporate work to self-employment. “When you start a small business, you won't make a lot of money in the first year. Budget properly, work hard, and take as many jobs as you can.” - Andy Brennan Today on Mastering Midlife: Andy's background and his first job out of college What made Andy think about starting his own business after 35 years in corporate America Translating corporate skills into self-employment Why Andy and his business partner decided to start a gutter cleaning business How long it took for Andy and his co-founder to prepare and plan for their company The importance of feeding your business Gutter Monkeys' customer base and how they generate peripheral business from gutter cleaning The value of over-delivering in entrepreneurship How Gutter Monkeys' business and gutter-cleaning processes have improved over the years Their marketing strategy and why Gutter Monkeys shifted from creating infomercials to funny ads How entrepreneurship has changed Andy Connect with Andy Brennan: American Gutter Monkeys American Gutter Monkeys on LinkedIn Andy Brennan on LinkedIn Mastering Midlife...Together! Thanks for tuning into today's episode of the Mastering Midlife Podcast: How to Thrive When the World Asks the Most of You with Mark Silverman. If you enjoyed this episode, subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts and leave us a review. Be sure to visit our website and connect with us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube and don't forget to share your favorite episodes on social media.

SPIN IT: Business & Crisis Management with Stephynie Malik
#26 Vulnerability in Entrepreneurship with Jason Feifer

SPIN IT: Business & Crisis Management with Stephynie Malik

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 50:39


This week Stephynie is speaking with Jason Feifer. Jason is the Editor in Chief of Entrepreneur Magazine, keynote speaker, and host of the podcast 'Build for Tomorrow.' He walks us through his early days as a local reporter in Massachusetts to achieving massive success as Editor in Chief of Entrepreneur Magazine. They discuss how Jason learned to navigate the world of media and eventually run it!   Jason Feifer's Social Media & Important Links :  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyfeifer/ Build for Tomorrow Podcast: https://www.jasonfeifer.com/build-for-tomorrow/ Jasons Newsletter that comes out 2x a week- How to Become More Adaptable:https://jasonfeifer.bulletin.com/   Timestamps:  - 00:00 - Spin It! Intro  - 00:33 - Intro to Jason Feifer  - 03:36 - Lessons that Jason took away from his first position  - 07:15 - Pitching the Washington Post - 09:17 - How do you pitch a story? - 12:56 - Understanding your value when pitching - 16:34 - Adaptiveness is the most important quality a person can have - 21:43 - Build your skills and everything else will come later - 23:03 - Biggest regret Jason has from being on TV this morning - 27:50 - Turning something you regret into a learning experience - 30:30 - Vulnerability and Transparency - 38:17 - “People don't remember what you say but they do remember how you make them feel” - 39:55 - Rapid Fire Questions  - 46:58 - Jason's biggest obstacle that he turned into an opportunity - 49:09 - How our listeners can find Jason Feifer (Links Above) - 50:00 - Outro  

From the Inside Out: With Rivkah Krinsky and Eda Schottenstein
Impactful Moments Behind the Scenes with The Lubavitcher Rebbe & Rebbetzin: With Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky

From the Inside Out: With Rivkah Krinsky and Eda Schottenstein

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2022 88:35


In honor of Chaf Beit Shvat, the Lubavitcher Rebbes wife, Rebbitzen Chaya Mushka's 34th Yahrtzeit, we are honored to share an incredible conversation with Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky, with a glimpse of the behind the scenes life of the Rebbe and Rebbetzin and the lessons we can take from them.  Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky , was born in Boston, Massachusetts. In 1946 he began his studies at the Lubavitch Yeshiva in New York where, shortly before his marriage, he received his rabbinical ordination.  In 1957, Rabbi Krinsky was appointed to the secretariat of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. The Rebbe later appointed him as secretary and officer of his three umbrella Chabad-Lubavitch organizations: Machne Israel, Merkos L'inyonei Chinuch and Agudas Chabad. He now serves as Chairman of the Board. Rabbi Krinsky also served as spokesman for the Rebbe and the Lubavitch movement, and editor of the Lubavitch News Service. As personal driver for the Rebbe, he had the unique distinction of spending hundreds of hours alone with the Rebbe. In 1988, the Rebbe appointed him as the sole executor of his will. In 2007,  Newsweek Magazine named Rabbi Krinsky to the top of a list of “America's top 50 Rabbis.”Rabbi Krinsky lives in Brooklyn, New York.Leave a review on apple, or email Rivkahandeda@gmail.com for feedback. 

The IMG Roadmap Podcast
91. IMGRoadmap Series #90 Dr. Aditi Agrawal (Psychiatry)

The IMG Roadmap Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 41:31


Can you complete the entire residency application process without actually being in the US? Though it may sound impossible, Dr. Aditi Agrawal's story will surely surprise you. Keep listening to find out how she accomplished such a feat! Dr. Aditi Agrawal was born in India and completed her medical studies there at the Banaras Hindu University. She is currently an incoming PGY 1 resident at the St. Elizabeth medical center in Boston, Massachusetts. Here are some of the highlights of her USMLE journey, she: Started preparing for the USMLE during her first year of internship in medical school. Took Step 1 in August of 2019, and then started preparing for the other exams. Began applying for electives at well known institutions in the US. Persevered in spite of the cancellation of her electives due to COVID. In the interim, studied for Step 2 CK. Engaged in a research project at her university. Participated in a paid telerotation in August of 2020. Was able to apply for residency without CS because of the relaxed restrictions due to COVID. . Did OET for ERAS certification which she gained just two days before her rank list submission. Out of 150 applications, got 3 interviews immediately, and 5 more after networking on social media and sending letters of interest! Here are some of the challenges she had to overcome: At the time, she had no US clinical experience. She had not yet written her Step 3 exams. She gave up residency seat to take the risk of applying for US residency. As a result, she faced financial constraints and did not have the complete support of her parents, family and social circles who did not understand her journey. There was a lack of guidance and so she was relegated to using online resources. In retrospect, Dr. Agrawal recommends that other IMGs: Join as many relevant online communities as possible, for example: Clinical Problem Solvers and PsychSIGN. Social media is a great equalizer since you do not need to be in the US to make your presence known. Documentation of your accomplishments is essential, especially on social media. You never know who may be watching! Collaboration, not only research projects but with other projects such as podcasts, and illustrations, helps you to make real, useful connections. While applying, be sure to narrow your list down to options where you have a real chance. Check to see if there have been any previous IMG residents. Pay attention to new programs and to those who sponsor visas. When asked for her mantra for success, Dr. Agrawal stated the following: She believes that the universe aligns to allow her to be successful. She always tries to be kind and smart She is driven by the search for a deeper understanding of life and human beings. You can connect with Dr. Agrawal via: Twitter: @DrAditi_Life Instagram: @Aditi.life and @Usmleflashcards Her blog: girlintheboots.com Listen to the full episode on: Google podcasts, Apple & Spotify. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ninalum/support

Boston Speaks Up
073: Endicott College's Gina Deschamps

Boston Speaks Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 53:56


Guest Gina Deschamps currently serves as the Director of the Angle Center for Entrepreneurship at Endicott College in Beverly, Massachusetts. She's in a fascinating position with a role focused on embedding entrepreneurship into the DNA of a college campus. Previously, Deschamps enjoyed a successful career as a senior sales and marketing leader while always remaining closely aligned with higher education. In 2020, she was the recipient of the Salem State University Alumni Association's Elizabeth Williams Wade award for her years of dedicated service to her alma mater. She has also served in leadership roles with organizations such as Montserrat College of Art Board of Trustees, AIGA Boston, Girls, Inc. of Lynn, and the Printing and Publishing Council of New England. A life-long learner, Deschamps is currently working to complete a Professional Development program in Entrepreneurial Studies at Stanford University.

Science Friday
Epstein-Barr Virus and MS, Agrivoltaics, Ag School Influence, Social Cues From Saliva. Jan 21, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 48:20


Scientists Are Working On A Universal COVID Vaccine As the Omicron wave of the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spike around the U.S., there are scientists working not on variant-specific boosters, but on a vaccine that might cover every possible strain, past and future. Called universal vaccines, they require a fundamentally different approach from a shot that would target Delta, Omicron, or any other variant. Instead, a universal vaccine would need to train the body to respond to something every variant has in common—or to fill in the blanks of any possible mutations. Vox senior science reporter Umair Irfan reports on the difficult path and ongoing work toward such a vaccine, and why the immune system's T cells and B cells, more than neutralizing antibodies, will dictate our long-term future with the virus. Plus how an undersea eruption near Tonga was one of the most documented volcanic explosions in history, new research assesses the vast toll of global antibiotic resistance, and more stories from the week.   New Research Links Epstein-Barr Virus to Multiple Sclerosis A group of scientists at Harvard University says they have made a major breakthrough in understanding multiple sclerosis. For years, they have been testing out a hypothesis that the Epstein-Barr virus causes multiple sclerosis, a chronic and incurable disease of the nervous system. (Epstein-Barr is the contagious virus responsible for mononucleosis.) Researchers analyzed a dataset of 10 million active-duty military members. They found that service members who contracted the Epstein-Barr virus were 32 times more likely to later be diagnosed with MS. The research was published in the journal Science. Ira is joined by Dr. Alberto Ascherio, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston, Massachusetts, to discuss his team's research and its broader implications.   Saliva Sharing Might Help Kids Identify Their Closest Relationships How do little kids understand who has a close relationship with them? One of the clues they use to figure it out is by noticing who they're swapping saliva with. The closest bonds are with the people who are giving them kisses, sharing their forks, and wiping their drool. Those are the findings of a recent study published in the journal Science. Ira is joined by Ashley Thomas, the study's lead author and a post doctoral fellow in the brain and cognitive sciences department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.   Big Agriculture Schools Face Increasing Donor Conflicts Of Interest A major donor to the University of Illinois wondered what the heck was up. Robb Fraley, a top Monsanto executive at the time, emailed the dean of the agriculture college in 2018 complaining about a professor saying publicly that one of his company's flagship products was causing widespread damage to crops. Monsanto was also a major donor. Fraley accused the professor of being “biased” and “prone to exaggeration.” U of I officials had spent years courting Fraley, and they had listened to him before when he'd complained about a lack of progress on an endowed chair he'd funded. But the 2018 episode highlights potentially thorny situations for public universities, which have cultivated powerful agricultural corporations as donors while public funding has stagnated. Dicamba posed a particularly critical issue to Fraley. After all, he was as responsible as anyone for leading modern agriculture into using lab-designed seeds that could withstand spraying from weedkillers. That Monsanto-branded Roundup Ready pairing of biotechnology with glyphosate herbicide revolutionized grain farming around the world. When glyphosate lost its punch — after weeds grew resistant to Roundup — Monsanto shifted to teaming different genetically modified seeds with the dicamba herbicide. But farmers who'd not adopted the new genetically engineered seeds started complaining about “dicamba drift” and of seeing their crops perish from the effects of the herbicide migrating to their fields. So when U of I weed scientist Aaron Hager spoke about a controversy as big as any in commercial agriculture in ways that didn't sit well with Fraley, the university benefactor let the school know about his displeasure. Read the rest at sciencefriday.com.   Growing Plants—And Providing Solar Energy Food is one of our most basic needs. As the population of the world grows, we're going to need to grow more of it within the same amount of space. The United Nations estimates the world's population will grow by 2 billion people between now and 2050. Access to fresh food is already a problem in many countries, and will likely get worse with more mouths to feed. This is where the concept of agrivoltaics could create a massive change. This farming setup mixes water, energy, and plant growth all in one space. Solar panels collect energy from the sun's rays; underneath those panels is where the plants grow. The setup takes less water than the traditional way of farming, all-in-all creating a more sustainable way to grow food and create energy. Joining Ira to talk about the promise of agrivoltaics is Dr. Chad Higgins, associate professor of biological and ecological engineering at Oregon State University, in Corvallis, Oregon.  

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan
Kerri Maher on How a Paris Bookseller Changed the Course of Literature

The Literary Life with Mitchell Kaplan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 32:13


On today's episode of The Literary Life, Mitchell Kaplan talks to Kerri Maher about her latest book, The Paris Bookseller, out now from Berkley Books. Kerri Maher is the author of The Girl in White Gloves, The Kennedy Debutante, and, under the name Kerri Majors, This Is Not a Writing Manual: Notes for the Young Writer in the Real World. She holds an MFA from Columbia University and was a writing professor for many years. She now writes full-time and lives with her daughter and dog in a leafy suburb west of Boston, Massachusetts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 01.20.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 59:57


Magnesium is essential for the immune system, including in the fight against cancer University of Basel (Switzerland), January 19, 2022 Previous studies have shown that cancerous growths spread faster in the bodies of mice when the animals received a low-magnesium diet – and that their defense against flu viruses was also impaired. However, there has so far been little research into how exactly this mineral affects the immune system. Now, researchers have discovered that T cells can eliminate abnormal or infected cells efficiently only in a magnesium-rich environment. Specifically, magnesium is important for the function of a T cell surface protein called LFA-1. (NEXT) More lycopene linked to longer lives for people with metabolic syndrome University of Nebraska Medical Center, January 16, 2022 Higher blood levels of lycopene may reduce the risk of mortality in people with metabolic syndrome, says a new study from the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Lycopene is an antioxidant that is present in red- and pink-colored fruits and vegetables. As well as being used as a food coloring, it is also used in supplements and functional foods and beverages. New data published in Nutrition Research suggests that higher serum levels of lycopene were associated with greater survival times for people with metabolic syndrome, compared to low serum levels. (NEXT) Too much sugar during adolescence may alter brain's reward circuits European Journal of Neuroscience, January 19, 2022 A new study in rats may provide significant insights into the long-term impacts of over-consumption of sugary foods during adolescence. The study shows that the enjoyment of such foods later in adulthood is reduced in those who over-consumed early in life. Investigators found that this decrease in reward relates to reduced activity in one of the key hubs of the brain's reward circuitry, called the nucleus accumbens. Such long-lasting alterations could have important implications for reward-related disorders such as substance abuse or eating disorders. (NEXT) Unveiled the epigenetic mechanism by which vitamin D modulates the tolerance of the immune system Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute (Germany), January 19, 2022 In autoimmunity, the mechanisms that guarantee that our defense system does not attack our own body - tolerance to oneself - does not work properly. Multiple sclerosis, which affects one in every 1,000 people in Spain, is a serious autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the myelin sheath of some types of neurons, causing progressive neurological disability. Dr. Esteban Ballestar, leader of the Epigenetics and immune diseases group at the Josep Carrreras Leukaemia Research Institute, and Dr. Eva Martínez-Cáceres, leader of the Immunopathology group at the IGTP-Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, have recently published in the prestigious journal Cell Reports the mechanism by which vitamin D activates the tolerance program of dendritic cells. (NEXT) Study links poor sleep in seniors to more severe arteriosclerosis University of Toronto, January 19, 2022 Poor sleep quality in older people is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain, both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment, according to the newest findings reported in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke. The relationship between cardiovascular disease and so-called "fragmented" sleep has been studied in the past, but this is the first study to look specifically for an association between sleep fragmentation and detailed microscopic measures of blood vessel damage and infarcts in autopsied brain tissue from the same individuals. Fragmented sleep occurs when sleep is interrupted by repeated awakenings or arousals. In this study, sleep was disrupted on average almost seven times per hour. Researchers found that greater sleep fragmentation was associated with 27 percent higher odds of having severe arteriosclerosis. Moreover, for each additional two arousals during one hour of sleep, researchers reported a 30 percent increase in the odds that subjects had visible signs of oxygen deprivation in their brain. (OTHER NEWS) America's New Class War Chris Hedges, January 18, 2022 There is one last hope for the United States. It does not lie in the ballot box. It lies in the union organizing and strikes by workers at Amazon, Starbucks, Uber, Lyft, John Deere, Kellogg, the Special Metals plant in Huntington, West Virginia, owned by Berkshire Hathaway, the Northwest Carpenters Union, Kroger, teachers in Chicago, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Arizona, fast-food workers, hundreds of nurses in Worcester, Massachusetts, and the members of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees. Organized workers, often defying their timid union leadership, are on the march across the United States. Over four million workers, about 3% of the work force, mostly from accommodation and food services, healthcare and social assistance, transportation, housing, and utilities have walked away from jobs, rejecting poor pay along with punishing and risky working conditions. There is a growing consensus – 68% in a recent Gallup poll with that number climbing to 77% of those between the ages of 18 and 34 – that the only way left to alter the balance of power and force concessions from the ruling capitalist class is to mobilize and strike, although only 9% of the U.S. work force is unionized. Forget the woke Democrats. This is a class war. The Democratic Party will not push through the kind of radical New Deal reforms that in the 1930s staved off fascism and communism. Its empty political theater, which stretches back to the Clinton administration, was on full display in Atlanta when Biden called for revoking the filibuster to pass the Freedom to Vote Act and the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, knowing that his chances of success are zero. Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams, along with several of the state's voting rights groups, boycotted the event in a very public rebuke. They were acutely aware of Biden's cynical ploy. When the Democrats were in the minority, they clung to the filibuster like a life raft. Then Sen. Barack Obama, along with other Democrats, campaigned for it to remain in place. And a few days ago, the Democratic leadership employed the filibuster to block legislation proposed by Sen. Ted Cruz. The Democrats have been full partners in the dismantling of our democracy, refusing to banish dark and corporate money from the electoral process and governing, as Obama did, through presidential executive actions, agency “guidance,” notices and other regulatory dark matter that bypass Congress. The Democrats, who helped launch and perpetuate our endless wars, were also co-architects of trade deals such as NAFTA, expanded surveillance of citizens, militarized police, the largest prison system in the world and a raft of anti-terrorism laws such as Special Administrative Measures (SAMs) that abolish nearly all rights, including due process and attorney-client privilege, to allow suspects to be convicted and imprisoned with secret evidence they and their lawyers are not permitted to see. The squandering of staggering resources to the military — $777.7 billion a year — passed in the Senate with an 89-10 vote and in the House of Representatives with a 363-70 vote, coupled with the $80 billion spent annually on the intelligence agencies has made the military and the intelligence services, many run by private contractors such as Booz Allen Hamilton, nearly omnipotent. The Democrats long ago walked out on workers and unions. The Democratic governor of Maine, Janet Mills, for example, killed a bill a few days ago that would have allowed farm workers in the state to unionize. On all the major structural issues there is no difference between the Republicans and the Democrats. The longer the Democratic Party does not deliver real reforms to ameliorate the economic hardship, exacerbated by soaring inflation rates, the more it feeds the frustration of many of its supporters, widespread apathy (there are 80 million eligible voters, a third of the electorate, who do not cast ballots) and the hatred of the “liberal” elites stoked by Donald Trump's cultish Republican Party. Its signature infrastructure package, Build Back Better, when you read the fine print, is yet another infusion of billions of government money into corporate bank accounts. This should not surprise anyone, given who funds and controls the Democratic Party. The rapacious pillage by the elites, many of whom bankroll the Democratic Party, has accelerated since the financial crash of 2008 and the pandemic. Wall Street banks recorded record profits for 2021. As the Financial Times noted, they milked the underwriting fees from Fed-based borrowing and profited from mergers and acquisitions. They have pumped their profits, fueled by roughly $5 trillion in Fed spending since the beginning of the pandemic, as Matt Taibbi points out, into massive pay bonuses and stock buybacks. “The bulk of this new wealth—most—is being converted into compensation for a handful of executives,” Taibbi writes. “Buybacks have also been rampant in defense, pharmaceuticals, and oil & gas, all of which also just finished their second straight year of record, skyrocketing profits. We're now up to about 745 billionaires in the U.S., who've collectively seen their net worth grow about $2.1 trillion to $5 trillion since March 2020, with almost all that wealth increase tied to the Fed's ballooning balance sheet.” Kroger is typical. The corporation, which operates some 2,800 stores under different brands, including Baker's, City Market, Dillons, Food 4 Less, Foods Co., Fred Meyer, Fry's, Gerbes, Jay C Food Store, King Soopers, Mariano's, Metro Market, Pay-Less Super Markets, Pick'n Save, QFC, Ralphs, Ruler and Smith's Food and Drug, earned $4.1 billion in profits in 2020. By the end of the third quarter of 2021, it had $2.28 billion in cash, an increase of $399 million in the first quarter of 2020. Kroger CEO Rodney McMullen made over $22 million, nearly doubling the $12 million he made in 2018. This is over 900 times the salary of the average Kroger worker. Kroger in the first three quarters of 2021 also spent an estimated $1.3 billion on stock buybacks. Class struggle defines most of human history. Marx got this right. It is not a new story. The rich, throughout history, have found ways to subjugate and re-subjugate the masses. And the masses, throughout history, have cyclically awoken to throw off their chains. (NEXT) Was Peter Daszak Working For The Central Intelligence Agency? Kanekoa, January 18, 2022 “We found other coronaviruses in bats, a whole host of them, some of them looked very similar to SARS. So we sequenced the spike protein: the protein that attaches to cells. Then we… Well, I didn't do this work, but my colleagues in China did the work. You create pseudo particles, you insert the spike proteins from those viruses, see if they bind to human cells. At each step of this, you move closer and closer to this virus could really become pathogenic in people. You end up with a small number of viruses that really do look like killers." This statement was said by EcoHealth Alliance President Peter Daszak at a 2016 forum discussing “emerging infectious diseases and the next pandemic”. Daszak, who received more than $118 million in grants and contracts from federal agencies, including $53 million from USAID, $42 million from DOD, and $15 million from HHS, appeared to boast about the manipulation of “killer” SARS-like coronaviruses carried out by his “colleagues in China” at the now infamous Wuhan Institute of Virology. According to investigative research done by independent-journalist Sam Husseini and The Intercept, much of the money awarded to EcoHealth Alliance did not focus on health or ecology, but rather on biowarfare, bioterrorism, and other dangerous uses of deadly pathogens. EcoHealth Alliance received the majority of its funding from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), a State Department subsidiary that serves as a frequent cover for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Their second largest source of funding was from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which is a branch of the Department of Defense (DOD) which states it is tasked to “counter and deter weapons of mass destruction and improvised threat networks.” The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) has a long history of acting as a contract vehicle for various CIA covert activities. With an annual budget of over $27 billion and operations in over 100 countries, one former USAID director, John Gilligan, once admitted it was “infiltrated from top to bottom with CIA people.” Gilligan explained that “the idea was to plant operatives in every kind of activity we had overseas; government, volunteer, religious, every kind.” From 2009 to 2019, USAID partnered with EcoHealth Alliance on their PREDICT program which identified over 1,200 new viruses, including over 160 coronavirus strains; trained roughly 5,000 people around the world to identify new diseases; and improved or developed 60 research laboratories. What better way for the CIA to collect intelligence on the world's biological warfare capabilities? Dr. Andrew Huff received his Ph.D. in Environmental Health specializing in emerging diseases before becoming an Associate Vice President at EcoHealth Alliance, where he developed novel methods of bio-surveillance, data analytics, and visualization for disease detection. On January 12, 2022, Dr. Andrew Huff issued a public statement (on Twitter) in which he claimed, Peter Daszak, the President of EcoHealth Alliance, told him that he was working for the CIA. Dr. Huff continued, “…I wouldn't be surprised if the CIA / IC community orchestrated the COVID coverup acting as an intermediary between Fauci, Collins, Daszak, Baric, and many others. At best, it was the biggest criminal conspiracy in US history by bureaucrats or political appointees.” In February 2020, Daszak told University of North Carolina coronavirus researcher Dr. Ralph Baric that they should not sign the statement condemning the lab-leak theory so that it seems more independent and credible. “You, me and him should not sign this statement, so it has some distance from us and therefore doesn't work in a counterproductive way,” Daszak wrote. More unredacted emails have revealed that while these scientists held the private belief that the lab release was the most likely scenario, they still worked to seed the natural origin narrative for the public through the papers published in Nature Medicineand The Lancet. If Dr. Andrew Huff is telling the truth, Fauci, Collins, and Daszak might be covering up the lab origin not only for themselves, but also for the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Government.

Boston's Best
078 - Home Is Where the Heart Is With McGary Mortgages

Boston's Best

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 46:29


Are you looking at buying a new property in 2022? Maybe you're looking for the perfect vacation spot for you and your friends. Or perhaps you're looking to start a family in your forever home. Regardless of your property needs, my guest this week is the perfect person to make your moving dreams come true. This week, I'm talking with Lucas McGary. Lucas is a Mortgage Advisor of McGary Mortgages through Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation. In 2019, Lucas was recognized as Rookie of the Year by closing over $63 million in loans during his second year. His secret? Lucas provides top-notch service and effective communication while educating potential home buyers. Throughout our conversation, Lucas shares challenges he faced while navigating the mortgage and home-buying industry, how he pivoted from his initial referral business, and the importance of focusing on what you're good at and leading with your strengths. Topics Discussed: Communication & Customer Service: The most critical things in any industry How Covid-19 impacted the home buying industry The average age of first-time homeowners in the next 3-4 years Understanding how Inflation and Interest Rates work Why minorities are buying more homes than ever Connect with McGary Mortgages: Website: https://www.fairwayindependentmc.com/Lucas-J-McGary Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lucas.mcgary Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mcgary_mortgages/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucas-mcgary-445b017 Additional Resources: Boston Magazine: https://bostonagentmagazine.com/whos-who-2021/lucas-j-mcgary/ Contact McGary Mortgages: Call: 617-347-9629 Email: lucas.mcgary@fairwaymc.com Address: 380 W Broadway, Boston, MA 02127 Connect with Mark Condon: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BostonsBestPodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bostonsbest_podcast/ About Boston's Best: “Highlighting successful businesses in and around Boston, MA.” Go behind the scenes with financial planner Mark Condon as he asks industry-leading experts to talk about their businesses throughout the state of Massachusetts. Through each episode, Mark finds what sets these different businesses apart from their competition and how they rose above the inevitable challenges they faced along the way to their ultimate success.

Fearless Health Podcast
More Tips For Avoiding Toxins And Transforming Your Gut Health! - with Dr. Wendie Trubow | Ep. 39

Fearless Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 22:21


Today on the Gut Health Reset Podcast, we are continuing our talk with special guest Dr. Wendie Trubow on the toxins that you might be exposed to on a daily basis without even noticing! Toxins, chemicals, heavy metals, and more can affect your gut and need to be addressed, and you need tips that you can begin applying in your life immediately.In this episode, we will discuss Addison's disease, the gut and mycotoxins, specific tips and tools to help you change your lifestyle, what to remove from your diet to help your liver health, and more with special guest Dr. Wendie Trubow! - We answer these questions:- Are there any toxins that specifically target the gut?- What are some specific tips that can help you remove toxins from your life and diet?- What can you do to help your liver better detox your body?- How can you tell if you are being chemically exposed?- What is the MSQ and how can it help you? - And more!-Enjoy our previous episode withSchedule a consultation with Alexis:www.altfammed.comSupplements:Glutathione: https://drannmariebarter.com/product/liposomal-glutathione/ - About Dr. Wendie Trubow:Dr. Wendie Trubow is an obstetrician-gynecologist in Newton, Massachusetts. She received her medical degree from Tufts University School of Medicine and has been in practice for years. Through her struggles with mold and metal toxicity, Celiac disease, and a variety of other health issues, she has a deep sense of compassion for what women are facing when they start seeking out help. Dirty Girl Book: https://amzn.to/3HQ8EdX (disclosure: this is an affiliate link)Free handout: https://FiveJourneys.com/promo Instagram @drwendietrubowTwitter: https://twitter.com/wendietrubowmd -Subscribe for more gut health content and share this podcast with a friend! Take a screenshot of this episode and tag Dr. Ann-Marie Barter:http://instagram.com/drannmariebarter-Dr. Ann-Marie Barter is a Functional Medicine and Chiropractic Doctor at Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic. She is the clinic founder of Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic that has two offices: one in Longmont and one in Denver. They treat an array of health conditions overlooked or under-treated by conventional medicine, called the "grey zone". https://altfammed.com/https://drannmariebarter.com/

Locked On Boston College - Daily Podcast On Boston College Eagles Football & Basketball
Finebaum Says FSU and Clemson Should Leave ACC, Join SEC

Locked On Boston College - Daily Podcast On Boston College Eagles Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 26:59


On today's show, we look at the comments of controversial SEC talking head Paul Finebaum, who says that that FSU and Clemson should leave the SEC to join the ACC. What would that look like, and should they do it? Secondly, Boston College lands a commitment from Christian Zamor, we look at the impact of this local Massachusetts recruit. Finally, where are the Eagles in future recruiting? Where are they targeting, what is their philosophy? We explain. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. NetSuite Over twenty-seven thousand businesses already use NetSuite and RIGHT NOW through the end of the year NetSuite is offering a one-of-a-kind financing program to those ready to upgrade at NetSuite.com/LOCKEDONNCAA. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Brew Roots
Great Blue Brewing Co.

Brew Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 48:09


Often times we tell the story of the already established brewery. This week we're talking to Chris Waldren (Co-Owner and Head Brewer) from Great Blue Brewing Co out of Boscawen, NH. This small scale breweries doors aren't even open yet and they're still in the process of purchasing their brew systems. We go over building a business plan, the trials and tribulations of opening a brewery, and how to grow a brand with the help of social media. Be sure to help Chris on his way to opening and invest in the brewery using their mainvest! Which helps them now, and gives you a kickback later. https://mainvest.com/businesses/great-blue-brewing-companyCheers!**Claw Hammer Supply- Claw Hammer Supply has taken brew in a bag (BIAB) to a whole new level with there single vessel, turn-key, all grain, digital brewing system. It's a homebrew setup like you've never seen. Instead of a typical brewing systems that require 2 or even 3 different vessels (pots, pans, kettles, etc…). theirs only uses 1.Use our link https://www.clawhammersupply.com/?aff=12 and get your system today!Looking to start a new hobby? Wanting to get into homebrewing? Just looking to upgrade your current set up? We have you covered with our Beer & Wine Hobby promo code! Beer & Wine Hobby is a Family owned business driven to help folks make amazing beers, wines, cheeses, and charcuterie. Fortunately, for our listeners we are able to offer an exclusive promo code for 10% off your online order. Items can either be ordered online and picked up in store same day for our local listeners or delivered to your home (for free over $35). Use our promo code BREWROOTS for 10% off your next order! Go to www.beer-wine.com to get all your brewing needs! https://www.beer-wine.com***Each month, Shirts On Tap teams up with a local brewery, to collaborate on a sweet custom shirt design, and then send it to their members with coupons, stickers, a brewery bio, and more! Join the excitement with our exclusive link shirtsontap.com/offers/brewroots to get your first box for $5! ***Did you know that some of your favorite breweries use hops from a local family operated Hop Farm right here in Massachusetts. Our friends over at Four Star Farms are there for you wether you are a commercial brewery or a small scale home brewer. Make sure to head over to their website today and get your hands on some of the best and freshest hops locally. https://fourstarfarms.com Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Conversations in Courage
The Inclusivity Series Presents...Sidney Baptista

Conversations in Courage

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 52:15


Hi Friends! We've missed you! We have so much to talk about, but until then please enjoy these 13 extra special episodes called The Inclusivity Series. Created by Ashley in collaboration with lululemon, this series of conversations attempts to answer the question: How do we make the wellness industry more inclusive? Over the course of these 13 conversations we talk about wellness, fitness, anti-blackness, diet culture, climate change and much much more. What started as a call to action to be better wellness practitioners has morphed into lessons on allyship and vulnerability.Each speaker brings something incredible to the table and we hope you'll enjoy them all! If you love what you hear, please share it with your friends! Need to reach out? Fill out the form on our website: www.thecouragecampaign.com Cheers, Mark + Ash About the speaker: Based in Dorchester, Massachusetts, Sidney Baptista is the founder of Pioneers Run Crew and PYNRS, an all-new genre-defining brand of performance streetwear. He is the host of the Fitness in Color Podcast, a father, and an individual passionate about the power of running to create connections, elevate voices, and champion change. You can find Sid on instagram @sidbap@pioneersrc@fitnessincolor@pynrs_Support the show (https://donorbox.org/the-courage-campaign-1)

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Sidney Hutter: At the Intersection of Form, Glass, Color and Light

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 95:00


Studio Glass pioneer Sidney Hutter creates three-dimensional sculptural objects in which the intersection of form, glass, color and light unite to create works of art with an amazing and ever-changing spectrum of color, reflection, and refraction. Transformed from industrial plate glass into beautiful objects, Hutter's iconic non-functional vessel sculptures read more like “three-dimensional paintings.”  Hutter states: “As a glass sculptor, my interest is in the effects of light reflecting and refracting off and through glass. By laminating layers of glass, I am able to emphasize and manipulate the effects of light using color, shape and surface treatments.” After a fire temporarily closed the glassblowing studio during his second year in the graduate glass program at the Massachusetts College of Art, Hutter developed his layered and coldworked vessels. In the late 1970s, he was in the unique position of creating art uninhibited by financial pressures. The artist immersed himself in the idea of making large-scale glass sculptures based on historical glass research and influenced by his interest in architecture and work by his hero, David Smith. He focused on the creation of his Plate Glass Vase series, with which he entered the gallery world.  Hutter says: “Now, 40 years later, it is inspiring to look back at the complex and unique pieces created during that time of freedom and ultimate creativity.” Post-graduation, Hutter became an instructor at Massachusetts College of Art, Boston University and in Boston Public Schools. In 1980, he founded Sidney Hutter Glass & Light in Boston and later moved his studio to its current location in Newton, Massachusetts. There, he continues to create sculptures which combine fine art and glass craft with commercial processes used in architectural glass, adhesive and pigment industries.  During the heyday of Studio Glass, Hutter's art and process became increasingly more technical. In response, he co-designed and fabricated machines to help make his work more efficient.  His interests in glass, ultraviolet light and adhesive technology, and pigment applications have taken him around the country – attending conferences and researching the latest advancements in those fields. Through conversations with industry leaders, he has been able to adapt commercial processes to his studio practice and create landscapes of color between layers of glass.   Hutter's work is represented by the country's finest galleries and included in numerous private and public collections as well as major museums in the US, including the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Museum of Art and Design in New York and the Renwick Gallery in Washington, DC.  In 1993, White House Vase #1 became part of the White House Craft Collection. The artist has created commercial projects for the Grand Hyatt Hotel in Hong Kong, the Hyatt on Collins in Melbourne, Australia, as well as for the Pittsburgh Gateway Hilton and the Righa Royal Hotel in Osaka, Japan, to name just a few.   With a career spanning more than four decades, Hutter has been an eyewitness to the changes in Studio Glass. In this conversation, he contemplates a shift in focus to include more lighting projects in his studio practice and reflects on advancing technology, economic highs and lows, and the ever-shifting interests of collectors and galleries.  Throughout the years, Hutter has developed a unique design style – influenced and cultivated from his passion for art and architecture and melded with his interest in the commercial glass and adhesive technology industries.  He adapted information, materials, and equipment into a unique studio practice, which contributed greatly to the glass art movement. His work will be on view in a spectacular collaborative show, Masters of Modern Glass, at Shaw Gallery, in Naples, Florida, with Richard Royal, Toland Sand, Rick Eggert, Tom Marosz, and Alex Bernstein. It opens March 3, 2022.  

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Jeopardy!

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 164:25


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on all things politics, including the failure of Democrats to pass voting rights legislation and the state of President Joe Biden's term. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on Attorney General Maura Healey's announcement that she is running for governor. Andrea Cabral tells the story of a con artist from Rhode Island arrested after faking his own death, and discusses debates over the efficacy of road tests for driving while high. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville explains how things are going in schools amid the Omicron surge and mental health crisis. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Shirley Leung discusses the state overpaying unemployment and asking for money back, and the latest news from Mass. and Cass. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Tom Nichols shares tips on competing in Jeopardy and why he thinks long running winning streaks are antithetical to the show's character. Nichols is a Contributing Writer and proprietor of “Peacefield” newsletter at The Atlantic, a professor of national security affairs at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island and a five-time Jeopardy winner. We end the show by asking listeners for stories of grudges they still hold.

Here & Now
School closures spell trouble for Democrats ahead of midterms; Renaming schizophrenia

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 41:00


Republican strategist Jason Roe and Democratic strategist Adrian Hemond join us to discuss the political challenges that school closures during the pandemic present for Democrats, and how Republicans plan to take advantage of it. And, a group of Massachusetts-based researchers and advocates say changing the name of schizophrenia could reduce the stigma associated with the disorder. But others say the term itself is not the problem. Karen Brown of New England Public Media reports.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
JobMakers: Gaetan Kashala Gives Immigrants a Leg Up (#39)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 23:21


This week on JobMakers, host Denzil Mohammed talks with Gaetan Kashala, immigrant from the Democratic Republic of Congo, co-founder of Globex Corporate, a consulting firm connecting the U.S. to Central and Western African businesses and governments, and also the engagement director for AIM, the Associated Industries of Massachusetts. Gaetan has built a career helping immigrant and other […]

New England Legends Podcast
The Mysterious Travels of Rollstone Boulder

New England Legends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 15:40


In Episode 231, Jeff Belanger and Ray Auger search downtown Fitchburg, Massachusetts, for Rollstone Boulder; a 110-ton rock moved into a traffic island back in the late 1920s. This boulder was once perched on top of a hill overlooking town, but when stone quarries moved in, local and state politicians made a legendary effort to save this local landmark. But now that it's been in the center of town for almost a century… no one cares.

The Horse Race
Episode 198: Test Stressing

The Horse Race

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 32:59


1/20/2022--This week on The Horse Race, two big campaign announcements hit the news. First, it's the one we've been waiting on for months. Attorney General Maura Healey is running for Governor. She enters the race after much anticipation and speculation with a rate of name recognition and funding that dwarfs that of her competitors. Tanisha Sullivan, President of the Boston NAACP, announced her candidacy for Secretary of the Commonwealth. Bill Galvin, who has been in the position for almost three decades, has not yet announced whether he'll run again. Vaccine mandates for indoor businesses went into effect throughout Boston this past weekend. Jenn and Lisa talk about the Twitter conversations circulating among people who've experienced gaps in enforcement — some businesses don't check for vaccine proof, others do. Also recently implemented is the state's vaccine passport system which Massachusetts residents can use to access digital proof of their vaccination status. Issues remain with that program as well, like incomplete information for veterans and residents who received jabs out of state. Our guest this week is State House reporter for MassLive, Alison Kuznitz. She explains the state's decision to move away from their current test-and-stay program that allows asymptomatic students to stay in school so long as they test negative for five straight days. The plan is to replace it with a program wherein students receive at-home rapid tests on a biweekly basis.

Franchise Findings | Buying a Franchise Made Simple
Baskin Robbins Franchise Cost Too High For Franchise Profits

Franchise Findings | Buying a Franchise Made Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 5:09


Ice cream is one of the biggest industries in the US and worldwide and no wonder why – the ice cream industry is one of the few that lets you adapt fast to new trends and consumer preferences. Baskin-Robbins franchise is one of the biggest ice cream shop franchises and you could very well own one. Baskin-Robbins Franchising has been offering franchises since 2006 and it is located in Canton, Massachusetts. We will analyze the potential return on investment and whether the initial investment is worth the profit of a Baskin Robbins franchise. Visit the franchise profile on Vetted Biz: https://www.vettedbiz.com/baskin-robbins-franchise/ Want to speak with a franchise specialist about Baskin Robbins or another franchise? Click here: https://share.hsforms.com/1ZtNM19w4R8WIXyNa_97N7w4e0xw If you are looking for more information, you can connect with us through our networks: https://www.vettedbiz.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/vettedbiz/ https://www.facebook.com/vettedbiz

PaintTalks's podcast
Ep 69 Melissa Jacobson of Jude and Julia

PaintTalks's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 50:50


Melissa Jacobson of Jude and Julia a vintage furniture restoration company in Massachusetts joins me on the podcast today. She's been painting furniture since 2015, enjoys mixed media, and recently started making junk journals. Melissa has 2 grown sons, 3 grandchildren, and a fantastic accent! https://facebook.com/judeandjulia https://www.instagram.com/judeandjulia

Sway
Elizabeth Warren Claps Back at Elon Musk

Sway

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 38:21


Few people draw more ire in Silicon Valley than the Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. She's long fought against the power of big banks and corporate behemoths, so it's natural that she's turned her attention to breaking up dominant tech companies and taxing the billionaires behind them. So far, it's not going down well: When she called out Elon Musk, a billionaire who paid no federal income tax at all in 2018, for not paying his fair share, she received a classically Muskian tweetback: “Please don't call the manager on me, Senator Karen.”Her response? “Every nurse who paid taxes, every firefighter who paid taxes, every dishwasher and waitress who paid taxes paid more than Elon Musk. That's a broken taxation system,” she tells Kara Swisher.In this conversation, Kara asks Warren to make her case for antitrust scrutiny of Silicon Valley. They discuss Congress and the Biden administration's first year — if Build Back Better is actually “Build Back Never,” Joe Manchin, and why Warren thinks the Democrats could expand their number in the Senate this year.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more information for all episodes at nytimes.com/sway, and you can find Kara on Twitter @karaswisher.

Crime and Roses
Ep. 154 True Crime: The Murders of Brendan Mess, Erik Hacker-Weissman, and Raphael “Rafi” Teken

Crime and Roses

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 51:36


Last week's episode of The Bachelor gave Megan MANY potential themes to explore in the true crime world, however, Megan decided to center her story around Ziwe, comedian, writer, and host of one of the week's group dates. Ziwe is from Lawrence, Massachusetts, so Megan tells a story from nearby Waltham, Massachusetts. This story is a wild ride from start to finish. This really gruesome triple murder from September 11, 2011, really doesn't have any kind of lead until April 2013. And where that lead leads us, is simply… confusing and maybe leads us into a bigger conspiracy? We still have so many questions about this story, tell us what you think! (Story starts at: 6:55) CONTENT WARNING: Graphic descriptions Links discussed in the Episode: Elizabeth Corrigan's Instagram (we stan advocacy for ADHD) Boston Magazine Article by Susan Zalkind Spotify Giveaway - give us a 5 star rating, in the month of January, to win a $50 Amazon gift card! You can always connect with us at: linktr.ee/CrimeandRoses. There you can see links to our podcast and social media platforms. You can support the podcast by becoming a Patreon Member at: www.patreon.com/CrimeAndRoses. We have several levels of membership, and we truly love you, mean it. Always feel free to email us at: CrimeandRoses@gmail.com. Send us true crime story suggestions and any questions or comments you may have. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crimeandroses/support

Cox n' Crendor Show
Episode 322 - Massachusetts Man!

Cox n' Crendor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 45:16


The boys are back and this time Jesse's got another story about his parents just trying to love him. Meanwhile Crendor STILL plays league of legends. Also cold weather hits the US and Jesse is over it! All this an a Massachusetts man who can't be stopped! On a brand new Cox n' Crendor! Go to http://beamorganics.com/cox and use code COX for $20 off. Go to http://joinhoney.com/cox to get Honey for free! Go to http://meundies.com/crendor to get 15% off your first order plus free shipping.

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI
Emerging role: CDI informaticist

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 32:44


Today's guests are Tricia Ramey, PMP, MS, clinical informaticist administrator, and Tonya Motsinger, BSN, RN, MBA, the system director of CDI at OhioHealth in Columbus, Ohio. Today's show is co-hosted by Dawn Valdez, RN, LNC, CCDS, CDIP, CDI education specialist at HCPro and ACDIS is Middleton, Massachusetts. During the show, Ramey and Motsinger referenced the job description for their CDI informaticist position. ACDIS members can download that job description from the ACDIS Resource Library by clicking here. (http://ow.ly/X23u30s7PCm) Featured solution: Today's featured ACDIS solution is Imagine: 2022 ACDIS Conference. Imagine the possibilities and join your CDI peers in Orlando May 2–5, 2022, at the Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center! As we reconnect after the COVID-19 pandemic, we all need a little magic in our lives, and we all need to Imagine what might be in store for us professionally. The ACDIS annual conference provides countless opportunities to engage personally and professionally with like-minded individuals across the healthcare spectrum. The educational offerings are unparalleled. The networking opportunities are extensive. Our exhibitors are waiting to share their national knowledge. The only necessary ingredient remaining is you. This year we are offering dedicated outpatient CDI content, a masterclass track to improve your interpersonal skills so critical to CDI success, a location with shuttle busses running to the major Disney theme parks, and more! Learn more or register by clicking here. (http://ow.ly/rG5Y30s7Pzt)   In the News: “Healthfirst Health Plan, Inc., received $5.2 million in overpayments for seven high-risk diagnoses, OIG says,” from CDI Strategies (http://ow.ly/WHxt30s7PAu)   ACDIS update: Download the January/February 2022 edition of the CDI Journal (http://ow.ly/ihYs30s7PAC) 

The Goods from the Woods
Episode #314 - "Vibe Check" with Joe Kaye

The Goods from the Woods

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 91:31


In this episode, Rivers and Carter are joined by comedian Joe Kaye for a rip-roaring conversation about the burning topics of the day! We're talking about a Craigslist ad by the worst landlord in Massachusetts, a cryptocurrency-themed restaurant in Florida, and some modern day train robberies in Los Angeles. Santana's "Black Magic Woman" is our JAM OF THE WEEK. Give us a listen and follow Joe on all forms of social media @JoeCharlesKaye. Follow the show on Twitter @TheGoodsPod.  Rivers is @RiversLangley  Sam is @SlamHarter  Carter is @Carter_Glascock Subscribe on Patreon for HOURS of bonus content! http://patreon.com/TheGoodsPod Pick up a Goods from the Woods t-shirt at: http://prowrestlingtees.com/TheGoodsPod

Windowsill Chats
Your style already exists inside of you! Explore what you are drawn to, and you will find it. Be YOU. An honest meaningful chat with Karin Lauria

Windowsill Chats

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 44:24


Margo chats with Karin Lauria is an independent artist and illustrator, Karin Lauria. Karin is from  Massachusetts and works mainly in digital, but also creates mixed media digital and watercolor art and illustrations. Her style is vibrant, colorful, whimsical, and thoughtful. She has licensed work and collaborations with several companies including Moi & Toi Studio, Amber Lotus Publishing, and GreenBox Art and Culture. She's represented by Creative Sparrow.    Margo and Karin discuss: Her start in art and early encouragement from family How running and dogs changed her world and opened up her creativity Why exploring is so important: exploring nature, new skills, and curiosity Why she credits her husband with getting her into digital art Trusting your path and taking it one step at a time Her hobbies outside of her art and how they help in her passions The doors that can be opened from participating in creative challenges Continuing education and courses   When Karin's not making art, she's hanging out with her husband and kitty, baking homemade bread, hiking the local trails, playing word games, or Zillow surfing over a giant mug of coffee.    Connect with Karin: https://www.karinlauria.com https://www.instagram.com/blackcoffeeplease/ https://creativesparrow.co.uk/creatives/karin-lauria

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl
Ep. 120 - Jean-Claude Tetreault of Trillium Brewing

Drink Beer, Think Beer With John Holl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 58:18


For a brewery less than a decade old, it's been a hell of a ride for Trillium in Massachusetts. Starting in  a small cramped space near Boston's waterfront, to now boasting a growing roster of locations including restaurants and a farm, the brewery has been celebrated and scrutinized but always focused.  This is most apparent in the beers themselves. Sure, there are hazy IPAs and big imperial stouts but also beers that celebrate agriculture, or play with ingredients like wine grapes and honey.  So that he did a spontaneous blend, in the Belgian tradition shouldn't be a surprise. That they are elegant and fun to drink shouldn't be a surprise either.  These beers, as all of the growth, is deliberate and is a push towards a goal that has been coming more and more into focus over the years. Beers aside, J.C. Tetreault who founded the brewery with his wife Ester, has also been trying to build a better beer community and culture, even recently hosting a symposium on best practices to eliminate the sexist undertones and overtones that have been in and around the beer space.  On this episode he talks about all of that and more.  This Episode is sponsored by:NZ HopsNZ Hops, the co-operative of Master Hop Growers are a passionate collective of farms dedicated to innovation and sustainability. Leading the charge in sustainable farm practices, some NZ Hops farms have over five generations of knowledge that inform their composting program, used by growers to promote healthy regenerative growth of hops year upon year. This creates high quality soil, a critical component of healthy growing conditions. At NZ Hops, they feel that sustainability is not only being a steward for the land, but for our future.Athletic Brewing Co.Athletic Brewing Company's innovative process allows them to brew great-tastingcraft beer without the alcohol. From IPAs to stouts to golden ales and more, they offer a full selection of beers starting at only 50 calories. Now you can keep your head clear and enjoy the refreshing taste of beer anytime, anywhere. Place an order today atathleticbrewing.com and get free shipping on two six packs or more. New customerscan also get 10% off their entire order with code BeerEdge10. Limit one per customer.For more Drink Beer, Think Beer or to check out Beer Edge: The Newsletter for Beer Professionals, follow us on Twitter @thebeeredge and subscribe to our beer industry focused newsletter. There is more information, articles, and engaging content at Beer Edge. Host: John Holl Guest: J.C. Tetreault Sponsors:   NZ Hops, Athletic Brewing, and The Beer Edge Tags: Beer, Bars, COVID-19, Florida, Belgium, Food, Culinary Beers, Special Ingredients 

Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven
Construction Pricing with Kevin Cradock

Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 27:16


Many homeowners want a fixed price contract for their construction project, but is that going to get them the best value for their money? Fine Homebuilder Kevin Cradock joins me to discuss fixed price contracts versus time and materials contracts, or cost plus. About our guest: Kevin Cradock grew up in Jamaica Plain surrounded by classic homes that awakened a love of carpentry and an appreciation for traditional craftsmanship. Beginning his career as a finish carpenter renovating classic Boston homes, Kevin gradually moved toward creating distinctive custom cabinetry for his building and renovation projects. By the mid-1990's he established his own workshop, and in collaboration with local designers, he devoted himself to crafting the finest custom millwork, cabinetry and furniture available. Today Kevin oversees a large crew of managers, carpenters and woodworkers. He works closely with architects, designers and homeowners, building and renovating homes and crafting cabinetry, furniture, and millwork to meet each customer's taste and lifestyle. www.cradockbuilders.com Instagram: @cradockbuilders ******************************************************************************************************* Thanks so much for being with us this week.  Please see the episode enhancement for this and other episodes athttps://www.talkinghomerenovations.com/ ( talkinghomerenovations.com) Do you have feedback you would like to share?  Would you like to be a guest on the podcast?  Email me at thehousemaven@talkinghomerenovations.com If you enjoyed this episode, please share it with your friends Don't forget to subscribe to the show and get automatic updates every Wednesday morning with the latest episode of Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven.   Clickhttp://eepurl.com/gFJLlT ( here) to get the episode enhancements sent directly to your inbox every week. Reviews and ratings help my show gain traction and credibility.  Please leave a review here-https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-home-renovations-with-the-house-maven/id1481716218 ( https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/talking-home-renovations-with-the-house-maven/id1481716218) Visithttps://my.captivate.fm/www.Talkinghomerenovations.com ( Talkinghomerenovations.com) for episode enhancements, containing photos and more information about the episodes as well as transcripts.  There you can leave a voice message through speak pipe that could be included in a future episode. Follow me on instagram: @talkinghomerenovations Join me on Facebook: Talking Home Renovations Follow me on Twitter: @talkinghomereno Join me on TikTok: @The House Maven Talking Home Renovations with the House Maven is part of Gabl Media, the largest, most engaged AEC network on the planet.  Visit http://www.gablmedia.com/ (www.Gablmedia.com) for great content.  Sign up for the weekly newsletter- I send out the episode enhancements every Wednesday morning, http://eepurl.com/gFJLlT (  sign up here) Thanks to Ray Bernoff, the editor of the show.http://www.raybernoff.com/ ( www.RayBernoff.com) Music at the beginning and end of the episode is The House Maven's Jig, written and performed by Neil Pearlman, https://neilpearlman.com/ (www.neilpearlman.com) Show Cover Art by Sam Whitehttp://www.samowhite.com/ ( www.samowhite.com) This podcast is a production of dEmios Architects.http://www.demiosarchitects.com/ ( www.demiosarchitects.com) Do you need a bit of design help? If you are in Massachusetts and need a second set of eyes on your design, my Ask an Architect design help-line can help.  We meet on zoom for an hour to review your issues.  Contact me for more information at kewm@demiosarchitects.com Support this podcast

Almost Famous on 95.9 WATD
Mike Valeras (1/18/22) *BONUS EPISODE*

Almost Famous on 95.9 WATD

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 28:53


Massachusetts born and now Nashville based guitarist Mike Valeras just released his album "Cover Me" comprised of both cover songs he's inspired by, and original compositions inspired by his favorite composers. Learn more at www.mikevalerasmusic.com.

Periodic Effects: Cannabis Business Podcast
Pe251 Treating Specific Ailments with Cannabis

Periodic Effects: Cannabis Business Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 79:36


We had Dr. Jordan Tishler (last ep. Pe247) back on the podcast to discuss more science than politics this time around. We discuss his private practice in Massachusetts, Inhale MD, and his insights on treating specific ailments with cannabis like cancer, pain, anxiety and insomnia. We also cover the current science on topical and sublingual consumption effectiveness.  Dr. Jordan Tishler is the President of the Association of Cannabinoid Specialists, helping educate physicians on the practice of cannabis medicine. LINK: Periodic Effects Youtube Channel LINK: Schedule 1-on-1 Consulting Call w/ Wayne *read all details for 1-on-1 calls in this calendar link LINK: Contact Periodic Effects Podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Mayor Michelle Wu calls vaccine mandate rollout "very smooth"

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 164:18


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their experiences with Massachusetts overpaying jobless claims and asking for money back. Trenni Kusnierek talks about Novak Djokovic's expulsion from Australia, Naomi Osaka's return to tennis and the state of the Patriots. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Mayor Michelle Wu takes questions from listeners, including on the response to the first few days of the city's vaccine mandate, protests she faces outside her home and issues with the MBTA. Wu is mayor of Boston. Tiffani Faison shares why she closed her iconic Boston restaurant Tiger Mama, her upcoming new ventures and how she has stayed resilient during a challenging time for the industry. Faison is an award-winning chef and restaurateur. She plans to open in March three new eateries: Dive Bar, Tenderoni's and Bubble Bath. Vivian and Elisa Girard tell the story of what inspired them to take housing issues into their own hands, building small affordable housing units in Dorchester. Vivan and Elisa Gergard are the husband and wife duo behind a coming apartment complex in the Field's Corner district of Dorchester. John King updates listeners on all things national politics, including the faltering state of voting rights legislation and polarization in the U.S. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their ideas for lowering the cost of housing in the city.

Eat The Damn Cake
Episode 60 - A Bright Light In A Dark World ft. Meg Nunes

Eat The Damn Cake

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 69:23


In this episode, we have the incredible, Meg Nunes, as our special guest! We learn about Meg's life, her yoga instructing, reiki mastering, and her recent TikTok fame. This is one you don't want to miss!!

Midnight Train Podcast
The Shocking History of Execution.

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 122:40


Tonight we are going to tell you a tale. A superb tale. A tale as old as time that takes us from the beginnings of civilization until today. This tale will thrill you and chill you. It may elicit feelings of dread and sadness. It may make you angry.  At times it may make you uneasily laugh like the friend at school that was kicked in the balls but couldn't show his weakness. It's a subject that people continually argue about and debate with savage ferocity. Tonight we are talking about executions! We'll talk about the methods and the reasons behind executions throughout the years. Then we'll talk about some famous executions, as well as some of the more fucked up ones. And by fucked up, we mean botched. Bad stuff. This episode isn't meant to be a debate for or against executions but merely to discuss them and the crazy shit surrounding them. So with all that being said, Let's rock and roll!           Capital punishment has been practiced in the history of virtually all known societies and places. The first established death penalty laws date as far back as the Eighteenth Century B.C. in the Code of King Hammurabi of Babylon, which codified the death penalty for 25 different crimes.  The Code of Hammurabi was one of the earliest and most complete written legal codes and was proclaimed by the Babylonian king Hammurabi, who reigned from 1792 to 1750 B.C. Hammurabi expanded the city-state of Babylon along the Euphrates River to unite all of southern Mesopotamia. The Hammurabi code of laws, a collection of 282 rules, established standards for commercial interactions and set fines and punishments to meet the requirements of justice. Hammurabi's Code was carved onto a massive, finger-shaped black stone stele (pillar) that was looted by invaders and finally rediscovered in 1901. The text, compiled at the end of Hammurabi's reign, is less a proclamation of principles than a collection of legal precedents, set between prose celebrating Hammurabi's just and pious rule. Hammurabi's Code provides some of the earliest examples of the doctrine of “lex talionis,” or the laws of retribution, sometimes better known as “an eye for an eye the greatest soulfly song ever!   The Code of Hammurabi includes many harsh punishments, sometimes demanding the removal of the guilty party's tongue, hands, breasts, eye, or ear. But the code is also one of the earliest examples of an accused person being considered innocent until proven guilty. The 282 laws are all written in an “if-then form.” For example, if a man steals an ox, he must pay back 30 times its value. The laws range from family law to professional contracts and administrative law, often outlining different standards of justice for the three classes of Babylonian society—the propertied class, freedmen, and slaves.   A doctor's fee for curing a severe wound would be ten silver shekels for a gentleman, five shekels for a freedman, and two shekels for a slave. So, it was less expensive when you were a lower-class citizen. Penalties for malpractice followed the same scheme: a doctor who killed a wealthy patient would have his hands cut off, while only financial restitution was required if the victim was a slave. Crazy!   Some examples of the death penalty laws at this time are as follows:         If a man accuses another man and charges him with homicide but cannot bring proof against him, his accuser shall be killed. Holy shit.         If a man breaks into a house, they shall kill him and hang him in front of that same house.          The death penalty was also part of the Hittite Code in the 14th century B.C., but only partially. The most severe offenses typically were punished through enslavement, although crimes of a sexual nature often were punishable by death. The Hittite laws, also known as the Code of the Nesilim, constitute an ancient legal code dating from c. 1650 – 1500 BCE. The Hittite laws were kept in use for roughly 500 years, and many copies show that other than changes in grammar, what might be called the 'original edition' with its apparent disorder, was copied slavishly; no attempt was made to 'tidy up' by placing even apparent afterthoughts in a more appropriate position.    The Draconian constitution, or Draco's code, was a written law code enforced by Draco near the end of the 7th century BC; its composition started around 621BC. It was written in response to the unjust interpretation and modification of oral law by Athenian aristocrats. Aristotle, the chief source for knowledge of Draco, claims that he was the first to write Athenian laws and that Draco established a constitution enfranchising hoplites, the lower class soldiers. The Draconian laws were most noteworthy for their harshness; they were written in blood rather than ink. Death was prescribed for almost all criminal offenses. Solon, who was the magistrate in 594 BCE, later repealed Draco's code and published new laws, retaining only Draco's homicide statutes.   In the 5th century B.C., the Roman Law of the Twelve Tables also contained the death penalty. Death sentences were carried out by such means as beheading, boiling in oil, burying alive, burning, crucifixion, disembowelment, drowning, flaying alive, hanging, impalement, stoning, strangling, being thrown to wild animals, and quartering. We'll talk more about that later. The earliest attempt by the Romans to create a code of law was the Laws of the Twelve Tables. A commission of ten men (Decemviri) was appointed (c. 455 B.C.) to draw up a code of law binding on patrician and plebeian and which consuls would have to enforce. The commission produced enough statutes to fill ten bronze tablets.    Mosaic Law codified many capital crimes. There is evidence that Jews used many different techniques, including stoning, hanging, beheading, crucifixion (copied from the Romans), throwing the criminal from a rock, and sawing asunder. The most infamous execution of history occurred approximately 29 AD with the crucifixion of that one guy, Jesus Christ, outside Jerusalem. About 300 years later, Emperor Constantine, after converting to Christianity, abolished crucifixion and other cruel death penalties in the Roman Empire. In 438, the Code of Theodosius made more than 80 crimes punishable by death.    Britain influenced the colonies more than any other country and has a long history of punishment by death. About 450 BC, the death penalty was often enforced by throwing the condemned into a quagmire, which is not only the character from Family Guy, and another word for dilemma but in this case is a soft boggy area of land. By the 10th Century, hanging from the gallows was the most frequent execution method. William the Conqueror opposed taking life except in war and ordered no person to be hanged or executed for any offense. Nice guy, right? However, he allowed criminals to be mutilated for their crimes.    During the middle ages, capital punishment was accompanied by torture. Most barons had a drowning pit as well as gallows, and they were used for major as well as minor crimes. For example, in 1279, two hundred and eighty-nine Jews were hanged for clipping coins. What the fuck is that you may be wondering. Well, Clipping was taking a small amount of metal off the edge of hand-struck coins. Over time, the precious metal clippings could be saved up and melted into bullion (a lump of precious metal) to be sold or used to make new coins. Under Edward I, two gatekeepers were killed because the city gate had not been closed in time to prevent the escape of an accused murderer. Burning was the punishment for women's high treason, and men were hanged, drawn, and quartered. Beheading was generally accepted for the upper classes. One could be burned to death for marrying a Jew. Pressing became the penalty for those who would not confess to their crimes—the executioner placed heavy weights on the victim's chest until death. On the first day, he gave the victim a small quantity of bread, on the second day a small drink of bad water, and so on until he confessed or died. Under the reign of Henry VIII, the number of those put to death is estimated as high as 72,000. Boiling to death was another penalty approved in 1531, and there are records to show some people cooked for up to two hours before death took them. When a woman was burned, the executioner tied a rope around her neck when she was connected to the stake. When the flames reached her, she could be strangled from outside the ring of fire. However, this often failed, and many were burnt alive.   In Britain, the number of capital offenses continually increased until the 1700's when two hundred and twenty-two crimes were punishable by death. These included stealing from a house for forty shillings, stealing from a shop the value of five shillings, robbing a rabbit warren, cutting down a tree, and counterfeiting tax stamps. However, juries tended not to convict when the penalty was significant, and the crime was not. Reforms began to take place. In 1823, five laws were passed, removing about a hundred crimes from the death penalty. Between 1832 and 1837, many capital offenses were swept away. In 1840, there was a failed attempt to abolish all capital punishment. Through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, more and more capital punishments were abolished, not only in Britain but also all across Europe; until today, only a few European countries retain the death penalty.   The first recorded execution in the English American colonies was in 1608 when officials executed George Kendall of Virginia for supposedly plotting to betray the British to the Spanish. In 1612, Virginia's governor, Sir Thomas Dale, implemented the Divine, Moral, and Martial Laws that made death the penalty for even minor offenses such as stealing grapes, killing chickens, killing dogs or horses without permission, or trading with Indians. Seven years later, these laws were softened because Virginia feared that no one would settle there. Well, no shit.   In 1622, the first legal execution of a criminal, Daniel Frank, occurred in, of course, Virginia for the crime of theft. Some colonies were very strict in using the death penalty, while others were less so. In Massachusetts Bay Colony, the first execution was in 1630, but the earliest capital statutes did not occur until later. Under the Capital Laws of New England that went into effect between 1636-1647, the death penalty was set forth for pre-meditated murder, sodomy, witchcraft, adultery, idolatry, blasphemy, assault in anger, rape, statutory rape, manstealing, perjury in a capital trial, rebellion, manslaughter, poisoning, and bestiality. A scripture from the Old Testament accompanied early laws. By 1780, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts only recognized seven capital crimes: murder, sodomy, burglary, buggery, arson, rape, and treason. And for those wondering, The Buggery Act of 1533, formally An Act for the punishment of the vice of Buggerie, was an Act of the Parliament of England that was passed during the reign of Henry VIII. It was the country's first civil sodomy law.   The Act defined buggery as an unnatural sexual act against the will of God and Man. This term was later determined by the courts to include only anal penetration and bestiality.   The New York colony instituted the so-called Duke's Laws of 1665. This list of laws directed the death penalty for denial of the true God, pre-meditated murder, killing someone who had no weapon of defense, killing by lying in wait or by poisoning, sodomy, buggery, kidnapping, perjury in a capital trial, traitorous denial of the king's rights or raising arms to resist his authority, conspiracy to invade towns or forts in the colony and striking one's mother or father (upon complaint of both). The two colonies that were more lenient concerning capital punishment were South Jersey and Pennsylvania. In South Jersey, there was no death penalty for any crime, and there were only two crimes, murder, and treason, punishable by death. Way to go, Jersey Raccoons!   Some states were more severe. For example, by 1837, North Carolina required death for the crimes of murder, rape, statutory rape, slave-stealing, stealing banknotes, highway robbery, burglary, arson, castration, buggery, sodomy, bestiality, dueling where death occurs, (and this insidious shit), hiding a slave with intent to free him, taking a free Negro out of state to sell him, bigamy, inciting slaves to rebel, circulating seditious literature among slaves, accessory to murder, robbery, burglary, arson, or mayhem and others. However, North Carolina did not have a state prison and, many said, no suitable alternative to capital punishment. So, instead of building a fucking prison to hold criminals, they just made the penalty for less severe crimes punishable by death. What the shit, North Carolina?!?   The first reforms of the death penalty occurred between 1776-1800. Thomas Jefferson and four others, authorized to undertake a complete revision of Virginia's laws, proposed a law that recommended the death penalty for only treason and murder. After a stormy debate, the legislature defeated the bill by one vote. The writing of European theorists such as Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Bentham had a significant effect on American intellectuals, as did English Quaker prison reformers John Bellers and John Howard.   Organizations were formed in different colonies for the abolition of the death penalty and to relieve poor prison conditions. Dr. Benjamin Rush, a renowned Philadelphia citizen, proposed abolishing capital punishment. William Bradford, Attorney General of Pennsylvania, was ordered to investigate capital punishment. In 1793 he published “An Enquiry How Far the Punishment of Death is Necessary” in Pennsylvania. Bradford strongly insisted that the death penalty be retained but admitted it was useless in preventing certain crimes. He said the death penalty made convictions harder to obtain because in Pennsylvania, and indeed in all states, the death penalty was mandatory. Juries would often not return a guilty verdict because of this fact, which makes sense. In response, in 1794, the Pennsylvania legislature abolished capital punishment for all crimes except murder “in the first degree,” the first time murder had been broken down into “degrees.” In New York, in 1796, the legislature authorized construction of the state's first prison, abolished whipping, and reduced the number of capital offenses from thirteen to two. Virginia and Kentucky passed similar reform bills. Four more states reduced their capital crimes: Vermont in 1797 to three; Maryland in 1810, to four; New Hampshire in 1812, to two and Ohio in 1815 to two. Each of these states built state penitentiaries. A few states went in the opposite direction. Rhode Island restored the death penalty for rape and arson; Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Connecticut raised death crimes from six to ten, including sodomy, maiming, robbery, and forgery. Many southern states made more crimes capital, especially for slaves. Assholes.   The first profound reform era occurred between 1833-1853. Public executions were attacked as cruel. Sometimes tens of thousands of eager viewers would show up to view hangings; local merchants would sell souvenirs and alcohol. Which, I'm not sure if I hate or absolutely love. Fighting and pushing would often break out as people jockeyed for the best view of the hanging or the corpse! Onlookers often cursed the widow or the victim and would try to tear down the scaffold or the rope for keepsakes. Violence and drunkenness often ruled towns far into the night after “justice had been served.” People are fucking weird, dude. Many states enacted laws providing private hangings. Rhode Island (1833), Pennsylvania (1834), New York (1835), Massachusetts (1835), and New Jersey (1835) all abolished public hangings. By 1849, fifteen states were holding private hangings. This move was opposed by many death penalty abolitionists who thought public executions would eventually cause people to cry out against execution itself. For example, in 1835, Maine enacted what was in effect a moratorium on capital punishment after over ten thousand people who watched a hanging had to be restrained by police after they became unruly and began fighting. All felons sentenced to death would have to remain in prison at hard labor and could not be executed until one year had elapsed and then only on the governor's order. No governor ordered an execution under the “Maine Law” for twenty-seven years. Though many states argued the merits of the death penalty, no state went as far as Maine. The most influential reformers were the clergy, of course. Ironically, the small but influential group that opposed the abolitionists was the clergy.    Ok, let's talk about electrocution. Want to know how the electric chair came to be? Well, Electrocution as a method of execution came onto the scene in an implausible manner. Edison Company, with its DC (direct current) electrical systems, began attacking Westinghouse Company and its AC (alternating current) electrical systems as they were pressing for nationwide electrification with alternating current. To show how dangerous AC could be, Edison Company began public demonstrations by electrocuting animals. People reasoned that if electricity could kill animals, it could kill people. In 1888, New York approved the dismantling of its gallows and the building of the nation's first electric chair. It held its first victim, William Kemmler, in 1890, and even though the first electrocution was clumsy at best, other states soon followed the lead.   Between 1917 and 1955, the death penalty abolition movement again slowed. Washington, Arizona, and Oregon in 1919-20 reinstated the death penalty. In 1924, the first execution by cyanide gas took place in Nevada, when Tong war gang murderer Gee Jon became its first victim. Get this shit. The frigging state wanted to secretly pump cyanide gas into Jon's cell at night while he was asleep as a more humanitarian way of carrying out the penalty. Still, technical difficulties prohibited this, and a special “gas chamber” was hastily built. Other concerns developed when less “civilized” methods of execution failed. In 1930, Mrs. Eva Dugan became the first female to be executed by Arizona. The execution was botched when the hangman misjudged the drop, and Mrs. Dugan's head was ripped from her body. More states converted to electric chairs and gas chambers. During this time, abolitionist organizations sprang up all across the country, but they had little effect. Several stormy protests were held against the execution of certain convicted felons, like Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were convicted of spying on behalf of the Soviet Union. The couple was convicted of providing top-secret information about radar, sonar, jet propulsion engines, and valuable nuclear weapon designs. At that time, the United States was supposedly the only country with nuclear weapons. Convicted of espionage in 1951, they were executed by the United States federal government in 1953 in the Sing Sing correctional facility in Ossining, New York, becoming the first American civilians to be executed for such charges and the first to receive that penalty during peacetime. However, these protests held little opposition against the death penalty itself. In fact, during the anti-Communist period, with all its fears and hysteria, Texas Governor Allan Shivers seriously suggested that capital punishment be the penalty for membership in the Communist Party.   The movement against capital punishment revived again between 1955 and 1972.   England and Canada completed exhaustive studies which were largely critical of the death penalty, and these were widely circulated in the U.S.  Death row criminals gave their moving accounts of capital punishment in books and films. Convicted robber, kidnapper, and rapist Caryl Chessman, published “Cell 2455 Death Row” and “Trial by Ordeal.” Barbara Graham's story was utilized in the book and movie “I Want to Live!” after her execution. She was executed in the gas chamber at San Quentin Prison on the same day as two convicted accomplices, Jack Santo and Emmett Perkins. All of them were involved in a robbery that led to the murder of an elderly widow.  Television shows were broadcast on the death penalty. Hawaii and Alaska ended capital punishment in 1957, and Delaware did so the following year. Controversy over the death penalty gripped the nation, forcing politicians to take sides. Delaware restored the death penalty in 1961. Michigan abolished capital punishment for treason in 1963. Voters in 1964 abolished the death penalty in Oregon. In 1965 Iowa, New York, West Virginia, and Vermont ended the death penalty. New Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1969.   The controversy over the death penalty continues today. There is a strong movement against lawlessness propelled by citizens' fears of security. Politicians at the national and state levels are taking the floor of legislatures and calling for more frequent death penalties, death penalties for more crimes, and longer prison sentences. Those opposing these moves counter by arguing that harsher sentences do not slow crime and that crime is slightly or the same as in the past. FBI statistics show murders are now up. (For example, 9.3 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1973, and 9.4 persons per 100,000 were murdered in 1992, and as of today, it's upwards of 14.4 people per 100,000. This upswing might be because of more advanced crime technology, as well as more prominent news and media.   Capital punishment has been completely abolished in all European countries except for Belarus and Russia, which has a moratorium and has not conducted an execution since September 1996. The complete ban on capital punishment is enshrined in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union (EU). Two widely adopted protocols of the European Convention on Human Rights of the Council of Europe are thus considered a central value. Of all modern European countries, San Marino, Portugal, and the Netherlands were the first to abolish capital punishment, whereas only Belarus still practices capital punishment in some form or another. In 2012, Latvia became the last EU member state to abolish capital punishment in wartime.   Ok, so now let's switch gears from the history of capital punishment and executions in general and get into what we know you beautiful bastards come here for. Let's talk about some methods used throughout the years, and then we'll talk about some famous executions and some fucked and messed up ones.   Methods:   We've discussed a few of these before, but some are so fucked up we're going to discuss them again.   Boiling To Death:   A slow and agonizing punishment, this method traditionally saw the victim gradually lowered — feet-first — into boiling oil, water, or wax (although uses of boiling wine and molten lead have also been recorded).   If the shock of the pain did not render them immediately unconscious, the person would experience the excruciating sensation of their outer layers of skin, utterly destroyed by immersion burns, dissolving right off their body, followed by the complete breakdown of the fatty tissue, boiling away beneath.   Emperor Nero is said to have dispatched thousands of Christians in this manner. At the same time, in the Middle Ages, the primary recipients of the punishment were not killers or rapists but coin forgers, particularly in Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. In Britain, meanwhile, King Henry VIII introduced the practice for executing those who used poison to commit murder.   Shockingly, the practice is believed to have been carried out as recently as 2002, when the government of Uzbekistan, led by Islam Karimov, was alleged to have tortured several suspected terrorists to death by boiling.   The Blood Eagle:   A technique ascribed to ancient Norse warriors, the blood eagle, mixed brutality and poetic imagery that only the Vikings could. First, the victim's back would be hacked open, and the skin ripped apart, exposing the spinal column.   The ribs would then be snapped from the spine and forcibly bent backward until they faced outwards from the body, forming a pair of bloody, shattered eagle's wings. As a horrifying finale, the lungs would then be pulled from the body cavity and coated with stinging salt, causing eventual death by suffocation.   There is some question whether this technique was ever actually used as the only accounts come from Norse literature. Odin did this shit, you know it.   Several scholars claim that the act we know of today is simply a result of poor translating and misunderstands the strong association of the eagle with blood and death in Norse imagery. That said, every account is consistent in that in each case, the victim is a nobleman being punished for murdering his father.   The good news for any poor soul who might have suffered this brutal death? The agony and blood loss from the initial wounds would probably have caused them to pass out long before the lungs were removed from their bodies.    Impalement:   Most famously used by Vlad the Impaler, 15th-century ruler of Wallachia (in present-day Romania) and inspiration for Count Dracula, the act of impalement has a long, grim history. While images tend to depict people skewered through the midsection and then held aloft — in a manner that would almost certainly bring about a rapid death — the actual process was a much longer, horrifically drawn-out ordeal.   Traditionally, the stake would be partially sharpened and planted, point up, in the ground. The victim would then be placed over the spike as it was inserted partway into the rectum or vagina.   As their body weight dragged them further onto the pole, the semi-greased wooden stake would force its way up through their body, piercing organs with agonizing slowness as it eventually penetrated the entire torso, finally tearing an exit wound through the skin of the shoulder, neck or throat. Holy shishkabob. Or bill. Or Karen.   The earliest records of the torture come from 1772 B.C. in Babylon, where the aforementioned King Hammurabi ordered a woman be executed in this way for killing her husband. But its use continued until as recently as the 20th century when the Ottoman government employed the technique during the Armenian genocide of 1915-1923. Which is super fucked up.   According to some accounts, it could take the victim — exposed, bleeding, and writhing in tormented agony — as long as eight whole days to die. Oh my hell!   Keelhauling:   Walking the plank might not be the most pleasant of deaths, but it seems moderately more humane than the other favored maritime punishment of keelhauling.   A punishment that often ended in death due to the severity of the wounds sustained (or was simply carried out until the point of death), it saw the victim, legs weighted and suspended from a rope, dropped from the bow of the ship, and then rapidly pulled underwater along the length of the hull — and over the keel (the beam that runs longitudinally down the center of the underside to the stern.   In the age of old, old wooden sailing ships, the hull of a vessel would generally be coated in a thick layer of barnacles, whose shells could be rock hard and razor-sharp.   As the drowning sailor was yanked relentlessly through the saltwater, these barnacles would strip the skin from his body, gouging out raw chunks of flesh and even, by some accounts, tearing off whole limbs or severing the head.   If the sailor was still alive, they might be hung from the mast for 15 minutes before going in again. In some cases, the victim would have an oil-soaked sponge — containing a breath of air — stuffed into their mouth to prevent a “merciful” drowning.   Employed mainly by the Dutch and the French from the 1500s until it was abolished in 1853, accounts of its use date back to Greece in 800 B.C.   The Roman Candle:   Many of the worst execution methods ever devised involve fire — from burning witches at stake in medieval Britain to roasting criminals alive in the hot metal insides of the brazen bull in Ancient Greece — but few match the sheer lack of humanity as the Roman Candle.   A rumored favorite of the mad Roman Emperor Nero, this method saw the subject tied to a stake and smeared with flammable pitch (tree or plant resin), then set ablaze, slowly burning to death from the feet up.   What sets this above the many other similar methods is that the victims were sometimes lined up outside to provide the lighting for one of Nero's evening parties.   Being Hanged, Drawn, And Quartered:   First recorded in England during the 13th century, this unusually extreme — even for the time — mode of execution was made the statutory punishment for treason in 1351. Though it was intended to be an act of such barbarous severity that no one would ever risk committing a treasonous act, there were nevertheless plenty of recipients over the next 500 years.   The process of being hanged, drawn, and quartered began with the victim being dragged to the site of execution while strapped to a wooden panel, which was in turn tied to a horse.   They would then experience a slow hanging, in which, rather than being dropped to the traditional quick death of a broken neck, they would instead be left to choke horribly as the rope tore up the skin of their throat, their body weight dragging them downwards.   Some had the good fortune to die at this stage, including the infamous Gunpowder Plot conspirator Guy Fawkes, who ensured a faster death by leaping from the gallows.   Once half-strangled, the drawing would begin. The victim would be strapped down and then slowly disemboweled, their stomachs sliced open, and their intestines and other significant organs hacked apart and pulled — “drawn” — from the body.   The genitals would often be mutilated and ripped from between their legs. Those unlucky enough to still be alive at this point might witness their organs burned in front of them before they were finally decapitated.   Once death had finally claimed them, the recipient's body would be carved into four pieces — or “quartered” — and the parts sent to prominent areas of the country as a warning to others.   The head would often be taken to the infamous Tower of London, where it would be impaled on a spike and placed on the walls “for the mockery of London.”   Rat Torture:   As recently depicted in that horrible show, Game Of Thrones, rat torture is ingenious in its disgusting simplicity. In its most basic form, a bucket containing live rats is placed on the exposed torso of the victim, and heat is applied to the base of the bucket.   The rats, crazy with fear from the heat, tear and gnaw their way into the abdomen of the victim, clawing and ripping through skin, flesh, organs, and intestines in their quest to escape.   Possessing the most powerful biting and chewing motion of any rodent, rats can make short work of a human stomach. Along with the unimaginable pain, the victim would also suffer the sick horror of feeling the large, filthy creatures writhing around inside their guts as they died.   While associated with Elizabethan England — where the Tower of London was said to have housed a “Dungeon of Rats,” a pitch-black room below high watermark that would draw in rats from the River Thames to torment the room's inhabitants — the practice has been used far more recently.   General Pinochet is said to have employed the technique during his dictatorship of Chile (1973-1990), while reports from Argentina during the National Reorganization Process in the late 1970s and early '80s claimed victims were subjected to a version in which live rats — or sometimes spiders — were inserted into the subject's body via a tube in the rectum or vagina….yep.   Bamboo Torture   Forcing thin shards of bamboo under the fingernails has long been cited as an interrogation method, but bamboo has been used to creatively — and slowly — execute a person, too. Allegedly used by the Japanese on American prisoners of war, it saw the victim tied down to a frame over a patch of newly sprouting bamboo plants.   One of the fastest-growing plants in the world, capable of up to three feet of growth in 24 hours, the sharp-tipped plants would slowly pierce the victim's skin — and then continue to grow. The result was death by gradual, continuous, multiple impalements, the equivalent of being dropped on a bed of sharpened stakes in terrible slow motion.   Despite the practice having roots in the former areas of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) and Siam (now Thailand) in the 19th century, there are no proven instances of it being used during WWII.   It's certainly possible, however, and it has been shown that the technique, among the worst execution methods ever, works: A 2008 episode of MythBusters found that bamboo was capable of penetrating a human-sized lump of ballistic gelatin over three days.   https://m.imdb.com/list/ls059738828/

new york canada japanese europe fighting american thailand man greece god history tower french spanish live oregon england british european human rights germany hawaii council burning babylon dc dungeon alaska united states vermont roman empire russia death washington public act arizona holy fbi maine north carolina pennsylvania new england philadelphia massachusetts west virginia middle ages netherlands delaware maryland new mexico rhode island connecticut romans norse new jersey bc ohio dutch portugal iowa michigan nevada wwii violence count dracula indians code new hampshire christians politicians argentina mrs controversy assholes ironically game of thrones commonwealth kentucky trial parliament european union divine rock and roll rats christianity ancient greece draco ac punishment britain chile soviet union henry viii family guy san marino armenian sri lanka death row jews voltaire bce roman law aristotle romania king henry viii boiling dugan execution old testament jesus christ moral conqueror shocking vikings jerusalem drawn san quentin prison wallachia communists ethel rosenberg vlad impaler european union eu laws ordeal athenian nero thomas jefferson belarus tong bradford european convention juries fundamental rights pressing latvia convicted allegedly siam ottoman voters reforms charter mythbusters montesquieu mesopotamia onlookers attorney general sing sing solon gunpowder plot draconian electrocution elizabethan england communist party holy roman empire guy fawkes south jersey english american babylonians ceylon bentham clipping river thames uzbekistan emperor constantine penalties roman candle john howard william bradford ossining beheadings islam karimov benjamin rush hammurabi euphrates river hittite theodosius twelve tables english quaker
The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
HubWonk: Massachusetts Telehealth Report Card: Are We Embracing Disruption for Better Quality of Care? (#88)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022


Hubwonk host Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Senior Fellow in Healthcare Josh Archambault about his newest research paper, produced with the Cicero Institute and the Reason Foundation, on states’ success in implementing telehealth to improve healthcare outcomes. They discuss how Massachusetts has used remote medicine to better reach patients and serve their needs. Read the […]

Ritter on Real Estate
Personal And Financial Freedom Through Real Estate Investing With Bob Couture

Ritter on Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:47


In today's episode of #RitterOnRealEstate, we sit down with special guest, Bob Couture! Bob is managing partner of CP Property Group, a realty and investment company, with offices in Springfield, Massachusetts, and Hermosa Beach, California. Bob is also the Co-Founder of the Western Mass Real Estate Investor Group. Additionally, he is a partner in Ironsides PropertyGroup, a property management company in Springfield, MA. As an investor himself, Bob has a personal portfolio of over 50 units and has helped clients achieve their real estate goals through apartment syndications, apartment purchases, and/or multifamily/single-family properties. Welcome to the show Bob! Key Points From The Episode:Starting off in the aerospace and defense industry. Growing up in a construction family.Getting into house flipping but becoming a buy/hold investor.Slowly adding to his portfolio, getting into multifamily & learning about syndication.Focusing on syndication and property management.What inspired Bob to get into Multifamily Investments, natural evolution. How real estate positively impacted Bob's life. Why the US middle east market is undervalued/untapped. Affordable Housing vs Market Rate Extremely low turnover with affordable housing.How Bob Couture analyzes deals. Books Mentioned:Millionaire Real Estate Investor By Gary Keller. Rich Dad Poor Dad By Robert Kiyosaki 

The John Batchelor Show
8/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 8:40


Photo:  George Washington Papers, Series 4, General Correspondence: George Washington to Washington, D. C., Commissioners, December 26, 1796 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
7/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:52


Photo:  Ice views in the Delaware River,  7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
6/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 7:22


Photo:  This is a photograph of the statue often incorrectly believed to represent Captain John Parker sculpted by Henry Hudson Kitson and erected in 1900.  This statue in Lexington, Massachusetts, is commonly called "The Lexington Minuteman" because it was meant to represent the Minutemen generally rather than any individual. There are no known portraits of John Parker made while he was alive.It is often confused with the Daniel Chester French statue The Minute Man in nearby Concord  6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
4/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:27


Photo:  Print showing two soldiers of the Continental Army color guard, playing fife and drum, marching in winter. 4/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
5/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:22


Photo:   Surf at Marblehead Neck, Marblehead, Mass. 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:17


Photo:  Cambridge 21st August 1775. Wanted for the Continental Army .  Public requisition of supplies, including bricks, firewood, lumber, charcoal, hay, straw, corn, oats, shovels, spades, pickaxes, handsaws, and lime. 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
3/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 11:07


Photo:  Views of Morristown National Historical Park, Virginia.  During two critical winters of the Revolutionary War, 1777 and 1779¿80, the countryside in and around Morristown, New Jersey, sheltered the main encampments of the American Continental Army and served as the headquarters of its commander-in-chief, General George Washington.  3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell      Hardcover – May 18, 2021 @combathistorian https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021 @combathistorian @Batchelorshow

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 9:27


Photo:  Silk painted flag of the Third Company, Third Connecticut Regiment, Continental Army, with a silver sword, green "III" and a green garland tied with a red ribbon painted in the lower left corner extending into the center on a white ground; tan linen sleeve for the flagstaff. New-York Historical Society. 1/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington across the Delaware, by  Patrick K. O'Donnell   @combathistorian     @Batchelorshow  Hardcover – May 18, 2021  https://www.amazon.com/Indispensables-Marbleheads-Soldier-Mariners-Washington-Delaware/dp/0802156894/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr= From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

Speaking Podcast
#129 Drop Kick the Drama - Madonna Hanna

Speaking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 40:39


About my Guest: Madonna was born on the Pensacola Naval Base and was raised in the conservative white suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts during the 60s and 70s. She was the only African-American student in her elementary school class. Her parents overcame incredible obstacles of discrimination to provide their family with the American dream of a suburban middle-class lifestyle. In 1979, Madonna moved to Washington state to embark on a 32 year teaching career. She taught Fashion Marketing in the Tacoma and Bremerton School Districts. She developed an award winning antibullying program, “Dare Not To Swear!” and an inclusivity program for students with disabilities. She partnered with area high schools and a junior high to create the award winning “Flights of Fancy” Fashion show for students with disabilities. Madonna was recognized for her excellence in teaching at the state wide and national level. What we Discussed: - How Acting helped her in Toastmasters - Preparation for the International Speech competition - Dilemma in a Speech Final - How to Raise more Funds at a Charity Event as an MC - The Bullying she experienced and how she teaches other about this important topic and more How to Contact Madonna: https://dropkickthedrama.com/ madfashion2001@yahoo.com https://www.instagram.com/madonnafitfastandfabulous/ https://www.facebook.com/MadonnaFitFastandFabulous More About Speaking Podcast: All Episodes can be found at www.speakingpodcast.com All Social Media + Donations link https://linktr.ee/speaking Sponsor : http://coolabulla.com Use Discount Code Speaking for a 10% Discount Our Facebook Group can be found at www.facebook.com/speakingpodcast All my 5 Podcast can be found at http://roycoughlan.com/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/roy-coughlan/message