Podcasts about Massachusetts

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State in the northeastern United States

  • 10,663PODCASTS
  • 25,460EPISODES
  • 43mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Oct 17, 2021LATEST
Massachusetts

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Best podcasts about Massachusetts

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Latest podcast episodes about Massachusetts

Trapping Today
Campfire Trapping Talk

Trapping Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 50:15


In this episode we sit down by the campfire with a few trappers from Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Support our Sponsors:Kaatz Bros. LuresOnXMapsMoyle Mink & Tannery Check out the new Kaatz Bros. pan coversCheck out the Trapping Today Store

Light Hearted
Light Hearted ep 141 – Paul Elias, Tarpaulin Cove, Massachusetts

Light Hearted

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 50:20


The Elizabeth Islands are a chain of small islands that extend about 16 miles to the southwest from the southern coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. There are seven major islands in the chain. Naushon Island is the largest at 7.4 square miles. Tarpaulin Cove, on the east side of the island, was a place where seamen traveling through Vineyard Sound often stopped for a meal or a night's stay at a tavern run for many years by Zaccheus Lumbert. Lumbert erected an early navigational light on the island in 1759. Tarpaulin Cove Lighthouse, Naushon Island, Massachusetts. Photo by Jeremy D'Entremont. In 1817, the federal government established a light station at Tarpaulin Cove with a rubblestone tower showing a fixed white light 71 feet above mean high water. A new 38-foot-tall brick tower was built in 1891. After the light was automated in 1941, the keeper's house and outbuildings fell into disrepair and were torn down in 1962. The lighthouse tower at Tarpaulin Cove is now maintained by the Cuttyhunk Historical Society. The Society was launched in 1978 and operates the Museum of the Elizabeth Islands on Cuttyhunk, the westernmost of the Elizabeth Islands. Naushon Island is also home to a herd of belted Galloway cows, who sometimes like to take a dip in the ocean. Photo by Jeremy D'Entremont. The light station on Cuttyhunk was demolished in 1947. (Collection of Jeremy D'Entremont) Paul Elias Also discussed in this episode is the lost lighthouse of Cuttyhunk, which was established in 1823. Paul Elias is a longtime summer resident and a trustee of Naushon Island. He's also a former board member of the Cuttyhunk Historical Society and the "point person" for Tarpaulin Cove Lighthouse.

Satiated Podcast
Satiated Saturdays Episode 101: Three Unexpected Eating On The Road Guidelines

Satiated Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 7:36


Happy Satiated Saturday!  My husband and I bought an airstream over a year ago. Right now, we're on our second trip driving across the United States. So far we have driven through Montana, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, North Carolina, Maryland, New York, and Vermont. Next up is Massachusetts and Connecticut. We have been on the road for about a month now and currently seeing some amazing fall foliage on the east coast. Every time we have hit the road, others keep telling me to do an episode about eating while traveling. When you look up these kinds of articles, they all say about the same thing. Plan ahead, look up menus to be able to choose the "healthiest" options, pack whole food snacks, yada yada yada. Sometimes these suggestions are doable and sometimes they simply are not. So I wanted to offer something a bit more basic of what might actually feel doable and honor you the eater that is always doing the best you can to nourish your body and that best may also mean just satiating your physical hunger with whatever is available. In this week's episode, I dive into three unexpected eating on the road guidelines. You can also read the transcript to this week's episode here: https://www.stephaniemara.com/blog/three-unexpected-eating-on-the-road-guidelines If you loved this episode and want to hear more about our travels, email me at support@stephaniemara.com with a YES! With Compassion and Empathy, Stephanie Mara FoxThis episode is brought to you by Kajabi. If you're someone who has been wanting to share your wisdom in a self created online program, start your own podcast, send out emails, Kajabi is your one-stop shop. Kajabi is an all-in-one platform to create and scale your knowledge. Get a special 30 day trial here! https://app.kajabi.com/r/7zLtW92X/t/yxukwczfSpecial thanks to Bendsound for the intro music in this episode. www.bensound.comSupport the show (https://account.venmo.com/u/stephaniemara)

Survivor Fans Podcast
Season 41 Week 4 LF

Survivor Fans Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 91:14


The fans really enjoyed the break from the byzantine advantage structure we were subjected to in the early episodes. The humorous attempt to throw the challenge and continued blunders of the last boot were also a frequent topic. Based on other feedback, we have at least two solid villains to cheer against now. It all contributes to our excitement for the next installment on Wednesday. We want to thank and acknowledge everyone who contributed to another great Listener Feedback show. This week we heard from: Pete, Christiana, Shea, Robert, Brian-Hedik-Save-Us, TitoBurrito, Dustin, Justin, Mike, Erin, Brad, Ann-n-John, Drew's Crew, David, Josh, Parker, Noelle, Rashmi, Shahin, Kim-n-Cameron, Jack, Jade-n-Christine, Jill, Jeremiah, Jen and Paul. We've got several ways you can reach us. You can call and leave a voicemail at 206-350-1547 or toll-free at 844-643-8737. You can record an audio comment and attach it or just type up a quick text message and send it to us via email at joannandstacyshow@gmail.com. Feedback is due noon Saturday Pacific time. 00:00 Date 00:06 Intro: Wakeful Spaces 00:39 Introductions 01:14 Pete from Boston, Massachusetts 04:36 Christiana from Massachusetts 08:21 Shea from northwest Arkansas 11:03 Robert from Peterborough, Ontario, Canada 13:01 Brian Heidek Save Us 16:14 TitoBurrito 17:24 Dustin from Mexico City, Mexico 19:33 Justin from Michigan 23:52 Mike from Cromwell, Connecticut 26:15 Erin from Canada 27:22 Brad from California 30:44 Ann-n-John from San Diego, California 32:55 Drew-Charlie-Adelaide-n-Milo from Utah 36:39 David from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 38:49 Josh the Plush Moose from Massachusetts 42:05 Parker from Indiana 45:39 Noelle from Albuquerque, New Mexico 48:36 Rashmi from Perth 51:15 Shahin from Australia 54:38 Kim-n-Cameron from North Carolina 58:05 Jack from California 59:46 Jade-n-Christine from Hawaii 66:33 Jill from the Outback 68:37 Jeremiah from SoCal 73:02 Jen from California 76:13 Paul from Louisiana 79:15 Wrap Up 89:43 Outro: Soulful Spheres Links for Today's Show Dalton Ross interview with JD Mike Bloom interview with JD Gordon Holmes interview with JD Paul's Visual Roster CBS Castaway Bios JSFL Survivor Fans Podcast Fans group on Facebook SFP on Twitter SFP on YouTube SFP on iTunes SFP on Spotify Contact Info: Voicemail: 206-350-1547 Toll Free: 844-643-8737 Email: joannandstacyshow@gmail.com Survivor Fans Podcast P.O. Box 2811 Orangevale, CA 95662 Enjoy, Jo Ann and Stacy

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 27:30


Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath by Heather Clark Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography • “One of the most beautiful biographies I've ever read." —Glennon Doyle, author of #1 New York Times Bestseller, Untamed The highly anticipated biography of Sylvia Plath that focuses on her remarkable literary and intellectual achievements, while restoring the woman behind the long-held myths about her life and art. With a wealth of never-before-accessed materials--including unpublished letters and manuscripts; court, police, and psychiatric records; and new interviews--Heather Clark brings to life the brilliant daughter of Wellesley, Massachusetts who had poetic ambition from a very young age and was an accomplished, published writer of poems and stories even before she became a star English student at Smith College in the early 1950s. Determined not to read Plath's work as if her every act, from childhood on, was a harbinger of her tragic fate, Clark evokes a culture in transition, in the shadow of the atom bomb and the Holocaust, as she explores Plath's world: her early relationships and determination not to become a conventional woman and wife; her conflicted ties to her well-meaning, widowed mother; her troubles at the hands of an unenlightened mental-health industry; her Cambridge years and thunderclap meeting with Ted Hughes, a marriage of true minds that would change the course of poetry in English; and much more. Clark's clear-eyed portraits of Hughes, his lover Assia Wevill, and other demonized players in the arena of Plath's suicide promotes a deeper understanding of her final days, with their outpouring of first-rate poems. Along with illuminating readings of the poems themselves, Clark's meticulous, compassionate research brings us closer than ever to the spirited woman and visionary artist who blazed a trail that still lights the way for women poets the world over

Hypermobility Happy Hour
36 - Discussing Disjointed: Interview with Dr. Richard Barnum - Psychiatric Misdiagnoses

Hypermobility Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 56:36


On this episode of the Hypermobility Happy Hour, Kerry interviews Dr. Richard Barnum. Dr. Barnum is a board certified child and adolescent psychiatrist who directed the Boston Juvenile Court Clinic for more than twenty years. In that role, he conducted psychiatric evaluations of thousands of children and families in the Massachusetts courts and also provided consulting services to the Massachusetts Departments of Mental Health and Youth Services, regarding cases involving complex legal and clinical problems. He has also consulted with the United States Department of Justice Civil Rights Division regarding psychiatric care provided to incarcerated juveniles in other states. He was also formerly an Assisted Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and was affiliated with the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Barnum also contributed a chapter to the book Disjointed. Dr. Barnum discusses the appropriate treatment of patients with hEDS, the issues in getting proper diagnoses, and what to do when you've been misdiagnosed with a psychiatric condition and/or undertreated for their physical ailments and conditions. Barnum, Richard, “Problems with diagnosing Conversion Disorder in response to variable and unusual symptoms.” Adolescent, health, medicine and therapeutics vol. 5 67-71. 17 Apr. 2014, doi: 10.2147/AHMT.S57486. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4000178/ Dr. Richard Barnum, Psychiatrist, discusses EDS & Psychiatric illness misdiagnoses, EDS Awareness Educational Series, 17 September 2014, https://chronicpainpartners.com/webinar/free-webinar-19/ Article on misdiagnosis mentioned by Dr. Barnum: https://www.verywellhealth.com/how-to-correct-medical-record-errors-2615506

New England Weekend
Supply Chain Chaos 101, and "Abel Bodied" Highlights a Piece of Malden History

New England Weekend

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 31:43


Are you struggling to find your favorite foods, appliances, furniture, or anything else you need at the store? There's one major factor driving all these shortages - problems in the global supply chain. Professor Michael Goodman teaches Public Policy at UMass Dartmouth, and he joins Nichole to break down these troubles in the chain. He also has some insight on how this might be playing out in your day-to-day life in the coming weeks and months. Michael Cloherty talks with Nichole about his new book, "Abel Bodied". It focuses on a piece of American history that unfolded in Malden - the first murder during a bank robbery! Michael has details on how he came up with the idea, and teaches us a bit about the story behind the book.

Truth's Table
We Gon' Learn Today: Fugitive Pedagogy with Jarvis R. Givens

Truth's Table

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:31


In this episode, Ekemini and Christina are sitting at the table with Jarvis R. Givens to learn about his book, Fugitive Pedagogy:Carter G. Woodson and the Art of Black Teaching. What is fugitive pedagogy? Why does it matter? How is it still in operation today? Dr. Givens takes us to school, y'all! So pull up a chair and have a seat at the table with us. Jarvis R. Givens, a native of Compton, California, is an assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, a faculty affiliate in the department of African & African American Studies, and the Suzanne Young Murray assistant professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. Givens earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a Mellon Mays, Ford Foundation, and Gates Fellow. Jarvis Givens is a co-director of a major new research project called The Black Teacher Archive with Imani Perry, PhD, of Princeton University. Givens is also the co-editor of We Dare Say Love: Supporting Achievement in the Education Life of Black Boys. He lives in Roxbury, Massachusetts. About the Fugitive Pedagogy: A fundamental part of black education during slavery and in the post-Emancipation period—centered on African Americans concealing important elements of their learning and masking their true intentions for education. In Fugitive Pedagogy, Jarvis R. Givens chronicles the efforts of Carter G. Woodson—a veteran schoolteacher during the Jim Crow era—as an iconic example of how African Americans strategically subverted an anti-black school system even as they were coerced to comply with white authority. Woodson, who went on to found Black History Month, spent his career fighting the “mis-education of the Negro" by helping teachers and students to see themselves and their mission as set apart from an anti-black world. Follow: Jarvis R. Givens Twitter: JarvisRGivens Facebook: Jarvis Givens Purchase Fugitive Pedagogy here: https://bookshop.org/books/fugitive-pedagogy-carter-g-woodson-and-the-art-of-black-teaching/9780674983687 Truth's Table Listeners can purchase Beasts of Prey by Ayana Gray here: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/673322/beasts-of-prey-by-ayana-gray/ Black Women, join Truth's Table Black Women's Discipleship Group on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/truthstablediscipleship Support Truth's Table: Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TruthsTable PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/TruthsTable Merchandise: https://www.teespring.com/truthstable

The News with Shepard Smith
Hollywood Strike, J&J Boosters, Two-Headed Turtle

The News with Shepard Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 49:43


Founding partner of Puck News Matt Belloni explains how the Hollywood strike would not only be disastrous for Hollywood, but also for the entire economy. CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on a FDA advisory panel's unanimous vote to recommend boosters for the nearly 15 million people who received Johnson & Johnson's vaccine. NBC's Sam Brock updates from a Ft. Lauderdale courthouse where the confessed Parkland shooter is set to plead guilty to all the charges related to the 2018 massacre. CNBC's Kate Rogers discusses a new report that says the U.S. labor shortage may get worse in the years to come. CNBC's Contessa Brewer reports on the rising popularity of digital fashion. Plus, CNBC's Perry Russom reports on a rare two-headed turtle brought into a Massachusetts wildlife center

Beer Sessions Radio (TM)
Celebrating 600 Episodes With Pitch Lined Pils at Notch Brewing, Boston

Beer Sessions Radio (TM)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 54:30


Jimmy heads to Boston for the 600th episode of BSR! We catch up with Chris Lohring, founder of Notch Brewing, to talk pilsner traditions, decoction, as well as the new Notch Tap Room and Brewery at the Charles River Speedway in Boston's Brighton neighborhood. For the second year in a row, Jimmy is tapping and tasting the extremely limited, Pitch Lined Pils. Take a journey through history as Chris walks us through the process of bringing this old-world technique back, from sourcing to brewing. This is the ultimate Beer Geek episode! Crack a Bavarian Lager and have a listen.A special note: Our hearts go out to the beloved Anne Saxelby, who passed this week. In the words of Jimmy, “Her legacy is in everything around us: The food we eat, the people we know, the memories of tastes like “Comersdale” and “Moses Sleeper”. We will never forget. Much love.” Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Beer Sessions Radio by becoming a member!Beer Sessions Radio is Powered by Simplecast.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Phone Users Anonymous

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 129:04


Today on Boston Public Radio: Rep. Katherine Clark discusses President Joe Biden's spending plan, including the importance of childcare funding, and updates listeners on the state of Democratic negotiations. Clark is assistant house speaker and represents the Fifth District of Massachusetts. Then, we ask listeners about their thoughts on vaccine mandates in Massachusetts and the politicization of vaccines, as New Hampshire residents push back against public health efforts. Sue O'Connell talks about Texas' child welfare agency removing resources for LGBTQ youth from its webpage, and an upcoming walkout by transgender Netflix employees over Dave Chappelle's latest comedy special. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Shirley Leung breaks down latest proposals to address the crisis at Mass. and Cass, and tells the story of a woman from New Jersey who drove north to look for her son there. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Andy Ihnatko talks about how iPhones can now track location even when turned off, so that the Find my iPhone feature can locate the device. He also discusses bipartisan efforts in Congress to bar tech companies from giving preferential treatment to their own products. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. We end the show by asking listeners for their tips on tackling phone addiction.

Red Cloaks Radio
Listening & Leadership: Is Mass. the tip of the spear for social justice?

Red Cloaks Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 24:57


Massachusetts candidate Simon Cataldo seeks state office (Rep. for Middlesex 14th), and brings us into conversation about whether Massachusetts is the tip of the spear when it comes to social justice. As a former prosecutor, and the son of a social worker, Simon discusses WHPA, the Texas abortion ban, humility, priorities and the importance of listening. In a state where many wish to see local and national progress made toward social justice - especially gender and racial justice - learn Simon's vision and approach.

Boston's Best
064 - Coffee That Inspires ​​With Atomic Coffee Roasters

Boston's Best

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 45:05


Calling all coffee lovers! This week, I'm talking with Spencer Mahoney, VP of Operations at Atomic Coffee Roasters, a coffee roastery located in Salem, MA. Their mission? To spread positive energy. For over two decades, the Mahoney family has used coffee as a catalyst for inspiring community, relationships, and adventures. In this episode, Spencer shares how his uncles started Atomic Cafe in the mid-'90s and what it was like working at Atomic Cafe growing up. He also shares how they recently split the cafe's roasting division after his father started roasting their coffee. After splitting the cafe and the roastery, Spencer describes how they have developed and scaled their business model over the last two decades. Topics Discussed: The complete production process of roasting coffee Myths and misconceptions around coffee roasting methods The reward from partnering with local cafes and local business owners Challenges faced dnd pivots made during covid-19 Making time to stay in balance in your professional and personal life Connect with Atomic Coffee Roasters: Website: https://atomicroastery.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/atomicoffeeroasters/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/atomiccoffeeroasters/ Instagram (Personal): https://www.instagram.com/spencermahoney/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/spencermahoney/ Relevant Articles: New England Country Mart - Meet the Producer: Atomic Coffee from Massachusetts: https://newenglandcountrymart.com/meet-the-producer/meet-the-producer-atomic-coffee-from-massachusetts/ St. John's Prep - Live! Since You Asked: Logan Mahoney '14 and Spencer Mahoney of Atomic Coffee: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5K-jfToaB8 Contact Atomic Coffee Roasters: Address: 45 Mason St, Salem, MA 01970 Call: 978-910-0489 Email: hello@atomicroastery.com Connect with Mark Condon: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BostonsBestPodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bostonsbest_podcast/ About Boston's Best: “Highlighting successful businesses in and around Boston, MA.” Go behind the scenes with financial planner Mark Condon as he asks industry-leading experts to talk about their businesses throughout the state of Massachusetts. Through each episode, Mark finds what sets these different businesses apart from their competition and how they rose above the inevitable challenges they faced along the way to their ultimate success.

Destinations Beyond Expectations
The Wonders of Western Massachusetts with Three Chics Hospitality

Destinations Beyond Expectations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 15:09


You've probably been to Boston, but have you seen the other side of Massachusetts? Gillian Amaral and Stacey Warren from Three Chics Hospitality chat with Stevie about things to do in Western Massachusetts. From the beautiful outdoors to interactive museums and more, there's something for everyone to enjoy. Learn More About Three Chics HospitalityFollow Three Chics Hospitality on Facebook and InstagramExplore Group Experience to Learn how to Build your Travel TribeSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/dbetravel)

Dime Dropper
2021-22 Boston Celtics Season Preview feat. Celtics Fan Brian Murphy

Dime Dropper

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 20:18


In this preview, I'm joined by good friend & hardcore Celtics fan Brian Murphy. Having been born & raised in Massachusetts, Murphy has been a Celtics fan since the pre Big 3 days. He gave his expectations on the upcoming season for Rookie Head Coach Ime Udoka & his young squad led by Jayson Tatum & Jaylen Brown. Also available on Youtube: https://youtu.be/e-EtTEdO-90 Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, & TikTok: @DimeDropperPod

Brew Roots
Stompbox Brewing

Brew Roots

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:52


Our guest this week are from Davenport Iowa, you might say what's a fun fact about Davenport? Well we will give you two. One is Davenport is the birth place of sliced bread and the other is it's the home of our guest this week Stompbox Brewing. We talked to Matt and James about their journey from home brewers to opening up their own place. We also get into guitar pedals and how they made an Oktoberfest without lagering it. It's a wild episode!Cheers!***For hours and more information check out https://www.stompboxbrewing.com or any of their social media.***Claw Hammer Supply- Claw Hammer Supply has taken brew in a bag (BIAB) to a whole new level with there single vessel, turn-key, all grain, digital brewing system. It's a homebrew setup like you've never seen. Instead of a typical brewing systems that require 2 or even 3 different vessels (pots, pans, kettles, etc…). theirs only uses 1.Use our link https://www.clawhammersupply.com/?aff=12 and get your system today!Looking to start a new hobby? Wanting to get into homebrewing? Just looking to upgrade your current set up? We have you covered with our Beer & Wine Hobby promo code! Beer & Wine Hobby is a Family owned business driven to help folks make amazing beers, wines, cheeses, and charcuterie. Fortunately, for our listeners we are able to offer an exclusive promo code for 10% off your online order. Items can either be ordered online and picked up in store same day for our local listeners or delivered to your home (for free over $35). Use our promo code BREWROOTS for 10% off your next order! Go to www.beer-wine.com to get all your brewing needs! https://www.beer-wine.com***Each month, Shirts On Tap teams up with a local brewery, to collaborate on a sweet custom shirt design, and then send it to their members with coupons, stickers, a brewery bio, and more! Join the excitement with our exclusive link shirtsontap.com/offers/brewroots to get your first box for $5! ***Did you know that some of your favorite breweries use hops from a local family operated Hop Farm right here in Massachusetts. Our friends over at Four Star Farms are there for you wether you are a commercial brewery or a small scale home brewer. Make sure to head over to their website today and get your hands on some of the best and freshest hops locally. https://fourstarfarms.com Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Locked On Patriots - Daily Podcast On The New England Patriots
Crossover Thursday: New England Patriots vs. Dallas Cowboys in Week Six — 10/14/21

Locked On Patriots - Daily Podcast On The New England Patriots

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 32:12


It's Crossover Thursday heading into Week Six of the the 2021 NFL Season. Join hosts Mike D'Abate of Locked On Patriots and Marcus Mosher of Locked On Cowboys as they preview this matchup between the New England Patriots and the Dallas Cowboys from Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts on Sunday, October 17, 2021. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
1765: Arms control and the unknowns of the PRC nuke arsenal. John Bolton @AmbJohnBolton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 11:40


Photo:  Shah of Iran building two nuclear plants Arms control and the unknowns of the PRC nuke arsenal. John Bolton @AmbJohnBolton https://www.nationalreview.com/2021/10/arms-control-is-not-an-end-unto-itself/  ..  ..  .. Permissions: Advertisement from the 1970s by American nuclear-power companies. Scanned by: J. Ardalan To be used on Nuclear programme of Iran, illustrating American nuclear companies relation with the Shah of Iran. The text reads as follows: GUESS WHO'S BUILDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. The Shah of Iran is sitting on top of one the largest reservoirs of oil in the world. Yet he's building two nuclear plants and planning two more to provide electricity for his country. He knows the oil is running out--and time with it. But he wouldn't build the plants now if he doubted their safety. He'd wait. As many Americans want to do. The Shah knows that nuclear energy is not only economical, it has enjoyed a remarkable 30-year safety record. A record that was good enough for the citizens of Plymouth, Massachusetts, too. They've approved their second nuclear power plant by a vote of almost 4 to 1. Which shows you don't have to go as far as Iran for an endorsement of nuclear power. NUCLEAR ENERGY. TODAY'S ANSWER. BOSTON EDISON, EASTERN UTILITIES ASSOCIATES, NEW ENGLAND POWER COMPANY PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, NEW ENGLAND GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANIES Fair-use Rationale It is a historic picture and No alternative picture can be found for this plane. The image is being used for no purpose other than to identify the subject of the article in Nuclear programme of Iran The image resolution has been significantly decreased from the original, so copies made from it would be of inferior quality. Text identifying the companies behind the advertisement is barely readable at the current resolution. The image is being used in an informative way | This is a copyrighted image that has been released by a company or organization to promote their work or product in the media, such as advertising material or a promotional photo in a press kit. The copyright for it is most likely owned by the company who created the promotional item or the artist who produced the item in question; you must provide evidence of such ownership. Lack of such evidence is grounds for deletion.It is believed that the use of some images of promotional material to illustrate:the person(s), product, event, or subject in question;where the image is unrepeatable, i.e. a free image could not be created to replace it;on the English-language Wikipedia, hosted on servers in the United States by the non-profit Wikimedia Foundation;qualifies as fair use under Copyright law of the United States. Any other usage of this image, on Wikipedia or elsewhere, might be copyright infringement. See Wikipedia:Non-free content and Wikipedia:Publicity photos. Additionally, the copyright holder may have granted permission for use in works such as Wikipedia. However, if they have, this permission likely does not fall under a free license. ..  ..  ..  

WagerTalk Podcast
New England Patriots vs Dallas Cowboys Picks and Predictions

WagerTalk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:20


New England Patriots vs Dallas Cowboys betting picks, predictions and odds for their NFL Week 6 showdown on Sunday, October 17 2021 at 4:25pm ET from Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts. Few teams have been able to slow down Dallas' offense so far this season. Why kind of defense can Bill Belichick draw up? Direct from Las Vegas, our panel of professional sports handicappers look at the Vegas odds and offer their expert NFL betting analysis on this cross-conference clash between the Patriots and Cowboys. At the time of posting, the WagerTalk Live Odds screen is showing Dallas as a 3.5-point road favorite in New England, with the over/under sitting at 50.5 points.

Roqe
The Contemporary History of Iran - Part 2: “The Americans and the '53 Coup”

Roqe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 60:16


“The Americans and the '53 Coup” - Part 2 of the new Roqe Media series, The Contemporary History of Iran. What exactly was the role of the United States in the removal of the popular Prime Minister Mossadegh in August 1953? And what was the American incentive to get involved? And how does that pivotal event affect American action on the foreign stage right up to today? Author and award-winning foreign correspondent, Stephen Kinzer joins Jian Ghomeshi from Boston, Massachusetts, to discuss his bestselling book, “All the Shah's Men,” and the American role in an event that he believes reshaped the geopolitical history of the world.

The Pet Loss Companion
#41 When Our Pet's Death Causes Great Anxiety About the Health of Our Surviving Pets

The Pet Loss Companion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:06


Join family therapists and authors Ken Dolan-Del Vecchio and Nancy Saxton-Lopez for a conversation sparked by an audience member's story and question. We'll talk about how the death of a pet can heighten our anxiety about the health of our surviving pets and strategies for addressing this. As always, we welcome your comments, questions and suggestions for future topics. Nancy can be reached at nsaxtonlopez@csmpc.com and Ken at kenddv@gmail.com. The Pet Loss Companion (book) on Amazon This program is a friend of Dakin Humane Society in Springfield, Mass. Dakin is a 501 (c) (3) community-supported animal welfare organization that provides shelter, medical care, spay/neuter services, and behavioral rehabilitation for more than 20,000 animals and people each year. Since its inception in 1969, Dakin has become one of the most recognized nonprofit organizations in central Massachusetts and a national leader in animal welfare. You can learn more about Dakin and make a donation at dakinhumane.org.. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/kenneth-dolan-del-vecchio/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kenneth-dolan-del-vecchio/support

Let's Talk About Food
Congressman Jim McGovern, Chair of the "Hunger Caucus"

Let's Talk About Food

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:57


Congressman Jim McGovern is our man in Congress. He represents Worcester, Massachusetts, but he really represents all of us who care about food. Not only is he the chair of the powerful rules committee, but he is lobbying for a White House Conference on Food & Nutrition. The last time that happened, Richard Nixon was president.Photo Courtesy of Congressman Jim McGovern.Heritage Radio Network is a listener supported nonprofit podcast network. Support Let's Talk About Food by becoming a member!Let's Talk About Food is Powered by Simplecast.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Fiona Hill On Opportunity

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 128:54


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd begins the show by talking about the possible effect of supply chain shortages on approval ratings of President Joe Biden as the holidays near. He also discusses what programs might have to give in order to pass Biden's spending plan. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners what they think Democrats should cut to pass Biden's infrastructure bill. Andrea Cabral updates listeners on the latest in the conviction of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev for the Boston Marathon bombing. The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this week as to whether Tsarnaev was properly sentenced to death, and whether he had a fair trial. Cabral also discusses a Boston Police officer back on duty after a suspension for bragging about hitting George Floyd protesters with his car. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Then, we talk with listeners about their thoughts on police reform, and why they think efforts to change policing have faltered in the months since protests in the summer of 2020. Fiona Hill previews her memoir that came out this month, “There Is Nothing for You Here: Finding Opportunity in the Twenty-First Century,” and weighs in on the similarities and differences between Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin. Hill served as deputy assistant to the president and senior director for European and Russian affairs in the Trump administration from 2017 to 2019, and was witness in Donald Trump's first impeachment hearing. Jared Bowen rounds up the latest arts and culture happenings in the city, including the MFA's “Fabric of a Nation: American Quilt Stories” exhibit, and Gregory Maguire's latest novel, “The Brides of Maracoor.” Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio.

Show-Me Institute Podcast
A Nation Still at Risk with Checker E. Finn Jr.

Show-Me Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 27:03


Chester "Checker" E. Finn, Jr., scholar, educator and public servant, has devoted his career to improving education in the United States. At Fordham, he is now Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus. He's also a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. Finn served as Fordham's President from 1997 to 2014, after many earlier roles in education, academe and government. From 1999 until 2002, he was John M. Olin Fellow at the Manhattan Institute and previously at Hudson Institute. In 1992-94, he served as founding partner and senior scholar with the Edison Project. He was Professor of Education and Public Policy at Vanderbilt University from 1981 until 2002. From 1985 to 1988, he served as Assistant Secretary for Research and Improvement and Counselor to the Secretary at the U.S. Department of Education. Earlier positions include Staff Assistant to the President of the United States; Special Assistant to the Governor of Massachusetts; Counsel to the U.S. Ambassador to India; Research Associate at the Brookings Institution; and Legislative Director for Senator Daniel P. Moynihan.

MCLE ThisWeek Podcast
Massachusetts Street Drug Crime Update

MCLE ThisWeek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 71:44


Get an update on street drug crimes in this podcast, excerpted from MCLE's 7/8/2021 program: Guns, Drugs, and Money. The full program is available as an on demand webcast or an MP3 here. Get 24/7 instant access to hundreds of family law eLectures like this one—and more—with a subscription to the MCLE OnlinePass. Learn more at www.mcle.org/onlinepass.

The Roundtable
"Call Fosse at the Minskoff" Premieres At The Mahaiwe

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 15:15


In 1986, choreographer and director Bob Fosse cast actor and dancer Mimi Quillin in the first Broadway revival of “Sweet Charity.” For the production, she served as dance captain - assisting Fosse and Gwen Verdon in recreating the original 1966 choreography. Quillin will perform her one-person show “Call Fosse at the Minskoff” in a pre-off-Broadway engagement at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, Massachusetts on October 15 and 16. In “Call Fosse at the Minskoff,” Quillin recounts her experience working with Fosse and Verdon on what would be their final collaboration.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
JobMakers: Bernat Olle Gets a Visa to Improve the World (#29)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:16


This week on JobMakers, Host Denzil Mohammed talks with Dr. Bernat Olle, co-founder and CEO of Vedanta Biosciences, about his journey from Catalonia, Spain, to Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he continued his Chemical Engineering studies at MIT. Navigating the complex immigration system while seeking purpose in his career, he eventually found his calling and was lucky enough to […]

Consumer Finance Monitor
Hot Issues in Auto Finance

Consumer Finance Monitor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 23:24


We discuss recent developments concerning fair lending and ancillary products, including the potential industry-wide implications of recent New York and Massachusetts consent orders and our expectations for future CFPB scrutiny in these areas.  We also discuss the CFPB's recent report that looks at whether the variation in interest rates among subprime auto loans can be explained by differences in borrower creditworthiness and share our thoughts on how the report's finding are likely to impact future CFPB activity. Chris Willis, Co-Chair of Ballard Spahr's Consumer Financial Services Group hosts the conversation, joined by Stefanie Jackman, a partner in the Group.

Ain't It Scary? with Sean & Carrie
Ep. 56: The Salem Witch Trials, Pt. 1

Ain't It Scary? with Sean & Carrie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 77:32


We've finally come to our long promised two-parter on one of Carrie's pet interests, the Salem Witch Trials! In 1692 Salem, Massachusetts, tensions were already high. The Puritan colonists were struggling through the "Little Ice Age" devastating their crops, paranoid about being attacked by neighboring Native American tribes, and quarreling with their minister and each other about who the most godly of the bunch really was. The atmosphere was rife for backstabbing and tragedy, and that tragedy was about to hit in a horrific way. It began with whispers, and would end with screams. Was the root of the Salem Witch Trials the hysteria of a group of young girls? Was everyone completely zonked out from ergot poisoning? Or had Satan himself really infiltrated this infighting colonial town? Join us, as we explore the whole unbelievable story of the Salem Witch Trials in the next two episodes. Thanks to the spooktacular THINGS TO DO IN SALEM.COM for sponsoring this episode - find them at www.thingstodoinsalem.com! ________________________________________ Connect with us on social media: Facebook: www.facebook.com/aintitscary Twitter: @aintitscary Instagram: @aintitscary Patreon: www.patreon.com/aintitscary ___________________________________________ Thank you to our sponsors: BetterHelp - Special offer for Ain't it Scary? listeners: Get 10% off your first month at www.betterhelp.com/aintitscary Audible - Get a FREE audiobook and 30-Day Free Trial at www.audibletrial.com/aintitscary BarkBox - Enjoy a FREE month of BarkBox on us when you sign up for a 6 or 12-month BarkBox subscription! Visit www.barkbox.com/aintitscary for more details Hunt a Killer - Receive 20% off your first Hunt a Killer subscription box at www.huntakiller.com with the code SCARYSQUAD at checkout! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/aintitscary/support

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 5/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:04


Photo:  View of the Attack on Bunker's Hill with the Burning of Charlestown, by Lodge CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 6/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:55


Photo:  First page of Paine's The American Crisis              "The morale of the Patriot forces was boosted on December 19 when a new pamphlet titled The American Crisis written by Thomas Paine, the author of Common Sense, was published. "These are the times that try men's souls; the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph."Within a day of its publication in Philadelphia, General Washington ordered it to be read to all of his troops. It encouraged the soldiers and improved the tolerance of their difficult conditions." CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 7/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:20


Photo:  George Washington praying at Valley Forge Dr Bond inoculated Washington's troops: "Finding the Small pox to be spreading much and fearing that no precaution can prevent it from running through the whole of our Army, I have determined that the troops shall be inoculated. This Expedient may be attended with some inconveniences and some disadvantages, but yet I trust in its consequences will have the most happy effects. Necessity not only authorizes but seems to require the measure, for should the disorder infect the Army in the natural way and rage with its usual virulence we should have more to dread from it than from the Sword of the Enemy. Under these circumstances I have directed Doctr Bond to prepare immediately for inoculating in this Quarter,1 keeping the matter as secret as possible, and request that you will without delay inoculate All the Continental Troops that are in philadelphia and those that shall come in as fast as they arrive."*             CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution. ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  *  The Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond had a problem. During the Battle of Lexington and Concord, in obedience to his Hippocratic Oath, he had treated British soldiers. For performing his duty as a doctor, he was falsely accused of being a Loyalist and had his life threatened by an angry mob.     "Doctor Nathaniel Bond, of Marblehead, having been charged before this Committee with having acted an unfriendly part to this Colony, the said Committee appointed Joseph Warren, Esq., Colonel Thos. Gardner, and Lieut. Colonel Joseph Palmer, as a Court of Inquiry, to examine witnesses in the case, and hear and determine the same; and upon full enquiry into the case, they are clearly of the opinion that said Bond's general behaviour has been friendly to American liberty; and though he may have discovered an imprudent degree of warmth in some instances, yet we do not find any proof of an inimical temper or disposition to this Country, and therefore recommend him to the esteem and friendship of his Country, that (as the errour which occasioned his being brought before this Committee appears to have been altogether involuntary, and was such as several of our most firm friends were led into, by false rumours spread, of the transactions of the nineteenth instant) no impressions to the Doctor's disadvantage may remain on the minds of any person whatsoever.             [signed] Joseph Warren, Chairman.”  April 26, 1775. .

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 8/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:50


Photo:   Colonel John Glover directs the evacuation of the American army from Brooklyn, on the night of August 29-30, 1776. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 3/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:35


Photo:  Gen. Sir William Howe CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1762: 4/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:25


Photo:  John Glover (November 5, 1732 – January 30, 1797) was an American fisherman, merchant, and military leader from Marblehead, Massachusetts, who served as a brigadier general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:00


Photo:  Brooklyn Heights in 1854. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 1/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:20


Photo:    A portion of Howes Map (1776) showing "The Heights" [of Guan, which is a variant of Gowanus], north of the village of Flatbush. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

That's So Cincinnati
105: That's So Cincinnati: FC Cincinnati veteran boasts about fans, explains why he's backed off talking Trump and politics

That's So Cincinnati

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:49


American soccer veteran Geoff Cameron is always outspoken about something. A few years ago, it was about his support of Donald Trump. Nowadays, though, it's more about how much he loves Cincinnati and the city's soccer fans. Cameron, in his first season with FC Cincinnati, spent time on his off day to chat with The Enquirer's "That's So Cincinnati" podcast partly about his decision to back away from publicly talking politics and how much he loves the fans here. The 36-year-old former U.S. national team defender calls FC Cincinnati's fanbase the "best" in Major League Soccer. In terms of overall soccer popularity and support, Cameron said, Cincinnati is a top 5 city in the U.S. The Massachusetts native added that the unwavering support for last-place FC Cincinnati reminds him of how fans in Europe back their favorite clubs regardless of record.  Cameron would know: He played nearly a decade in Europe before returning to the U.S. this season for his second stint in MLS.  "Just walking around the city, you see FC Cincinnati shirts everywhere," Cameron said. "It's crazy. You don't see that other places (in the U.S.). Even though we've been poor, they're still loyal and deserve all the credit."  As for talking politics, Cameron did media interviews and took to Twitter to support Trump during his presidency. In a 2017 interview with Sports Illustrated, Cameron said he supported Trump's immigration policy.  “I believe it's important to support our president whether he was your candidate or not,” Cameron told SI.com. “I am pleased he is making security of all Americans one of his top priorities. Our enemies have stated – and in Europe they have proven – they will take advantage of lax immigration procedures for the purposes of staging attacks."  Cameron faced intense backlash on social media for his ongoing support of Trump. The soccer player said it's not worth continuing to openly talk about politics now that he has other priorities such as raising his 1-year-old son. He told "That's So Cincinnati:"  "It's a touchy subject now. As of recent, I really haven't said much because of just the way the world is now. It's really hard to have an opinion – if you don't have an opinion that's similar to other people.  "It's sad in a way of (how) I grew up. Twenty years ago, it wasn't that way. With the news and social media giants, things are shoved down people's throats whether it's good or bad. It's tough. When I was outspoken and said certain things, a lot of people said things about me that weren't true whatsoever and that was really hard to deal with. They don't know me. People are just saying things to be hateful. That's why I don't really share pictures with my family, because I don't really know what people's intentions are. "I haven't been as outspoken now because there's other things I care about. I'm sure there are fans in Cincinnati who are conservative or liberal or whatever. Whether they want to believe the stuff that I believe in or disagree with the things that I believe, (I hope) they'll see that I am a good, genuine person. It's OK to have people with different political views or religious views, but you can respect them as a person." 

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Who Needs Doctors and Nurses Anyway Janet Mills - 10.13.21 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:19


Howie talks about the shortage of hospital workers here in Massachusetts and now in Maine with Janet Mills refusing to ease the mandate amidst 'unprecedented healthcare workforce shortages'.

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
What's Next for The Real Estate Market? With CoStar's Senior Economic Consultant Joseph Biasi | EP74

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 45:31


Joseph Biasi spends his Days Analysing Economic Trends and their Relationship with Commercial Real Estate for CoStar – the Leading Real Estate Data Analytics and Aggregator in the US.  In this episode we talked about: Joseph's Bio & Activity Commercial Real Estate Market Outlook Retail Property Analysis Industrial Real Estate Overview Interest Rates Government Policy Single Family VS Multifamily Real Estate The Effect of Inflation on Real Estate Investors Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned Useful links: https://www.costar.com Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. All right, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to working capital the real estate podcast. My special guest today is Joseph Biassi. Joseph spends his days analyzing economic trends and the relationship with the commercial real estate sector. And he works for CoStar advisory services. For those of you that don't know what CoStar is, they're the leading real estate data analytics and aggregator in the us. And I'm not sure if Canada as well, but I wouldn't be surprised we use them pretty much every day. They're our go-to for analytics, for properties, for research and a part of our underwriting process. Joseph, how's it going? Great. How are you doing? I'm doing great. Do I have that right, Joseph, in terms of CoStar where they're at today, maybe you could, you could let the audience know a little bit about your position there and CoStar in general and what you guys do. Sure. Yeah. Joseph(1m 10s): CoStar is a data analytics platform and a data vendor. We, we track pretty much every commercial building that we can at least get research on across the United States. We are moving into Canada as well, more and more. We're getting better coverage in Canada and as well as Europe, my job in particular is I sit on top of that data as a consultant. I'm a senior consultant with advisory services. And my job in particular is to advise client both developers as well as investors on macro economic and commercial real estate trends Jesse (1m 45s): Right on. Yeah. What I've noticed is we have, I think 84, 85 offices now, and we've, we've pretty much switched over completely to CoStar and that goes for Canadian and, and us markets, but it's definitely come a long way in terms of the coverage that we have at least, you know, in our major markets, you pretty much, you've got everything covered there. Speaker 1 (2m 7s): Yeah. I mean, we've been really pushing research recently. Speaker 0 (2m 11s): So this was, this was something we were at, we were at this panel and in new Orleans this past, I guess two weekends ago now, and we were talking about, you know, where, where people can find information, those people looking for deals in the market and a lot of, a lot of what we do on the investing side and not just in brokerage, but we'll, you know, when we tried to track down owners, a lot of times we're looking at properties on CoStar trying to find the beneficial, the true owners and reach out to them directly for off market deals. Speaker 1 (2m 38s): Yeah. So I, I, before actually, before I worked at CoStar, worked in brokerage. And so I was, I I've been a user, it's a fantastic site for anybody who wants to do any kind of real estate deals, right. On a little biased, but Speaker 0 (2m 52s): Yeah, a little biased. So in terms of the, the actual market, I thought what would be, will be just that would be useful and educational for our listeners is talking a little bit about what's been going on in the market over the last year or two and the outlook for the next, let's call it a mid to mid to longterm. And by longterm for me, I think five years, I don't think longer than that, but yeah. You know, let's talk a little bit about the commercial real estate market in general, over the last two years, how have things changed in terms of the data that you're seeing in terms of the way you approach the market and, and your analysis? Speaker 1 (3m 31s): Great question. Yeah. So, you know, when the pandemic hit, I think there was a lot of fear going around and that translated into a lot less commercial real estate deals, particularly in the office sector. Everybody began to work from home. We knew, we noticed a pretty steep drop off in transaction activity, which has since returned. And that's, that's pretty much been the story is we had this initial 20, 20 decline, a couple of, a couple of quarters of, you know, pretty severe transaction volume decline. And it's all become back effectively, but it's come back in a very different way. And that's the actual story behind what's happening in the commercial real estate market is if you look at the macro macro numbers, you know, total amount of transaction, the total transaction volume is back. But if you look at where that's happening, it's very different. For example, the Dallas Fort worth had more transaction activity in 2020, the first half of 2021 than New York. That's not normal. We're seeing, we're seeing those rooms moved down to, if you're talking about retailer, multi-family, we're seeing them move down to the south, the study United States, as opposed to, you know, the new York's and the San Francisco's of the world. Phoenix is another market we've seen, which is, I suppose, as a Western market, those, those Sunbelt markets are where we're seeing the most demographic growth. We're seeing the most transaction activity. And we're seeing the biggest pricing gains across all four, four major property types Speaker 0 (4m 55s): In terms of the, to go from geographic to the property types, if, you know, starting with retail, I guess. Cause that's, that's the one where when the pandemic first started, there was the big question of retail, which I think for, for the most part has been overbuilt. I don't think it's a surprise in the U S Canada. Canada's pretty. Yeah. I mean, we are as well, but I think we're somewhere in between the U S and in most European countries on a per square foot basis. But talk about retail, you know, how has that analysis been over the last, you know, call it a year to two years? Speaker 1 (5m 29s): I think retail, it, at least in my opinion is one of the most fascinating property types. Like, yeah, you're absolutely right. There needs to be some level of rationalization. If the landscape has changed, it is no longer the place where people go deep. The only place people go shopping to buy goods, that doesn't mean it's going away and there's still, I would argue opportunities. And I think that's the way we've been trying to, to talk about retail, which is look, you know, you're not, if you're looking at a class B or class seem, all those are going to struggle, but if you're looking at, you know, there's still good opportunities and you just, there's a lot more nuance and a lot more detail that you need to look into for a retail building the tenants matter so much in a retail building, even more than an office or an industrial building, because if you have a good grocery anchor, a neighborhood center in a well-populated area, that's still a good asset. And that, that I think has kind of been, under-reported just due to the fear around retail during the pandemic and the fear around retail because of e-commerce. Speaker 0 (6m 36s): Yeah. It's a, it's one of those things that we've always talked about that, you know, good grocery store, anchored retail. I can't imagine in a lot of these markets, if anything, they were a bit, some of those properties were buoyed by the fact that the only places that were open were the Walmarts or, you know, these grocery stores that were anchored. Speaker 1 (6m 54s): Exactly. And we're, you know, we are seeing, you know, returns to normal leasing patterns in the Southern states where, you know, where retail really does follow rooftops. And in those Southern states, we've seen pretty much a full recovery, and we've seen a pretty much a full recovery in terms of pricing as well. Whereas if you talk about, you know, these, these tertiary markets in the Midwest, or some of these coastal gateway markets that have really struggled during the pandemic, there's still, there's still losing people. They're still struggling to kind of recover. Speaker 0 (7m 25s): So have you seen, I know you, you track a lease terms and different differently structures. Have you seen a difference in the way that retailers are approaching their leases? You know, where you could have some retailers in the past doing 5, 10, 15, 20 year leases, has that, has that shifted or is it, is it too early to tell Speaker 1 (7m 43s): It's a, it's a little early to tell, just because we're, we're finally kind of getting back at least down south, but the, the tenants that they're looking for at certainly become far more focused on either, you know, necessity based retail, certain tenants like dollar stores. So these, these discount stores are doing really well. And then experience-based tenants have done are something that landlords are really looking into as a long-term longer-term play. At some point, this pandemic will become less and less, have less and less of an effect on the economy. And a lot of landlords believe that the future of real estate of retail is experiential. That you're drawing people there for something more than just a shopping experience. Speaker 0 (8m 28s): Does CoStar track the rezoning or reclassification of buildings in terms of, for example, one of the, one of the, the guesses that, you know, that we have is that retail and, and certain types of office buildings may be converted, maybe switch the use might be switched even in hospitality, potentially hospitality going to multi-family. But if do you track that type of thing? Speaker 1 (8m 54s): Yeah. It hasn't occurred as much as you would think, given the amount of airtime, not an ink that's been spilled on it. It really hasn't happened. It does happen, you know, so I went to college in Worcester and the Greendale mall in Worcester got turned into an Amazon distribution center, but that isn't really the rural quite yet. They're still working on that because, you know, it's, a lot of people think that a mall is going to turn into an industrial center, like a distribution center, and it's more likely to be knocked down and turned into multi-family center because it's still the highest and best use is, is multifamily for a dense urban area. We're, we're, we're starting to see some of these malls really struggle. Speaker 0 (9m 36s): Yeah. I think you're absolutely right with the amount of ink that's been spelled as a that's been spilled on it because it is one of those things, I guess, more of an academic thing. It's logical to think that okay. But I think the reality is you get in transaction costs the actual time it takes to convert these things. There's a little bit more that goes on with it. If you, if you kind of slide from retail, move into the, the office space. So my partner and I on the brokerage on predominantly work in office investment sales, as well as leasing, they, I don't, you know, despite some of, you know, what, what has been said last year, that markets haven't been affected. I just think a lot of people were saying certain things were, what we saw was a large, large drop-off in office. And not surprisingly, I'm assuming that's, that's what you S what you've seen. And if not, maybe you could provide some insight there. Speaker 1 (10m 26s): All right. No, absolutely. I, I, if you look at where most of the transaction activity has fallen off, it's been an office and it really has a lot to do with uncertainty. Right. It's, you know, what will work from home look like in five years from now, because if you, and you know, this probably better than I do, if you're buying an office for your leasing office, it's, it's a five to 10 year lease or three to 10 years typically. So you're, you're really guessing what's going to happen down the road. So when you're buying office, it's, it's a little scary right now. And I, I understand that the shop view for CoStar advisory services, and I do not speak for all of CoStar district health, say for CoStar advisory services, is that, you know, the office, there will be less demand for office because I work from home, but we don't believe this is the death of office everybody's going to be working remotely. And we also don't believe that. And I personally don't believe that, you know, these downtown offices are going to, you know, go away anytime soon. I I've in that downtown, these downtown clusters are going to severely struggle. I think the actual concern for office, if we want to think about where, where we might see struggle is those class B offices in urban areas that have less, that don't have as good a commutability score that aren't dark, aren't able to draw. Don't have the same amount of amenities. Those, I think are the ones that well, we think are going to struggle a little bit more. Yeah. It's funny. You Speaker 0 (11m 53s): Mentioned that I was having a conversation with a, with a colleague of mine. And I was, we were talking about that specific thing where a lot of suburban markets actually, haven't been doing particularly poorly with office and then these downtown connected, but there's, these Midtown markets are like these markets that are tertiary markets, that if, unless they have good connectivity, it's a really, you know, there's a question mark about how they'll do well, we've also seen though, is that the, the office side, like you were saying before, the underwriting has changed to the extent that, you know, we, they want to see is what type of tenant, what, you know, where are they in the lease? What are their rights? And, and it's funny too, that you mentioned five-year and then kind of went back to three-year because what we've seen is that, you know, when I started in brokerage, really, it was rare to find even three-year head leases. It was typically a five-year minimum. Where now, if one thing has happened from COVID, we've seen all kinds of different lease lease terms. Speaker 1 (12m 47s): Yeah. I mean, if you, if you think about going to selling a building, occupancy matters more than anything else, even, you know, that's the, that's the first and only thing I, if you have to take some rent losses, you'd rather take some rent losses and lose occupancy. So peop landlords are for office buildings are, you know, it is definitely a tenants market right now, but we, in terms of the, the urban areas, I think the reason they lose out is because the downtown offices have that commutability and then the suburban offices have that advantage of being able to drive to them. If I'm in, I'm in Boston, which is a famously difficult Metro to drive in. And there's no way I'm going to go drive to, let's say Brighton, which is just outside the main city to go to an office there, but I'd be willing to go to suburban office and I'd be willing to take the T down to than the downtown crossing, for example. Speaker 0 (13m 37s): Yeah, for sure. And you, you know, one thing too, is like we've had, what we've seen is that the CFO or COO, depending on, or the real estate, you know, facilities manager, whoever's dealing with the company's real estate. It has been a lot of like kicking the can down the road, because like you said, it's, it's, you're making a decision. That's going to impact five, 10 years. Whereas if you're buying an investment, one thing you can say is that interest rates are where they're at right now. You can, you can, you know, logically pursue maybe a little bit more risky investment, but for the people that work at a company, they're like, I'm not going to make a decision where in a year from now I could look like this was the terrible, the worst thing I did for the company. Speaker 1 (14m 12s): Right. Right. Exactly. Speaker 0 (14m 14s): So if we, okay, so that's retail office. If we switch now to, to industrial, because one thing that was really a cool stat that I saw when, when COVID just happened was the fact that retail sales did not decrease. It's just where the sales happen changed. Right. There was a pivot to online sales, total sales didn't D decrease, at least at the beginning of the pandemic, the data that I was looking at. So I'm curious, I mean, I think it's no surprise industrial's doing pretty well today. Speaker 1 (14m 48s): Yeah, no, it's not. It's no surprise. And it continued to do well. The pandemic, you are somehow seeing cap rate declines, which I think if you said two years ago, most people would be like, there's no way, but I just given how quickly we begun to really shift into e-commerce and the, you know, the room to run in terms of e-commerce. If you look at Europe, Europe uses e-commerce far more than the United States does still, but kind of going back to your point about retail sales it's, I've been tracking it very closely for that specific reason. If you look at retail sales, and this is because, you know, the government stepped in and enacted a lot of stimulus by, by June of 2020 retail sales had more sales than you would expect, given what you would expect pre pandemic. So if you forecast it out pre pandemic, but retail sales should be, and it's a fairly linear trend, you would expect them to have, you know, X amount of retail sales. And we're, we've seen exceed that basically since June of 2020, and about 35% of that is e-commerce, which is impressive when only 16% of retail sales is e-commerce right now. So e-commerce is pushing along, is pushing along retail sales. And realistically there's only, only it can only go up in terms of e-commerce. I want to be careful in saying that, because I know that's gotten people in trouble before. It can only go up in terms of e-commerce industrial is starting to become, starting to see a lot of construction. If you want to talk about the property type in particular, we're starting to see more speculative construction, but on the, at the, at the, at the other end of it, you can make the argument that it's pretty easy to turn off the industrial tap. If you it's just, you're building a big slab of concrete and yeah, exactly. It's a slab of concrete. Got you build a box and you're good to go. And there's a lot of reasons to believe that structural shifts from retail, from onsite retail to e-commerce means strong sales, and that's not even getting into three PLS and manufacturing tenants that we do also expect to do quite well. Amazon alone accounts was one, a hundred million square feet of absorption in 2020. And I, I don't know if they're going to do that again, but they are already, they're already in the, you know, they continue to be the player in the market and continue to push industrial. So do you think, Speaker 0 (17m 20s): Look at the, on the topic, the three PL or third, third party logistics and last mile delivery, like, do you, do you, do, do you break down industrial into these sub categories for your analysis? Speaker 1 (17m 31s): Yeah. Yeah. I mean, you almost have to, right, because that's how, that's how tenants think about it. You have these big distribution centers and then you have these last miles and, you know, these last miles tend to be these, these crappy frankly buildings that are in well better located areas. And the great thing, if you're looking from an standpoint about these last miles, they're not usually the highest and best use. So there isn't a ton of new construction in the last mile, despite the huge amount of demand for the last mile, at least according to what we're seeing. Speaker 0 (18m 5s): So in terms of the, the actual investment sales side of the industrial coin, when, you know, we see in our market, which I think pre pandemic, we were at 2%, I know Toronto is, I know LA and Toronto you'd know better than I would, but I know that we were at the top and north America with the, in terms of how lower vacancy rates were and continue to be on the industrial side. And what we've seen on the investment sales side is there's only so much product that, you know, you've seen, oh my God, that thing's traded again, that's traded three times in the last year. Are you seeing that same stuff in these really hot markets where properties have, basically, I'm assuming it's a constraint on the, on supply right now. Speaker 1 (18m 45s): Yeah. I mean, I, you know, everybody is out for industrial and they're continuing to increase their allocation. It's it's, you know, when we talk to clients, it's the first thing they always say is don't worry, we're going to increase our allocation to industrial really? Usually at the cost of office and retail. Well, not usually, always at the cost. No. Yeah. It, it, you know, that's, that's the other side of the coin, right? Is we saw 6% rent growth so far in 2021, we can be concerned about construction and market specific. If you look at like, you know, inland empire, for example. Yeah. There's a lot of construction or, you know, Las Vegas, for example, there's a decent amount of construction, but at the same time, the amount of demand that we're seeing come in and given it's a structural shifts, it means that you could, you should expect continued demand. That being said, we're getting to a point where cap rates are going to struggle. Maybe a little bit to continue to decline. Speaker 0 (19m 45s): I was going to say, it's for reminds me like economics 1 0 1. We're like, no, that the shift it's the whole demand curve moving, not just going up along, right? Like there's a, there's an innovation here. There's, there's a structural shift to less retail and more, more industrial distribution. Speaker 1 (20m 0s): I was actually trying to the other day to think of a, a good comparison. And I think we landed on radio for retail retail's radio where it it's still gonna have a use, but it's not the same use that it used to have an industrials TV now, the television. Cool. That's the entertainment. Yeah. Speaker 0 (20m 22s): So where does, where does vaulty Rez line up with that? If we, if we go to multi Rez, which you have to think that, you know, prior to the pandemic, we were like, can cap rates keep going down? And then they kept going down. And even right now, buoyed by I'm sure interest rates are multi-res team. I think, did their, did their had a banner year for 2020, like a record year for them? Speaker 1 (20m 46s): Yeah, we we've hearing that a lot is that, you know, 20, 20 and now 2021 in particular, it's been a great year. 2021 saw the largest increase in rent we've ever seen quarters for Q3. So we just finished up two, three, we're still finalizing the results, but shaping up that Q2 Q3 and Q1 of 2021 are the top three years in terms of demand for multi-family. And it, you know, that's across the board. However, if you start breaking it down by markets, the south in particular is really, really very strong. I mean, I'm going to keep harping on myself just because it is as strong as it is, but you know, multi-family is price per unit has gone up by 30% compared to pre-recession averages in Sunbelt markets rents in, like, for example, Austin increased by 15%, six months, you get, you kind of become to begin to become worried more about affordability than anything else, which is at some point, this becomes a economic macro economic problem, which of course then comes back to haunt investors. You know, a lot of that gain has already happened and really have seen a deceleration, which you would expect given seasonal trends in multi-family. And, you know, in some of these markets, you really are beginning to hit the, the affordability limit. And that's where you can start making a great argument for like, for manufactured homes or for mobile home parks. For example, particularly in the south, the Southern states, they don't work as well in the Northern states. I would argue at least mobile home parks. Speaker 0 (22m 27s): Yeah. Neither up here. Speaker 1 (22m 30s): It gets a little chilly. I know, but it's, multi-family has done, has probably been the outperformer, which, you know, given all the news around how well single-family pricing has done is isn't that surprising. And if you, if you look at single family, a single family price growth compared to multi-family rent growth, single family price growth in almost every single market has grown faster. So it's not like your, your other options is getting any easier to, to afford. Speaker 0 (23m 8s): Yeah. And in terms of like your outlook on this, in terms of the actual properties themselves, like, are we finding that in these markets that there are underperforming assets that are now being utilized to their, to their, you know, market rents, you know, value, add deals. Do you think that is what's happening in a lot of these markets? Or do you think that the pressure of lower interest rates is, is what's fueling most of, most of the acquisition in, in multifamily being an asset class that's pretty much being subsidized or was subsidized for the last year, year and a half by the government in most in countries. Speaker 1 (23m 46s): Yeah. I mean, that's a huge part of it. And then on top of that, I think lower interest rates is extremely helpful for multi-family acquisitions. You know, part of it is it, some of it has to be just the inflation hedge that you'd get for multi-family. If, if you were to all concerned about inflation and you want to look in real estate multi-family is probably your best bet just given. And we can talk about this at some point, just given the short lease term is, but the, the eviction moratorium also, at least in our opinion, has had a pretty big effect on multifamily demand because on one end, you're, you know, you are seeing a huge spike in terms of demand, but then we kind of scratch our heads at it for a while. But then if you think about it, we weren't evicting anybody. There's 800,000 evictions in the U S per year. I don't know what it is for Canada. That's 800,000 units that aren't going, that aren't in negative demand. We aren't, we aren't building, you know, these, these class C units were, if we're building anything, it's, it's a class, a, a, that's the only thing you can really afford to build right now that will, that will pencil. So, you know, people are, people are basically sitting in their home, sitting on their apartments, they're unwilling to move. So we aren't seeing that, that negative demand. And on the other, the other side, we're seeing a huge uptick in people separating how tools, if you're, let's say you're a 22 year old kid and you you're living with four roommates, we're seeing people decouple those households and begin to move out into their own places. All of that kind of leads to these, this huge spike in, in multi-family. Speaker 0 (25m 36s): Yeah, I guess the real question, like you said before, it's, it's the affordability aspect you have, like you said, 30% increase, I think in evaluation, but 15% increase in rental rates. And there is, there is a certain level where, you know, you, you just hit a, you hit a wall in terms of affordability from the, from the consumer point of view. Speaker 1 (25m 56s): Yeah. I think it's, it's going to have, it was a concern even before the pandemic was, you know, a home affordability shelter affordability, and it certainly did not get better. Speaker 0 (26m 8s): And on the construction end, you, you, you mentioned class a, are you seen quite a bit of construction on the multi-family side? Generally, Speaker 1 (26m 14s): It's pretty, it's pretty much in line with the last couple of years, to be honest with you, which was pretty significant. But on the other end, we saw a huge amounts of construction delays even before the pandemic. And it, it kind of acted as this filter for, for supply being added, frankly, especially, especially down south where there's huge amounts of demand, there's huge amounts of supply waiting to be added. But at th at the same time, they just can't get it out. Whether it be supply costs, labor is certainly a problem. Anybody and anybody who's trying to build multi-family right now has told me that labor is almost impossible to find at this point. Yeah. Speaker 0 (26m 51s): I mean, just even on the small scale or we're doing projects in our area, it's, it is extremely slow. And, you know, you talk to anybody in the construction industry. They'll, they'll tell you the same thing right now. Not just supplies, but labor as well. If we shift over to, to that piece on inflation, it's been a hot topic in terms of ink spilled. I'm sure it was one of those things that, yeah, the over the last little while there's been enough fuss bulled over on, on the inflation side, what's your view from the data that you guys are seeing? Speaker 1 (27m 25s): Yeah. I, I take the view that I am in agreement with the bond market and the fed that it is transitory. I think the definition of transitory has been changing pretty significantly because at first I think it was six months and now it's probably going to be a little bit longer than that. Kind of where I begin to split a little bit from the fed at least, is that it's inflation is likely to be higher for longer. I don't think it's going to be quite as high as it has been. A lot of that. A lot of the reasons it's been high currently, it has a lot more to do with the pandemic and kind of short-term factors. You know, you can think about shortages and chips. You can think about shortages and car parts, for example, or appliances, as well as transportation demand, which should burn itself off and on top of the stimulus. But the fed changed how it does it targets inflation. And I think it really went under reported. I think a lot, it, it didn't really make as much noise as it should have because what they're essentially doing now is they're saying, okay, we need to make up for really chronically low inflation in the, the last cycle. So we're going to allow inflation to run hot, to get the labor market gains that we saw at the end of the last cycle. Because if you look at between 2018 and 2020, the federal site statistics around minority wage gains, for example, it didn't really begin to appear until the economy was basically at full employment. What that three, 3.5, 3.4% unemployment rate. They want to see that again, that's Jerome Powell has basically explicitly stated that that's what they're looking for. That being said, the fed has begun to sound a little bit more hawkish. Cause I think they, I know they were taken by surprise by the how high inflation got, and they're, they're likely going to raise rates by the end of next year. All of that said, I, I still believe the fed is willing to let inflation run above that 2% mark for the next couple of years. Speaker 0 (29m 30s): So for those that don't know what you're referring to in terms of the under-reporting is the fact that they've, they've broken off of the, the, what they used to be the 2% target, is that right? Speaker 1 (29m 40s): Yeah, I, yeah. I mean, I was in colleges, every continent was, you know, they target 2%, they adjust rates based off of that. That's obviously a little more complicated than that, but now they're targeting a longer term inflation average of 2%. And because inflation from 2010 to 2019 ran between, you know, according to their measure of inflation PC around between 1.5 and 1.8% for most of that, they view allowing it to run from two to 3% as making up for some of that loss, those loss pricing increases over the last cycle. Speaker 0 (30m 15s): So in terms of, from the investor perspective, if your outlook as to how that informs your decisions from a real estate point of view, you know, what does, what does that leave us with in terms of the discussion that we've had even today in terms of the different asset classes and how you view economic decisions and investment decisions? Speaker 1 (30m 35s): Yeah, I mean, look, inflation is here to stay at, which is actually fair, especially since it's not, you know, hyperinflation I, where the fed is going to be forced to raise rates quickly. Hopefully, you know, it's actually good news for real estate. Real estate is a real asset, you know, I'm sure, you know, everybody, every economist has said this at some point, you know, real estate is a real asset. It, it benefits from a real value gains and holding real value, which means that in an inflationary environment, commercial real estate itself is a good play within those property types. There are some that are better than others, especially if you're unsure of how stable and the inflation rate is going to be the shorter, the lease term, especially in a higher demand property types that, you know, you can think about industrial or especially multi-family, it means you can adjust your, your rent increases to match inflation. If you look at, and we've seen this actually in the market, if you look at NOI gains real NOI gains from Nate grieve since 1990, there was only two real periods of actual real NOI gains from the nineties to the, from early nineties to the late nineties and from 2010 to 2015. Other than that, if you deflate real and alive for multi-family, it's basically flat, which, which essentially means that NOI is just, is, is working as an inflation hedge. You get the same real return year after year. That that makes multi-family really attractive. Industrial actually has not done that well, based on that same measure up until very recently. Speaker 0 (32m 12s): Yeah. I liked the idea. I was always told by a mentor of mine there where, you know, real estate is one of those few industries investment that you can download inflation to your, to your customer, you know, pretty much one for one. Speaker 1 (32m 27s): Yeah, you can, it, it is extremely easy to just pass on that inflation to the investor, unlike pretty much any other asset class. I mean, if you think about bonds, for example, you can't do that for the most part. You just, you know, if you invest in a bond, you you're losing real value every, every coupon payment. Speaker 0 (32m 44s): Yeah. And I th and I think to your point earlier where you have those shorter terms with multifamily, it's obviously easier to do, but I was just reading a lease yesterday that was kind of the old school lease where the, it was over 10 years, but the, the bump ups, the step-ups and rent were basically the CP attached to a CPI inflator. So we haven't seen those as much, usually landlords, if anything, at least prior to the pandemic, they would just say, okay, it's, you know, 10 bucks a square foot now 12 bucks 14. And usually that would be more than inflation, but they have some mechanism in there. Speaker 1 (33m 17s): Yeah. Well, I was going to say, the other thing landlords might want to start thinking about is, is indexing it to inflation and that's, that's actually the great part. I mean, that's why we target a specific inflation rate is because then you can make these easy decisions. I know inflation is going to be 2%, it's a very stiff assumption. So, you know, we can, we can just assume a 2% going forward. Now you have to start thinking about, okay, is it, you know, is it going to go, you're making a bet. Is inflation going to be long-term? Is this higher inflation could be long-term or is it going to come back down? How much is it going to come back down? It's really difficult. And while it does sound really nice to indexed, to inflation, if you're an office, a landlord right now, I think you struggle a little bit because you don't have the negotiating power necessarily that you did two years ago. Speaker 0 (34m 5s): Yeah, absolutely. So in terms of, so in terms of that, how that view informs the interest rate discussion, the way that, you know, the fed will respond, if, you know, if employment is higher than, or full employment, or if changes in inflation that, that they're measuring, how, how do you see that impacting the interest rate decisions? Speaker 1 (34m 27s): Yeah, so I, I I'm, I think I'm in the minority here, at least in terms of the broader economics where I really don't see interest rates increasing significantly. And I know that's a really economist answer to touching it a little bit, but I don't see interest rates hedging or increasing significantly because one of what the feds, the fed said about how they're going to react to inflation, they said, they're willing to let inflation run hot. They care more about the labor market gains right now on that needs us more liquidity in the system for longer, which, you know, can go only a few places. It can, it can drive. And we have seen equity increase by multiples. And then the only other place we can go really is bonds for, you know, those multi-trillion dollar that multi-trillion dollar liquidity pool we have right now. I mean, it's at the point where the banks just basically don't know where to put the money. All of that, to me suggests a, you know, short, you know, lower interest rates on top of that. If you think about the demographic factors that are affecting the United States, you know, slower demographic growth going forward, that's not going to change. That's baked in effectively. Unless people begin to move here in a mass on top of technological change, you know, you would expect to see more automation going forward. I think it's coming faster than a lot of people like to acknowledge that pushes down prices, which then pushes down interest rates. And I know globalization is no longer it, maybe isn't moving forward as quickly or as moving forward at all. But globalization still means a lower interest rate environment. You know, the fed in 2018, tried to push interest rates to 2.5% and ran into huge liquidity problems in the market. There isn't there, they don't and they view, and this is their view. They don't view the neutral interest rate as much higher than rate where they're no longer stimulating nor creating drag on the economy is much higher than two or two and a half percent. So all of that, to me suggests maybe slightly higher interest rates from what was the tenure at. At one point I, you know, 50, 50 basis points, but maybe not, it's probably gonna be lower than it was before, before the pandemic. Speaker 0 (36m 45s): Would there be something that would change that view for you or, or a few factors that would change that view for you in terms of where interest rates could go? Cause, I mean, that's usually the big thing where a lot of people say, oh, if inflation is going in this direction, interest rates have to, you know, come up to that, you know, come up as a result of that. But yeah, what are, what are, what are some factors that may, may kind of give you pause to, to think it might go the other way or at least increase over what you're, what you're talking about? Speaker 1 (37m 13s): That's a great question. And, you know, as inflation has continued to stay high, it's been something I've been thinking more and more about, but the, you know, inflation first and foremost above all else, if inflation gets out of hand, it, it becomes a inflation spiral. That's when I think, you know, you'll begin to see interest rates really start to hike. The other, the other concern would be the fed. It depends on who Biden dominates next year for the fed. If we get someone who's hawkish, if we see you're going to see some more hawkish fed governors, I think that in a more hawkish fed chairman that could change my view on interest rates. And finally, we begin, we begin to S you know, removing chewy really begins to drain liquidity faster than I thought it would. No we're right now, we are still buying billions of dollars of bonds every month. I don't expect removing QV would do that, but that could drive interest rates higher if the, if the market begins to react to, or begins to become concerned about liquidity in the us, into global bond markets. Right. I, I sh I should mention real quick that also there are wars and pandemics that I can't predict. I learned that last year. Speaker 0 (38m 40s): Yeah. That was a, it was, I remember two, two or three years ago. And I won't say who the company was, but, you know, I remember it was couched almost as a joke, you know, barring any geopolitical disputes or a global pandemic. And I was like, oh my God. But yeah, those are always the things you're like, you know, there's these extra exogenous factors that you're not going to be able to, to forecast these black swans. So I guess the, you know, from the real estate perspective, that's a good overview of where we're at today in terms of the different asset classes. And we're, you know, the view of the economy is just want to be mindful of your time. Joseph, we have four questions. We ask everybody before we, we end the episode. So if you're okay with that, we'll kick it off. Speaker 1 (39m 25s): Absolutely. Speaker 0 (39m 26s): What's something, you know, now in your career, you wish you knew when you started. Speaker 1 (39m 32s): That's a great question that it's okay to be wrong and it's okay to make a mistake. I think I was, at least at the beginning of my career was a little more concerned about mistakes and being wrong. If you're, if you're an economist, if you work in economics, you know, if you work in real estate and you're trying to forecast trends, you're, you're going to be wrong and that's okay. It's just, just, don't be wrong. You just learn from the mistake. Don't make the same mistake twice, twice, I think is what I needed to learn as opposed to you have to be right the first time. Speaker 0 (40m 1s): Yeah. It's all always lies. I camera it was like Truman or something that said, ah, give me a one-handed economist. Everyone says on the, on one hand, on the other hand, but yeah. I Speaker 1 (40m 11s): Mean, I'm certainly, I'm certainly guilty of that Speaker 0 (40m 15s): While you want to be precise with your answers in terms of mentorship, what would you tell younger people coming into the industry or your views of mentorship in general? Speaker 1 (40m 25s): Oh, I would not be where I am without mentors. I think it's so important to talk to people who that are in a place that you want to be, or are doing things that you want to do. I've had some fantastic mentors for both in real estate and in, in economics before, before I worked in commercial real estate, I was working in banking regulation. I was thinking regulation research, I suppose I worked with some fantastic economists that taught me everything I knew, including, you know, my, my advisor in college. I, I, you know, like find someone that you think is worthwhile to talk to and then just bug them. I think I was my first job. I was in the chief economist office, every opportunity I could just asking questions, being curious, trying to learn as much as I could cause that, and it's, it's paid dividends for me. Speaker 0 (41m 25s): Awesome. Are there any recommendations you could give a book recommendations, podcasts, I guess, with the spirit of this conversation, maybe in real estate or economics? Yeah. Speaker 1 (41m 34s): There's, that's not a good question. There's two, there's two, there's two that I, one that I love just for all time, which is thinking fast and slow by data economy, which, you know, I, I like to think that I don't necessarily subscribe to the, the basic, the, what a lot of mainstream economists think about in terms of models. I think there's more to it than that. And David Kahneman does a really good job of breaking down how people think and how that relates to economics. Fantastic book. It's a really interesting read, even if you're not an economist and the other one is the rise and fall of economic of us economic growth. I believe it's, I'm reading it right now. So I should know the name. Speaker 0 (42m 17s): Yeah. We'll put a link. I think I know the one, the one you're talking about, Speaker 1 (42m 23s): I, you know, the first economist I worked under was an economic historian. So he instilled that interest in me. And it basically shows that, you know, the century from 1870 to 1970 was a period of unbelievable technological change and economic growth. And I it's really fascinating and it informs a lot of what I think will happen going forward in terms of slower, you know, slower but steady economic growth. We're not going to see those four to 5% GDP gains without, you know, huge amounts of stimulus anymore. And it was good. Speaker 0 (42m 54s): Yeah. I have a, if it's Robert Gordon, is that a that's right? Yep. Okay. We'll put it. Speaker 1 (43m 0s): I think it's a fantastic book. I really like it. If you liked economics, I would suggest that it's. Speaker 0 (43m 6s): Yeah, no, it's, it's one of those things where I w was interested in reading, but unless you get like a recommendation, sometimes you go down a rabbit hole, but the Conaman that's I think, correct me if I'm wrong. I think Conaman was the first non economist to win the Nobel prize in economics. Speaker 1 (43m 23s): Yeah. He was a psychologist and I it's, it's a lot about how the brain thinks and makes decisions and you know, it really attacks that idea of rationality and really looks at why people actually make decisions. It's, it's a great book. It really changed how I thought about, you know, economic modeling and where I work, how we, how markets work. Speaker 0 (43m 45s): Very cool. We'll put a link to both last question. First car, make and model. Speaker 1 (43m 51s): Oh, I had a 2004, a Honda accord, which is it. And it was, it had a bigger engine than it was supposed to have, which was great because if you've ever driven in Massachusetts, all of the on-ramps are about five feet long, so you have to really gun it. And so that was a fantastic car. I missed that car still. I would rather drive that than when I'm driving now. Speaker 0 (44m 20s): Right on. I feel like a lot of engines were stuffed into those older Accords and civics, Joseph, for people to connect with you or a, you know, anything related to the information or data you do with CoStar work and they reach out, Speaker 1 (44m 34s): Yeah, we have a website, I'll send it to you for blankets, CoStar advisory. You know, you can always find me. I write a lot of articles for the website, so you'll see me on CoStar, if you have it, which I would suggest otherwise, you know, just I'm on LinkedIn. Speaker 0 (44m 54s): My guest today has been Joseph Biassi Joseph. Thanks for being part of working capital. Speaker 1 (44m 59s): Thank you for having me. Speaker 0 (45m 10s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse, for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five-star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.

Indy Audio
Alane Hartley & Russell Braen Interviewed on WBAI by The Indypendent

Indy Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 12:27


Alane Hartley and Russell Braen, co-owners of Park Hill Orchard in Easthampton, Massachusetts, talk about the people who grow and harvest food, the challenges they face and the community-centered solutions that some farmers have developed that stand in stark contrast to Big Ag and its corporate monoculture.

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI
Auto suggested prompts and clinical validation

The ACDIS Podcast: Talking CDI

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 31:36


Today's guests are Kory Anderson, MD, CHCQM-PHYADV, medical director at Intermountain Physician Advisor Services and CDI, and Kearstin Jorgenson, MSM, CPC, COC, the system operations director for physician advisor services at Intermountain Healthcare. Today's show is co-hosted to Sharme Brodie, RN, CCDS, CCDS-O, CDI education specialist at HCPro/ACDIS in Middleton, Massachusetts. Today's show is supported by 3M Health Information Systems. 3M Health Information Systems, now with M*Modal, delivers innovative software and consulting services designed for a wide range of healthcare environments. From closing the loop between clinical care and revenue integrity, to computer-assisted coding, clinical documentation integrity and performance monitoring, 3M can help you reduce cost and provide more informed care. Featured solution: Today's featured ACDIS solution is the 2021 ACDIS national conference. After a year in which we had to cancel our 2020 event, ACDIS is stepping forward to make ourselves and the CDI profession stronger than ever. Join us October 24-28 in Dallas, Texas, for the return of the ACDIS national conference. We're offering cutting-edge education across more than 60 CDI-focused presentations in our first-ever hybrid event. Our in-person event at the Sheraton Dallas Hotel features four concurrent tracks focused on coding and clinical concerns, management and professional development, regulatory changes and challenges, outpatient CDI, and much more. In a new value-added supplement this year, we're offering online-only bonus presentations that participants can enjoy when they return home. Click here to learn more and register today! (http://ow.ly/7l3b30rLACx) In the News: “Kaiser Permanente researchers push the envelope with AI and NLP,” from Healthcare IT News (http://ow.ly/6ptz30rWW3N) “Large-scale identification of aortic stenosis and its severity using natural language processing on electronic health records” from the Heart Rhythm Society (http://ow.ly/kmrD30rWW6Y) ACDIS update: 2021 CDI Salary Survey open now! (http://ow.ly/z7wM30rWW76)

Allworth Financial's Money Matters
The shadow inflation problem

Allworth Financial's Money Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:45


On this week's Money Matters, Scott and Pat discuss the surprising reasons why inflation is higher than the news indicates. Scott and Pat advise a new father making $300,000 a year about saving for his child's future. A Massachusetts caller asks how to develop a more thoughtful Roth conversion strategy for his $1.8 million in retirement savings. A federal employee with $1.2 million in a Thrift Savings Plan asks if he can afford to retire comfortably. A California caller asks if he should pay down his $115,000 mortgage balance with his 401(k). Finally, Scott and Pat advise a saver about how he should handle his multiple life insurance policies. Ask a question by calling 1-833-999-6784 or email Scott and Pat at questions@moneymatters.com.

CRT - Class Racing Today
CRT Episode 37: Brenda Grubbs - Out with a Bang

CRT - Class Racing Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 37:55


Out with a Bang! Brenda Grubbs joins the show! The Texas native just won her third NHRA National Event with a convincing .004 final round light putting a stop to the Jerry Emmons' 14 round win streak.Class Racing Today https://linktr.ee/classracingtodayFacebook, Instagram, YouTube, AppleT-shirts and Stickers for sale!Tim Stickles' Gutters By Designhttps://www.facebook.com/guttersbydesignNH Gutters by Design now serving Seacoast NH, Southern Maine, and Massachusetts. Offering the industry's premiere gutter system. We feature a 5 inch channel, scratchguard finish that comes with a lifetime warranty. Call today for a free estimate! 603-953-4640DragInsights Sportsman App Draginsights.com Register FREE to track yourself and your competition!

DEAD Talks
Suicidal Thoughts | Jeff Landreville

DEAD Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 73:08


Jeff explains a story taking place in Massachusetts of his friend who showed no warning signs and chose to take his own life one night. This is a jam packed episode of fascinating and entertaining stories of his own personal journey as well where he got to a breaking point of considering suicide, himself. When two east coaster step in to a podcast room it tends to be loud so enjoy some deep interpretive conversation with plenty of jokes mixed in.  Don't forget to subscribe/follow on whichever platform you stream on and follow us on social media! @Deadtalkspodcast on instagram www.deadtalks.net Guest: @jeff_landreville

Indy Audio
The Indypendent News Hour on WBAI // 12 October 2021

Indy Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 54:47


On this week's show: Theodore Hamm talks about the real estate interests of NYC's prospective next mayor, Eric Adams, who has received a large amount of donations from real estate developers and other wealthy, conservative New Yorkers like Michael Bloomberg. Joe DeManuelle-Hall, an NYC-based organizer with Labor Notes, a media and organizing project that has been the voice of union activists who want to put the movement back in the labor movement since 1979, talks about the historical context around the upswing in the labor movement and some of the current strikes happening now. Alane Hartley and Russell Braen, co-owners of Park Hill Orchard in Easthampton, Massachusetts, talk about the people who grow and harvest food, the challenges they face and the community-centered solutions that some farmers have developed that stand in stark contrast to Big Ag and its corporate monoculture.

The GetUp Crew
GetUp Crew : What's Hot and Trending (Wednesday,10/13)

The GetUp Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:03


Concern over fights caught on video in a Massachusetts school, Tyga arrested for felony domestic violence

The Ortho Show
Hosted by Dr. Scott Sigman – “Olympic Gold: Dr. Chris Lee”

The Ortho Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 32:22


Dr. Christopher Lee is a board certified orthopaedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine, arthroscopy, joint and cartilage preservation as well as shoulder and knee replacements. He is in private practice in Burbank, CA. Dr. Lee is also the team physician for men and women's USA National Indoor Volleyball Team. He traveled with the team's to Tokyo for the 2021 Summer Olympics, where he was on the court with the women's team gold medal win. Topics include: -We continue to bring you the best of the best in orthopedics, including those with unique experiences. We hear about Dr. Lee's experience as a violinist since an early age. -He is part of the "Tufts University Triple Jumbo." Born and raised in Boston, Massachusetts, Dr. Lee attended Tufts University where he received awards for both academic and artistic achievements. Dr. Lee subsequently attended the Tufts University School of Medicine where he participated in the MD/MBA program. After completing the Tufts Combined Residency in Orthopaedic Surgery, he then received his fellowship training at the San Diego Arthroscopy and Sports Medicine Fellowship where he trained with international pioneers in sports medicine, arthroscopy and shoulder replacement surgery. -Dr. Lee discusses the long, arduous road to becoming the lead physician for the USA National Indoor Volleyball team for both men's and women's teams'. He gives us the insights going to Tokyo for the Olympics, the challenges while there and ultimately, being there for the women's team big gold win. Find out more about Dr. Christopher Lee here.  For MD's, capture quick reflections on each learning below & how it applies to your day-to-day to unlock a total of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CMEs.

The Howie Carr Radio Network
MA State Workers have to Get Vaxxed or Get Out - 10.12.21 - Hour 1

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 44:20


The Massachusetts vaccine requirement deadline for state workers are coming up this Sunday and Baker is prepping the National Guard to fill the work gap.

PARANORMAL PODCAST
The Afterlife Frequency - Witches In Massachusetts - Paranormal Podcast 702

PARANORMAL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 89:22


We talk about scientific proof of the afterlife with our guest Mark Anthony. In part two, Peter Muise joins us to talk about historic Massachusetts witches! You can find Mark and Peter's books at Amazon: The Afterlife Frequency: The Scientific Proof of Spiritual Contact and How That Awareness Will Change Your Life Witches and Warlocks of Massachusetts: Legends, Victims, and Sinister Spellcasters -TRADE COFFEE- We get almost everything delivered to us these days. Why should coffee be any different? Let Trade bring the best coffee right to your front door. We love Trade Coffee in the Harold Household! For our listeners, right now Trade is offering your first bag free and $5 off your bundle at checkout. To get yours, go to drinktrade.com/jim and use promo code jim. Take the quiz to start your journey to the perfect cup. -RAYCON- Raycon earbuds are my wireless earbuds of choice! Great sound at a great price! Raycon's offering 15% off all their products for my listeners and here's what you've gotta do to get it. Go to buyraycon.com/harold Thanks Raycon for your sponsorship of The Paranormal Podcast!