Podcasts about South

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

One of the four cardinal directions

  • 17,408PODCASTS
  • 49,336EPISODES
  • 44mAVG DURATION
  • 10+DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 17, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about South

Show all podcasts related to south

Latest podcast episodes about South

South of Gaza
REWIND: God, I'm Available

South of Gaza

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:41


BE AVAILABLE! Today's episode is a throwback to one of my first couple of episodes ever! Back when this podcast was called "The South of Gaza Podcast". I hope you listen and enjoy! We look back at Daniel and his life and the lives of his friends Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah. The verses for this episode are Isiah 6:8, and Daniel 2: 14-23; 46-49. Listen and enjoy! Let me know what you think! Subscribe to my YouTube Channel- Can I Be Real? Podcast Follow me on Instagram- @raee.michele Join the South of Gaza Community Facebook Group to receive daily Bible scriptures and encouragement on your Facebook timeline! RATE, REVIEW, & SUBSCRIBE! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rachel398/message

ROI’s Into the Corner Office Podcast: Powerhouse Middle Market CEOs Telling it Real—Unexpected Career Conversations

Syed Barizuddin, Ph.D is a researcher, an academic, and an entrepreneur with over 20 years of experience. Syed's bachelor's degree and subsequent work experience of 5 years gave him the expertise in Electronics Engineering, Power Systems, Telecommunication Engineering, and Control Systems. The Master's degree research imbedded the expertise on Nanotechnology, Chemical Engineering and Energetics. His Doctorate education and subsequent work experience of 10 years encompassed expertise in Bio-Medical Engineering, Microbiology, Optics, Diagnostic Systems and other areas of science and technology. More recently, his work experience has focused on Environmental Engineering and Green Technology projects.  Also unique to Syed's experience is, how intrinsically he is aware of the academic and industrial setting and their workings. He has been on both sides and has led project teams as the Principal Investigator, as well as founded two start-up companies and was an equal partner in the third.  He has worked on projects for federal agencies such as the DoD, NSF, NIH, EPA, and many multinational companies. He insists on how important and meaningful partnerships can be - be it with the industry partners or government agencies. His experiences over the years and the acquired nuances in the interactions and engagement with corporates, industry partners, and government agencies provide an advantage for his start-ups to succeed. In my current position as the Chief Executive Officer of Plasmonic Diagnostics, he is busy leading the company to commercialize a disruptive non-invasive and ultra-sensitive technology in the infectious disease space. Born in Hyderabad (central/South), India, Syed moved to the United States more than two decades ago. He has mostly resided in the midwest. His reason for not making a move from Missouri according to him are the courteous drivers and people kindly holding the doors for you to pass!

Green Light with Chris Long
Yannick Ngakoue! Joe House! Suns & Bucks Bounced From NBA Playoffs & Baseball Good Bad Ugly.

Green Light with Chris Long

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 106:52


(2:24) - Hello, Hockey is the Sport of the South and Favorite Maryland Terrapins of All Time. (15:28) - Yannick Ngakoue on his Upbringing and Journey to NFL, Joining Indianapolis, Playing in Las Vegas Last Year, Leaving Jacksonville and Receiving Praise from Rod Marinelli.  (43:41) - Reviewing Green Light's Best Accessory Draft. (47:30) - Baseball's Good, Bad, Ugly. (56:30) - Luka Shades the Suns and Boston Bounces the Bucks. (1:12:44) - Joe House Talks Crystal City Restaurant, Betting Golf, PGA Championship and Phil Mickelson, Saudi Golf League and Washington Sports. Yannick Ngakoue Article: https://www.golongtd.com/p/you-dont-know-yannick-ngakoue?s=r Green Light Spotify Music: https://open.spotify.com/user/951jyryv2nu6l4iqz9p81him9?si=17c560d10ff04a9b Spotify Layup Line: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1olmCMKGMEyWwOKaT1Aah3?si=675d445ddb824c42 Green Light Tube YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/GreenLightTube1 Green Light with Chris Long: Subscribe and enjoy weekly content including podcasts, documentaries, live chats, celebrity interviews and more including hot news items, trending discussions from the NFL, MLB, NHL, NBA, NCAA are just a small part of what we will be sharing with you. https://www.greenlightpodcast.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Bears Barroom Radio Network
South Burbs Hitmen | Guest: Missy Carroll

Bears Barroom Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 123:08


The guys welcome Missy Carroll from SouthSide Behavior to break down the last brutal week of White Sox baseball (we shotgun a few beers). Plus, show hosts Joe Mandel, Vinnie Parise, Steven Zim Zimmerman & Chris Gonzalez preview the upcoming series with the Royals & Yankees. Tune in! Lead Producer/Director: Joe Mandel Executive Producer: Aldo Gandia

Greatest Pod in the South
GPITS, Ep. 182 (5-16-22)

Greatest Pod in the South

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 62:05


It's time for another potentially excellent episode of the Greatest Pod in The South starring Neal McCready of RebelGrove.com and Jay G. Tate from AuburnSports.com. . Topics covered: • Jay struck gold (proverbially) during his 50th Birthday weekend in Louisville. • What other kinds of good things happened during Jay's drunken trip? • It looks like reporters will be welcomed, or perhaps encouraged, to cover games in person this fall. That forces a curious choice for folks like Jay and Neal, who have spent the past two or three years doing shows off campus. • Will the SEC actually change its scheduling paradigm as it relates to football? With the upcoming addition of Oklahoma and Texas, something has to change. Still, Neal thinks even more teams will be part of the SEC before too long. That adds even more complexity to the task. • Is Miami positioning itself to jump away from the ACC? • Is Auburn's Jabari Smith the best NBA prospect in the 2022 Draft class? • Ole Miss' approach toward recruiting high-school players is very interesting — and may put the Rebels uniquely ahead of the curve. • Coaches make more money than ever now. That will affect how long they coach. Villanova coach Jay Wright is living proof. CHECK OUT ... * CATHEAD DISTILLERY, makers of fine vodka, gin, liqueur and bourbon! www.catheaddistillery.com * PINNACLE: www.pinntrust.com * JOHN EDWARDS of REGENCY TRAVEL: 901-494-3387 or jedwards@regencytravel.net or www.regencytravel.net

Charlotte Talks
'Southernization' authors describe the immense influence of the South

Charlotte Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 49:32


From the racial backlash against President Obama to the rise of white nationalism, a former Observer editor and a Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist argue the changing politics and culture of the nation have deep roots in the South. We discuss their new book, “The Southernization of America: A Story of Democracy in the Balance.”

Radio 4 Quiz
Round Britain Quiz Ep 8

Radio 4 Quiz

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:05


Kirsty Lang is in the chair as the South of England take on Northern Ireland.

Society Owes Me A Gen-X Podcast: The 90s
Special: The Greatest Gen-X Movie Tournament!

Society Owes Me A Gen-X Podcast: The 90s

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 63:04


SOMAGXP gets the chance to take part in 'The Greatest Gen X Movie Tournament' hosted by the fab guys over at Project Gen X podcast. We dig into our 'South' bracket and it gets tense for 'May Movie Madness' - Fight Club, Grosse Pointe Blank, Trainspotting, SLC Punk, Breakfast Club, Wayne's World, Say Anything and Party Girl... sparks fly! Once we whittle it down to two, you can hear us debate the rest with the tournament's other participants - Gen X Mixtape, Gen X Grown Up and of course Project Gen X. Let the games begin! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/societyowesmeagenxpodcast/message

Apple News Today
The racist conspiracy theory behind the Buffalo shooting

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 10:33


On Saturday, a gunman opened fire at a supermarket in Buffalo, New York — killing 10 people. Investigators believe the alleged gunman was motivated by a racist conspiracy known as “replacement theory.” The Washington Post reports on how this idea has moved from the fringes of the internet to mainstream media and politics. A Time reporter traveled to the North and South poles to see the impact of climate change there for for herself. Music-concert tickets have recently become way more expensive. Vice explains why. Ukraine won the 2022 Eurovision Song Contest. NPR spoke with the frontman of Kalush Orchestra, the band behind the winning entry, who said it’s a huge responsibility to represent the country at a global competition.

Low Carb MD Podcast
Episode 225: Triple J

Low Carb MD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 48:48


Thank you for joining us for another episode of the Low Carb MD Podcast. Triple J has an amazing and inspiring story of hope. He found himself in a place of severe depression, in poor health, and in physical pain after going through a divorce. He was overweight and losing faith that he could ever recover when he decided to give the keto diet a try. His results and the multitude of positive changes that have happened in his life since then have been jaw-dropping.  In their conversation, Brian and Triple J talk about growing up in the South eating the Southern diet, divine intervention in a hopeless situation, the multifaceted benefits and positive effects that come from fixing your relationship with food, shedding ‘mental weight' in addition to physical weight, the power of gratitude, and the power of believing in yourself. For more information, please see the links below. Thank you for listening! Links: Triple J: Linktree Dr. Brian Lenzkes: Website Twitter Dr. Tro Kalayjian: Website Twitter Instagram

Jazz Focus
Eddie South Transcription recordings - 1933

Jazz Focus

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 62:49


These recordings were made for a radio program in Los Angeles in the early 1930's by his "International Orchestra" including Milt Hinton, Antonia Spaulding, Clifford King, George Barnes and Jimmy Bertrand - quite a mix of jazz, tango, rhumba, German, Jewish and Latin music! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/john-clark49/support

Nebraska Athletics Podcast
Huskers Head South for Stillwater Regional

Nebraska Athletics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022


The Nebraska softball team (40-14) has been selected for the Stillwater NCAA Regional in Stillwater, Okla., and will play North Texas (35-14) on Friday, May 20, at 5 p.m. (CT).

Calvary South Austin Godcast
Are You Unteachable? – Luke 20:1-40

Calvary South Austin Godcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022


Are you a disciple of Jesus who loves to learn from the Lord? Or have you become an unteachable believer? In this study from Luke chapter 20, Pastor Bunjee Garrett encourages believers to stay humble and teachable. The post Are You Unteachable? – Luke 20:1-40 appeared first on Calvary South Austin.

Get Reelisms
S3E79: Meet Ari (Diana Rose)

Get Reelisms

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 68:31


Hosts: Adam Rani (@adamthechase)   & Christine Chen (@cchenmtf) For more information about Christine Chen: christinewchen.comFor more information go to getreelisms.com Follow the movie go to: erzuliefilm.com WEBISODE version of the PodcastTo watch our films: https://www.christinewchen.com/films-on-amazon

South Harbor Church Sermons
Jesus and the Demon Possessed Man

South Harbor Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022


Speaker: Rich Ferreira South Harbor Church is a community of believers seeking to follow Jesus together and get a fresh start on life.

Around the House with Eric G
New Power Generation with Generac and Jake Thomas. Are you ready for a storm or hurricane?

Around the House with Eric G

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 47:33


As we depend more and more on electricity to power our homes and cars we need to have reliable power. It doesnt matter if you have a solar power system....you need to have a way to store that power. If you dont you still need something to power it when the power is out. We dive into this discussion as we get into storm and hurricane season with Jake Thomas from Generac. With more and more power companies in the Western US cutting power during wind storms and then with hurricanes in the South and East Coast this show will help you understand what system might be best for your home. Thanks for listening to Around the house if you want to hear more please subscribe so you get notified of the latest episode as it posts at https://around-the-house-with-e.captivate.fm/listen (https://around-the-house-with-e.captivate.fm/listen) We love comments and we would love reviews on how this information has helped you on your house! Thanks for listening! For more information about the show head to https://aroundthehouseonline.com/ (https://aroundthehouseonline.com/) We have moved the Pro Insider Special on Thursday to its new feed. It will no longer be on this page. You can find it and subscribe right here: https://around-the-house-pro-insider.captivate.fm/ (https://around-the-house-pro-insider.captivate.fm/ )

Macro n Cheese
Pakistan's False Dawn and the Beginning of History with Aqdas Afzal

Macro n Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 54:57


A false dawn is a promising situation which comes to nothing. This is how Aqdas Afzal describes the situation in his native Pakistan and India at the end of the Raj. “The point to remember here, Steve, is that the British were in India not to govern. They were in India to extract surplus and to maintain what they called law and order. And so the British left without giving the local people any taste or mechanism for bringing about accountability or democracy. But they did leave behind these two very, almost draconian institutions for keeping law and order. And because of these two institutions - these two state institutions that the British left behind - in the case of Pakistan, the first 25 years of Pakistan's history was complete chaos.” Aqdas talks to Steve about the chaos of partition – a humanitarian crisis. Remember, Pakistan was not only separated from India, but it was also cleaved from its own Eastern wing, now known as Bangladesh. The generation that sacrificed and struggled to gain independence was hoping for a bright future. That was the false dawn. Pakistan fell into the lap of neoliberal thinking because of the Cold War, as Aqdas explains it. When the Soviets entered Afghanistan, the military government took over in Pakistan, cozying up with the US defense establishment. Pakistani policy makers began to sound like the godparents of the neoliberal project, Thatcher and Reagan. The interview covers the destructive role of the IMF, World Bank, and WTO – what Steve refers to as the evil trinity. No matter how many of our guests talk about them, there is always more outrage to be uncovered in their manipulation of the economies of the global South. Steve and Aqdas discuss Francis Fukuyama's concept of “the end of history.” With the collapse of the USSR, liberal democracy and capitalism were expected to be the final stage of human evolution, leaving no other pathway for developing nations. Aqdas counters with the notion that history is not linear. “Russia is a country that went through shock therapy, that was undertaken by experts coming from the World Bank and the IMF. These experts are basically telling Russia how to open its economy, how to change over from socialism to a market-based economy. The same Russia today is challenging the might of capitalist countries like Britain, United States, Germany.” He calls this the beginning of history. Aqdas Afzal finished his undergraduate and first master's degree in Political Science from Ohio State University, then returned to his native Pakistan. After working there for five years he won the Fulbright scholarship for his second master's and PhD in Economics from UMKC. He teaches at Habib University in Karachi and writes https://www.dawn.com/authors/8439/aqdas-afzal (a monthly op-ed in Dawn), a leading English language newspaper there. @AqdasAfzal on Twitter

How To Love Lit Podcast
Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 49:51


Kate Chopin - The Awakening - Episode 3 - Edna Pontellier Battles The Forces Without Only To Meet The Forces Within!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our third episode discussing Kate Chopin's controversial novella, The Awakening.  Week 1 we introduced Chopin, her life and the book itself.  We talked about what a stir it made during her lifetime ultimately resulting in it being forgotten and then rediscovered midway through the 20th century.  Last week, we spent all of our time on the vacation resort island of Grand Isle.  We met Mr. ad Mrs. Pontellier, as well as the two women who represent got Edna, our protagonist, two alternating lifestyles.  Edna Pontellier, we were quick to learn, is not a happily married woman.  Her husband is outwardly kind to her, but readers are told outright that love and mutual respect was never part of the arrangement between these two.  Edna is indulged by Mr. Pontellier, for sure.  He gives her anything she wants in terms of money or material, but in exchange, she is his ornament, an expensive hobby, a pet even- something to be prized- or as Ibsen would describe it- a beautiful doll for his doll house.      The story starts in the summer at the vacation resort town of Grand Isle, Louisiana.  While vacationing on the island, Edna Pontellier experiences what Chopin terms “the awakening”.  She awakens to the understanding that she is not a pet or a doll in the doll house, and just like Nora in the The Doll's House, she decides she really doesn't want to be one anymore.     No, I guess if that were the only thing to this story, we'd have to say, Sorry Kate, Ibsen beat you by about 20 years.  In Ibsen's story, Nora awakens when her husband, Torvald, turns on her over money.      That's a good point, what awakens Edna in this book is not a marital crisis over money.  It is a crisis that awakens her, and it totally informs how she views her marriage, but it is a crisis concerning her husband at all that is the catalyst.   She is awakened to her own humanity by discovering her own sensuality.  I want to highlight that this awakening isn't overtly sexually provoked.  No man comes in and seduces Edna; she does not go off with a wild vacation crew.  She is left vulnerable, if you want to think about it that way, because of loveless marriage, but she is sensually and emotionally provoked through three  very different relationships- all of which affect her physically as well as emotionally.  The first is with a Creole woman, Adele Ratigntole, one with a younger Creole man, Robert LeBrun, and the third with the provocative music of Madame Reisz.  Experiences with these three awaken something in Edna that encourages maybe even forces her to rebel- rebel against her husband, against the culture, against the person she has always been, against the roles she has played, against everything that she has ever known.      The problem is- rebellion only takes you so far.  You may know what you DON'T want, but does that help you understand what you DO?  And this is Edna's problem.  Where do we go from here?     And so, in chapter 17, we return with the Pontellier's to their home in New Orleans.  And, as we have suggested before, New Orleans is not like any other city in America, and it is in these cultural distinctives of Creole life at the turn of the century that Chopin situates our protagonist.  But before we can understand some of the universal and psychological struggles Chopin so carefully sketches for us, we need to understand a little of the culture of this time period and this unusual place.  Garry, tell us a little about this world.  What is so special about Esplanade Street?    Well, one need only Google tourism New Orleans and a description of Esplanade street will be in the first lists of articles you run into.  Let me read the opening sentence from the travel website Neworleans.com    One of the quietest, most scenic and historic streets in New Orleans, Esplanade Avenue is a hidden treasure running through the heart of the city. From its beginning at the foot of the Mississippi River levee to its terminus at the entrance of City Park, Esplanade is a slow pace thoroughfare with quiet ambiance and local charm.  According to this same website, Esplanade Street, during the days of Chopin, functioned as “millionaire row”- which, of course is why the Pontelliers live there.    It actually forms the border between the French Quarter and the less exclusive Faubourg Marigny.  At the turn of the last century it was grand and it was populated by wealthy creoles who were building enormous mansions meant to compete with the mansions of the “Americans” on St. Charles Avenue.    “The Americans”?    Yes, that was the term for the non-Creole white people.  The ones that descended from the British or came into New Orleans from other parts of the US.     Esplanade Street was life at its most grand- there is no suffering like you might find in other parts of New Orleans.  The Pontelliers were wealthy; they were glamorous; these two were living competitively.      The first paragraph of chapter 17 calls the Pontellier mansion dazzling white. And the inside is just as dazzling as the outside. Mrs. Pontellier's silver and crystal were the envy of many women of less generous husbands.  Mr. Pontellier was very proud of this and according to our sassy narrator loved to walk around his house to examine everything.  He “greatly valued his possessions.  They were his and I quote “household gods.”    The Pontelliers had been married for six years, and Edna over this time had adjusted to the culture and obligations of being a woman of the competitive high society of Creole New Orleans.  One such obligation apparently centered around the very serious etiquette of calling cards and house calls.  This is something we're familiar with, btw, since we watch Bridgerton.  It was something we saw in Emma, too.  Garry, talk to us about the very serious social business of calling cards.     Well, this is first and foremost a European custom during this time period. It started with simple cards designed to announce a person's arrival, but as in all things human, it grew and grew into something much larger and subtextual- and of course, with rules.  During the Victorian era, the designs on the cards as well as the etiquette surrounding were elaborate.  A person would leave one's calling card at a friend's house, and by friend meaning a person in your community- you may or may not actually be friends. Dropping off a card was a way to express appreciation, offer condolences or just say hello.  If someone moved into the neighborhood, you were expected to reach out with a card, and a new arrival was expected to do the same to everyone else.      The process would involve putting the card on an elaborate silver tray in the entrance hall.  A tray full of calling cards was like social media for Victorians- you were demonstrating your popularity.    For example, if we were doing this today, we would have a place in the entrance of our home, and we'd make sure the cards of the richest or most popular people we knew were on to.  We would want people who dropped off cards to be impressed by how many other callers we had AND how impressive our friends were. The entire process was dictated by complicated social rules, and as Leonce explains to Edna, to go against these rules could mean social suicide.     It could also mean financial suicide because business always has a human component.  The function of an upper class woman would be to fulfil a very specific social obligation and this involved delivering and accepting these calling cards.  Every woman would have a specific day where she would make it known she was receiving cards, and the other ladies would go around town to pay house calls.  In some cases, a woman might remain in her carriage while her groom would take the card to the door.  During the Regency era like in Jane Austen's day, there was a system of bending down the corner of the card if you were there in person, and not if you were sending it, but by Chopin's day, I'm not sure if that was still a thing.     The main thing was that the card would be dropped off on this special silver tray. If it were a first call, the caller might only leave a card.  But, if you were calling on the prescribed day, the groom would further inquire if the lady of the house were home.  A visit would consist of about twenty minutes of polite conversation.  It was important that if someone called on you, you must reciprocate and call on then on their visiting day.      Well, the Tuesday they get back, Edna leaves the house on her reception day and does not receive any callers- a social no-no.  In fact, as we go through the rest of the book, she never receives callers again. This is an affront to the entire society, and an embarrassment to her husband; it's also just bad for business, as Mr. Pontellier tries to explain to his wayward wife, let's read this exchange.    “Why, my dear, I should think you'd understand by this time that people don't do such things; we've got to observe “les convenances” if we ever expect to get on and keep up with the procession.  If you felt that you had to leave this afternoon, you should have left some suitable explanation for your absences.      One thing I find interesting.  Mr. Pontellier assumes that Mrs. Pontellier is on the same page on wanting the same things as he wants, and what he wants is to keep up with the procession.  They'd been doing this for the last six years, and doing it well.    Another thing I notice is that he doesn't rail at her for skipping out. Mr. Pontellier, unlike her father, even as we progress through the rest of the book, is not hard on her at all.  In fact, he's indulgent.  The problem in the entire book is not that he's been overtly abusive or cruel.  Read the part where he tries to kind of help her fix what he considers to be a serious social blunder.    Page 60    Well, if taken in isolation, this exchange doesn't seem offensive, and I might even have taken sides with Mr. Pontellier if it weren't back to back with this horrid scene of him complaining about his dinner then walking out to spend the rest of the evening at the club where he clearly spends the majority of his time.  You have to wonder what is going on at that club, but beyond that.  Edna is again left in sadness.  “She went and stood at an open window and looked out upon the deep tangle of tea garden below”.  (On an aside, if you've read Chopin's story, the story of an hour, you should recognize the language here and the image of this open window).  Anyway,, Here again we have another image of a caged bird, or a person who is looking out in the world but not feeling a part of it.  “She was seeing herself and finding herself in just sweet half-darkness which met her moods. But the voices were not soothing that came to her from the darkness and the sky above and the stars.  They jeered and sounded mournful notes without promise, devoid even of home.  She turned back into the room and began to walk to and from down its whole length, without stopping, without resting.  She carried in her hands a thin handkerchief, which she tore into ribbons, rolled into a ball, and flung from her.  Once she stopped, and taking off her wedding ring, flung it upon the carpet.  When she saw it there, she stamped her heel upon it, striving to crush it.  But her small boot heel did not make an indenture, not a mark upon the little glittering circlet.  In a sweeping passion she seized a glass vase from the table and flung it upon the tiles of the hearth.  She wanted to destroy something.  The crash and the clatter were what she wanted to hear.”    She's clearly angry…and not just because Mr. Pontellier complained about the food and walked out of the house.  She's angry about everything.     Never mind the fact that we are never told what goes on at this club, but there are several indications in different parts of the book that Mr. Pontellier may be doing other things besides smoking cigars in crowded rooms.  Adele even tells Edna that she disapproves of Mr. Pontellier's club.  She goes on to say, “It's a pity Mr. Pontellier doesn't stay home more in the evenings.  I think you would be more- well, if you don't me my saying it- more united.”      Although I will add, Edna quickly replies, “'Oh dear no!' What should I do if he stayed home? We wouldn't have anything to say to each other.”  - the fact remains that MR. Pontelier does not see any need to nurture any sort of human or intimate relationship with Edna- theirs comes across as a cordial business arrangement, at best, with Edna in the position of employee.      True, and although I don't know if this is the right place to point this out, but in terms of the sexual indiscretions that may or may not be going on when Mr. Pontellier is at the club, there is likely a lot in the culture at large going on under the surface that a person from the outside wouldn't immediately be aware of.   Edna is naïve at first to all that goes on in her Victorian-Creole world.  There just is no such thing as “lofty chastity”  amongst the Creole people, or any people I might add, although Edna initially seems to believe that in spite of all the sexual innuendo in the language, nothing sexual was ever going on.  There are just too many indications otherwise in the story that that is not the case.  The reader can see it, even though Edna cannot.     True, and if you didn't catch it on Grand Isle, in the city, it is more obvious, and the farther along we go in the story, it gets more obvious as well.  Mrs. James Highcamp is one example.  She has married an “American” but uses her daughter as a pretext for cultivating relationships with younger men.  This is so well-known that Mr. Pontellier tells Edna, after seeing her calling card, that the less you have to do with Mrs. Highcamp the better.  But she's not the only example.  Victor basically details an encounter with Edna of being with a prostitute he calls “a beauty” when she comes to visit his mother..ending with the phrase that she wouldn't comprehend such things.  And of course, most obviously there is the character Arobin with whom Edna eventually does get sexually involved, but his reputation has clearly preceded him.       Well, Edna's awakening to all of this would explain part of her anger, but  there is more to Edna's awakening then just Leonce, or the new culture she's a part of, or really any outside factor.     Yes, and it is in the universality of whatever is going on inside of Edna that we find ourselves.  That's what's so great about great literature- the setting can be 120 years ago, but our humanity is still our humanity.       I agree and love that, but let's get back to her setting for a moment. I think it's worth mentioning that the 19th century culture of the Creole people in New Orleans is messy and complicated in its own unique way.  It's fascinating, but for those who are not of the privileged class, life was often a harsh reality.  The world, especially in the South, was problematic for people of mixed race heritage.  So, and this is more true the closer we get to the Civil War and the Jim Crow era, but those who called themselves “white creoles” had a problem because of the large existence of the free people of mixed race ancestry in New Orleans.  There was a strong outside pressure to maintain this illusion of racial purity, but the evidence suggests this simply wasn't reality.  Let me throw out a few numbers to tell you what I'm talking about.  From 1782-1791, the St. Louis Catholic Church in New Orleans recorded 2688 births of mixed race children.  Now that doesn't seem like a large number, but let me throw this number out- that same congregation at that time same only records 40 marriages of black or mixed race people.  Now, I know Catholics are known for having large families, but I'm not sure 20 women can account for 2688 births.      No, something feels a little wrong.  That number suggests another explanation may be in order.      Exactly, and by 1840 that number grows from 2688 to over 20,000 with mixed raced Creoles representing 18% of the total population of residents of New Orleans.  And if that doesn't convince you, here's another indicator, during this same period many many free women of color were acquiring prime real estate in New Orleans under their own names.  These women had houses built and passed estates on to their children, but notice this detail, the children of these mixed-raced women had different last names then their mothers.  We're not talking about small amounts of property here.  By 1860 $15 million dollars worth of property was in the name of children with last names that were not the same as that of their mothers, oh and by the way, a lot of that property was in the neighborhood where Edna rents her pidgeon house just around the corner from Esplanade street- in other words around the corner and walking distance from millionaire row.      Well, that's really interesting, and I guess, does add a new dimension to the subtext in the language for sure.    Well, it does, and it is likely something readers of the day would have certainly understood, more than we do 100 years later when the stakes of identifying as being of mixed raced heritage are not the difference between freedom and slavery.  But beyond just that, it's an example of cultures clashing.  Edna represents an outwardly prudish Puritan culture coming into a society that is French, Spanish and Caribbean- very different thinking.  This is a de-facto multi-cultural world; it's Catholic; it's French-speaking; it's international.  She doesn't understand what she's seeing.  And in that regard, her own situational reality is something she's realizing she is only beginning to understand, and she comes into it all very gradually. She is not, in Adele's words, “One of them.”  In fact, there may have been irony in the narrator in Grand Isle suggesting that Robert LeBrun's relationships every summer were platonic.  His relationship with the girl in Mexico we will see most certainly is not, but nor was his relationship with Mariequeita on Grand Isle, the girl they meet on the day they spent together.      Indeed.  You may be right- perhaps there is a real sense that Edna has been blind, and perhaps not just to her husband but by an entire society that presents itself one way but in reality is something entirely different altogether.  When she visits Adele and her husband at their home, everything seems perfect- of course.  Adele is the perfect woman with this perfect life.  Adele is beautiful.  Her husband adores her.  The Ratignolle's marriage is blissful, in fact to use the narrator's words, “The Ratignolles' understood each other perfectly.  If ever the fusion of two human beings into one has been accomplished on this sphere it was surely in their union.”      Do you think it's sarcasm again?  Was it truly perfect, or just presenting itself to be perfect?     It's really hard to tell.  Maybe they have worked out a great life together.  I think there is a lot in this passage to suggest they are truly happy together.  Edna even expresses that their home is much happier than hers.  She quotes that famous Chinese proverb “Better a dinner of herbs”.  The entire quote is “Better a dinner of herbs than a stalled ox where hate is.”- meaning her house has better food but she thinks of it as a hateful place- whereas this place is the opposite.   Poor thing- she sees her reality for what it is.  I still see a little sarcasm in the narrator's language, but even if Adele is every bit as perfect as she seems, and even if her home is every bit as perfect as it seems, and even if her husband is every bit as perfect as he seems, in the most real of ways, that could all be true and it wouldn't matter.  E    Precisely, The Ratignole's life can be every bit as perfect as it appears. and it wouldn't make Edna want it any more.  Edna leaves Adele's happy home, realizing that even if she could have it it's not the life she wants.  She wouldn't want that world even if Leonce loved her.  It's just not for her.  The problem is, that's as far as she's gotten with her problem solving.  All she knows is what she DOESN'T want.  Her new world is a world of negation.  She wants to quit, and so she does.  She absolutely disregards all her duties to the point that it finally angers Leonce enough to confront her.    “It seems to me the utmost folly for a woman at the head of a household, and the mother of children, to spend in an atelier days which would be better employed contriving for the comfort of her family.”    An atelier is an artist studio.  It' seems Edna has left all the responsibilities she had as a housewife as well as a mother.  And let me add, Edna was never dusting, cooking, or bathing her children.  She has several house keepers and nannies.  But now, she's not even overseeing what others are doing.  Instead, she's devoting herself entirely to painting.  And surprisingly, Leonce doesn't even have a problem with that in and of itself.  Edna tells her husband, “I feel like painting.”  To which he responds, “Then in God's name paint!  But don't let the family go to the devil.  There's Madame Ratignolle, because she keeps up her music, she doesn't let everything else go to chaos.   And she's more of a musician than you are a painter.”  Yikes, that may be honest, but it does come across as a little harsh.  I know.  I think it's kind of a funny line.  To which, Edna has an interesting comeback- it's like she knows it's not about the painting. She says, “It isn't on account of the painting that I let things go.”  He asks her then why she's let everything go, but she has no answer.  She says she just doesn't know.  Garry, do you want to take a stab at what's going on with Edna?   Well, I do want to tread carefully.  What is fascinating about this book is not so much that Chopin is arguing for any specific course of action, or warning against any specific set of behaviors.  She doesn't condemn Edna for anything, not even the affair she will have with Arobin.  Instead of judging, Chopin, to me, seems to be raising questions.  And it is the questions that she raises that are so interesting.  Edna is desperately trying to rewrite the narrative of her life.  There is no question about that.  But that is an artistic endeavor, in some ways like painting or singing.   I guess we can say Chopin is blending her metaphors here.  Edna doesn't want to be a parrot and copy, but she's living her life exactly the way she is painting- it's uncontrolled; it's undisciplined; it's impulsive.  I'd also say, it's rather unoriginal.  There is no doubt that the social roles offered to her are restrictive.  There's no doubt her marriage is a problem, but as we get farther into the story, it's hard to believe that even if all of these problems could be rectified that Edna would be able define a life for herself.  We, as humans, are always more than a reaction to the social and cultural forces in our world- I hate to get back to the word we used last week, but I can't get away from it.  Even under strict social norms, which I might add, Edna is NOT under for her time period- she is after all one of the most privileged humans on planet Earth at that particular time in human history, but even if she were under severe restrictions, she, as a human, still has agency- we all do.  Yes- and to use Chopin's words from chapter 6, Mrs Pontellier was beginning to realize her position as an individual as a human being, and to recognize her relations as an individual to the world WITHIN and about her.  I think that Edna is like the rest of us in that it's easier to understand and manage the world about us as opposed to the world within.  At least I can SEE the world about me- how can I see within?  How can I understand myself?  And so Edna goes to the world of Madame Reisz having discarded the world of Adele Ratignolle- the world of art, the world of the artist- which is where Edna goes in chapter 21.  I would argue that she sees it as the polar opposite of Adele's reality.  There is the Adele version of being a woman- a totally objectified, sexualized but mothering type of woman= versus this version of womanhood who is basically asexually.  Perhaps Madame Reisz isn't a woman at all- she's an artist.    Except that world, the world of the artist, comes with its own share of difficulties nevermind that it is simply more uncomfortable.  Reisz' house is described as “dingy”.  There's a good deal of smoke and soot.  It's a small apartment.  There's a magnificent piano, but no elegant food or servants or silver trays for calling cards.  She cooks her meals on a gasoline stove herself.  Let me quote here, “it was there also that she ate, keeping her belongings in a rare old buffet, dingy and battered from a hundred years use.”  True, but there is also  the music and when the music filled the room it floated out upon the night, over the housetops, the crescent of the river, losing itself in the silence of the air and made Edna sob. The art is otherworldly, and there is something to that.  Something attractive maybe even metaphysical.  I want to talk about Kate Chopin's choice of music.  I don't think we noted this in episode one, but Chopin was an accomplished pianist.  She played by ear and read music.  She held parties, almost identical to the ones she described Madame Ratignole throwing in the book with dancing and card playing.  Music was a very big deal to Kate Chopin, so when she includes specific music in her writing, she's not just dropping in commonly used songs, she uses artists she likes for specific reasons, and in this novel, the pianist Frederic Chopin is selected intentionally- and not because he has the same last name, although I did check that out- they are not related.  Garry, as a musician yourself, what can you tell us about Frederic Chopin, the Polish composer and pianist?  Well, let me make this comparison, Frederic Chopin's music in his day was the pelvis gyrating Elvis' Rock in Roll of his day.  It was provocative.  19th century attitudes towards this type of harmony driven romantic music would seem hysterical to us.  They were seen as sensual and a destructive force, especially for women.  This may even be Chopin's sassy narrator playing with us again- Frederic Chopin's music is definitely driving sensuality in Edna. To say Kate Chopin is using it ironically is likely taking it too far, but I don't know, maybe not.  This narrator has been ironic before. The main undeniable connection is that Madame Reisz plays Impromptus.  Impromptus are improvisational music.  Frederic Chopin wrote only four of them in his career.  The one Kate selects here is called Fantasie-Impromptu in C minor- it's the only one in a minor key that he ever wrote.  You can pull it up on Spotify and hear it for yourself.   It is full of rhythmical difficulties.  It's very difficult to play. It's quick and full of emotion.  There is banging on low notes at times, thrills and rolling notes going faster and slower at others points.  Frederic Chopin, by the way, was a very temperamental person and in some ways shares a lot of the personality quirks of Madame Reisz. But he did have an interesting philosophy about music that I really like and does connect to our book.  He is recorded to have said this, “words were born of sounds; sounds existed before words…Sounds are used to make music just as words are used to form language.  Thought is expressed through sounds.  And undefined human utterance is mere sound; the art of manipulating sounds is music.”  Interesting, music is thoughts as sounds.  I like the expression “undefined human utterance” especially in regard to Edna because she absolutely cannot get her thoughts out nor is she willing to share then with anyone.  She expresses more than once that her inner world was hers and hers alone. She can't get her thoughts out when she talks to Adele; she can't get them out when she talks to her husband, and she can't get them out even with Madame Reisz which would have been a very safe space for her to express herself.  At the end of chapter 21, she's sobbing at the music and holding in her hands a letter from Robert LeBrun crumpled and damp with tears.   It would have helped her to have found someone to talk to, maybe the Dr. Mandelet that Leonce goes to in chapter 22 for advice about how to help his wife.    What we find out from Leonce's conversation is that Edna has withdrawn from every single person in her world.  She won't even go to her sister's wedding.  What the doctor sees when he goes to dinner at their house is a very outwardly engaging woman but an inwardly withdrawn one.  The Doctor wonders if she's having an affair, but she isn't.    She is, to use the title of the book, One Solitary Soul.  As a human being, there are only so many types of relationships we find meaning in: we have our parents and birth family, we have our intimate relationship, we have our children (if we have any), we have our professional relationships, and we have our social friends- at least one of these has to be working for us.  Edna finds no satisfaction in any of them.  She doesn't have a trusting relationship anywhere.    Yes, every single relationship in her life is basically a burden.  Edna is trying to relieve herself of every single responsibility in the world hoping that getting out of relationships will help her expand her identity.  The problem is getting RID of responsibilities is not really the answer.  To find meaning in this world you must DO something worth doing.  Something that takes strength and energy.  Something you can be proud of.  Of course as a classroom teacher, that is what we do everyday.  It's not helpful to give students high grades or marks for nothing.  It weakens them.  When you give them a difficult task and then they are able to do that task, they grow, they get strong, they learn they are capable of even great responsibilities.  If you want to get strong, you have to take ON responsibilities- you have to practice strength training, Edna goes the opposite way here.      Edna does look for models, and if she wanted a career path, or a professional life like we think of in  our era, Chopin threw in a character that could have served that function.  It's what I see going on in  the chapters about the races.  Edna is actually really good at horse gambling.  She knows horses.  She knows the horse-racing business and knows it well.  The text actually says that she knows more about horse-racing than anyone in New Orleans.  In fact, it's her knowledge about horses that puts her on the radar of the man she eventually has the sexual relationship with, Alcee Arobin.    Let's read the section where we see this relationship, if we want to call it that, take shape.  Arobin had first seen her perform well at the tracks and to use the narrator's words, he admired Edna extravagantly after meeting her at the races with her father.  Mrs. Highcamp is also a completely different version of a feminine ideal, although neither Edna nor the narrator seem to think enough of to give her a first name.  This confused me some when I read this because in my mind, Mrs. James Highcamp would have been this type of a liberated woman that Chopin might want to have Edna admire.  She's clearly sexualy liberated, but beyond that she's worldly, intelligent, slim, tall.  Her daughter is educated, participates in political societies, book clubs, that sort of thing.  But nothing about Mrs. James Highcamp is alluring to Edna at all.  She suffers Mrs. James Highcamp because of her interest in Arobin.   Let's read about these encounters between Arobin and Edna.   Here's the first one  Page 86     So, Arobin becomes fascinated with Edna, in part because she is so smart and different from other women.  At the end of that evening, they dined with the Highcamps. And afterwards Arobin takes Edna home.  The text says this “She wanted something to happen- something, anything, she did not know what.  She regretted that she had not made Arobin stay a half hour to talk over the horses.  She counted the money she had won.  There was nothing else to do, so she went to bed, and tossed there for hours in a sort of monotonous agitation.  And so the relationship with Arobin is born out of boredom.    Yes, the dominant movement in Edna's life is always drifting towards boredom.  Edna wants to rewrite her social script, but she can't seem to define what she wants.  She has trouble speaking, so she has no words to write her own story.  She doesn't want to be a mother; she doesn't want to work except in sunny weather; she has an opportunity with Mrs. Highcamp to get involved with political or literary women; but that doesn't spark her interest.  She could make a name for herself at the races, but the money doesn't motivate her- she's always had it and in some ways doesn't seem to know a world without money.  So, she's going to default into this relationship with Arobin.  I'm going to suggest that she is again playing the part of the parrot.  Messing around with Arobin is just the kind of thing she sees men doing.  It's what Victor does; it may be what her husband does; it is likely what Robert is doing down in Mexico, so she's going to try to mimic male behavior since she hasn't really found a female model she's interested in emulating, and Arobin is an opportunitiy for this.    And yet, she's self-aware enough to not be seduced by Arobin.  The first time he really tries to make a move on her by kissing her hand, this is what she says which I find insightful,  “When she was alone she looked mechanically at the back of her hand which he had kissed so warmly.  Then she leaned her head down on the mantlepiece.  She felt something like a woman who in a moment of passion is betrayed into an act of infidelity, and realizes the significance of the act without being wholly awakened from its glamour.  The thought was passing vaguely through her mind, “what would he think?”  She did not mean her husband; she was thinking of Robert LeBrun.  Her husband seemed to her now like a person whom she had married without love as an excuse.  She lit a candle and went up to her room.  Alcee Arobin was absolutely nothing to her.  Yet his presence, his manners, the warmth of his glances, and above all the touch of his lips upon her hand had acted like a narcotic upon her.  She slept a languorous sleep, interwoven with vanishing dreams.”  Garry, is there a connection between Edna's boredom with her new life and her desire to pursue this relationship with Arobin.   Well, again, Dr. Kate Chopin is playing the psychologist.  Science has absolutely confirmed there is a relationship with boredom and risk-taking behaviors.  In other words, the more bored you find yourself, the more likely you are to do something risky.  It's one reason teenagers are so prone to dangerous behaviors like drugs.  They don't know yet how to cope with personal down time.  They can't manage their own boredom.  Bored people don't know what they want to do.  They also score low on scares that measure self-awareness.  Bored people can't monitor their own moods or understand what they truly want.  And here's another characteristic that should sound familiar in the life of Mrs. Edna Pontellier, notice that last line “vanishing dreams”, Edna is not dreaming.  She's not working at writing a script for her life..structuring a story for herself.  Her dreams and not building anything, they are vanishing.  That's not good.  And it's not that doesn't have illusions, she does, but a dream is not an illusion.  Dreams are what inspire us to do something different. Both a dream and an illusion are unreal, but an illusion will always be an illusion- it has no chance of becoming real; out of dreams new realities are born.  We are not seeing Edna dream.  Her dreams are vanishing.    Which brings us to the place where I want to end with this episode- chapter 26 and Edna's decision to move out of her husband's house.  I mentioned that this book is constructed with the archetypal 3 in mind at every point.  Edna has been living on Esplanade street- the wealthy gilded cage life, and she doesn't want that.  She has visited Madame Reisz's apartment, but she doesn't seem to want that- it's, and I quote, “cheerless and dingy to Edna”.  So what does she do? She moves two steps away from Esplanade Street, to a house Ellen calls, “the pigeon house.”  Pigeons are the oldest domesticated bird in the world.  They never fly far from home- homing pigeons is actually a term. She's building an illusion. Edna is going out of her husband's house to a place around the corner, but is she really building a new life of any kind?  What is this about?   Edna describes it to Madame Reisz, this way,  “I know I shall like it, like the feeling of freedom and independence.”    But is the feeling of freedom and independence the same as actually having freedom and independence?  Well, obviously not.  They are worlds apart.  But Edna lives in feelings.  She works when she feels like it.  She plays with her children when she feels like it, and now she admits to Madame Reisz that she's in love with Robert LeBrun, who by the way is coming back.  And when she finds that out she feels, and I quote “glad and happy to be alive.”  And what does she do after that, she stops at a candy store, buys a box to send to her children who are with their grandparents in the country and she writes a charming letter to her husband.  Her letter was brilliant and brimming with cheerfulness.  I'm sorry, but Edna frustrates the feminist in me.    Well, Edna is struggling for sure.  She can't connect with people.  She can't identify a dream worth pursuing.  She can't write her own story.  There is no doubt that a lot of this has to so with cultural and social forces at work in her world.   These are powerful forces.  However,  it is not the outside forces of her world that will do her in.  Edna is smart.  She's beautiful.  She's charming.  She actually has a lot going for her, especially for a woman during this time period.  If Chopin had wanted to write a story where a woman breaks free and soars, she has a protagonist who is positioned to do that very thing.    But she's in a mess.  And maybe that's why she's so relatable.  Many of us have made messes of our lives.  We have an incredible ability to screw up, but  humans are also incredibly resilient.  Look at Chopin's own life as an example.  In some ways, she's both Adele Ragntingole and Madame Reiz, at different points in her life she'd been both.  She may even have been Mrs. James Highcamp to a lesser degree. Why is Edna struggling here?  Well, humans are incredibly resilient, but you know what else we are- we are social beings.  Let's revisit that original book title, “One Solitary Soul”- it's my experience that no one gets out alone- not even the rich, the beautiful or the smart.  No one gets out alone.    Ah, Edna is strong enough to confront the forces without, but who will help her confront the forces within?  And so next episode, we will see her confront those internal forces.  There are no more female characters to meet; no more male characters either for that matter.  We will see Edna confront Edna alone, and we will see what happens.  Thank you for listening.  If you enjoy our podcast, please share it with a friend, a relative, your classmates, your students.  We only grow when you share.  Also, come visit with us via our social media how to love lit podcast- on Instagram, facebook and our website.  Feel free to ask questions, give us your thoughts, recommend books.  These are all things we love.  Thanks for being with us today.  Peace out.         

The Two Norries Podcast
#102 CEO of the Irish South and West Fish Producers Organisation Pat Murphy talks to us about fishing in Ireland

The Two Norries Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 57:28


On this episode we're joined by Chief Executive Officer of the Irish South and West Fish Producers Organisation, Pat Murphy, who talks to us all about his life as a fisherman and what it means to be a fisherman in Ireland.Pat goes into the history of fishing in Ireland, the barriers and restrictions that face Irish fishermen and just how unfair the quotas available to the Irish market is.PatreonWhy not become a Patron of the Two Norries to help us help you and others? We're always happy to receive donations which all go towards bills, production costs, maintenance and everything else it takes to keep the podcast alive.Donations can be as little as €1 or as much as you can afford. To sign up simply CLICK HERE, thank you. Two Norries Podcast See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat – Analyzing the NFL's paper party is surprisingly fun!

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 70:58


Once again, sports radio goes nuts for the NFL’s paper work. Sullivan Absher is officially coming to Notre Dame. Brian Kelly made how much here? Also, thanks, Sean.

Coronavirus Daily
Ukraine's military continues to chip away at Russia's positions in the East and South, but still this war has decidedly entered a stalemate

Coronavirus Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 8:23


Ukraine's military says it recently did major damage to Russian units looking to cross a key river in the northeastern part of the country, inflicting what it says were hundreds of casualties among Russian soldiers ... and a significant loss of armor and equipment. And yet the situation on the ground in both Eastern and Southern Ukraine hasn't changed much in recent days. The war has ground into a stalemate that neither side seems totally capable of winning ... and yet neither side is ready to make concessions. Meanwhile there's a possible fly in the ointment in what looked to be a sure-thing expansion of NATO, by welcoming Finland and Sweden into the alliance. Today Turkey's president raised concerns about allowing the two Nordic countries to join NATO under rushed timetables. It could all be a negotiating ploy to make sure Turkey, which maintains one of NATO's most powerful militaries, gets something out of the deal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Queens of the Mines
Bridget “Biddy” Mason The Grandmother of Los Angeles

Queens of the Mines

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 31:06


 Today we are going to talk about Bridget “Biddy” Mason, the grandmother of Los Angeles, one of the most influential Black women in California. She overcame unimaginable prejudice and inequity and was one of the first prominent landowning citizens of Los Angeles. Briget was born into slavery in Georgia on August 15 of 1818. Her parents were of mixed African American and Native American descent. She wasn't given a last name. Because of this common practice with slaves, many African Americans can only go back so far in their ancestry. Stolen. One of her several slaveholders in Georgia and South Carolina started calling her Biddy. Biddy spent much of her childhood enslaved on John Smithson's plantation in South Carolina, performing tasks in the cotton fields, the South's most important crop. Biddy was forbidden to learn to read or write but she learned about herbs and midwifery from the older enslaved women. Smithson gave her, two other female house servants, and a blacksmith as a wedding gift to his cousins, Robert and Rebecca Smith. The Smiths were successful landowners in Logtown, Mississippi. Biddy was 18. Smith was Mormon convert who cultivated cotton and traded slaves. Although, Mormons were better known as opponents of slavery.  For the Smith family, Biddy did domestic work, toiled hard in the cotton fields and performed farm labor. At other times, she worked as a midwife and house nurse — a job she liked. Biddy took care of Rebecca Smith, who was often ill and helped her during the birth of her six children.  During her years in Mississippi, Biddy gave birth to Ellen, Ann and Harriet, aged ten, four, and a newborn. It's likely that Smith himself fathered these children. Like countless other enslaved women, Biddy was almost certainly the victim of sexual violence. In 1848, Smith decided to follow the call of the church with his fellow Mississippi Saints in the great Mormon Exodus to Utah. He moved his family and his 14 slaves west to the Salt Lake Valley where Joseph Smith established a new Mormon community seventeen years prior. The area was still part of Mexico at the time but would soon become Utah.   Smith, his wife and children sat in the wagon on the journey while  Biddy, her daughters and the other slaves walked barefoot behind the 300 wagon caravan. Biddy was in charge of herding the animals for the 1,700 mile trek.   While they walked from Mississippi through Illinois and Colorado towards Salt Lake City, Biddy had a ton of responsibilities, including herding the cattle, preparing and serving the campfire meals and setting up and breaking down camp. All this while acting as the midwife and herbalist for the party, and still tending to her three young daughters. The trail must have been disturbing, frightening and strange. There were moments when surely there was a chance to escape, and for this reason, Biddy's value increased on the trail. With young children, she didn't have the option to leave. They lived in Utah for three years until Governor Brigham Young authorized another Mormon community, this time in San Bernardino. Brigham Young warned Smith that California, had been admitted to the Union as a free, non-slave state the year prior. Smith ignored his warnings and set out with his family and slaves and a 150-wagon caravan in 1851, to establish the Mormon settlement and extend the reach of his Church.  When Smith arrived in San Bernardino, he became one of the counselors to the bishop and owned a very large property. He was among the wealthiest settlers in San Bernardino. Held in bondage in the Mormon colony were dozens of African Americans as well as an untold number of local Native Americans, as well as an untold number of local Native Americans. San Bernardino was built, in part, by enslaved laborers like Biddy. Even though California was technically a free state, it was a land made up of unfree laborers of various kinds. Many indigenous people weer being forced to work in the Los Angeles "slave mart." This "slave mart" was the second most important source of municipal revenue in Los Angeles after the sale of licenses for saloons and gambling venues. On the weekends, local authorities would seek out and arrest intoxicated natives on dubious vagrancy charges. The Native Americans were thrown in a pen, and their labor for the coming week was auctioned off. If they were paid at the end of that week at all, they were usually paid in alcohol so they could get drunk, be arrested and continue the cycle.  In California, Biddy met two sets of couples who were free blacks. Charles and Elizabeth Flake Rowan and Robert and Minnie Owens. They urged her to legally contest her slave status in California. But she did not. Biddy remained enslaved in a “free” state for five more years as Smith maintained his southern way of life in California. He found himself increasingly at odds with fellow colonists and his own church who favorably disposed toward the practice of slavery. In 1855, the leaders of the Mormon colony in San Bernardino thought they were paying top dollar for 80,000 acres of land but had purchased only 35,000 acres. Fine print fuck up. When the colony sued the people who had sold them the land, they lost. The court allowed them to choose up to 35,000 acres anywhere in the larger area. The church chose Smith's ranch. It was turned over to them without any compensation and Smith was pissed. Without his property in California and in fear of losing his slaves, he sold off his cattle and conspired a plan to quietly leave the colony and move to Texas. Biddy and her fellow slaves did not trust Smith and they feared they were going to be sold and separated from their children. Smith lied to Biddy, promising her and her family's freedom in Texas. He needed her cooperation to get there and considered her valuable property. Without his land, he needed a place for them to all stay as he secured provisions for the ride east. He chose a camp of settlers originally from the American South in the Santa Monica Hills. Surely a more hospitable place for a slaveholder than Mormn san Bernardino.  One of Biddy's daughters was romantically involved with the Owens son. In December, Robert Owens and Elizabeth Rowan tipped off the local authorities. There was a group of Black Americans that were being illegally held in Santa Monica Canyon and they were about to be taken across state lines to the slave state of Texas. The sheriffs from San Bernardino and Los Angeles approached Judge Benjamin Hayes. Hayes issued a writ of habeas corpus, widely used against slaveholders in free states. Late on the night of New Year's Eve 1855, as Los Angeles residents celebrated the new year, sheriffs raided Smith's camp in the Santa Monica mountains.  Biddy's children were taken into protective custody at the city jail at the corner of Spring and Franklin Streets in downtown L.A. They let Biddy stay with the Owens family. Judge Hayes ordered Smith to bear all costs associated with the case and caring for those placed in guardianship of the sheriffs as they prepared for trial.  Los Angeles was then still a small town and the three day court hearing, starting on January 19, 1856 was a huge event.   Smith argued that Biddy and the rest of his slaves wished to go to Texas with him. Under state law, Black Americans could not testify against white Americans. Judge Hayes brought Biddy  and her eldest daughters into his chambers along with two trustworthy local gentlemen who acted as observers. Hayes asked Biddy if she was willingly leaving for Texas and Biddy told him, “I always do what I have been told, but I have always been afraid of this trip to Texas.”  Biddy also told the judge about the kind of treatment they had been subjected to over the years. Hannah, who was one of the women enslaved by Smith, gave an unbelievably damaging testimony in the courtroom. She reluctantly said that she wanted to go to Texas. There were long silences. Hannah had given birth to a baby boy only two weeks earlier and was terrified of what Smith would do to her if she refused to go with him to Texas. Hayes sent the San Bernardino sheriff up to talk with her and she said, I promised I would say in court that I wanted to go but I don't want to go. If you bring me back to court, I'll say I want to go but I don't want to go. The sheriff returned with an affidavit saying that, in fact, she did not want to go. Smith's behavior before and during the course of the hearing made it clear she had good reason to be afraid. It was awful. He threatened the Owens family, a neighborhood grocer and a doctor in the courtroom yelling “If this case isn't resolved on Southern principles, all people of color will pay the price.” A gang of Smith's sons and workers went to the jail and tried to intimidate the jailer and lure Biddy's daughters away from the jail with alcohol. Biddy's lawyer abruptly withdrew from the case after being  threatened and offered a bribe of $200.  Judge Hayes was furious with Smith, and clearly rattled by what he had heard. His family was behaving like thugs. Robert Smith was lying about trying to take them out of California and this disturbed Hayes. Smith, who was not being held, was a no-show on the last day of the trial, Monday, January 21. He ran off to Texas. He knew his reputation was ruined and was unwilling to pay court costs. Judge Hayes stated "all the said persons of color are entitled to their freedom and are free and cannot be held in slavery or involuntary servitude, unless for the punishment of crimes, shall ever be tolerated in this State. It is therefore argued that they are entitled to their freedom and are free forever."    Amasa Mason Lyman was the mayor of San Bernardino and a Mormon Apostle. Biddy was a friend of Lyman and was fond of the Lyman family. Biddy took the surname Mason. It was her first last name.  With Smith gone, her daughters were released from protective custody and Mason moved her family into the Owens family home. They were now citizens in rough-and-tumble Los Angeles, where only around 80 of its 4,000 residents were Black. Her oldest daughter, Ellen, married the Owens' son, Charles. Owing to her experience and quality of work, she became one of the most popular midwives of that state, using the skills she learned as a slave.  Judge Hayes had a brother-in-law famous for being one of the first formally trained doctors in Southern California. Dr. John Strother Griffin, the “Father of East Los Angeles”. Griffin was impressed with her nursing skills and hired her as a nurse and midwife. She made $2.50 per day. That would be about $85 dollars in 2022. About 10 bucks a day for an 8 hour day. Griffin's office was on Main Street in the same county building as the jail in which she'd taken refuge with the 13 other enslaved people fighting for freedom. She offered her services to the prisoners free of charge. Biddy delivered hundreds of babies in Los Angeles and braved a smallpox epidemic, risking her life to tend to the sick. In her big black medicine bag, she carried the tools of her trade, and the papers Judge Hays had given her affirming that she was free. Biddy Mason worked as a midwife for ten years, saving her earnings carefully. When she was 48, she purchased her own property on the outskirts of Los Angeles where there were more gardens and vineyards than paved streets. She was the first African American woman to buy property in Los Angeles. It had a water ditch, and a willow fence running around the plot. Two lots for $250. Mason initially used the land for gardening and lived with the Owens. This purchase made her one of the first pioneers of Los Angeles. A remarkable feat for a woman who had spent the first 37 years of her life enslaved.  In her home, she established the city's first child care center for working parents. The First African Methodist Episcopal Church is the oldest African American church in the city. It was established on her Spring Street property. The initial meetings were held in Mason's home in 1872. She paid taxes and all expenses on church property to hold it for her people. The permanent church was eventually erected on land she donated at Eighth and Towne. Mason was quickly beloved and “known by every citizen” as “Aunt Biddy.”   She was also well received in the Los Angeles Spanish-speaking community. She could not read or write, but had become a fluent Spanish-speaker. She befriended Pio Pico, Mexico's last governor in California. Pico, Owens and Griffin were involved in real estate and all encouraged her to invest her money wisely and purchase property. Biddy invested in real estate in what is now the heart of downtown L.A. Finally, in 1884 Mason finally moved to her own land at 311 Spring Street and what is now Broadway. On one of the two lots, she built a two-story brick building which she rented the first floor to commercial interests and lived in an apartment on the second. Los Angeles was booming, and rural Spring Street was becoming crowded with shops and boarding houses. She sold the north lot for $1,500. A gain of nearly $13,000 today. She sold a property she had purchased on Olive Street for $375 in 1868, for $2,800. $82,000 today. Basically, in 1884, Biddy had over a 100,000 year in today's numbers. There were dirt streets and unpaved sidewalks, with curbs and gutters. The drainage system was primitive. Water was still channeled through the city through open ditches and bricklaid channels. Only fifteen streets had sewers running below their surface via riveted iron pipes. Three hundred foot tall poles holding electric lights had recently been erected on the major streets, illuminating with 3,000 candle power. Early that year, storms in February of 1884 caused the Los Angeles River to swell and cut new channels and the city's streets began to flood. The Aliso Street Bridge broke in two, part of the bridge was pushed down the river with half a dozen homes and they all lodged against the First Street Bridge,  creating a dam. The water rose, the river overflowed its banks and flooded the streets. Finally, the pressure from the rising water and the piled up homes and portion of bridge was too much for the First Street Bridge.  The west bank eroded when the First Street Bridge collapsed and thirty-five more houses were carried away. Along the riverbed, people sifted through the debris. Cradles, baby wagons, doors, cupboards, fences, pigs. Looking for something. Someone. Brooms, chickens, orange trees, beds. It was a dreadful sight. People were killed. Obviously, city lighting could not slow fooding, but it would aid in the recovery from the storm that had put a third of the city under water for hours. After the flood, Biddy arranged a deal with a grocer on Fourth and Spring. All of the families who lost their home were able to sign off for all of their groceries. Biddy Mason would pay the tab. Biddy owned land on San Pedro Street in Little Tokyo and was renting to over twenty tenants on three large plots near the now Grand Central Market. For the next three decades, she continued her real estate venture,  participating in the frontier town's transformation into an emerging metropolis. She used her wealth, a fortune of $300,000, the equivalent to $9.5 million in 2022 to feed and shelter the poor. She would visit the jail to leave a token and a prayerful hope with every prisoner. She opened a foster home, an elementary school for black children and a traveler's aid center. She was charming, effective and was deeply appreciated. In so many ways, she became the backbone of society. She helped her family buy properties around the city. She deeded a portion of her remaining Spring Street property to her grandsons “for the sum of love and affection and ten dollars.” She signed the deed with her customary fancy “X.” Still, never learning to read or write. Too busy making that cash.  Her success enabled her to support her extended family for generations.  Los Angeles had become a bustling city with 50,000 residents in the late 1880's. She was so well-known, at dawn each morning, a line would form in front of Mason's gate. Swarming with people in need of assistance. Her neighborhood developed quickly around her homestead and by the early 1890s, the main financial district of Los Angeles was one block from Mason's property. As she grew old and became too ill to see visitors, her grandson Robert was forced to turn people away each morning.  On January 15, 1891 Bridget “Biddy” Mason died at her beloved homestead in Los Angeles. She was 73 years old, one of the wealthiest Black women in the country. When she was buried at the Evergreen Cemetery in Boyle Heights, her grave was left unmarked. The family held onto Mason's cherished “first homestead” until the Depression. Today the Broadway Spring Center Parking garage stands on the site.  Ninety-Seven years after her death, L.A. Mayor Tom Bradley, and members of the church she founded held a ceremony, during which her grave was finally marked with a tombstone. Biddy Mason Memorial Park in downtown Los Angeles was erected one year later in her honor. Behind the Bradbury Building near Third and Spring, a memorial on an 80-foot-long poured concrete wall shows the timeline of Biddy Mason's life. November 16 was declared “Biddy Mason Day” in Los Angeles. Jackie Broxton said this, "She showed people what could happen when they were free and could set their own destiny". Jackie Broxton is the CEO & President of the Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation. The Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation was established in 2013 and began as an outreach ministry of the church Biddy founded. The Foundation caters to current and former foster youth in the local community. It should also be noted that Biddy's success story was the exception and not the rule. I believe that she attained so much, because she gave so much. As she navigated multiple levels of oppression, Biddy advocated for her community. When it comes to movements advancing our communities, culture, and policies in more equitable directions, it seems that women have always been at the forefront. Biddy Mason once said, “If you hold your hand closed, nothing good can come in. The open hand is blessed, for it gives in abundance, even as it receives.” She is an inspiration that when given the support and opportunity, it is possible to overcome even the toughest of circumstances. Her story is one of resilience, compassion, and triumph. The fight continues today against the inherited systemic racism, sexism, and each and every intersection.  Sources: Los Angeles Almanac  Free Forever: The Contentious Hearing That Made Biddy Mason A Legend By  Hadley Meares The Life of Biddy Mason: From Slave to a Master by Fareeha Arshad Biddy Mason Collaborative National Park Service Biddy Mason: One of LA's first black real estate moguls By Hadley Meares Los Angeles Western Corral Honoring the legacy and 200th birthday of slave-turned-entrepreneur Biddy Mason by Michael Livingston Negro Trail-Blazers of California by Delilah Beasley  The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History by Dolores Hayden https://kentakepage.com/bridget-biddy-mason/ Bridget "Biddy" Mason: From Bondage to Wealth - Kentake Page Biddy Mason Charitable Foundation  

Trumpet Hour
#697: Week in Review: Chinese Forces Surround Taiwan, and Much More

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 57:01


Chinese military forces are surrounding Taiwan in a series of drills, what many have said looks like a rehearsal for an invasion of the island nation to bring it under Chinese rule. Finland and Sweden are making a historic push for NATO membership, a sign of their fear of Russia. Britain promised immediate protection by extending its nuclear umbrella over these nations. The leaked draft of a Supreme Court decision that would overturn Roe v. Wade has sparked serious backlash from the radical left, and it is turning violent. We also talk about Palestinians using the death of a journalist to foment violence, an election in Germany that revealed how politically weak Olaf Scholz has become, the Philippines ushering in a new Marcos era, signs of how powerful Iran's supreme leader has grown, and the Biden administration continuing to exacerbate rising gas prices. Links [00:42] China Surrounds Taiwan (6 minutes) “Taiwan Betrayal”Russia and China in Prophecy [06:19] Finland and Sweden and NATO (9 minutes) “Finland and Sweden Want to Join NATO” “Germany Is Transforming Before Your Eyes” [15:47] Violence in Israel (9 minutes) The Eternal Has Chosen Jerusalem [24:00] Radical-Left Violence (8 minutes) “Protests After Roe v. Wade Opinion Leak” “The Kavanaugh Hearings Reveal America's Lawless Spirit” [32:02] Germany's Weak Leadership (5 minutes) “More Troubling Signs for Scholz” “Europe Is About to Be Hijacked” A Strong German Leader Is Imminent [37:47] Philippines Elections (7 minutes) “Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Wins Philippine Election” [44:39] Iran Nuclear Talks (4 minutes) The King of the South [48:59] Biden Hikes Gas Prices (8 minutes) “Weaponizing Environmentalism”

The Jordy Culotta Show
FRIDAY THE 13TH POD!! LSU Football Recruiting! Barstool's Ben Mintz! Foodie Friday!!

The Jordy Culotta Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 133:13


HAPPY FRIDAY THE 13TH! LSU Football has some major targets in the state of Louisiana for the class of 2023 and Brian Kelly has taken a more rational approach to recruiting lately we discuss what type of player the Tigers are looking at in this year's recruiting class for Louisiana. The NFL had its full schedule release for all 32 teams last night and the New Orleans Saints schedule is out, they will face 3 division opponents in the first five weeks of the season. Their over/under projected win total from Vegas is 7.5 wins, we think that number can be slightly low for this new look Saints team. The South's favorite son, Barstool Ben Mintz joins the show to discuss the latest on him as he has been living the dream in South Louisiana! He gives his outlook on the LSU baseball team as his team the Ole Miss Rebels are in town to face LSU in the Box this weekend for an SEC West showdown! FOODIE FRIDAY and MORE!! 

Sis & Tell Podcast
"The Scorpion Attack"

Sis & Tell Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 31:25


The sisters talk about Yiddish gone wrong, road trip trauma and the bat mitzvah of Alison's PBS show. Sis & Tell, an award-winning weekly comedy podcast, is hosted by southern Jewish sisters Alison Goldstein Lebovitz from PBS' The A List and comedian Amanda Goldstein Marks.

Studio Sisters Podcast - Grow Your Etsy Shop, Get Creative Inspiration, and Live Your Dream Life
Why its Never Too Late to Start a Side Hustle + Time Saving Tips with Naa Ardua of Paper Flo Designs

Studio Sisters Podcast - Grow Your Etsy Shop, Get Creative Inspiration, and Live Your Dream Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 26:38


In this episode, we interview Naa Ardua Floic, a American/Ghanaian ex-pat living in the South of France. We dive deep into why it's never, ever too late to start a new business or side hustle, and we also break down the myth of not having enough time. Naa Ardua shares some killer tips for managing your business while also being a full time mom, so heads up to all the moms out there! You'll leave this episode feeling inspired and encouraged to just take the very next step. You can find Naa Ardua here: https://paperflodesigns.com/ And her Etsy shop: https://www.etsy.com/shop/PaperFloDesign And on Instagram: @paperflodesigns - What if you could feel like a thriving artist & make consistent sales in your handmade business every day? ...and you actually made a profit because you know exactly what to charge? ...and you could market your handmade products without feeling guilty, sales-y, or fake when it comes to posting on Instagram? ...and you didn't have to feel overwhelmed or lost when it comes to getting it all done and understanding algorithms! In Dream, Create, Sell, we teach you how to do *exactly* this, step-by-step. Get $100 off the course with the code READY: https://studiosisters.teachable.com/p/dream-create-sell- - Looking for our Show Notes? https://www.shopstudiosisters.com/podcast Get our FREE worksheet on how to learn the basics of Etsy SEO, what a long-tail keyword is, and some basic do's/don'ts of Etsy search tags in just 15 minutes: https://www.shopstudiosisters.com/etsyseoguide Want to learn how to do keyword analytics with Sale Samurai? Use our code SHOPSTUDIOSISTERS for 20% off this *awesome* keyword research tool, Sale Samurai: https://www.shopstudiosisters.com/salesamurai Visit our website, www.shopstudiosisters.com, and sign up for our weekly newsletter for more creative magic & small business strategy.

New Books in American Studies
Glenda E. Gilmore, "Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South" (UNC Press, 2022)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 72:41


In Romare Bearden in the Homeland of His Imagination: An Artist's Reckoning with the South (UNC Press, 2022), Glenda Gilmore meticulously documents and interprets the artistic life of Romare Bearden. Gilmore details four generations of the Bearden family and grounds the reader in places formative to Bearden like North Carolina, New York, and Pennsylvania. By centering Bearden's art, Gilmore mines the historical record and this artist's recollections which were at times conflicting, but nevertheless, shaped his creative imagination. This text weaves archival depth with visual art analysis, illuminating a richer understanding of this important twentieth-century artist and his work. Amanda Joyce Hall is a Ph.D. Candidate in History and African American Studies at Yale University. She tweets from @amandajoycehall. N'Kosi Oates is a Ph.D. Candidate in Africana Studies at Brown University. Find him on Twitter @NKosiOates. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Joy in the Weeds
Miracles in the Midst of Struggle

Joy in the Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 71:02


Angela has a powerful personal story of great struggle all the while experiencing profound joy while experiencing the miracles only God can provide.  This is a podcast you don't want to miss. Follow us on Facebook and Instagram. Subscribe to our YouTube channel.Send us an email: joy@carolinasda.org and visit our website: www.joyintheweeds.org

#AmWriting
When Your Agent Doesn't Like Your Idea as Much as You Do: Episode 315 with Kristen Green

#AmWriting

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Jess here. On this week’s episode, I talk with New York Times bestselling author Kristen Green about her first book, Something Must Be Done About Prince Edward County: A Family, a Virginia Town, a Civil Rights Battle and her new book, The Devil’s Half-Acre: The Untold Story of How One Woman Liberated the South’s Most Notorious Slave Jail. We go into the process of writing a research-intensive historical nonfiction book, particularly when that book requires the author to investigate and implicate her own family in the darker parts of the story. We also discuss the birth of The Devil’s Half Acre, a tale that involves a lot of challenges including parting ways with one agent and finding another.More than anything else, we discuss the need for authors to believe in themselves and their story. COMING JULY 1: It’s the #AmWriting Blueprint for a Book Challenge! 10 episodes, 10 guests, 10 weeks to you being ready to write your best novel, memoir or non-fiction book this fall. There will be homework. There will be deadlines. Complete all 10 weeks, and you could win a critique of that Blueprint from KJ or Jennie Nash—but you’ll already be a winner, because you’ll have a plan that will put you way ahead of the game. Play for free—or reserve an Author Accelerator critique for your finished product to hold your feet to the fire and make sure you do the work and get bonus episodes and write-alongs. Want details? Ready to sign up? CLICK HERE. PS: Along those lines, Author Accelerator has opened registration for the 2022 Manuscript Incubator, an intensive, 7 month coaching opportunity that offers one-one-one support and guidance for novelists and memoirists planning to have a submission-ready project by early 2023—and includes the opportunity to have that project reviewed by a group of agents and editors when it’s ready. For more information, head to authoraccelerator.com/manuscript-incubator. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit amwriting.substack.com/subscribe

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio
Weekday Sportsbeat – More NFL paperwork! WOOOOOOO!!

Weekday Sportsbeat - 96.1 FM WSBT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 67:44


Mike Brey is right about NIL deals: adapt or die. The NFL continues to make the shuffling of paper into appointment television. The Bears schedule leaked. It’s going to be a looooooong year in Chicago. Get these

Florida Sportsman Action Spotter Podcast
Episode 142: How Have New Regulations Affected Our Fishing? | Action Spotter Podcast

Florida Sportsman Action Spotter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 56:52


This week Rick and the guys discuss the great spring fishing we've been experiencing lately and also dig into the topic of recent redfish and cobia regulation changes. What species should be reconsidered next? Tune in this week for the best weekly fishing report and deep dive discussions in this week's episode of the Florida Sportsman Action Spotter Podcast. Do you have a question about fishing in your area? Email rick@floridasportsman.com and we'll answer your questions on the air! Download for the best tips of the trade right in your pocket, any time, anywhere. Subscribe to get notified when a new episode drops each week. Follow us on social media for daily fishing reports, we may even share yours! Outline of this Episode [1:35] Tropics Report [5:30] Northeast Report [12:07] East Central Report [15:00] Southeast Report [18:54] South Report [24:51] 10,000 Islands Report [32:38] Southwest Report [38:23] West Central Report [41:23] Big Bend Report [45:09] Northwest Report [51:08] Panhandle Report [54:38] Florida Fishing Wrap-Up A BIG thanks to each of our sponsors, without whom we would not be able to bring you these reports each week Yamaha Outboards Shimano Fishing D.O.A. Lures Tournament Master Chum Fishing Nosara / Nosara Paradise Rentals Young Boats  Castaway Hat Co. Want your brand to reach thousands of potential customers each week? Contact us via rick@floridasportsman.com to see how you can become a sponsor or advertise on other Florida Sportsman outlets. Connect with Florida Sportsman Facebook Instagram YouTube Website

With All Due Respek
Ke'm Samyul Gone!!!?? Nih what??!

With All Due Respek

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 109:11


New Kendrick!!! Kevin Samuels Young Thug and YSL AFAF with some of the South's Finest!! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/withallduerespek/support

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Lincoln and the Fight for Peace by John Avlon

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:00


The Chris Voss Show Podcast - Lincoln and the Fight for Peace by John Avlon A groundbreaking, revelatory history of Abraham Lincoln's plan to secure a just and lasting peace after the Civil War—a vision that inspired future presidents as well as the world's most famous peacemakers, including Nelson Mandela, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr. It is a story of war and peace, race and reconciliation. As the tide of the Civil War turned in the spring of 1865, Abraham Lincoln took a dangerous two-week trip to visit the troops on the front lines accompanied by his young son, seeing combat up close, meeting liberated slaves in the ruins of Richmond, and comforting wounded Union and Confederate soldiers. The power of Lincoln's personal example in the closing days of the war offers a portrait of a peacemaker. He did not demonize people he disagreed with. He used humor, logic, and scripture to depolarize bitter debates. Balancing moral courage with moderation, Lincoln believed that decency could be the most practical form of politics, but he understood that people were more inclined to listen to reason when greeted from a position of strength. Ulysses S. Grant's famously generous terms of surrender to General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox that April were a direct expression of the president's belief that a soft peace should follow a hard war. While his assassination sent the country careening off course, Lincoln's vision would be vindicated long after his death, inspiring future generations in their own quests to secure a just and lasting peace. As US General Lucius Clay, architect of the post-WWII German occupation, said when asked what guided his decisions: “I tried to think of the kind of occupation the South would have had if Abraham Lincoln had lived.” Lincoln and the Fight for Peace reveals how Lincoln's character informed his commitment to unconditional surrender followed by a magnanimous peace. Even during the Civil War, surrounded by reactionaries and radicals, he refused to back down from his belief that there is more that unites us than divides us. But he also understood that peace needs to be waged with as much intensity as war. Lincoln's plan to win the peace is his unfinished symphony, but in its existing notes, we can find an anthem that can begin to bridge our divisions today.

TODAY
May 12: Breaking overnight – wildfire south of Los Angeles. Passenger lands plane with no flying experience. Baby formula shortage.

TODAY

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 32:57


Breaking overnight – we're live on the scene of that devastating wildfire south of Los Angeles. Plus, new details on how a passenger with no flying experience landed a plane after the pilot fell unconscious. And, expert tips on what you should do to get through the baby formula shortage.

The Apple Seed
S2 E14: Antonio Sacre + Gang Busters OTR + 'Boy Called Bat' book helps a family understand autism

The Apple Seed

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 52:50


Today on the show we've got an hour of stories about anticipation and expectations, and about things not exactly turning out how we expected, for better or for worse. (4:05) Storyteller Antonio Sacre remembers a long road trip where countless billboards for something called "Pedro's South of the Border" built up impossible expectations. The story was recorded live in The Apple Seed Studio. (22:32) Did you ever agree to do a favor for a family member, but then it ends up being different than what you thought you were agreeing to? Host Sam Payne's got a story like that. It's today's entry in the Radio Family Journal. (30:50) True crime stories are all the rage right now, and we go back in time to bring you an OTR (Old-Time Radio) true crime story from the long-running radio show Gang Busters about a bunch of crooks that think they've got the perfect racket stealing from gangsters, but of course the scheme doesn't go as smoothly as they planned. (40:59) The book 'A Boy Called Bat' is a tender story about a boy with autism, and we'll hear from both author Elana K. Arnold and from a family that made a surprising discovery when they read the book together.

Missing Witches
WF Ana Tajder: Mother Wisdom and Mother Wounds

Missing Witches

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 47:09


https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/thank-you-mama/id1502312840 Full Transcript: Risa: [00:00:00] Welcome. Welcome friends. Welcome. Children, mums, parents, magical beings... welcome a wall of fog and returning birds. You'll hear the honk soaring overhead, and the stomps of the three-year old upstairs as we begin to sort of circle in, call in our feelings for a missing Witches first let's talk about mothers. We'll say from the beginning, what a complicated question. And we have the right person to open this up with us. For so many of us, this idea of just purely celebrating mama culture is really hard. There's so much mother trauma in so many of our communities [00:01:00] and so many families where that idea needs to be queered and needs to be multipled. And today I am carrying the heavy weight on my chest of having read the leaked opinion from the United States Supreme court that will force motherhood, forced pregnancy on women's bodies that will remove the protection of Roe vs. Wade. And I'm just really, reeling with the sorrow of what that will mean today. And it all just feels complicated and connected, by the time this episode comes out, we'll know more, but that's where my feeling is. And I have to be honest about it. Thanks for being here, thanks to the coven for being here and for all of you portalling in and out and being in this circle wherever you are in time, by the time the sound hits you. We'll just hold this sorrow together and also this light. [00:02:00] And we'll turn to the complicated question of things we can learn from our mothers, whether they mean to teach it to us or not. You can hear the sweet laugh of Ana she's the award-winning journalist, who is the host of the Thank You Mama podcast. She has interviewed so many people from all over the world about what their mothers taught them. And really you dig into both sides of this question. What did they mean to teach you? What do you wish they could have taught you? What were the tacit lessons? What is this knowledge that's sort of on the edges of all this rationalized knowledge. What are moms passing down hand by hand? You you've gotten so many windows into that. So thank you so much for being here with us today. Ana: Thank you for having me. I'm so excited [00:03:00] to be here with. Today and talk about this and share my learnings and insights and thoughts about this. It's a fascinating topic and I've been dealing with it for two years at this stage, and it's just opening more and more angles. You know, the deeper I go into it, the more dimensions of being open to me and I'm, I feel very blessed that it's a beautiful world to discover and a beautiful topic to be dealing with. Risa: Yeah, it is. Do you wanna tell us how you started and then maybe what are some of the dimensions that are opening now that you're surprised about? Ana: It started very organically. It did not start as a podcast. It started a few weeks after I lost my mom and my mom and I were extremely, extremely close. Her parents had died when she was very young. So she basically lonely had me. She turned me. I mean to her family. And [00:04:00] we had a very beautiful relationship. She was by far not a perfect mother. She was a strange mother, but the one I loved so much. She had two parallel careers. She was an award-winning acclaimed and admire movie actress and parallel to that. She finished the academy of arts and was a visual artist equally, a claimed and awarded. And. What's amazing about my mom being my mom is that she, in a way she's an idol to me, but I meet more and more young women in creation nowadays. So tell me she was there. She is there idle as well. So it's, it's a very. Beautiful situation of having a mom. Who's your idol, both career wise and, you know, towards the outside, towards what she represented in the society, as well [00:05:00] as how she raised me and the relationship she had with me. So when she died of cancer, very surprisingly, oh, it was a big shock for me. And a few weeks afterwards, I had a panic attack. I had this panic fear that I was going to forget everything she told me and that through that I was going to forget everything. She. Who she is that I'm going to lose her if I forget what she told me. So I sat down and started writing down everything I could remember. She told me, and then that turned into everything she taught me and everything she showed me and that turned, started turning into a book about her life, through her lessons. And then the magic started happening in that I was telling my friends what I'm working on. And you could see their reactions, how obvious and deep and important [00:06:00] this topic is to all of us. What have we learned from our mothers, but we never really articulated or put it in a form or give it a deeper thought. And that inspired me to start a podcast. because for me, the important thing was to interview women from all over the world. I really, and this is why a podcast was such a great medium to do this because I can just use Skype and interview women. I had women from 50 different countries. I had women from Nepal and Tanzania and Kenya and Trinidad and Iran, and you know, all over the world. And it was important to me to not only go geographically globally, but also to interview women from very different backgrounds and different religions and different socio economic status and not only successful professionally [00:07:00] successful women, but stay at home moms, women who are farmers to really get a feeling for what is it that our mothers around the world teach us. And then little by little, and this is one of the dimensions that opened up. A question popped up to me. I still quite early on in my interviews was what, what was something important that your mom did not teach you? What, what did you miss in, in what she showed you taught to you? And this turned out to be one of the equally important question as what your mom taught you. But then another dimension that was really important to me because I had such a close relationship to my mom and I grew up in this beautiful mother-daughter bubble. Was that. Not all women have relationships like that. They're mothers. And somehow the universe shoved my head into a [00:08:00] series of interviews just recently with women who had very let's call them complex relationships with their mothers. And I started reading literature on mothers who don't love, or, you know, complicated mother daughter relationships to prepare myself for these interviews because it was a completely foreign world to me. And I've learned that this is just as important as those women who come on my show, who just, you know, bursts with love with their mothers is women who had very tough relationship and still have lessons to share that they learn from, from that, that, that that's beautiful. Risa: It gives me a sense of ease in a way around the subject to know that those stories are included to, you know, those stories are, as you say, they're, they're pushing their way in the universe is pushing their way into you [00:09:00] being. Like, this is complicated shit, you know? Ana: Well, I started reading the books about mother wounds and, you know, the, the inherited trauma and they just opened, it opened again, it opened the whole world to me, a new world that I didn't know, but also it opened my eyes towards some of the trauma that goes around in my family that we never dealt with it actually, or, you know, it gets mentioned, but never really dealt with. Risa: Can you tell us more about this childhood on an island in Croatia, you told me that children told you you were a witch when you were growing up and your mother sounds like she had. A real magic, like a real, she made a magic bubble for you and it wasn't always perfect, but.. Ana: So I, I did not grow up on the island. I grew up basically in [00:10:00] Zagreb in the capital of Croatia, but my mom's family comes from a very tiny island. South of Croatia. It's so tiny there during the winter, there are 120 people living in it. It doesn't have any hotels. It doesn't have any cars. So it's really, when you watch a Disney movie, Luca, I think was the last Disney movie with this beautiful Mediterranean island. That's our island. You know where everybody's family, no cars, no tourists, just this wild. Beautiful. Mediterranean island. And so just as my mother did, I would spend my whole summers there. So come end of school, you know, immediately the next day we went to the, to the island and I would spend two and a half, three months on the island every year. We. All of us in our family feel extremely, extremely, deeply connected to the island. We really feel like it's in our blood, in our veins and the [00:11:00] island. I know I'm boasting and I sound like a person in love, but people who arrive to the island do say that it has very, very deep energies and it's very special. we Have an old house, which my great grandmother bought. And that's another beautiful story about my island. Please tell me to shut up if I'm too long with my story. Oh no, no, no. A theme of our podcast is please expand. So please take us on this journey. So in early. 20th century. So just, I would say just around first world war. The, that was back then, Austro-Hungarian monarchy that the island belong to went through its crisis. As did the whole world. There was no food. There was, there were, there was a depression and the men on the island decided to go and look for [00:12:00] other places to work and go look for money so they can send money back home to the island to support their wives and children. So they left. Once the men left the women decided to dress themselves in black and they took over everything, everything they took over the farming, they went fishing, they raised their children, they took, took over whatever work there was. These women. Dressed in black on this Mediterranean island took over and I have a beautiful postcard, always on my desk of these women. And you can see how burned by the sun and hard work they are. They, they, they look like men actually. This life toughened them up a lot. And it was famous for being this island of these women dressed in black and they would go rowing the boat. They would go fishing. And this picture stays very clearly in my head from hearing about it and seeing [00:13:00] the old photographs of these women in these big black dresses, rowing their boats, you know, and fishing. So it's, it's a very magical, and female, like this place, that's just bursting with this women, females and female energy. Quite recently, I heard stories I read that the inhabitants of the island original inhabitants were considered witches. They were in, I think there were shamans. Uh, they brought the. Whatever religion or shamanism, I think from Bosnia Herzegovina when they came towards the island centuries earlier and they never forgot it. So there are stories of raising dead back to life. Apparently in front of each house door, we have bones of our ancestors buried. I dunno, I haven't yet looked into it. Who is buried and what's buried in front [00:14:00] of our house, but. There are all these stories of this. And there are also stories of people being able to fly on the island. So there is a old fishermen who is now, now, already dead, but he, I think he was also like 1940s, 1950s, where he self taught himself to paint and he started painting all these amazing paintings off the magic on the island. So his paintings are full of this people flying around the island and, doing some strange rituals. And. I didn't know this. When somebody told me once one older gentlemen on the island once looked at me I was saying something and he said, oh, you're a witch just like your great grandmother. And I said, I got a little offended because I thought he meant I was, you know, we in west of this idea [00:15:00] of witches as being old evil women. And I was like, why, why is he telling me that, you know, and only once I heard this background story about what, they meant what he meant you know, I, I realized I received a compliment. Risa: Yes, you did. Ana: So that's the story. That's the story of the island. Risa: That's so powerful. I had to stop to write down. They dressed themselves in black and took over everything. Ana: How amazing is that? So pure and I'm so glad there are photographs of this women, you know, it's not just a legend. It's it's it'sreal. Risa: Yes. And now that you know, it's a compliment, do you feel connected? Do you feel like your, your writing your interviews are sort of drawing, weaving that web of power [00:16:00] between women's knowledge powerful femme knowledge? Ana: I do. And you know, it's interesting that my mom, my mom was a feminist and very outspoken and she was always an activist. She was always fighting for the weaker ones in a society back then in 1970s, way before Hollywood stars, she created a charity organization for hungry children in Africa. And she donated. Well, every award she would win she would donate and collect money and buy food and medication and fly to get over these things to Sudan and to different countries, to make sure that they reach the, the, the ones who need, they reached children and don't end up in the wrong hands. And equally, she was always very loud and raised me to be very aware of this... female energy and how special we are. Dare I say, you know, and how powerful we are. But, [00:17:00] but I'm very embarrassed to say that only through this hundred something interviews I made in last two years, this really entered my body. I don't know how to say it in different way. I really feel with every cell of my body. How. Interconnected we are. And, and what I've learned through these interviews is how there is a common narrative in women's lives, no matter where they are and what, what circumstances they live in and grew up in, you know, a woman who grows up on a farm in Turkey and a woman who grows up in a, Middle-class family in Switzerland there are always these common narratives in women's lives, and that feels extremely connecting. And that made me aware of what a sisterhood we have and how interconnected we are. And it [00:18:00] kind of was beautiful for me to learn through my podcast that I lost my mom, but I gained... billions of mothers around the world. You know, this podcast because it was really such a beautiful gift to me and listening to all this lessons and women's lives and how, how universal the lessons are, what women are teaching their children , really, really, really brought home how, how powerful and how connected we are. And it made me very, very sad that we are not aware of it. You know, even me when my mom who tried to teach me this and show it to me, it took a while for me to learn it. And I wish we, all of us would be more aware of it. Risa: Yeah, it feels pretty intentional sometimes eh? Layers and layers and layers of intention that separated us from each other, separated us from that sense of power. Ana: I just wanted to say that from the sense of power I interviewed a [00:19:00] lady a few weeks ago, who wrote a book called "We are the daughters of the witches you didn't burn" and reading her book was just so eyeopening to me. It really hit me very strongly, how unaware we are, how buried this, this feeling of our power. It was just as you say, systematically, buried through century, not century millennium, you know, and I'm glad that we are slowly waking up to it. It's going to be magical, we'll save the planet. Risa: Oh I love your optimism Ana! I need this today. I mean, I feel that in our work too, and it's so powerful to connect with your web and your circle and the sense of mounting knowledge. Cause I do believe this is how we cast a circle of protection for trans women for non-binary people for gender expansive people that it is in [00:20:00] owning our own power our own divinity, our own, power as women, as something deeply connected to the earth and to the reproductive power in the, Earth, fertility, whatever that fertility is for you. Ana: I just wanted to say this female energy that's nurturing How should I say, it's, it's nurturing and cherishing and taking care of things. We've been too long in this male energy of using rational brains and building things and constructing. My mom was always telling Ana don't construct life. It's a very male thing to do. This conscious constructing. And, I really think. We really need more of this intuition and this nurturing, caring energy, which I want to call female, you know, Risa: can you talk about [00:21:00] when the nurturing breaks down in the interviews that you've had, where for whatever reason, a mother wasn't capable of that? Can you talk about what lessons you've been hearing from that side of the experience? Ana: The most important lesson I heard from all of that is that to two things. One is there is a magical moment that happens. My guests tell me when the Mom admits to her daughter that she made mistakes and that she didn't do certain things right. And when she tells her daughter, but this has to be honest, of course, that, you know, I'm, I'm sorry. I'm sorry if I made mistakes, I'm sorry. I did make mistakes. I'm sorry that sometimes I hurt you. I come from this place. I couldn't do better at the moment. You know, just to knowledge I did my best and I'm sorry [00:22:00] that it wasn't enough or it was wrong. I loved you. And did what I could and I heard in a few interviews, how that creates a very magical moment when a door open. A door to forgiveness opens and new energies released in that relationship. And, and you know, some of my interviews were in tears telling me about this, how, how much that matters. The other thing I learned is that it's connected, you know, it's connected, I've learned that we have to look back and see where the person comes from. You know, what her trauma was or why she wasn't able to give the love that we deserve or the support for it. and this is where forgiveness come comes in again. I learned that growth comes from this [00:23:00] forgiveness, that caring I had, you know, I had a few guests who didn't speak to their mothers for decades. One of my guests told me she hugged for mum for the first time in her life when she was 69, but it's never too late. You know this moment of connecting and forgiving at the end. Right. Open open some beautiful energies, no matter what happened. Risa: Yeah. I mean, I will say, I think if you've been, um, you don't have to forgive everybody. Ana: You don't. No, no, no, no, no, you don't need to forgive, but you have to come where I think you have to see where they come from. Risa: Yeah. That can be a great gift yourself. Ana: Yeah, exactly. Because as one of my guests said, being angry is like drinking, poison and waiting for the other person to die. And then in a way, is that, is it because what we [00:24:00] need to do is learn how to. Release what, whatever the negative thing was from our moms, was it their trauma or the way they treated us as you say, it doesn't have to be forgiving, but it has to be recognizing and maybe through seeing where it comes from, just releasing it, you know, I've, I've, it's funny. I went through this with my dad and partially with my mom, but when my mom passed away, my dad, I don't know what happened to him. He suddenly turned in. It felt like he turned into my enemy. He, he just, instead of being there for me, then I was an only child and don't have any other family. And he was the only person that was out there that still, I feel like he should have been supporting me through this. He suddenly turned into this person like a stranger who was against me. And I didn't speak to him for, I mean, after all the courts and [00:25:00] lawyers and most awful experiences, I didn't speak to him for a year. But then, then I decided for myself that. That's not what I want. You know I know what he did to me. I recognize it. It's there. The pain won't disappear. The, the feeling of betrayal won't disappear, but I do not want to be a person who doesn't speak to her father I want my son to have his grandfather and I've learned for myself and I'm very proud for that to compartmentalize, or what is the word in English, you know, to just put this feeling into its own place and say, this is give it a ribbon and say, this is what it is, but I still want to have a father in my life and a grandfather in my son's life. And, and it was a huge learning experience to create boundaries and self-defense and know how close to let certain people to you, you know, [00:26:00] where to just raise the wall and be like, this is how far you are in my life. You're my dad, but this is how far you can come. Risa: Yes. Raise that wall. And you point to such, a poignant and painful thing. And I'm so sorry that happened to you, that those layers of complex trauma around your mother's death that's fucking sucks. Ana: Oh, man. It really, it was, it was it really sucked that, that part, it was hard enough dealing with losing her and losing her so quickly. But then dealing with that, I felt like I really felt like somebody tore the skin of my body and I was lying wounded without skin on the floor. And he came and started punching me with his feet. This is how I felt like I was really like, you're supposed to give me a hand and protect me and not in this worst month. But anyway, Yeah. Risa: And you point to you, point to something [00:27:00] that I think is so core to this is that the, the mother trauma, is twisted and tied up in the father wound too. Right? It's all this shit that patriarchy did to women it did to men too did it to them, to. It's a violence that it took from them too, that it made them. You know, suffer also and put that suffering on their, on their children. Ana: Yeah, yeah, absolutely. Yeah, Risa: yeah. Yeah. I didn't mean to diminish what you said, because I've had very powerful experiences in the same way of like choosing a forgiveness that was for me and wasn't for that. Exactly. Yeah. Um, but I also, yeah, I wanted to say it out loud because I do know there's people in our coven, people who listen to people in the world, close friends of mine for whom the mother trauma you know, it's at the level of abuse. [00:28:00] It's at the level of such pain that it's like Ana: but I think what I'm trying to say, spit that poison out. You might find that poison in your body, in your being and the pain and spit it out in whatever shape or form you find it useful, like you decide or works for you, but maybe more than forgiveness. It's. Spit it out, throw it like, whoa, get rid of it. Yes. Risa: Yes. And like you said, put that, put that wall that maybe it's a container, you know, for me there was some container magic involved or there was, you know, there was some freezer magic involved. There was some burying of things with seeds that, you know, there was also some like drawing out of like, what do I choose to keep from that experience Ana: Burning for me, burning burning helps a lot. Fire helps a lot for that kind of cleansing. Yes. Risa: Yes you are [00:29:00] a Witch. Ana: Discovering little by little day by day. Risa: Yeah. All of us, all of us are discovering. Can you tell us, take us down like memory lane, maybe, uh, take us on a memory journey of some of the moments in your interviews that were the most profound for you. Ana: Well, I already mentioned that lady who just, she said, I couldn't be in the same root word. My mom, since I was born, you know? Wow. There was some bad energy there. They never, they just never got along. And then she told me how. COVID happen. And her mom was in her eighties and she was 69 and suddenly they were kind of in a similar situation of being the high risk group and very [00:30:00] nervous about, you know, what is going to happen if they're going to die from this. And they started zooming everyday. Just to check on each other and see how the other one is doing. And they shared this fear. And little by little day by day, they started talking more and more and they found a way to each other. It was amazing listening to this story. And then when everything was over and they had a group reunion, this is where that hug happened, where for the first time in their lives, they hugged. And listening to that, I, I cried. I also had, just my last interview is a book author who in her twenties remembered that she was sexually abused by her mother's father and her mother would not have any of it. Instead of supporting her her mother got very angry that, [00:31:00] you know, she's doing this to the family and to her father and... this is one of these interviews where I listened to this, both having my mom as my mom and being a mother, just my, my brain, this information can't land anywhere in my brain that a mother wouldn't support her daughter in that. The good thing is Laura started writing about, she went through therapy and started writing about it and wrote a book about it. And this book reached millions. She sold millions of copies and reached millions and millions of women who were in the similar situation and help them, you know, she started doing workshops and obviously she helped other people with same experiences. But her modern, never, no matter what happened from mother, never accepted that this was the truth. And in spite of that, Laura took care of her when she was old and dying and she was there and [00:32:00] they somehow, they somehow found each other, you know, that was deeply touching. And then on the inspiration, very positive side, I, this might be my favorite interview and I keep talking about it all the time. I interviewed a doctor in molecular biology whose mom grew up in Turkey, on a farm in Turkey. And she as a girl was not allowed to go to school or get any kind of education and so she was completely illiterate and she had three daughters, which in Turkey, on a farm is not considered a big achievement, maybe even a burden. This Mom. Somehow managed to gently and lovingly support these three daughters and gently push them. And this is the beautiful thing. Listening to my guest, explain how gentle, these pushes and supports were from this [00:33:00] mom, to the extent where she would ask neighbors to help the girls with a homework, because she wasn't able to, she was illiterate. Two of the girls now have PhDs. One is a lawyer in the UK. My guest, as I mentioned, has a PhD in molecular biology and that was just an amazing story. That was the, the, the beautiful, positive. This is exactly that nurturing, loving, supporting energy that I think the world's needs right now. Risa: Oh! Yes. What a world changing power. Ana: You know, it was so funny when I was, I have a corporate history. I did an MBA and spend many, many, many, too many years in corporate life. I was an international marketing, . Uh, professional. Strategies for different markets. And [00:34:00] anyway, my company invited two Scandinavian futurists is talking about future of business and management. And it was a very big symposium taking place in a, in a beautiful, Theater here in Vienna and this tool dude's dressed in black and shaved heads with their glasses. And they were telling us about the future of business and you know, this whole blah. And then they throw a question in the audience and they said that they asked us, what do we think the managers of the future would be like? And I got up and said, mothers. And I think that was the moment where it was clear to me by the silence from the audience and the dudes on the stage. It was clear to me that I need to resign. This is not a world for me. You know, bed moment was so clear to me that. This is [00:35:00] completely wrong and it needs to change it just as a, as I said, mothers, you know, it was clear to me that. That's what needs to happen. Risa: Yep. And you're, I mean, I think all the research backs you up, right? I was just reading research about, the most effective new hires in police departments the ones that have the best success rate at solving cases at resolving situations without violence. Uh, building community connections. They are mothers. They are women who are later in their career. They have like raised some kids, and now they're doing this out of a commitment to their community. Policing is pretty fucked as an institution, but when, when people are trying to get it right, they are trying to hire, you know, generally like black women, who've already raised kids. And that's the thing that's making the biggest impact in communities. Is it enough to save the institution of policing? I, you know, I don't [00:36:00] know, but I think you're right that we need. Mother energy and intelligence. Ana: Nurturing and nurturing and connecting. Somebody who unifies and connects. Risa: Yeah. I will, um, open it up. If anybody who is here wants to say hi, ask a question, just share a response. It's so nice to have you here in person. So feel free to just go ahead and unmute. Coven 1: Is it okay if I just sort of respond a little bit? Risa: Of course. Coven 1: I'm Zoe and I am a Witch from Western Australia, currently working on a mine site driving dump trucks. I've had to delve deep into a lot of psychological and spiritual healing that went back many generations on both sides of my family. Like Anna [00:37:00] was saying coming to a place of understanding and forgiveness. Is something that's definitely come in time. Like for me you know, I'm 31 and it's been a journey to get to there. I think as witches, we are self appointed to break, those traumatic cycles we are often the black sheep of the family. It's a solitude, lone Wolf kind of practice. And we do a lot of healing for a lot of other people. And that comes from that divine, feminine energy that we're talking about. And it's yeah, just to do with healing, all of the trauma that has come before. All of the other women and the men. And, I think I'm in a good place with my mum now, but we can't live under the same roof. [00:38:00] Risa: Same.. Coven 1: Thanks for letting me chime in. Risa: that's what's special about, being in the coven and, and for us being able to have you here is there's, it's a prism you know, as you say, this practice or this identity can be so solitary. So. It's a relief to get, to hear each other's voices and hear my own thinking drawn out and reflected. And yeah, it's a, it's a support. So thank you for being here. Coven 1: Thank you so much for having me Risa: CAS. How are you doing with all this? There's a lot. There's a lot of stuff in here, especially as a mom. Coven 2: This was such an emotional topic for me. Been sitting here like. Tears in my eyes because, well, first of all, Ana, thank you so much for this conversation I'm a stay at [00:39:00] home mom and I hold a lot of privilege with that under capitalism. I also questioned my worth. However as I'm sitting here and we're talking about what didn't we learn from our mothers and honoring that generational trauma and with everything that's happened this morning, I'm just holding space for the work that I do. For my family, with my own family, I've ended up becoming my mother's mother and my grandmother's mother. And as my husband is learning how to hold emotions. I'm holding space to mother him and I mother, my children. I feel really powerful in my tears right now. Would it be alright if I speak my [00:40:00] great great-grandmother and my grandmother and their names Risa: right now. Yes. Thank you. Coven 2: Elizabeth. Rose.. Linda Tammy. Cassandra.. Risa: I hope in this litany of names, you also hear reflected listener the names of the women, the DNA lines, the deep timelines that connect us to each other, these complicated, painful memories. Especially on today when we're reminded again, of all the people who don't get to make this choice and all the people who've brought us here and made infinite choices along the way, and all the people hoping desperately to get us safely to tomorrow. Ana: thank you to Zoe and thank you to [00:41:00] Cassandra. I am, I am in tears and I'm very deeply touched because they were so touched with our conversation. Um, I have something I would like to share with Cassandra. It just lights went off in my head when I heard her talk, one of the most important things I've learned from this hundred something interviews again from mothers everywhere and every shape and form and every situation and every circumstance. When I ask women, what do you wish your mom had taught you? One of the three things that always comes up is self care. And I know it became more of a very cliche word, but hearing Cassandra mothering, her children and her husband and herself, I just want to throw it out there. Cassandra, please mother yourself as well, [00:42:00] because you, you, you have to, you have to mother yourself so that you can mother all of these other people around you. And I know where you come from. I feel like I have two children, although officially I have only one I'm I'm mothering them both and, and it's beautiful. and awarding, but it can be depleting as well. And yes, healthy boundaries as well. Just be there for yourself as well. Not only for everybody else. Risa: So in that spirit, can I ask you Ana. Would you draw on all of these voices that you've heard and maybe as a, as a closing moment for us here today. Can you speak in a collective mother voice, or maybe it's your own mother voice and offer us listeners a little piece of [00:43:00] motherly wisdom, a little piece of that nurturing that we can carry with us in our hearts this week and this year, and going forward, that's a big question, but I feel like you can do it. you're a witch from an island of women who dressed in black and took care of things, Ana: I can definitely, I can improvise and I want to connect to what I just said to Cassandra, which is. Just love yourself, you know, love yourself and love this life. It's one life that we have and it's short and it's beautiful. And it's so magical. The fact that we. Can be here on this planet and look at this beautiful full blue sky or your beautiful foggy forests and put our feet in the grass and feel the ground and breathing and hear the birds, twitter in our ears. It's magical. And we should just appreciate it. And. Feel how amazing we are. This is, this is I think the most important thing I've learned from the mothers around the world is [00:44:00] how powerful, how unique, how amazing in our uniqueness, how strong we are and how connected we are. And. We should just celebrate it. We should share this love and kindness with everybody around us and stay strong because tough times come and challenges come, but we can do that. We're strong enough and just pass on all this joy and love. And I think that's, that's what I feel I want to share. Risa: Thank you for that. I will replay that when I need to hear it. And thank you for being here. Ana, it's so nice to get, to spend time with you. I love the way you think it was such a pleasure to get to talk to you on your podcasts about Amy's and my moms. And so nice to get a little glimpse of your [00:45:00] magical mom. I feel really lucky to have this conversation with you. So thank you. Ana: Thank you so much for having me and thank you to Zoe and Cassandra for joining us. Risa: Thank you to the coven who's here and the coven we make in the dark between our ears. We love you so much. You know, you have Canadian aunties up here whenever you need us. And I think a Croatian aunty, I'm going to include Ana in this great circle of protection we make for you. If you need to get the fuck out of America or whatever, we love you guys blessed fucking be.

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#1,114 - Court rules San Francisco can't ban drug dealers from Tenderloin District

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 16:20


A California appeals court ruled against an effort by San Francisco to ban four suspected drug dealers from a 50-square-block area in a city neighborhood rife with drug dealing and drug use.The ruling issued Friday is part of a case that started in 2020 when San Francisco sued 28 alleged drug dealers who frequent the Tenderloin and South of Market neighborhoods to try and clean up the area that has seen the city's largest number of overdose deaths. Then San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera said the lawsuits, if approved in California Superior Court, would prevent the alleged dealers from entering that area of downtown.LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos everyday. https://bit.ly/3KBUDSK

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
Col. Darrell Whitcomb: The Raven Pilots in Laos Part I

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 42:34


Col. Darrell Whitcomb served in the United States Air Force as an OV-10 Forward Air Controller. He joined the classified Steve Canyon Program (Project 404), also known as The Ravens, which operated in secret in Laos. He flew missions over South and North Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia. As a Forward Air Controller, it was his job to coordinate airstrikes, and ensure that no friendly troops were hit.  In the first part of his interview, Whitcomb discusses aircrafts, airstrikes, and joining The Raven program.  Whitcomb is also the author of The Rescue of Bat 21.