Podcasts about harvard

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Private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

  • 11,987PODCASTS
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  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about harvard

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Latest podcast episodes about harvard

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes
The Science of Building Confidence & Self Esteem w/Harvard Psychologist Amy Cuddy EP 1198

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 108:56


Today's guest is Amy Cuddy. She's a social psychologist, award-winning Harvard lecturer, expert on the behavioral science of power, presence, and prejudice and best-selling author of the book Presence: Bringing Your Boldest Self to Your Biggest Challenges.In this episode we discuss what it means to have personal power and how to develop it, why it's important to overcome trauma from the past, how to stop being afraid of going after your dreams, the science behind body posture and power posing and how it can affect your confidence, and so much more!For more go to - www.lewishowes.com/1198Read her book - https://www.amazon.com/Presence-Bringing-Boldest-Biggest-Challenges/dp/0316256587Check out her website - www.amycuddy.comMel Robbins: The “Secret” Mindset Habit to Building Confidence and Overcoming Scarcity: https://link.chtbl.com/970-podDr. Joe Dispenza on Healing the Body and Transforming the Mind: https://link.chtbl.com/826-podMaster Your Mind and Defy the Odds with David Goggins: https://link.chtbl.com/715-podSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The John Batchelor Show
Marilyn Brookwood. #UNBOUND: Eugenics and orphans. The complete, forty-minute interview. October 13, 2021. @MarilynBrookwo1 @wwnorton

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 39:30


Photo:  Eugenics supporters hold signs criticizing various "genetically inferior" groups. Wall Street, New York, c. 1915. @Batchelorshow The Orphans of Davenport: Eugenics, the Great Depression, and the War over Children's Intelligence, by Marilyn Brookwood.   https://www.amazon.com/Orphans-Davenport-Depression-Childrens-Intelligence/dp/1631494686 The fascinating―and eerily timely―tale of the forgotten, Depression-era psychologists who launched the modern science of childhood development. “Doomed from birth” was how the psychologist Harold Skeels described two toddler girls at the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home in Davenport, Iowa, in 1934. Their IQ scores, added together, totaled just 81. Following prevailing eugenic beliefs of the times, Skeels and his colleague Marie Skodak assumed that the girls had inherited their parents' low intelligence and were therefore unfit for adoption. The girls were sent to an institution for the “feebleminded” to be cared for by “moron” women. To Skeels and Skodak's astonishment, under the women's care, the children's IQ scores became normal.  Now considered one of the most important scientific findings of the twentieth century, the discovery that environment shapes children's intelligence was also one of the most fiercely contested―and its origin story has never been told. In The Orphans of Davenport, the psychologist and esteemed historian Marilyn Brookwood chronicles how a band of young psychologists in 1930s Iowa shattered the nature-versus-nurture debate and overthrew long-accepted racist and classist views of childhood development. Transporting readers to a rural Iowa devastated by dust storms and economic collapse, Brookwood reveals just how profoundly unlikely it was for this breakthrough to come from the Iowa Child Welfare Research Station. Funded by the University of Iowa and the Rockefeller Foundation, and modeled on America's experimental agricultural stations, the Iowa Station was virtually unknown, a backwater compared to the renowned psychology faculties of Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. Despite the challenges they faced, the Iowa psychologists replicated increased intelligence in thirteen more “retarded” children. When Skeels published their incredible work, America's leading psychologists―eugenicists all―attacked and condemned his conclusions. The loudest critic was Lewis M. Terman, who advocated for forced sterilization of low-intelligence women and whose own widely accepted IQ test was threatened by the Iowa research. Terman and his opponents insisted that intelligence was hereditary, and their prestige ensured that the research would be ignored for decades. Remarkably, it was not until the 1960s that a new generation of psychologists accepted environment's role in intelligence and helped launch the modern field of developmental neuroscience. Drawing on prodigious archival research, Brookwood reclaims the Iowa researchers as intrepid heroes, and movingly recounts the stories of the orphans themselves, many of whom later credited the psychologists with giving them the opportunity to forge successful lives. A radiant story of the power and promise of science to better the lives of us all, The Orphans of Davenport unearths an essential history at a moment when race science is dangerously resurgent. 16-page black-and-white insert

Post Corona
The American College Crack-Up - with Niall Ferguson

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 29:22


In this decade we may finally experience a true crack-up in higher education. There have been comparable periods on American college campuses in the past (in the 1960s and 1980s, for example). But our guest today, historian Niall Ferguson, believes what's happening now is on a whole other level. Niall is doing something about it -- he's starting a new university. Niall argues that parents -- who had enriching and intellectually diverse experiences when they went to college -- don't fully appreciate that their own children will experience something completely different when they go off to university. Niall Ferguson has taught at Harvard, Cambridge, Oxford and New York University. He's authored 17 books. He's currently at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University where he is the MIllbank Family Senior Fellow, and Managing Director of Greenmantle, a macroeconomic and geopolitical advisory firm. Order Niall's most recent book, “Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe” here: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/doom-niall-ferguson/1137713414 Learn more about the University of Austin here: https://www.uaustin.org/ Learn more about Greenmantle here: https://www.gmantle.com/ Email me with questions, comments and ideas at Dan@unlocked.fm.

Lovett or Leave It
And YOU get an Oz!

Lovett or Leave It

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 65:00


Comedian Kiran Deol forgives us for making her talk about the state of modern apologies, J. Jonah Jameson (Paul F. Tompkins) stops by to explain how photos of Spider-Man are just barely keeping the newspaper industry alive, and Hot Takes has us defending Harvard grads, the Citizen app, and, worst of all, abstaining from video games. For a closed-captioned version of this episode, please visit crooked.com/lovettorleaveit.  For a transcript of this episode, please email transcripts@crooked.com and include the name of the podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Awakin Call
James Gordon -- Finding Treasure in the Ruins of Trauma

Awakin Call

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021


Trauma comes to all of us, and its consequences can be terrible. That’s the truth and the bad news. The good news is that all of us can use tools of self-awareness and self-care to heal our trauma and, indeed, to become healthier and more whole than we’ve ever been. If we accept the pain that trauma inflicts, it can open our minds and bodies to healing change. -- Dr. James Gordon As a second-year psychiatric medical student at Harvard University, Dr. James Gordon hit a wall. Although both his father and grandfather had been physicians before him, he was no longer sure why he was there. He was troubled by the way he saw patients being treated, feeling the focus too cut and dried, and missing the loving approach that he had envisioned and hoped for in medicine. But he was graced at this time to meet a kind and compassionate professor and psychotherapist in Robert Coles, who offered Gordon the opportunity to discover and embrace parts of himself that he had forgotten or not even known. Further, Coles shared his work with kids stricken by poverty and racism in New Orleans, kindling the flame of Gordon’s own life-long passion for taking trauma healing to all walks of life – especially the world’s most troubled areas. “Suffering is the soil in which wisdom and compassion grow; it is the school from which we graduate, committed to healing others’ hurt.” This pivotal time in Dr. Gordon’s life, and the healing journey that called him to serve others, set him on the road to becoming a world-renowned expert on healing population-wide psychological trauma, anxiety, and depression. His approach marries Western medical knowledge with alternative medicine methods and those of the world’s indigenous and spiritual traditions. A proponent of “self-care as the true primary-care,” Dr. Gordon founded the nonprofit Center for Mind-Body Medicine (CMBM) in 1991, in Washington, D.C., with an initial mission “to make self-awareness, self-care, and group support central to all healthcare” by training health care professionals with the tools of stress- and trauma-relief. But similar to his experience hitting a wall in medical school, he soon recognized the limits of the medical establishment in embracing holistic modalities – and so he extended his work and offerings beyond the walls of traditional health care practice, going directly out to communities and creating a version of medicine for the people, by the people. Through the CMBM, Dr. Gordon has created training programs of mind-body healing that extend far and wide – not just for health professionals, but for traumatized populations in the world’s hot spots such as the Balkans, the Middle East, Haiti, and Africa; for teachers and families in Broward County, FL after the Parkland school shootings; for victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey; for U.S. vets returning from Iraq and Afghanistan; and even for the U.S. Capitol police. He and the CMBM faculty have traveled worldwide, embracing a model of creating healing communities by training the trainers, or “Teaching Thousands to Heal Millions.” Dr. Gordon leads an international faculty of 130 who have trained more than 6,000 clinicians, educators, and community leaders. In turn, these trainers have brought CMBM’s therapeutic and educational program to many hundreds of thousands of traumatized and stressed adults and children, as well as people confronting the challenges of anxiety, depression, and chronic and life-threatening illnesses. An early pioneer in using mind-body medicine to heal, Dr. Gordon contends that we are all, in the end, affected by trauma. (Never more true than today, he adds.)  But he also believes that “all of us, regardless of age or educational level, have a great and largely untapped capacity to help and heal ourselves and one another…We may think we don’t have the answers, but each of us has a part inside us that knows.” His experience serving the world’s many traumatized populations has reinforced his commitment to supporting individuals’ own inherent capacities for self-healing. “Going through difficult situations myself, and coming out the other side has taught me that I could be a midwife to this process [in others]; I’m not there to fix people.” Regular meditation on the breath, as an antidote to “flight or fight” mode, is a critical component of Gordon’s three-fold approach to trauma self-healing work – all sessions, groups, and meetings begin and end with this important component. Another key component, sourced from indigenous forms of healing, is sharing in community. “As we bring parts of ourselves online that have been suppressed or ignored, we become more complete and whole human beings – part of that is wanting to share ourselves with others. It’s built into our DNA.” Characterizing himself as “a free spirit and a bit of a troublemaker,” Dr. Gordon volunteered, after his Harvard training, at the Haight-Ashbury Free Medical Clinic in the 60s, attended Woodstock as a volunteer physician, and then spent 10 years as a National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) researcher, where he developed the first national program for runaway and homeless kids.   In 1973 he had a powerful encounter with a London-based osteopath, acupuncturist, naturopath, and meditation master of East Indian background who “opened universes” to him, most importantly the value of “expressive meditations” that Dr. Gordon incorporates as high energy “Shaking & Dancing” to fast, rhythmic music in his Mind-Body Skills trainings. “These were the tools of the shamans of Siberia and of ancient healers and traditions around the world -- archaic techniques of ecstasy.” They also have proven value for reestablishing equilibrium for stressed and trauma-frozen bodies. Bringing his healing work to populations from the Eastern and indigenous traditions that seeded many of his initial explorations, Gordon has shared Shaking and Dancing with a group of recent Tibetan refugees in Dharamsala, India, the home of the Dalai Lama. He also has worked closely with tribal elders, teachers, and clinicians on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservations in South Dakota to create a program that has joined Mind-Body Medicine with traditional Lakota healing, effectively addressing youth suicide. In addition to his work with the CMBM program, Dr. Gordon has been Director of Mind-Body Studies and clinical professor in the departments of psychiatry and family medicine at Georgetown Medical School and Georgetown University since 1980. He chaired the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Policy under Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush. He publishes widely, having authored several books including his latest, The Transformation: Discovering Wholeness and Healing After Trauma, as well as many articles. He has recently conducted a series of interviews with a broad spectrum of individuals who are benefiting from his trauma healing work, ranging from a Black human rights lawyer and activist campaigning for reparations, to an Islamic jihadist who was jailed for his role in terrorist plots, to Buddhist meditation teacher Tara Brach, to a Michigan Democrat facing “Congressional trauma.” Join us in conversation with this devoted practitioner of a medicine truly based on compassion for self and all beings.

Deep State Radio
A DSR Debate: Who Will Win the Power Struggle Between Big Tech and Nation States?

Deep State Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 35:55


Big tech today rivals in influence many nation states. Even the largest and most powerful countries are debating how to contain and control tech giants who have the ability to influence their politics, their economies and their standing in the world. To explore how the coming power struggle between big technology firms and nation states will play out, we present a debate between the Eurasia Group's Ian Bremer and Stephen Walt of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government. It's a thought provoking and enlightening discussion. Don't miss this special edition of Deep State Radio.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/deepstateradio. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

That's So F****d Up
Episode 75- American Terrorist: Ted Kaczynski, The UNAbomber

That's So F****d Up

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 65:55


This week the gals wrap up their two parter on MKUltra and Ted Kaczynski aka The UNAbomber! Jeepers Creepers!Last week Ash regaled you with stories of the CIA's secret torture and brainwashing program, MKUltra, and we're going to continue that trend today! Cam is talking about Ted Kaczynski and the MKUltra experiments that were done to him at Harvard, his decades long maiming and killing spree, and how he became the infamous American domestic terrorist known as The UNAbomber.Hexaquest Kickstarter link: kickstarter.com/projects/tumbling-heads/hexaquest?ref=agmuv7If you'd like to support your gals and the show, you can head over to patreon.com/TSFU and join for as little as $5 a month! That's less than a latte! You can find links to all of our sources, our Discord, our super sweet merch store, and more at tsfuthepodcast.com!Follow us @tsfuthepodcast on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook!Audio engineering by Evette Darensbourg and Lexi Jackson.

The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics
181. The Power of Metaphors for Brands with Olson Zaltman's Malcolm and Hannibal Brooks

The Brainy Business | Understanding the Psychology of Why People Buy | Behavioral Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 47:21


You are familiar with metaphors...you likely learned about them in elementary school. But do you know how important they are in your business?  Well, it turns out that metaphors are way more important in understanding the mind of your consumer than you could have possibly imagined. There are two associates from the firm Olson Zaltman here today to share the power of metaphors and how they use them in their Zaltman Metaphor Elicitation Technique (ZMET) process. The ZMET was created by Dr. Gerald Zaltman at the Harvard Business School in the 1990s and is still incredibly relevant for brands today.  During the conversation, Malcolm and Hannibal Brooks will share how they have used the ZMET for brands like Harvard, Tropicana, a funeral company, and more. Plus, insights into the 16 deep metaphors they work with at Olson Zaltman and why they matter for all companies who want to appeal to their customers (i.e. everyone!).  Show Notes: [00:06] In today's episode we are digging deep into the power of metaphors with two associates of Olson Zaltman. [02:53] Malcolm and Hannibal share about themselves, their background, and how as twins they ended up in the same field and working together.  [03:44] They both graduated with degrees in food science and went to a master's program focused on marketing, management, and consumer psychology.  [05:57] At Olson Zaltman, they do research that is focused on understanding the unconscious through metaphor. Their process is focused on using imagery and verbal metaphors to understand emotions.  [06:40] We think in images, not in words; metaphors are our way of describing the world.  [09:28] Metaphors really affect the way we perceive the world around us.  [11:04] Part of what makes these metaphors universal is that a lot of them originate in the experiences we have in life that exist before we can even verbalize.  [12:25] There are 16 deep metaphors that define our experience.  [14:48] Different groups of consumers might have different metaphors or understandings of a product or service.  [15:24] For women, clothing is a form of self-expression and freedom.  For men, clothing is often about a form of control.  [18:12] They share examples of the types of business problems they are solving. [19:42] With ZMET they want to understand with your particular consumers, are they getting something out of your product and your brand? [22:44] Prior to the ZMET process the business only needs to know the problem that they are having.  [25:08] The ZMET process can help answer a lot of questions for businesses.  [25:57] They share their findings from a case study with Harvard. [28:17] Helping to trigger the unity piece can be very valuable (as was the case for Harvard). They have found that there are core principles that they stumble upon time and time again.  [31:12] Deep 1-on-1 guided conversations help them unpack what is the best way for the business to move forward.  [33:20] You want to understand your brand's core assets and what fits with the mindset people have around it.  [36:19] One of their most fun cases to talk about is the research they did for the Funeral Service Foundation. They found that people would look at their funeral almost as a performance. People don't want to be remembered in a way that is sad. They want to be remembered for who they were, with a celebration.  [38:57] Their recommendations included creating this online experience that is more fun, including the most fun things about the person and how they want to be remembered. It gets people thinking and talking about their death while they are still alive by making it less scary.  [41:33] Their real work is understanding stories and connecting with people.   [42:23] Melina shares her closing thoughts.  [44:28] Shop at The Brainy Business shop for that perfect brainy gift. Thanks for listening. Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Android. If you like what you heard, please leave a review on iTunes and share what you liked about the show.  I hope you love everything recommended via The Brainy Business! Everything was independently reviewed and selected by me, Melina Palmer. So you know, as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. That means if you decide to shop from the links on this page (via Amazon or others), The Brainy Business may collect a share of sales or other compensation. Let's connect: Melina@TheBrainyBusiness.com The Brainy Business® on Facebook The Brainy Business on Twitter The Brainy Business on Instagram The Brainy Business on LinkedIn Melina on LinkedIn The Brainy Business on Youtube Join the BE Thoughtful Revolution – our free behavioral economics community, and keep the conversation going! More from The Brainy Business:

The Money Movement
Ep 41 | Building An Open Source Music Community with Roneil Rumburg of Audius

The Money Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 44:47


Richard Stallman, a Harvard educated software engineer, joined the MIT AI Lab in 1971 to help develop computing platforms… however the AI Lab shut down later in the 80's as their talent was lost to the private sector. Seeing how closed, proprietary software was on the rise, Richard used the knowledge he had accumulated over the years to create public, open source software… Software that users could operate, debug, modify or tweak without altering the initial distribution terms. This movement: open source code… is now colliding with the world of digital commerce. Audius, a new, open source music streaming platform gives musicians the same rights to their distribution… And users can leverage programmable money like USDC to exchange value and services on the platform. In this episode of The Money Movement, Jeremy is joined by Roneil Rumburg, Co-Founder, and CEO of Audius.   They discuss:  

Brooklyn
Plot Smokers Dissect the Film "Soul Man" with C. Thomas Howell

Brooklyn

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 54:10


This episode on "Plot Smokers" Tom and Kjell Bjorgen dissect the notorious 1986 blackface comedy debacle "Soul Man". A film which taught us a lot about racism.  Sooooo 80's.

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk #417 - 12.01.2021  OMNI CONNED: Metaverse Gateway, Cuomo Collapse, Xenobots and Nephilim - CCNT 417 WEBSITE/SHOW NOTES: CanaryCryNewsTalk.com LINKTREE: CanaryCry.Party SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com ravel Podcast (Basil's other podcast) Facelikethesun Resurrection (Gonz' new YouTube channel) Truther Dating experiment   INTRO YouTube appeal rejected (do Rumble) Gonz goes to Twitter jail  Agrawal, Twitter bans “media of private individuals” corporations exempt (Sociable) MetaVerse gateway, MetaHero (Metahero.io)   FLIPPY AI Xenobots that can reproduce (Harvard Edu) already covered    PSYOP 3 killed, 8 hurt, Michigan HS shooting (ABC) →Mystery around young suspect in Michigan shooting (Reuters/Yahoo)   COVID19/I AM WACCINE Omicron starting to spread (Economist) Omicron linked to inequality, experts say (NBC News) Do we need a new shot for Omicron? (NBC) Courts block 2 Biden mandates (Reuters)   Party Pitch BREAK 1: Executive Producers, Paypal, Patrons   GREAT RESET SF is boarded up, out of control (SF Chronicle) Microsoft shareholders vote to publish sexual harassment reports (CNBC)   POLYTICKS Chris Cuomo suspended by CNN (Variety)   VR FDA clears VR surgical planning tool from PrecisionOS (Mass Device)   BREAK 2: Art, Reviews, Jingles, Meet Ups   ALIENS/BEAST SYSTEM Aliens can visit us on our OWN spacecrafts! (Yahoo/Independent UK)   NEPHILIM UPDATE Nephilim Game Studio's

Death Panel
One Million w/ Justin Feldman (12/02/21)

Death Panel

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 76:50


Justin Feldman joins us to discuss how the narrative on covid has largely dropped enduring racial and economic disparities in deaths, and a certain milestone we've probably crossed due to underreporting. We also discuss his recent study in JAMA showing that if everyone had died at the same rate as college-educated white people in the first year of the pandemic 71% fewer people of color would have died. Justin Feldman is an epidemiologist of social inequality and state violence and a Health & Human Rights Fellow at the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard. You can follow him on Twitter @jfeldman_epi As always, support Death Panel at www.patreon.com/deathpanelpod new Death Panel merch here (patrons get a discount code): www.deathpanel.net/merch join our Discord here: discord.com/invite/3KjKbB2 Referenced in this episode: Justin's study, "Variation in COVID-19 Mortality in the US by Race and Ethnicity and Educational Attainment" in JAMA: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2786466 Justin's piece for Slate, "All the Ways That “1 in 5,000 per Day” Breakthrough Infection Stat Is Nonsense": https://slate.com/technology/2021/09/breakthrough-infections-one-in-five-thousand-nonsense.html

Temprano en la Tarde... EL PODCAST
¿Busca el Americano sustituir la clase política del País? Wilda Rodríguez en la casa

Temprano en la Tarde... EL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 58:25


Pésame a Diógenes Ballester por la partida a la tierra de las ancestras de su compañera Obituario de Mary Katherine Boncher (Slye) Mary Katherine Boncher nació en Green Bay, Wisconsin, el 24 de agosto de 1948, y murió en paz en su casa de Nueva York el 30 de noviembre de 2021. Mary, fue poeta, erudita, terapeuta, amante, esposa, amiga y mentora. Era conocida por su sincera lealtad, su férrea determinación, su profunda sabiduría, su hermosa voz y su amable y cariñosa sonrisa. Como poeta, Mary integró las artes en todos los aspectos del quehacer humano. Se reflejó en su trabajo profesional, en su activismo y en su tiempo libre. Llamaba a su poesía "realismo social con corazón". Mary conoció al amor de su vida, el artista puertorriqueño Diógenes Ballester, en la Universidad de Wisconsin-Madison, donde él cursaba su maestría en Bellas Artes. La pareja se casó en 1983 y se trasladó a Nueva York en 1987. Mary y Diógenes fundaron la CASA DE ARTE Y CULTURA DE LA PLAYA DE PONCE INC. el 14 de junio de 2016, que ofrece talleres, conferencias y eventos educativos y de sanación artística para empoderar a las comunidades de La Playa de Ponce, en Ponce y el sur de Puerto Rico. A Mary le sobreviven su esposo Diógenes Ballester, su hijastra Yajaira Ballester Ortiz, sus nietos Yarisel Rodríguez Ballester, Alenaira Ballester Rodríguez, Rachelle Rodríguez Ballester, Elvin Rodríguez Ballester y su bisnieta Arianis Rodríguez, así como su hermana Diana (nee Boncher) Ingram, (la hermana Bonnie LeTourneau la precedió en 2004), las sobrinas Brenda (de soltera LeTourneau) Eggebrecht, Kelly (de soltera LeTourneau) Poquette, Jodie (de soltera LeTourneau) Beachler, Yvonne (de soltera Ingram) Fouts, Nancy (de soltera Ingram) Samberg y Beth (de soltera Ingram) Sasser, así como los hijos e hijas de sus sobrinas, Jade y Jordan Eggebrecht; Natasha y Marki Poquette, y Brennen y Hunter Beachler. También le sobreviven su suegra Carmen María Rodríguez Wiscoviche, su cuñado Nelson Ballester, su cuñada Migdalia Valentín, su cuñado Roberto Ballester, su cuñada Carmen Murphy, y sus ahijadas Lola Velazquez-Aguilu y Kelly LeTourneau. Mary dejó el mundo como un lugar mejor. La echaremos mucho de menos. Comentario de Wilda Rodríguez sobre la reacción del país a los posibles arrestos de funcionarios electos Sobre la cultura de tumbe y la corrupción Intención de los Federales Diferentes a la antigua clase administradora de los tiempos de Muñoz, la clase intermediaria de ahora se siente con el derecho a “la comisionsita” Los federales y el rol de la clase administradora colonial Los federales están provocando un cambio electoral El proceso de Puerto Rico en medio de la polarización y decadencia que ocurre en EEUU. ¿En Puerto Rico entendemos estos? ¿Los Intelectuales? ¿EEUU busca crear una clase política y una intelectual? ¿Estamos listos para discutir este asunto? “La colonia permanente surge en Harvard” ¿Puerto Rico es del interés de los poderes en EEUU? “Bola de Pega’o” para Pierluisis “Moon Over Parador” https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0095654/

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews
Khaled Kteily on Improving Male Fertility

Muscle For Life with Mike Matthews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 55:12


This podcast is all about sperm. That's because I'm talking with Khaled Kteily about male fertility. The reason I thought this would make a good topic is it's an aspect of health I haven't really touched on before and male fertility isn't something many people talk about. And what better person to speak about male fertility than the CEO of Legacy, a Harvard-backed company that offers at-home sperm testing, cryostorage (freezing your little swimmers for future use), and educational resources to help men understand and protect their fertility. In this episode, Khaled and I chat about how fertility is changing (and possible reasons why male fertility is on the decline), why it matters, what you can do to improve your fertility, how family planning is changing, what conception might look like in the future, and more. And even if you've already had kids (like me) or don't plan on having kids, this podcast is worth a listen because you probably know someone who is trying to have kids or wants to have kids in the future. Not only is your fertility an important biomarker for overall health, but considering how common fertility problems are these days, it could be affecting someone you care about. So, if you want to learn all about male fertility and whether you should consider testing and freezing your sperm, definitely check out this podcast! Timestamps: 12:46 - How and why are thoughts about fertility changing? 16:17 - How is fertility measured? 17:49 - What factors are causing a decrease in male fertility? 22:45 - Do cell phones and radiation affect our sperm? 26:05 - How can people reduce exposure to harmful chemicals? 27:50 - What can you do to make your body more resilient to negative effects? 30:14 - What role does meat eating play in fertility? 31:38 - Family planning 38:21 - Does using younger eggs and sperm reduce the chances of things going wrong? 41:35 - What's the ideal age to test and freeze your sperm? 42:26 - Are there risks associated with IVF? 43:53 - Why do you think IVF will be preferred? 52:27 - Where can people find you online? 53:33 - Should you test your sperm even if you're not going to freeze your sperm? Mentioned on the Show: Legacy: https://givelegacy.com/ Legacy's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/givelegacyinc Books by Mike Matthews: https://legionathletics.com/products/books/

Burn the Boats
Fred Wellman: The Signs of a Violent America

Burn the Boats

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 51:48


Fred Wellman is the former Executive Director of the Lincoln Project. He is a Westpoint and Harvard graduate, and served in the Army as an aviator and public affairs officer for 22 years.  The Lincoln Project is a political action committee that was founded in 2019 by former and present Republicans, with the goal of preventing the re-election of Donal Trump and defeating ‘Trumpism.' You can find Fred on Twitter at @FPWellman Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer
Ditch the stress and lead with longevity

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:51


Kayla Tucker is the owner of Kayla Elease Coaching Services, LLC, a company that helps female K-12 principals to effectively manage stress and prioritize health and well being without a dependency on time management hacks, exercise, or delegation. As a school psychologist by trade with years of experience in the online wellness space, Kayla is an expert on stress management for school leaders. Using a unique framework that is founded in resilience, biology, and humanistic psychology, she helps school leaders learn how to bounce back from the day-to-day demands with ease while keeping personal sustainability at the forefront.   Show Highlights Overcome negative impact on leadership and educators mental health. The biggest myth school leaders believe about the work. Inventory questions leaders need to ask.  Notice and act on your interest, insights and reflection. Unspoken culture code in education. SUCCESS in 3 MONTHS! A service for Women in Leadership. Lead and leverage live video content.  Framework to keep Longevity in Mind with “Why and What if.” Make your educators and team crisis and future proof with this framework.    “The most important thing I often tell myself is that we only have things to give when we have enough to give.” -Kayla Tucker Full Transcript is Available on the BLBS Website    Kayla Tucker's Resources & Contact Info: Linkedin Instagram Twitter hello@kaylaelease.com https://kaylaelease.com Buy Daniel's new book: Mastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School Leader A Beautiful Constraint Lead with Longevity program: http://kaylaelease.com/blbs   Looking for more? Read The Better Leaders Better Schools Roadmap Join “The Mastermind” Read the latest on the blog   SHOW SPONSORS: HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Transform how you lead to become a resilient and empowered change agent with Harvard's online Certificate in School Management and Leadership. Grow your professional network with a global cohort of fellow school leaders as you collaborate in case studies bridging the fields of education and business. Apply today at http://hgse.me/leader.   TEACHFX School leaders know that productive student talk drives student learning, but the average teacher talks 75% of class time! TeachFX is changing that with a “Fitbit for teachers” that automatically measures student engagement and gives teachers feedback about what they could do differently.  Learn more about the TeachFX app and get a special 20% discount for your school or district by visiting teachfx.com/blbs.   ORGANIZED BINDER Organized Binder is the missing piece in many classrooms. Many teachers are great with the main content of the lesson. Organized Binder helps with powerful introductions, savvy transitions, and memorable lesson closings. Your students will grow their executive functioning skills (and as a bonus), your teachers will become more organized too. Help your students and staff level up with Organized Binder.   Copyright © 2021 Twelve Practices LLC

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer
Ditch the stress and lead with longevity

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 37:51


Kayla Tucker is the owner of Kayla Elease Coaching Services, LLC, a company that helps female K-12 principals to effectively manage stress and prioritize health and well being without a dependency on time management hacks, exercise, or delegation. As a school psychologist by trade with years of experience in the online wellness space, Kayla is an expert on stress management for school leaders. Using a unique framework that is founded in resilience, biology, and humanistic psychology, she helps school leaders learn how to bounce back from the day-to-day demands with ease while keeping personal sustainability at the forefront.   Show Highlights Overcome negative impact on leadership and educators mental health. The biggest myth school leaders believe about the work. Inventory questions leaders need to ask.  Notice and act on your interest, insights and reflection. Unspoken culture code in education. SUCCESS in 3 MONTHS! A service for Women in Leadership. Lead and leverage live video content.  Framework to keep Longevity in Mind with “Why and What if.” Make your educators and team crisis and future proof with this framework.    “The most important thing I often tell myself is that we only have things to give when we have enough to give.” -Kayla Tucker Full Transcript is Available on the BLBS Website    Kayla Tucker's Resources & Contact Info: Linkedin Instagram Twitter hello@kaylaelease.com https://kaylaelease.com Buy Daniel's new book: Mastermind: Unlocking Talent Within Every School Leader A Beautiful Constraint Lead with Longevity program: http://kaylaelease.com/blbs     Looking for more? Read The Better Leaders Better Schools Roadmap Join “The Mastermind” Read the latest on the blog   SHOW SPONSORS: HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Transform how you lead to become a resilient and empowered change agent with Harvard's online Certificate in School Management and Leadership. Grow your professional network with a global cohort of fellow school leaders as you collaborate in case studies bridging the fields of education and business. Apply today at http://hgse.me/leader.   TEACHFX School leaders know that productive student talk drives student learning, but the average teacher talks 75% of class time! TeachFX is changing that with a “Fitbit for teachers” that automatically measures student engagement and gives teachers feedback about what they could do differently.  Learn more about the TeachFX app and get a special 20% discount for your school or district by visiting teachfx.com/blbs.   ORGANIZED BINDER Organized Binder is the missing piece in many classrooms. Many teachers are great with the main content of the lesson. Organized Binder helps with powerful introductions, savvy transitions, and memorable lesson closings. Your students will grow their executive functioning skills (and as a bonus), your teachers will become more organized too. Help your students and staff level up with Organized Binder.   Copyright © 2021 Twelve Practices LLC

Purple Patch Podcast
196 Dr. Gil Blander talks Aging, Supplements, Extending your Lifespan, and How to Stave off Cognitive Decline

Purple Patch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 54:59


This week features a conversation with Dr. Gil Blander. Dr. Blander is an expert in nutrition, biomarker analytics, athletic performance, biochemistry, and aging research.  Gil is also the Founder and CSO of InsideTracker, a personalized health and performance analytics company created by a team of scientists, physicians, nutritionists, and exercise physiologists from MIT, Harvard, and Tufts University. Today Matt and Dr. Blander discuss aging, supplements that actually help performance, homeopathy, extending your lifespan, and how to stave off cognitive decline.  They deliver insights and information to help you understand your body, apply focus, and move towards an optimized life by focusing on what matters. And, just like a deck of cards, you may be dealt a certain hand, but you can always play them well.    Episode Resources This episode is sponsored by our new collaboration with INSIDE TRACKER. Inside Tracker and Purple Patch - Receive 25% off their services with code: PURPLEPATCHPRO25 Learn more about Purple Patch Fully Customized 1:1 Coaching Learn more about Purple Patch Squad High-Performance Training Program Learn more about Purple Patch Strength Programming Stay Up-to-Date with Purple Patch News and Events Purple Patch Upcoming Webinars and Events  

TheSugarScience Podcast- curating the scientific conversation in type 1 diabetes

In this episode, Dr. Dario Gerace joins us to discuss engineering immune-evasive stem cell-derived islet cells. Ask the Expert is a ~30 minute digital cafe experience where scientists and grad students can meet and exchange with thought leaders in the field of type 1 diabetes. Link below to sign up for a seat in the cafe! https://thesugarscience.org/ask-the-expert/

Daniel Alonzo's Wealth On The Beach Podcast
The Career Toolkit with Mark Herschberg

Daniel Alonzo's Wealth On The Beach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 41:19


Mark Herschberg has three degrees from MIT. He teaches at Harvard and MIT and is also a retired competitive ballroom dancer. He created The Career Toolkit, which teaches leadership, communication, and negotiation skills to people who want to build their professional ethicacy. When Mark first graduated from MIT, he had all of the skills to do a job, but he didn't have the communication skills to get the job.   He talks about growing up with a love for learning, which expands beyond college. He discusses how college can be beneficial and also other institutions that can help in other ways.

Natural Medicine Journal Podcast
Blood Sugar Stabilization: Addressing Prediabetes in Clinical Practice

Natural Medicine Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 28:49


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 3 Americans have prediabetes and more than 84% don't even know they have it. That's one reason that addressing prediabetes in clinical practice is absolutely critical. In this interview, Robert Graham, MD, FACP, who is board-certified in both internal and integrative medicine, discusses his approach to identifying, reversing, and treating prediabetes. Graham will also highlight some key natural blood sugar stabilizers that he uses in his practice. About the Author Chef Robert E. Graham, MD, MPH, is the cofounder of FRESH Medicine an integrative health and wellness center in NYC. FRESH is an acronym for their five ingredients for health: food, relaxation, exercise, sleep, and happiness. Graham is a Harvard-trained physician, board-certified in internal and integrative medicine, who obtained his culinary degree from the Natural Gourmet Institute. In 2019, he launched an online school called FRESHMEDU with his wife Julie and developed a line of medically tailored meals with Performance Kitchen. Follow their work at @freshmednyc. Graham received his medical degree from the School of Medicine at Stony Brook University Medical Center and completed his residency in internal medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital. He earned a masters of public health from the Harvard School of Public Health while completing 3 fellowships in general internal medicine, complementary and integrative medical therapies, and medical education at Harvard Medical School. About the Sponsor As it stands, 77 million Americans are pre-diabetic and almost 90% are unaware of their condition. Fortunately, our society is becoming aware of the problem. In fact, almost 90% of Americans are actively trying to reduce their sugar intake. But when it comes to sugar and diabetes, options have been limited; either pharmaceutical drugs for more severe cases or lifestyle changes reliant on willpower. Sugarbreak's cofounders are all veteran entrepreneurs who have spent their careers building solution-oriented products that improve millions of lives, and their next challenge is confronting sugar. They set out to create a plant-based, natural solution that helps consumers manage their blood sugar as part of a healthy lifestyle, without completely altering their daily lives or costing them an arm and a leg financially. Sugarbreak is the first natural, nonprescription support system that empowers you to reduce your sugar intake and manage healthy blood sugar levels to support overall health. Sugarbreak products are made with natural, herbal ingredients that have been scientifically tested in over 20 clinical studies and are proven to curb sugar cravings, minimize postmeal blood sugar spikes & crashes, and promote healthy blood sugar management. All of their products are Non-GMO, Gluten-Free & Allergen 8 Free, and their adult line is Vegan. Sugarbreak is backed by a world-class scientific advisory team, including an endocrinologist, integrative & internal medicine physicians, the head of eating & weight disorders at Mount Sinai, a registered dietitian, sugar addiction expert, pediatric specialist, and more. Sugarbreak exists outside the pharmaceutical complex and works alongside leading scientists and clinicians to provide the research and evidence you deserve. Managing your blood sugar at any age is now Natural, Safe, Effective, & Easy. Sugarbreak products are available through Emerson Ecologics, in Target stores nationwide in the Diabetic Care & Diagnostics section & on Target.com. Sugarbreak is also available at select CVS Pharmacies & on CVS.com, HyVee Groceries, and on Thrive Market. Use code NMJ15 at checkout for 15% off your order on www.sugarbreak.com.

Sounds of Science
Ep. 43: Two Pioneers in HIV Activism and Research

Sounds of Science

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 30:05


For World AIDS Day, I interviewed two pioneers in HIV/AIDS activism and research: Dr. Kenneth Mayer, Medical Research Director of Fenway Health and a professor of medicine, global health and population at Harvard; and Professor Gregg Gonsalves from the Yale School of Public Health. Ken has been part of AIDS research almost from the beginning, and Gregg is a passionate advocate for underrepresented patients. Both have devoted their careers to furthering HIV/AIDS awareness and public health responsiveness.

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Utah Valley University Wins the Debate...and Shows Us a Better Way to Engage

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 10:39


Utah Valley University came away with a big win in the 2021 Wasatch Mountain Ethics Bowl this month, beating teams from Harvard and the University of Colorado, among others. But what can this experience teach all of us about how to debate better? UVU Professor Jeff Nielsen and Kaitlynn Russell, who is a part of the team joined Boyd to talk about all this and more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Twin Cities Wellness Collective™ Podcast
#137: Ashley Oswald- Functional Nutrition

The Twin Cities Wellness Collective™ Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 28:31


Ashley Oswald founded Oswald Digestive Clinic in 2016 after being frustrated to see people struggle with their gut health, while knowing that there are ways to help them improve and often resolve their bothersome symptoms.After struggling with her own gut heath issues from being on and off antibiotics for 10 years as a child to her early 20's, Ashley is passionate about helping others to improve and eliminate their gut health issues too, and to regain their freedom in life. She has completed 7 years of schooling in nutrition science, including a year at Harvard's Brigham And Women's Hospital, and has worked in a variety of settings in the health care system, so has a unique big picture view of where there are gaps.She has been published on ABC, CBS, FOX, and NBC, has spoken at Top 50 Hospitals across the country, and has been invited to be on guest panels at leading Universities. With Oswald Digestive Clinic, she is working to fill healthcare gaps, helping their clients finally go from gut struggles to gut freedom, so they can get back to living life on their own terms.She is an optimist, explorer, and nature lover.Links from the Episode: Oswald Digestive Clinic Website: https://www.oswalddigestiveclinic.com/Oswald Digestive Clinic YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyq1VZj9OxWmoop2PElltEAAshley's LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashleyoswalddietitian/Join the Twin Cities Wellness Collective™: https://www.tcwellnesscollective.com/

Plant the Flag-Inside UMass Athletics
Plant the Flag; Men's Basketball Week 3 & 4

Plant the Flag-Inside UMass Athletics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 27:03


How about that finish? UMass took down their second Big 10 opponent on Saturday at the Mullins Center on a last second three-point shot by Noah Fernandes. We visit with Coach McCall to talk about the win and the busy stretch to the start of the year. Minutemen have a few days to reset before they take on Harvard this weekend.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Best Ever You Show
Best-Selling Author Frank Schaeffer

The Best Ever You Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 61:00


Frank Schaeffer is a New York Times bestselling author of more than a dozen fiction and nonfiction books. He joins us to have a conversation about his latest book Fall in Love, Have Children, Stay Put, Save the Planet, Be Happy. Frank is a survivor of both polio and an evangelical/fundamentalist childhood, an acclaimed writer who overcame severe dyslexia, a homeschooled and self-taught documentary movie director, and a feature film director of four low-budget Hollywood features that he describes as “pretty terrible.” He is also an artist with a loyal following of collectors who own many of his oil paintings. He has spoken at dozens of major universities, libraries, and museums from the Hammer in LA to Harvard, Princeton, and Yale.  Bestselling author Frank Schaeffer offers a passionate political, social, and lifestyle “blueprint” for changes millions of us know are needed to rebalance our work lives with thriving relationships: Fall in Love, Have Children, Stay Put, Save the Planet, Be Happy. Even before everything was disrupted by COVID-19, millions of Americans were already questioning capitalism's “values.” We were already challenging the idea that your job defines you. We already knew something was wrong. Loneliness, frustration, and alienation were already on the rise. Even the most successful of us felt too busy, too preoccupied, and too distracted to enjoy what we intuitively know are life's greatest rewards: vibrant relationships, family life, connection to others, involvement in our community, and the thrilling experience of love. 

Double Your Sales Now!
Revenue Growth is Downstream of Operational Excellence | QRE199

Double Your Sales Now!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 31:19


While studying psychology and neuroscience as a Harvard undergrad, my guest Will Nitze became fascinated with the human brain and how it functions. After graduating and taking a job in selling and marketing software, he found himself working long hours and feeling terrible as a result. Realizing that his diet (or lack thereof) played a key part in his physical and mental breakdown, Will became obsessed with this idea of “on the go” brain food. Why did such a thing not exist? …and so 2017 saw the start of nights and weekends spent tinkering in his kitchen which led to the eventual birth of “IQBAR” in mid 2018. If you are looking for inspiration on how to start, run and grow a business while living through a drastically changing world, then this episode is for you. Grab your paper, your favourite pen and let Will's story inspire your own journey to quantum revenue expansion. Ursula's Takeaways: Intro (00:00) Will's Story (4:34) Running 2 Different Companies (11:14) How Are You Leading Now (14:51) Revenue Growth (18:03) Zillion Ways To Grow Your Topline (23:00) Connect with Will Nitze: Website: https://www.eatiqbar.com/ (https://www.eatiqbar.com/) Facebook: facebook.com/eatiqbar LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/will-nitze/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/will-nitze/) Instagram: https://www.linkedin.com/in/will-nitze/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/will-nitze/) Twitter: twitter.com/eatiqbar About Will Nitze My name is Will Nitze and I'm the Founder & CEO of IQBAR. I'm passionate about entrepreneurship, nutrition, and ruthless efficiency! FREE GIFT: Visit - https://www.eatiqbar.com/ (https://www.eatiqbar.com/) - Use the code QUANTUM25 for 25% off! About Ursula Mentjes  Ursula Mentjes is an award-winning Entrepreneur and Sales Expert. She will transform the way you think about selling so you can reach your revenue goals with less anxiety and less effort! Ursula specializes in Neuro-Linguistic Programming and other performance modalities to help clients double and triple their sales fast.   Honing her skills at an international technical training company, where she began her career in her early twenties, Ursula increased sales by 90% in just one year. Just 5 years later, when the company's annual revenue was in the tens of millions, Ursula advanced to the position of President at just 27.  Sales guru Brian Tracy endorsed her first book, Selling with Intention, saying, “This powerful, practical book shows you how to connect with customers by fully understanding the sales process from the inside out. It really works!” Ursula is also the author of One Great Goal, Selling with Synchronicity and The Belief Zone, which received the Beverly Hills President's Choice award.  Her Podcast, Double Your Sales NOW, is available on iTunes, iHeartRadio and other outlets.  Ursula also serves as Past Statewide Chairperson of the NAWBO-CA Education Fund and Past President of NAWBO-CA. She is the recipient of the SBA's Women in Business Champion and a recipient of the Willow Tree's Extraordinary Example and Extraordinary Entrepreneur Awards, the NAWBO-IE ANITA Award, chosen as PDP's Extraordinary Speaker, PDP's Business Woman of the Year, the Spirit of the Entrepreneur Awards Finalist and the President's Lifetime Achievement Award from two Presidents.  She has shared the stage with bestselling author Loral Langemeier, Les Brown, Tom Antion, Lisa Nichols, Giuliana Rancic and many others!  Her clients include Aflac, Ebenezer and Fairview Hospitals, New York Life, Paychex and more!  She holds a B.A. in Psychology and Communication from St. Olaf College and an M.S. in Counseling Psychology from California Baptist University. Social Links: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ursulamentjessalescoach/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/ursulamentjessalescoach/) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UrsulaSalesCoach (https://www.facebook.com/UrsulaSalesCoach) Instagram:...

Navigating the Customer Experience
152: Loyalty Redefined! How to Enrich the Lives of Your Customers – The Unbeatable Strategy with Fred Reichheld

Navigating the Customer Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 36:13


Fred Reichheld is the creator of the Net Promoter system of management, the founder of Bain & Company's Loyalty practice and the author of five books including The New York Times bestseller, The Ultimate Question 2.0. He is currently a Fellow and Senior Advisory Partner at Bain, where he has worked since 1977. Fred is a frequent speaker at major business forums and his work on customer loyalty has been widely covered in The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Financial Times, Fortune, Businessweek and The Economist.   His upcoming article to be published in November marks his 15th contribution to the Harvard Business Review. In 2012, he became one of the original LinkedIn influencers, an invitation only group of corporate leaders and public figures who are thought leaders in their respective fields. In 2003, Consulting Magazine named Fred as one of the world's 25 Most Influential Consultants.   According to The New York Times, he put loyalty economics on the map. The Economist refers to him as the “high priest” of loyalty. Reichheld graduated with honors both from Harvard College (B.A., 1974) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A., 1978). He's based in Cape Cod and Miami.   Questions   Could you share a little bit about your own journey? How is it that you got to where you are today? Could you explain to us what the Net Promoter system is and how companies should really be using it to yield the best results? Could you share with us maybe two or three things that you believe are contributing drivers of loyalty? What are some things that companies should look at in trying to enrich the lives of your customers? Do they need to understand what type of customer they're serving and does the generation matter? Could you share with us what is Customer Capitalism exactly? And how does that impact the consumer? Could you share with us what's the one online resource, tool, website or app that you absolutely cannot live without in your business? Could you also share with us maybe one or two books that have had the biggest impact on you? Could you share with us what's the one thing that's going on in your life right now that you're really excited about? It could be something that you're working on to develop yourself or your people. Where can our listeners find you online? Do you have a quote or a saying that during times of adversity or challenge, you'll tend to revert to this quote, it kind of helps to keep you on track, or at least get you back on track if for any reason you get derailed. Do you have one of those?   Highlights   Fred's Journey   Fred shared that early in his career at Bain & Company, he noticed companies similar to us all, some brand new, some quite mature, but they were all outperforming all of the things he learned at the Harvard. Some were crushing it and a good example was enterprise Rent-A-Car, who started out as a tiny little rental leasing agency in St. Louis, and has grown now to become the largest car rental company on Earth without ever having to tap public equity markets, it's still a private company. And you think, Gosh, what I learned at Harvard was a capital intensive business, low growth industry, low margins, there's no way that you could grow on internally generated cash.   So, when he went to meet with Andy Taylor, their CEO, he said, “Fred, there's no secret, there's only one way to grow a successful business sustainably.” And so, he was listening for this great secret. And he said, “You treat your customers so they come back for more and bring their friends.”   And that basic idea changed his world because that's what he now understands is the key to success. If your customers are coming back for more and bringing their friends, your economic flywheel will crush the competition.   What is the Net Promoter System and How Companies Can Use it to Yield the Best Results   Me: Amazing. So I had an opportunity to get an advanced copy of your book Winning on Purpose: The Unbeatable Strategy of Loving Customer. I really, really love it. I haven't finished reading it as yet, but I've gotten quite far in it. And so, I just wanted you to share with us.   Fred, in the book, especially in the preface and the foreword, you kind of mentioned that you have this net promoter system, but people are not actually using it the way how you created it to be used. Could you explain to us what the Net Promoter system is and how companies should really be using it to yield the best results?   Fred shared that he's long been troubled by the fact that financial accounting is how we run our businesses. And while financial accounting is very good at telling us when we've extracted a million dollars from our customers wallets, it does nothing in helping us understand when we've enriched a million customers lives or when our teams have done work that's meaningful and toward an important purpose.   And Net Promoter was his attempt at helping companies measure that important idea of all the lives you touch, how many are enriched? How many diminished? And that evolved into Net Promoter Score is based on one question, how likely you'd recommend us to a friend, 0 through 10.   And it turns out that when someone gives you a 9, and especially a 10, you've enriched their life, you've lived up to the golden rule of loving your neighbor.   And 0 through 6, you failed, you diminish their life. And so, this notion of Net Promoter Score is just keeping track of all the lives touched, how many enriched, how many diminished, and how many promoters, how many detractors, it's very practical for running a business because your promoters are your assets, who come back for more and bring their friends. But also, it's a little bit inspirational because putting your teams to work, and enriching lives and measuring that outcome and helping them learn how to do better, that's really helping them live the right kind of life.   The Contributing Drivers of Loyalty   Me: So, at the end of the day, we're all trying to build better relationships with our customers. Now, in your book, you also said that loyalty means investing time and resources in relationships.   Do you know maybe could you share with us maybe based on your experience and your research, you've definitely been in the thing way longer than I have; maybe two or three drivers that you think contribute to loyalty.   And this is loyalty in general, which I'm sure impacts business relationships, because I mean, loyalty is something that as human beings, we do link it to a person. For example, if you have an animal, your dog is loyal to you as the owner, in a relationship; you're loyal to the other person that you're in the relationship with, whether it's a personal or professional relationship. So could you share with us maybe two or three things that you believe are contributing drivers of loyalty?   Fred shared that he thinks it's quite poorly understood in this day and age when people are demanding loyalty and trying to get loyalty through gimmicks and marketing, so called loyalty programs. So, he thinks it does make sense to get back to basics.   He thinks loyalty is an investment from you and another person in a relationship. And you think, “Why would I invest in someone else?” Well, it's because they stand for what you believe in you.   You believe that they'll reciprocate and treat you reasonably and not abuse your trust and that you're in a position to actually do something to make their life better. Otherwise, you're just wasting your time.   A lot of people think about loyalty as, “Oh, I want them to be loyal to me.” He thinks the way to start is, “How can I invest in this relationship and love them, make their lives better?”   And that's what great companies' do, that's what great leaders do, they inspire their troops to find ways to enrich the lives of customers sustainably, of course, profitably. But the whole goal in a business is making your customers lives better. Because when you do that, you're investing in the right relationships, they come back for more, they bring their friends, they say great things about you, they become your public relations force, that's how great business works.   And he thinks we get drawn off center a little bit because the larger our company is, the more it's run through financial mindset. It's our accounting numbers that we seem to view as the framework of success, when in fact, no, it's this golden rule ideas, it's love thy neighbor as thyself. And when you do it, you'll see the results because when customers feel the love, they are loyal and that's at the core of loyalty, it's earning loyalty by enriching customers lives. And loyalty from employees, by putting them in a position to earn lives of meaning and purpose, by enriching the lives of customers that they touch.   Me: I like the fact that you mentioned that it's not just about loyalty in terms of you getting the person to be loyal to you, but it has to be earned and it's not something that can be bought. So I'm glad that you mentioned at the beginning that a lot of these loyalty programs and marketing initiatives that organizations have that they dub as loyalty programs are not actually programs that will make or even influence your customers to be loyal to you. So it's good that you identified for us that loyalty is something that is earned.   What Companies Should Look for to Enrich the Lives of Customers   Me: Now, in terms of showing your customers or enriching their lives regardless of the industry that you're in, whether you're a financial company, you sell insurance or you have credit cards, or you're a retail company, what are some things that companies should look at in trying to enrich the lives of your customers? Do they need to understand what type of customer they're serving and does the generation matter?   Fred shared that of course it does. And yet, he finds that the most successful businesses, whether dealing with teenagers today or octogenarians, it's understanding how to communicate effectively, how to always act in your customers best interest, to listen very carefully to how you're doing and what they need. Because at the core, a business is trying to solve the customer's problem, it's trying to turn a frown, into a smile, and the human process of understanding that, he doesn't think that's changed in thousands and thousands of years. Of course, the technologies we use, the innovative approaches, those open up wonderful new opportunities, but the basics, they haven't changed.   One of his colleagues at Bain, they joined about the same year, Scott Cook, who's the founder of Intuit, who has built TurboTax, and other very successful business, huge, huge success.   And he said, “Fred, you want a big business, solve a big problem for your customers.” And that's the right way to think about it, “I am going to be a reliable resource that is going to make a real difference in your life by turning that frown into a smile, and I'm going to measure my success that way.”   Obviously, profits are necessary but those who think of profits as the true objective, they're not going to grow a very big business very long because that's very selfish, “How much money can I extract from your wallet, get away from me, I'm not going to tell you anything about myself for what I need.” If he has someone who actually acts in a loving, caring way, they're a mutually beneficial relationship affair. But that's the kind of person he's willing to actually share his information with and give constructive feedback to because he wants them to succeed, he wants them to succeed in helping him solve problems.   What is Customer Capitalism and How it Impacts the Consumer?   Me: So, while I was reading part of your book as well, I bucked up on a term, Customer Capitalism. Could you share with us what is that exactly? And how does that impact the consumer?   Fred shared that he thinks people have a framework in their heads about capitalism that's just dead wrong, that maximize shareholder value as the underlying concept. Through the years, whether it's Milton Friedman, or Adam Smith, there's an ancient and an out of date framework that people call capitalism, that without giving it this name, it's financial capitalism, because it's based on this idea of profits and shareholder and investor is the king. He thinks that has changed over the last few decades, at least, to where now, there's so much capital in the world; you can raise millions and millions if you have a good idea.   What there's not infinite amounts of are good people with good ideas who are willing to work together in a team framework to serve others.   And the real capital in that system, our customers, all the cash flow comes out of customers' wallets.   So let's keep track of how many customers you have, how many are coming back for more, how many referrals you're getting, that was the basic, those are the keystone metrics in customer capitalism.   And more than anything, it's being clear about the purpose. If the purpose in the old school capitalism was maximizing profits and shareholder value, in customer capitalism, the purpose is to enrich the lives of your customers.   Bain did a survey of a couple 100 Senior Executives around the world, C suite executives and they found that only 10% believe that the primary purpose their business existed was to make customers lives better. They thought it was about profits or great place to work or balance duties to shareholders, stakeholders. He just thinks that is dead wrong. A good business, a sustainable business has to have a primary purpose of making their customers lives better.   Me: Amazing. One of the companies that you mentioned in your book when I was reading was Chick-fil-A and I absolutely love Chick-fil-A, both me and my daughter. But one of the things that I really love about Chick-fil-A was the fact that I remember I traveled a few years ago and my daughter wanted to get something from them on a Sunday and they're actually closed on Sundays and I thought that was awesome, from what I read that was a principle that their organization had and they've lived it up to this day and they've still been very successful even though they're closed on a day when they could be making more profit, as you mentioned.   Fred stated that the purpose of Chick-fil-A is certainly to enrich the lives that it touches. It's interesting, the founder, Truett Cathy was one of his early teachers in his business career, and they're totally different people. He's a Southern, he was a Southern Baptist, very, very conservative point of view. He (Fred) lives up in New England, Unitarian Universalist, you couldn't be more liberal in your religious thinking. And yet they had enormous overlap at the core, he picked a proverb from the Bible, that essentially, it says, “A good name is worth more than silver or gold.” Or in other words, your reputation is everything, which he thinks is so true.   And this notion of net lives enrich and Net Promoter Score, you think about when you enrich a life, you're living up to the golden rule, you're loving a neighbor, when you diminish your life, you're failing.   And so, the reason Chick-fil-A has been very interested and supportive of Net Promoter is because we're trying to achieve the same mission, this is back to Truett Cathy's words, he was inspired to turn frowns into smiles on his customers' faces and that is the purpose of the business.   So, then you mentioned Sunday, he asked him why he closed on Sundays and he said, “It's not a religious thing, Fred.” He's a very religious guy but he's not preachy, their business does not put biblical quotes at the bottom of their cups, and they're not proselytizing in the parking lot. They try to be models; they try to help their people live up to this standard of loving your neighbor. And closing on Sundays, he just knew that you could not run a restaurant and have the manager there 7 days a week, you'll kill yourself. And he said, “Given that, and I definitely want my store operator there running the place not delegating to an assistant.” He said, “We have to close a day and closing Sundays gives this signal that we care about our people, and we care about golden rule.”   As he said, “But you know, Fred, I go to other restaurants on Sunday, it's not like it's wrong to go out and eat at a restaurant on Sunday. It's just wrong for us to try and have our managers running a business 7 days a week.” And he thinks it's brilliant. And it is a signal. He thinks it reminds people that they're different. And you're right, their productivity, they have far higher sales per unit than any of the competitors. And those competitors are open 7 days a week. And it shows you when you get the purpose right; your business can crush the competition.   App, Website or Tool that Fred Absolutely Can't Live Without in His Business   When asked about online resource that he cannot live without in his business, Fred shared that it's a new one for him, he discovered a company through one of his Bain partners, it's called BILT. The reason they were intriguing to him was their goal is to help their customers, their customers tend to be consumer brands, like Weber, who makes grills and place at manufacturers and so on. They try to help them build promoters among their customers, to create more promoters.   And what they've done is just taken one of the most painful steps in every customer's journey episode, which is assembly and first use, using paper instructions, which these paper instructions are horrible, let's be serious, they're written by engineers whose English is certainly their second language and they're just totally unintuitive.   So, BILT takes the 3D CAD drawing from the manufacturer, and then turns it into great little 3D instructions on how to assemble and use your product effectively and it's free to the consumer. So you go to a Home Depot or Costco and you'll start to see BILT on the packaging, and you know that you're going to get that home and you'll be able to put this thing together quickly and you'll feel great about yourself or Home Depot will have their faucets or ceiling fans, things that are really tricky to install, or garage door openers, and you go to BILT and you put the product in it and it downloads up to date information about how to put it together in a very intuitive way where you can zoom in and pinch out and rotate upside down and voice activated to help you guide you through your journey, it's just brilliant.   Me: Nice, very good. They obviously saw a need in the market, as you said, a problem that people were having challenges with and complaining about and created a product that would be applicable to make people's lives easier.   Fred stated that try ordering a bicycle online, you get it back to your driveway and then you try to put it together using paper instructions and he thinks you'll see why BILT is so successful.   Me: Yes, I can just imagine and my coordination of doing things like that are extremely poor, so I'm sure I'd benefit from using BILT.   Books That Have Had the Greatest Impact on Fred   Me: Could you also share with us maybe one or two books that have had the biggest impact on you? I'm sure you have many because you've been around for quite some time and I'm sure you've had to read and engage with a lot of authors over the years that have definitely helped enrich your life and the lives of others. But is there maybe one or two that have definitely had a great impact on you over the years, maybe something you read a long time ago, or even something you read recently?   When asked about books that have had biggest impact, Fred shared that he read a lot of books. Actually, he listens to them now; his eyes are so strained from working at his computer and writing a book, he can't read in a relaxed way so he listens to Audible. Probably the most impactful book in the last 10 years was written by a guy who passed away, Clayton Christensen was a business school professor, who he got to know, he worked briefly at Bain and then worked at an entrepreneurial thing and ended up at Harvard.   He wrote a book called How Will You Measure Your Life? And he (Fred) thinks he's just absolutely right. And the reason that helped him is, he thinks you do need to measure a life carefully, that's what a Net Promoter Score is, of all the lives he touched, how many enriched, how many diminished?   That's how you measure a life. And he thinks Clayton put this in very human terms, and thinking about that, not just in a business sense, but all of your relationships in life, how do you think about investing in those relationships and being loving and loyal in a way that's not just correct in your mind, but you know the other party felt the love, you have to get feedback on how you enrich their life. So, How Will You Measure Your Life is a big one.   There's a recent book by Adam Grant called Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know, that he thinks is quite good. Adam is a guy that they must think along the same lines, because it was an earlier book that he wrote about it's called Give and Take. And he just makes the case that the world is full of people; there are some people who are givers, there are people who are matchers, they want a relationship to be in balance and then there are takers. And he said, one of the keys to life is avoid those takers, they're sociopaths, you can try and change them, but good luck.   And he thinks this is important and living a golden rule existence. Not all people want to be part of a community where people are treated with love and care, they'll abuse that community and he thinks if they can't be fixed, they have to be excluded. And then Think Again, Grant just says, we have these mindsets that are fixed, and he thinks of financial capitalism as a fixed mindset for 90% of the world and he needs to change the way people think about the purpose of business and how to enrich a life.    What Fred is Really Excited About Now!   Fred shared that he got the paperback galley of Winning on Purpose just a week ago and he can't take it off on his desk, but very pleased with the way it's come out. And that's going to be every day of his life for the next probably 90 days is how to get people to see the relevance of this book to their personal lives, not just their business lives because the subtitle of Winning on Purpose is “The Unbeatable Strategy of Loving Customers.” And loving customers, it doesn't sound like it's a business book, he doesn't know what it sounds, just a little flaky but it's not because this notion of loving thy neighbor as thyself is the core, it's the highest standard in human affairs. And what he's arguing and Winning on Purpose is that, that is how you win.   When you enrich lives, you have to do it sustainably, and you have to do it profitably, but that's not the magic, accountants can do the profits for you. The magic is figuring out how using your energy and ingenuity to love your customers and have them come to trust you and come back for more and bring their friends but it goes so far beyond business.   So, the great challenge he's got is getting people to recognize, he wrote this book for his granddaughters, infants who he wants them to see how you live the right life. And it sets out a way of measuring progress that he thinks is consistent with what Truett Cathy had in mind of building a reputation that you'll be proud of, and investing in relationships where you can earn people's loyalty.   It's probably a good rule of thumb anywhere to just don't spend time with a person unless you can figure out a way to make their life better. And by the way, the good news, chapter two and five of the book, demonstrate that companies that do this, they're the ones that get rich.   It's not clear from reading the Wall Street Journal, but every company, every industry, where they look at the Net Promoter Score, versus the competition, measured carefully, correctly, not just some self reported vanity metric, but real apples to apples.   It's the company with the highest Net Promoter Score who is growing faster and delivering better total shareholder value. And that's really good news.   But people are the mindset is fixed, they just don't get it. They say, “Oh, that's just some industries.” No, every time they're finding it, how did Andy Taylor grow to be the biggest car rental company on earth? How did Apple become one of the biggest companies on earth? Because they built a set of customers who are Promoters who are out there buying more stuff, and referring their friends and giving good feedback because they trust you, and making your employees feel special and loved, that's the flywheel that's going on. So, he's trying to convince the world that business works in a very different way than they probably learned in business school, or if they read the Wall Street Journal and The Economist.   Me: And you know, one of the things that kind of came in my head just now when you're speaking in terms of what we were taught in school versus what is reality, the reality is, a business isn't a static thing, it's made up of people and without people in the business, there is no business and people are human beings with feelings and emotions. And you get more out of people when they feel loved, when they feel listened to, when they feel heard, as you said, when you enrich their lives. So, if you really do live that principle, I'm sure you'll win in all aspects of your life.   Fred shared that he's worked at Bain & Company since 1977. So what is that 43 going on 44 years now. And they've been through good and bad times. For the last 10 or 20 years, it's been good times. If you look on Glassdoor, the place that rates businesses as great places to work, Bain, this year, it's the best in the world according to Glassdoor, it's always been one of the top several since Glassdoor started. And Bain hires lots of different kinds of people. But these are really ambitious, talented people. And even with that slice of ambitious people, when you look at what makes a person happy at work at Bain, they want to feel loved; they want to feel like they're a valued member of a team that wins with its customers. So it's an act of service and if you ask, remember he said the typical business person in the world, 10% of them think the reason their business exists is to enrich customer lives, at Bain, if you just ask everybody through the company, you find 60% to 70% of the people think the reason Bain exists is to make their clients more successful.   It's a servant culture where love is at the core, helping people succeed and putting smiles on faces and that's what makes it a great place to work.   And the irony is, he knows what makes, at least he thinks he knows what makes Bain a great place to work, it's that they are dedicated to helping their teams make a difference in their clients success, and be recognized and rewarded and part of a team that helps achieve that.   And it's financially successful but that's not the purpose, the purpose is making their customers lives better. And he thinks most great places to work lists, completely ignore that. They think it's refrigerators full of beer in the break room, pool tables and ping pong and cool fringe benefits, that's the fringe, the core is being on a team where you're playing a valued role at really making a difference in a customer's life.   Where Can We Find Fred Online   Website - https://www.netpromotersystem.com/ LinkedIn – Fred Reichheld   Quote or Saying that During Times of Adversity Fred Uses   When asked about a quote or saying that he tends to revert to, Fred shared that he wished he did. When he's preaching to whether it's at the dinner table or elsewhere, he goes back to this idea of how important loyalty is. You got to understand what your life stands for, what is your purpose as an individual and then the way you live that purpose is to invest in relationships with other people who share that purpose. And it's how you can invest and help those people succeed that he thinks helps you achieve your mission. So, “Choose your loyalties wisely, they guide your life and they define your legacy.”   Me: Love it, choose your loyalties wisely, they guide your life and define your legacy. Amazing. Love it, absolutely love it. And I'm sure every person on the face of this earth that wants to do good, wants to leave a good legacy behind. So the only way to do that, I believe, as you had said was to try and live by doing those actions on a daily basis, do it consistently because that's the only way when you leave this world you'll be able to leave that legacy.   Fred stated that and measure, so many people would say, “Oh, I can't measure love.” And he would say, actually you can, you can get feedback from your customers in a systematic Net Promoter framework and understand how many lives you've enriched and that is your legacy. And then you should be measuring your way toward the kind of life you want to lead.   Please connect with us on Twitter @navigatingcx and also join our Private Facebook Community – Navigating the Customer Experience and listen to our FB Lives weekly with a new guest   Grab the Freebie on Our Website – TOP 10 Online Business Resources for Small Business Owners   Links   The Ultimate Question 2.0 (Revised and Expanded Edition): How Net Promoter Companies Thrive in a Customer-Driven World by Fred Reichheld Winning on Purpose: The Unbeatable Strategy of Loving Customers by Fred Reichheld How Will You Measure Your Life by Clayton Christensen Think Again: The Power of Knowing What You Don't Know by Adam Grant   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience   Do you want to pivot your online customer experience and build loyalty - get a copy of “The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience.”   The ABC's of a Fantastic Customer Experience provides 26 easy to follow steps and techniques that helps your business to achieve success and build brand loyalty. This Guide to Limitless, Happy and Loyal Customers will help you to strengthen your service delivery, enhance your knowledge and appreciation of the customer experience and provide tips and practical strategies that you can start implementing immediately! This book will develop your customer service skills and sharpen your attention to detail when serving others. Master your customer experience and develop those knock your socks off techniques that will lead to lifetime customers. Your customers will only want to work with your business and it will be your brand differentiator. It will lead to recruiters to seek you out by providing practical examples on how to deliver a winning customer service experience!

The Jordan Harbinger Show
593: Steven Pinker | Why Rationality Seems Scarce

The Jordan Harbinger Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 71:08


Steven Pinker (@sapinker) is a psychology professor at Harvard, one of the world's leading authorities on language and the mind, and an author of several bestsellers. His latest is Rationality: What It Is, Why It Seems Scarce, Why It Matters. What We Discuss with Steven Pinker: Why, by most metrics, older generations are mistaken when they proclaim: "Things were better back in my day!" Alternatives we might consider if Universal Basic Income can't sustainably solve the problem of housing and feeding a workforce increasingly unemployed by automation. Why nostalgia is overrated, and how criticizing the present is very often a way of criticizing your rivals. If we're really living, as Steven says, in "the most peaceable era in our species' existence," how does he explain why we still have wars, famines, uprisings, and genocides? What sentiment mapping shows us about the power of the media to manipulate us into seeing the world in a heavily negative light even as it's improving constantly on every measurable level. And much more... Full show notes and resources can be found here: jordanharbinger.com/593 Sign up for Six-Minute Networking -- our free networking and relationship development mini course -- at jordanharbinger.com/course! Miss the last time we had Navy SEAL leadership authority and Extreme Ownership co-author Jocko Willink on the show? Make sure to check out episode 93: Jocko Willink | Leading on the Line Between Extreme and Reckless! Like this show? Please leave us a review here -- even one sentence helps! Consider including your Twitter handle so we can thank you personally!

The Munk Debates Podcast
Be it resolved: Let's engineer a better human being

The Munk Debates Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:16


We've come a long way since DNA was first discovered in the mid 19th century. Today's scientists are using powerful engineering techniques to edit genes in human eggs and sperm, curing diseases and repairing defective genes before a child is even born. Some scientists are excited about these therapies, championing them as an exciting opportunity to create immunity to viruses, eliminate serious illnesses like AIDS, Alzheimer's, and cancer, and possibly reverse aging. Like prior innovations in medicine and technology, why wouldn't we embrace a science that allows people to live longer, healthier, and happier lives? Others are alarmed. They are worried that these new techniques raise a host of profound ethical issues. While eliminating genetic diseases is a worthwhile endeavor, many parents might be inclined to use this science to create designer babies: children who are smarter, taller, or have other supposedly desirable traits. And these tools aren't cheap. They will surely be available to the rich first, creating a terrifying new dimension to the growing economic inequality crisis. Scientists also point out that ‘playing god' and editing genes will alter our DNA code forever, and one mistake could inadvertently introduce new diseases into the human gene pool. While the desire to cure genetic diseases is a noble one, the manipulation of our DNA is more likely than not to push humanity towards a dangerous and dystopian future no one wants.  Arguing for the motion is George Church, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, Professor of Health Sciences and Technology at Harvard and MIT Arguing against the motion is Joyce Harper, Professor of Reproductive Science at the Institute for Women's Health, University College London. GEORGE CHURCH “If we bring the cost down, help with education, and make sure there's a dialogue that goes on in both directions, then everybody will have access.” JOYCE HARPER “I worry that these technologies will not be accessible to all and I also worry that people will use them for non-medical reasons. We will have a rich-poor divide that will become bigger and bigger as technology advances.” Sources:  ABC News, France24, Today Show, NBC News, VICE, PBS, Gattaca, Critical Past The host of the Munk Debates is Rudyard Griffiths - @rudyardg.   Tweet your comments about this episode to @munkdebate or comment on our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/munkdebates/ To sign up for a weekly email reminder for this podcast, send an email to podcast@munkdebates.com.   To support civil and substantive debate on the big questions of the day, consider becoming a Munk Member at https://munkdebates.com/membership Members receive access to our 10+ year library of great debates in HD video, a free Munk Debates book, newsletter and ticketing privileges at our live events. This podcast is a project of the Munk Debates, a Canadian charitable organization dedicated to fostering civil and substantive public dialogue - https://munkdebates.com/ The Munk Debates podcast is produced by Antica, Canada's largest private audio production company - https://www.anticaproductions.com/ Executive Producer: Stuart Coxe, CEO Antica Productions Senior Producer: Ricki Gurwitz Editor: Reza Dahya Associate Producer: Abhi Raheja  

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos
How to Give More Effectively

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 30:28


We all want to do good - and doing good can make us feel good - but we often don't make the most effective choices when we do things like donate money to charity. To mark #GiveTuesday, Harvard psychologist Joshua Green explains why we tend to give with our hearts rather than our heads. And why this means we don't do the most good possible with every dollar we donate. To donate to some of the most effective charities around (and to the causes close to your heart) go to: https://givingmultiplier.org/HAPPINESSLAB Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Harvard Alumni Entrepreneurs Invites
Confidence and the Entrepreneur

Harvard Alumni Entrepreneurs Invites

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:12


IN THIS EPISODE: In this episode our host, Denise Silber, is joined by  Eric McNulty,  a lifelong student of confidence and Associate Director of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard. With concrete examples and practical tips, they discuss: how to spot the overconfident entrepreneur, why it is essential to cultivate the right balance of confidence and humility,  where to find confidence, and how to maintain it in times of turbulence. As an author, researcher, and entrepreneur himself, Eric provides not only unique insights but the confidence checklist for entrepreneurs and observes that a confident entrepreneur will wait for the investors that her start-up deserves. GUEST BIO: Eric McNulty is Associate Director of the National Preparedness Leadership Initiative at Harvard. His work centers on leading in high stakes, high pressure situations. He is the principal author of case studies on the Boston Marathon bombing response, super storm Sandy, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. He is the co-author of the book, You're It: Crisis, Change, and How to Lead When it Matters Most and others. He is a contributing editor at strategy+business and has written many times for Harvard Business Review. Previously, he worked at Harvard Business Publishing (HBP). He was an intrapreneur at HBP and has worked with several startups.

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott
Dr. Steven Pinker: Psychologist, psycholinguist and author

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 68:24


What could be more interesting than the human mind? Pinker is a best-selling author interested in all aspects of language and human nature. Kevin talks with this Harvard professor about the human mind, rationality and developmental linguistics. Click here for transcript of this episode. Behind the Tech with Kevin Scott Steven Pinker Discover and listen to other Microsoft podcasts. 

Dr. Duke Show
Ep. 598 – Turns Out Homeschoolers Are Pretty Smart, According To Harvard

Dr. Duke Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 23:58


On this episode of the “Dr. Duke Show” we start with a study out of Harvard that finds homeschool students not only grow into well-adjusted adults, they're also more responsible, volunteer more, and have no problem socializing with others.

The Vance Crowe Podcast
Alina Chan: The Lab-Leak Hypothesis; co-author of "Viral" on the origin of COVID-19

The Vance Crowe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 56:12


Alina Chan is a molecular biologist who specializes in gene therapy and cell engineering at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. She published a pre-print document regarding a hypothesis about how COVID-19 might have entered humans. This led Chan on a wild adventure to discover COVID-19 true origins.Alina Chan is the co-author of the book Viral with Matt Ridley. To purchase the book and support the podcast use this link: https://amzn.to/3o5DSq4 Alina Chan's Twitter: https://twitter.com/AyjchanPODCAST LINKS —Vance Crowe Podcast Website: https://www.vancecrowe.com/podcastApple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-vance-crowe-podcast/id1463771076Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/08nGGRJCjVw2frkbtNrfLw?si=WUCu-FoyRRu9U_i-1gJZfgRSS: https://feeds.transistor.fm/the-vance-crowe-podcastYouTube Full Episodes: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCigB7W5bX_gCinJxev9WB8w/YouTube Clips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJKKb66A5_4ZcsE-rKI24ygBuy a sweatshirt, T-shirt or mugs from the podcast! Check out the Articulate Ventures Merch Store: https://teespring.com/stores/thevancecrowepodcastSubscribe to the podcast for email notifications on new episodes, invites to events and other exclusive content — http://eepurl.com/gSTfk5ABOUT THE VANCE CROWE PODCAST — Vance Crowe interviews people with an expertise that you would want to know about, but might not think to ask. He prompts his guests to think about their work in novel ways, discusses how it applies to regular people and has fun sharing stories and experiences.SUPPORT THE PODCAST —Rate the Podcast |  https://ratethispodcast.com/vcpJoin the Articulate Ventures Network | https://network.articulate.ventures/ —We are a patchwork of thinkers that want to articulate ideas in a forum where they can be respectfully challenged, improved and celebrated so that we can explore complex subjects, learn from those we disagree with and achieve our personal & professional goals.Contact Vance for a Talk | https://www.vancecrowe.com/ —Vance delivers speeches that reveal important aspects of human communication.  Audiences are entertained, engaged, and leave feeling empowered to change something about the way they are communicating.  Vance tells stories about his own experiences, discusses theories in ways that make them relatable and highlights interesting people, books, and media that the audience can learn even more from. Join the #ATCF Book Club | https://articulate.ventures/category/atcf-book-club

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 214: The Life of Hubert Harrison w/ Jeffrey B Perry

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 81:24


Often time the names of Black historical figures are relegated to the same usual suspects: Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, W.E.B Dubois, or Marcus Garvey. This myopic narrative of Black history leaves out figures who often had radical political agendas that challenged institutions traditional figures did not pick up on until later in their lives. One of those neglected figures is Hubert Harrison, who was deemed, "The Father of Harlem Radicalism." On this episode we will ask Jeffry Perry, author of a two volume series on Harrison's life, what distinguished Hubert Harrison from his contemporaries and made him one of the most important Black figures in American history no one knows about.    About Jeffrey B. Perry Dr. Jeffrey B. Perry (Jeff Perry) is an independent, working-class scholar formally educated at Princeton, Harvard, Rutgers, and Columbia. The recently published, second volume of his Hubert Harrison biography entitled "Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927" (Columbia University Press, December 2020) was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. Dr. Perry's work focuses on the role of white supremacy as a retardant to progressive social change and on the centrality of struggle against white supremacy to progressive social change efforts. Get Perry's books and more here: https://www.jeffreybperry.net/   About TIR Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron-only programming, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now: https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, especially YouTube!   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast & www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   Pascal Robert in Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert Read Pascal's Piece in Newsweek Here: https://www.newsweek.com/black-political-elite-serving-corporate-interests-misrepresenting-our-community-opinion-1652384   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music from the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/   Follow Djene Bajalan @djenebajalan   Follow Kuba Wrzesniewski @DrKuba2

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing
Ep#149 Leveraging tech to streamline the syndication process with TJ Lokboj

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:59


With a wide range of experience in entrepreneurship, real estate investing, and technology, our today's guest TJ Lokboj the co-founder of SyndicationPro and the managing partner at Holdfolio discusses the way he leveraged the power of tech in his investments right from his very first deal. Through SyndicationPro, TJ serves real estate sponsors and fund managers to automate fundraising, investor relations, and provide institutional-level reporting. TJ is also a managing partner at Holdfolio, a real estate investment firm with a rich portfolio value exceeding over $755M in total asset value including over 4,000 units. Tune in to the conversation to learn more about How TJ learned House Hacking from his early mentorDeploying tech to increase NOI and mitigate risksWhat drives TJ to focus on diversifying into different markets and asset classesHow they identify strategic partnersWhat drives TJ to thrive each day - Your future is as bright as your faith.—President Thomas S. Monson,ResourcesNeighbor: https://www.neighbor.com/Harvard study on the lead response: https://hbr.org/2011/03/the-short-life-of-online-sales-leadsHow will you measure your life: https://www.amazon.in/How-Will-Measure-your-Life/dp/0007490542Connect with TJ LokbojSyndicationPro: tj@syndicationpro.comHoldfolio: tj@holdfolio.comLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/tjlokboj/Instagram: @tjlokbojConnect with Rama KrishnaWebsite: www.ushacapital.comE-mail: info@ushacapital.com

Ask a Harvard Professor
Jerrold Rosenbaum: Are Psychedelics an Effective Treatment for Mood Disorders?

Ask a Harvard Professor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 44:46


Jerrold Rosenbaum, director of Massachusetts General Hospital's Center for the Neuroscience of Psychedelics, discusses the potential of using psychedelics, such as MDMA and magic mushrooms, to treat treatment-resistant mood disorders like depression and anxiety. Topics include the effect of psychedelics on the brain, how psychedelic therapy is conducted, the legality of medicinal psychedelics, and current research findings.  For more information about Harvard Magazine and this podcast, visit www.harvardmagazine.com/podcast and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.For a transcript of this episode, go to https://harvardmagazine.com/2021/jerrold-rosenbaumAsk a Harvard Professor is hosted by Lydialyle Gibson, Jonathan Shaw, Jacob Sweet, and Nancy Walecki, and produced by Jacob Sweet and Niko Yaitanes. Our theme music was composed by Louis Weeks.

The Paint & Pipette Podcast
Ep 09: Conscious Leadership with Amy Yin

The Paint & Pipette Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 37:58


This week we get together with Amy Yin, CEO and Founder of Office Together, a company that delivers manager empowerment and scheduling tools to achieve the full potential of a flexible workplace. We talk with Amy about her unique life experience and how it influenced her mindset and career. She describes how her parents raised her to have a CEO mindset and be comfortable with risk and how this differed from the upbringing of her peers who share her American-born Chinese identity. We hear from Amy about her decision to drop out of Harvard to pursue an opportunity to be part of a start-up with her professor in Paris, and why the opportunity was so valuable despite the company ultimately not succeeding. Next, we discuss Amy's work experience at companies like Hired and Coinbase and how her experiences with working remotely prompted her to found her own company. Amy goes on to explain why she was determined to hire her friends, why she is proud of her choices, and how she maintains those relationships with clear boundaries and expectations. You'll also hear how Amy nurtures creativity and inspiration in her daily life and why she is a big proponent of conscious leadership. Join us today for this inspiring conversation on what it means to start a company!Key Points From This Episode:Get to know today's guest Amy Yin, CEO and founder of Office Together.Amy's company Office Together and how they are helping managers by selling empowerment and scheduling tools to run a hybrid office.How Amy started Office Together after being inspired by the quiet time inherent to lockdown measures and working from home.Amy's upbringing and how it diverges from many of her peers who are also the children of immigrants.Why Amy's parents raised her to take risks and have a CEO mindset and how that affected her education, career, and attitude towards risk.How Amy dropped out of Harvard to build a company and how her parents' support was integral to that.Why this experience was hugely formative and positive, even though the company didn't succeed.The Conscious Leadership framework and how it manifests in Amy's attitude to work and life.Amy's decision to hire many of her close friends and their experiences organizing other events together.What Amy has learned from working with friends like setting clear boundaries and expectations.Some of the ways that Amy encourages people to think outside of the box at social engagements.How Amy recognized the moment that she should start a company.Why it was difficult for Amy to leave her job at Coinbase and start her own company.Amy's search for a co-founder and how she became a solo founder.How to determine whether you have a customer and whether something is worth building.How Amy used her connections to interview companies to test the viability of her product idea.How Amy nurtures creativity and inspiration in her daily life.Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:Amy YinAmy Yin on LinkedInOffice TogetherHiredCoinbaseJeremy UtleyMelissa MirandaMar HershensonThe Paint & Pipette Podcast

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer
Fostering curiosity in schools with Cultured Kids

The Better Leaders Better Schools Podcast with Daniel Bauer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 32:25


Michelle Goldschlag is the Co-founder and CEO of Cultured Kids (CK), a nonprofit organizationthat believes a student's sense of belonging is the primary catalyst for their success. Michelle's entrepreneurial spirit led to two other “failed” businesses before starting CK. Both endeavors, along with her dual degrees in Art & Spanish, strengthened CK's foundation. Aside from partnering with schools and community organizations in Northern VA and the Metro Boston area since their 2015 founding, Michelle has provided consulting services for international museums and global organizations like the Holistica Foundation in Brazil. Michelle's personal mission is to use her creative gifts and empathy to maximize her impact.   Her lofty professional goals include: Changing the trajectory of education along with her community impact Growing a robust and unified donor community that is genuinely valued Developing the most sought after, kickass volunteer program   Personally, Michelle aspires to: Shed her fear of failure and stop caring what others think Learn to love public speaking (currently makes her sick) Become an author To Michelle, Cultured Kids is a third child, constantly working its way through new stages of development, inciting sleepless nights, and in constant need of attention & nourishment. While Michelle loves her job and struggles to draw the line between work and life, during her personal time she can be seen backpacking and hiking with her family all over the country,reading four or more books at a time, and dreaming with reckless abandon.    Show Highlights Involve yourself in the greatest need for students. Programs that impact, solve problems and connect for the entire learning community.  The value in CLOSING CIRCLES. The number one focus in education moving forward. Facing these fears for unlimited growth. Engage students' curiosity about themselves and the world with Cultured Kids Natural and unique ways to promote SEL and embrace cultures.    “Having two children of my own and not being able to afford to travel. I wanted to make sure they were exposed to other perspectives. They were not only seeing cultural diversity around them, but that they were actually learning about different cultures and about how to talk about differences.”  Full Transcript Available    Michelle Goldschlag's Resources & Contact Info: Cultured Kids Jacqueline Woodson - books What Do You Do With an Idea?  Webinar Form: https://view.flodesk.com/pages/6169a87f74d564fa09f3f4f4 Instagram Facebook Linkedin Twitter   Looking for more? Read The Better Leaders Better Schools Roadmap Join “The Mastermind” Read the latest on the blog   SHOW SPONSORS: HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Transform how you lead to become a resilient and empowered change agent with Harvard's online Certificate in School Management and Leadership. Grow your professional network with a global cohort of fellow school leaders as you collaborate in case studies bridging the fields of education and business. Apply today at http://hgse.me/leader.   TEACHFX School leaders know that productive student talk drives student learning, but the average teacher talks 75% of class time! TeachFX is changing that with a “Fitbit for teachers” that automatically measures student engagement and gives teachers feedback about what they could do differently.  Learn more about the TeachFX app and get a special 20% discount for your school or district by visiting teachfx.com/blbs.   ORGANIZED BINDER Organized Binder is the missing piece in many classrooms. Many teachers are great with the main content of the lesson. Organized Binder helps with powerful introductions, savvy transitions, and memorable lesson closings. Your students will grow their executive functioning skills (and as a bonus), your teachers will become more organized too. Help your students and staff level up with Organized Binder.   Copyright © 2021 Twelve Practices LLC

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast
Yale Doctoral Candidate & Author Crystal Harrell

Ivy League Prep Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 27:18


Crystal grew up the 7th of 10 children in public housing. She didn't dream of attending a top-tier college until she was older, because she didn't think it was possible and didn't know anyone else who was doing it. Share shares her incredible story here about overcoming the odds and getting into a highly competitive PhD program at her dream university, Yale. Check out her book: Crystal ClearYou can also follow her on Instagram at @Crystalharrell_

Plant Proof - Plant Based Nutrition & Inspirational Stories
Food ideology with Melanie Joy, PhD

Plant Proof - Plant Based Nutrition & Inspirational Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 48:17


In Episode #178 we hear from Harvard trained Psychologist Dr Melanie Joy on food ideology and speciesism. This is a condensed throwback of a previous episode we recorded together.Key things covered in this episode:- What lead Melanie to studying psychology and veganism- Learning how to communicate the vegan message- Cognitive dissonance and why people may react negatively to the vegan message- What is carnism and the system that disconnects us from our food- The difficulty of communicating the vegan message- Vegan allies and using psychology to open the conversation to non-vegans- The potential harm of using comparisons of slavery, the holocaust & rape- How to approach people in a way that they will be receptive to the message- Vegans using shaming techniques is demotivating- Moral superiority in vegans and privilege- Trauma narratives and toxic moral perfectionism- Finding a healthy process of communicating- Focusing on feeding compassion- The rapid growth of the vegan movementResources:The 3 minute video on Carnism created by Melanie and her team Beyond Carnism that I referred to in this conversationConnect with Melanie on Instagram @beyondcarnismCarnism.org websiteMelanie's Book Why We Love Dogs, Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows: An Introduction to Carnism, 10th Anniversary EditionThe Vegan Matrix - another book written by Melanie exploring what she believes is a serious problem with the vegan movement: unexamined privilege.Melanie's 2015 TedX Talk Toward Rational, Authentic Food ChoicesWant to support the show?If you are enjoying the Plant Proof podcast a great way to support the show is by leaving a review on the Apple podcast app. It only takes a few minutes and helps more people find the episodes.It's also helpful to subscribe on Apple Podcast app and/or follow on the Spotify Podcast app.Simon Hill, Nutritionist, Sports PhysiotherapistCreator of Plantproof.com and host of the Plant Proof PodcastAuthor of The Proof is in the PlantsConnect with me on Instagram and TwitterDownload my FREE two week meal planDownload my FREE blood test and supplement guides here

Up Your Creative Genius
Deena Pierott: How to embrace change with dignity and integrity with diversity and inclusion pioneer

Up Your Creative Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 42:46


Deena Pierott is also a Social Impact Entrepreneur and the Founder of the award winning and nationally recognized STEM+Arts program for youth of color called iUrban Teen which has chapters in four states, and most recently launched Black Women in STEM 2.0. Ms. Pierott is also a diversity strategist and international public speaker. She has served on several boards and commissions including a Gubernatorial appointment to the Commission on African American Affairs in the State of Washington. She has been featured on the following publications: Government Technology, Essence Magazine, Working Mother Magazine, Black Enterprise, Ebony Magazine, Deliver magazine, Portland Business Journal, Geekwire, Colors of Influence, Neurology Now, the Chicago Tribune and on NPR. “We are standing on the shoulders of our ancestors who are slaves. It's a responsibility in this life to walk through it with dignity, grace and integrity.” “Stand up for others and be fearless with it.” “Raise your hand, ask questions, be engaged, even if you know the answer to it. Don't be a wallflower.”  Deena Pierott https://www.linkedin.com/in/dpierott  iUrbanTeen https://iurbanteen.org/ Do Better: Spiritual Activism https://www.amazon.com/Do-Better-Spiritual-Activism-Supremacy/dp/1982151277  Follow Patti Dobrowolski - Instagram https://www.instagram.com/upyourcreativegenius/ Linkedin https://www.linkedin.com/in/patti-dobrowolski-532368/ Up Your Creative Genius https://www.upyourcreativegenius.com/  Timestamp [3:56] Meeting Deena Pierott and fling into Diversity, Equity and Inclusion [7:23] Working with innovative ways to change policy [8:44] How being a gay person in Texas is similar to Deena's experience [10:21] You have to be yourself in corporate America [10:55] How Deena started iUrbanTeen [14:26] Growing iUrbanYouth, iUrbanUniversity and working with Microsoft [15:57] Why Black Women in STEM was created [17:19] Making change in the world where anything can be done [19:20] It's never too late. What's your next thing? [21:22] Who is an inspiration to Deena? [22:56] How to tap into your creative genius? What's your routine? [24:35] You got to have skin in the game [27:52] Trick is to get into motivation and keep in momentum [28:20] Workaholic, selfcare, and dealing with trauma [31:30] Hurdles of being a black women founder [34:30] Sometimes its easier to stand up for others [36:27] What is the book you are reading right now [39:40] Biggest tip for someone making a change   Patti Dobrowolski 0:03 Hello superstars. Welcome to the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast where you will gain insight and tips to stomp on the accelerator and blast off to transform your business and your life. I'm your host, Patti Dobrowolski. And if this is your first time tuning in, then strap in because this is serious rocket fuel. Each week I interview fellow creative geniuses to help you learn how easy it is to up your creative genius in any part of your life. Hey, everybody, it's Patti Dobrowolski. What's Up Your Creative Genius? Oh, my God. Today, I have just one of my favorite people in the universe. Deena Pierott. Now listen. So if you don't know who Deena Pierott is, I'm going to give you the lowdown on her and then she's going to tell us about herself. But first, I just want to say thank you to everyone who has been subscribing and listening to the podcast and writing reviews. You like drove us up in the charts! It's fantastic. I love it. And I'm so grateful I am because this podcast is all about making change: how you can make change happen. And I've invited all these changemakers who have decided to change the world for other people or for themselves or their business. And so Deena Pierott is a serious changemaker. I got to read you her bio. Okay, so she is a sought after diversity strategist, Talent Acquisition Professional and international keynote speaker, no doubt, she's created cutting edge DEI programs that yield results in impact. And you know, we need that. Okay. But here's what I want to say she served on a number of boards. She's really super amazing. And she started iUrbanTeen, which really helped to advance and allow for kids who didn't have access to computers to get them. And so I know you're going to talk a little bit about that. But before we go on, I want to say this, that she was honored to be acknowledged by President Barack Obama as a White House Champion of Change for technology inclusion, and by Ebony magazine on their Power 100 list. She is like been, in Essence Magazine, the top 50 black female founders. She's just amazing. I'm telling you, if I showed you this List of awards, you will be here forever. But my God, welcome to the show. Deena Pierott. You're amazing! Deena Pierott 2:41 Oh, wow. Thank you. I you know, when I hear that stuff, I'm going is that me? And now that you know, because a lot of times you're so busy working and creating and working and creating that you have to sometimes stop and look back at you know, I did this. Patti Dobrowolski 2:58 I know it. Deena Pierott 2:59 I did this. Oh, I'm ready to cuss I got it. Because Patti Dobrowolski 3:02 That's okay. i You should have seen somebody else I had was just F bomb every other word. Right? You're all right. Yeah. Here's the amazing. You are just incredible. And I met you because somebody decided that we should meet. We hooked up. We had lunch together with your granddaughter. Yeah. And we were both like, what are we doing in Portland? Wow, this place is so weird. And neither one of us live there anymore. So they're, you know, right. Deena Pierott 3:34 I know. There you have it. But I just think it was just an instant connection. I wonder how they might just like, Look, Patti Dobrowolski 3:41 I know, friends. I know. It is so good. And so I just been following. Honestly, I stalk you all the time to see what you're up to. And then I like, post "Deena Pierott, she's so amazing." So follow her and do stuff with her. Now tell us if you would in your own words, like tell us about you and how you got started doing what you're doing and you know, anything you want to share about it? Well, you know, Deena Pierott 4:03 it's I'm going to try to make it a shorter story because usually I tell this long story with Patti Dobrowolski 4:09 international keynote speaker that goes on. And Deena Pierott 4:13 I sometimes I think I'm a Baptist preacher. Patti Dobrowolski 4:17 Exactly. We love that. You know, Deena Pierott 4:19 I always like to say, what's the why, you know, What's your why and things that you do. And sometimes you end up in a space that you didn't think he would be in, you know, 1015 20 years ago. So I kind of fell into the Diversity Equity work back in the 90s when I moved up to Portland from Compton, California. Patti Dobrowolski 4:39 Alright, so there you go right now. Oh, now I'm from LA Oh, I know all about content. I know in the Portland is white, white. Deena Pierott 4:48 Girl. Let me tell you, it's the whitest white folks I've ever seen in my life. And I even started fading. I was not this color. But I guessed it But then I instantly saw this disconnect, I saw this inequity on how people of color, especially the black community was treated. Yeah, no, I was called the n-word. I don't know how many times and I'm going I've never been called that in California. Right. Not that it doesn't happen, but it didn't happen to me. Right. I also saw when working in the workplace, the inequities there as well. I also saw how my own people and other people of color kind of were a little complacent to things where they didn't know how or didn't feel like they needed to advocate for themselves. Patti Dobrowolski 5:36 Yeah. Would they just let it slide? Slide and just go, like, well, that's the way it is here. Deena Pierott 5:43 And see, that was not me. Oh, no, not me at all. And so I instantly started creating different forums and different initiatives at the City of Portland. And it was interesting, because I worked for a director at a bureau who was from the East Coast. And he wholeheartedly gave me the platform to do what I did right now. I felt that he truly trusted my decisions. Yes, he believed in diversity and equity. And it gave me the floor, let me run with it. And I ran like hell. So I was able to create, like, I created the city's infinity groups that they have employee resource groups, in partnership with the mayor's office, the commissioners and all that and made it really meaty. I created so many different initiatives. Oh, my gosh, I made sure that all of our interview panels were reversed. I ensured that all of our panels for contract reviews were diverse. And that was in the 90s Patti Dobrowolski 6:40 for for my cat popular. Wow, that's crazy. But I also Deena Pierott 6:43 advocated for myself, and that scared a lot of people, you know, because here's this woman of color, a black woman that is holding her own. And yeah, letting you get away with this. And so, but what made me sad, Patti was a lot of the employees from different bureaus would come to me, and they would go Deena, can you ask my boss, if I could do this? If I can go here? Patti Dobrowolski 7:05 Oh my God. I know that. Deena Pierott 7:09 You know, and it Patti Dobrowolski 7:10 makes me sad. Because that means that they don't feel empowered enough to go. They don't have the confidence to go maybe because somebody slapped him down. You know what exactly happened here? Yeah, fear of losing a job. Deena Pierott 7:23 Exactly. And so I will tell them, No, you can tell them. And this is what you say and how you say it. Yeah, I still wouldn't do it, I would still go to their directors and ask these questions. And so, but someone told me and I remember that this was in like the late 90s. One of my own folks from the black communities that Deena, you're too opinionated. You rock the boat too much. You have to make them comfortable, meaning I needed to make white people comfortable. And I'm like, I don't need to make anybody comfortable. Exactly. And I say hold on a second, what plantation? Did I just arrived on? Exactly right. And so but that kind of pushback from not only the white community, but my own community made me try harder. Right. And so that's, I was creating initiatives that were way ahead of their time, and people are just now catching on. Right. So that was my last. And that was my journey into the diversity, equity belonging inclusion arena. And so I still get asked from different companies to either Keynote or to lead their teams on edgy innovative ways to change policy. How do you look at this through an equity lens? Yeah. And how do you do it? Not me, not how I how do you do it? Right? Yeah, within those companies. So that was the DEI journey. Yeah. Now, let's go to iUrbanTeen. Patti Dobrowolski 8:44 Yeah, cuz I want to talk about them. I know. I love them. Well, the other thing is that, I mean, honestly, I'm a gay woman. So you can imagine my story isn't exactly the same. But it is about you. You have to come out every second. And then you know, I live in Texas now. So come on, people go meet my neighbors. And my neighbors were kind of like really skeptical about us. And then, you know, a young transgender kid came and left a card at our door and said, thank goodness, you have that sign in your front lawn? Because now I know that there's possibility for me. Deena Pierott 9:19 Oh, see, right. You never know. You never know who you're the role model for? Or what pathways you're helping to create someone how you're helping their voice be heard. You never know. But for you or just to think if you didn't speak up, if you didn't feel comfortable in your own skin. Think about the health issues, the mental health issues. Yes, I would be steaming inside. That's why I tell people say something. You feel that you just had a micro or macro aggression thrown your way. Say something. It may not be that instant. It may not be that same day. It may not be that week. That's some point. I need to come to Patti Say, Patti, you know what you mentioned to me what you said to me last week, blah, blah, blah. It really felt like a microaggression. That's how it felt for me. How can we bridge this? You know, how can we do this differently? You need to be comfortable enough to have that kind of conversation. don't own that shit. Okay? Patti Dobrowolski 10:18 Yeah, don't take it in. Don't, don't Deena Pierott 10:21 get in, Patti Dobrowolski 10:21 don't try to change yourself. This is me. Like I remember, I wanted to write a book called How to Be yourself in corporate America, because you have to be yourself have to be your own. You cannot. I mean, now, thankfully, some things are breaking open. But in big companies, it's still Deena Pierott 10:38 the same. I still say that's not the company for you if it's feel that way. And that's why I tell all of my folks and even our students in Ireland team. Yeah, one of the things we teach them is how do you best advocate for yourself? Patti Dobrowolski 10:50 I love that. So how did you start that? How did you start Ironman teen, Deena Pierott 10:55 you know, the story goes, I was commissioner here on Governor Greg gwass. Commission on African American Affairs back in 2006, to 2011. And at the time, all of our ethnic Commission's were talking about the opportunity gap issue, especially for male youth of color, you know, falling through the cracks, being marginalized, disenfranchised, not having a clear pathway. And I'm an entrepreneur, I'm not one to sit back and meetings and boards, and just talk something to death over and over overnight, Patti Dobrowolski 11:26 we got to get things going. We got to add some happen. You got to make some happen now. Deena Pierott 11:31 So I instantly started looking at my community is being how if our families knew about the Running Start program, which is an amazing program, which has been graduate high school with not only a diploma but with an associate's degree. The issue was a lot of our brown and black families weren't aware of it because the school counselors were telling them yeah, of course not. That's not and so we were making sure that happened. Then I was asked to participate on a chief information officer Council in Portland. And I told my friend Mark, who arranged these for these councils all across the country, but I'm not a CIO. He goes, I know that, but you're innovative and we need you. So I went okay. Works for me. And so I went to the very first meeting, Patti, and I was a little late getting to the party. And so I opened the door, and it's a roomful of white men. Yeah, so imagine me walking in there with an afro wig on. Alright, I had a big curly Afro wig. Yeah, leopard print jacket, lay Yes. And big hoop earrings. Patti Dobrowolski 12:34 I love it. Deena Pierott 12:35 I went, oh, i Whoa. Okay. So. So during that meeting, I was sitting there and I said to myself, Okay, so over here we have these youth who are being disenfranchised, marginalized. Yeah, clearly don't have a pathway for success. But in this room, is where the opportunities are. That's right. So how do I reach this divide? And during that lunch meeting, I thought up iUrbanTeen, and within six months, we launched with the help of some of those men in the room, who were still engaged with me after all of these years. Oh, that's fantastic. We launched iUrbanTeen in October 2011, exactly 10 years ago, the 13th year, and wow, that was incredible. And I knew from the first event that we had to keep going because I saw this magic happening, you know, during those sessions, because everything we do is fast paced, hands on. Kind of eclectic, cool, kind of funky. You know, all of that. But it grabs them. It grabs your attention. Patti Dobrowolski 13:38 Yeah, they'll switch a notch when they need you since we launched Deena Pierott 13:43 in that 2008. Yeah. 2011 We have since launched in Seattle, Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston. We've also we're hoping to launch in New York and also in Miami, Florida, as well as several other cities in 2022 and 2023. Patti Dobrowolski 14:02 Does that mean you get to go to those cities and launch they see now that's right and went to Texas Come on. You should call me because now Deena Pierott 14:12 are you in Dallas or Houston or I'm in Fortworth? I'm close enough I could go to Dallas Yeah, Dallas Yeah, well you know we're gonna be working with the city of Dallas on expanding all right ramps there so we go I will definitely let you know. Patti Dobrowolski 14:26 Yes, for sure. I love it. Alright, so you set up i Urban Youth, right. And you really helped them to create some programs that gave them access they didn't have before tools and resources and do you do internships too? How did you set the all that up? Deena Pierott 14:44 We do you know, we started just kind of grassroots having these paid internship programs in Portland for high school students. Yeah, with partnership with Cigna and then there was a company I Otis that was there as well. And now because we've had so many youth over the years that have been with our program, now they're in college. So we had to launch I Urban University. Oh, yeah. That is for over 18 crowd. Yeah. And so now do they get mentorship and things like this? Yeah, we have mentors that work with them. Yeah, we have diverse instructors that work with them. And in all the thing that for this Ironman University, that's where we have our scholarships. We have our paid college internships there. And now we are launching a support engineer training program with Microsoft that launches early next. I love it. Oh, that's so we have women we have black women in this first cohort aged 19 to 46. Yeah, that will be trained by Microsoft and also go through the certification process where they can get jobs starting at 80 to 90,000 a year. Oh, after 120 hours worth of trade. i Patti Dobrowolski 15:57 Oh my god, that's so fantastic. Now is this black woman in STEM? Deena Pierott 16:02 That's separate. That's separate. That's I mean, Patti Dobrowolski 16:05 oh my god, that is so incredible. Alright, so now talk about your latest thing, black woman in STEM, Deena Pierott 16:12 STEM 2.0. And we call it 2.0. Because, you know, we change the M and stem to manufacturing. because math is interwoven in all the other elements as well, and sciences and technology and engineering. Math is already interwoven in that. So we wanted to add manufacturing, because yes, that's a segment that sometimes overlooked in the whole stem arena. Definitely. So a couple years ago, some of my colleagues and I wanted to create a platform or an association for women that are in those spaces that we can brainstorm, have training sessions for, conferences for and basic networking, and also sisterhood. Sister fellowship. That's right. And so that's what we did. And so this year, you know, we were supposed to have our conference last year, but because in Texas, but because of COVID Yeah. Hectic, nutso course. So this year, we are having the conference, and it's a hybrid, where we will have in person events and virtual sessions. I learned this this Friday and Saturday here in Bellevue, you know, which is a community. Patti Dobrowolski 17:19 Oh, that's fantastic. Okay, I love that. All right. So look at how many I just so for those of you that are listening, so here is somebody that saw a need way back in the 90s. And then just built that, you know, went to bat for everything that she believes in, and then started to build the infrastructure to help other people. And this is what we're talking about is when you want to make change in the world, like yours is about big change in the world so that it will impact you know, your grandkids, it will impact your neighbors, your community. So these are the things that you did, but you are such an innovator because you sat in that room of all those. This is me, I'm imagining that because that's me too. I walk I know rooms with all white men, and I'm thinking Oh, yeah. Okay, now we're gonna have fun. Now I'm going to be myself and you guys are gonna love me at the end or else right? Yeah. And part of it is that you have to use your woo strength, but you also have to in that moment, you have to really build a bridge between your state of consciousness and theirs. And that's what you are. You excel in that when you do that, how do you do that? What is it that you do that you tap into in yourself to hear what needs to be done? Deena Pierott 18:40 Well, you know, I just kind of sit back. I think I blame my mom for making me think and understand that I could do anything. Right. And I believed it. I fell for it. Yeah. And so I still believe I still know nothing. I believe I know that I can do anything well, and you have Patti Dobrowolski 18:59 such that there's no reason why you shouldn't believe but what if you're a young person coming up? Or even if you've been working in a corporation for a long time or working for somebody else in the city for a long time, and you feel like, oh, yeah, yeah, but it's too late. And I'm almost going to retire. Why would I want to rock the boat? What would you say to them? Deena Pierott 19:20 Oh, it's never too late. It's never too late. Like I just turned 63 You know, on October 6, and I'm are ready. I know. I'm already thinking about what's the next best thing? What's the next thing I could do? Right? I don't know how some of us fell into that trap of okay, well, now you're over 50 So it's time to slow down. Everything is downhill from there. I don't know who sent us that Patti Dobrowolski 19:45 Milan. Oh, no, that was really big. Yeah. Now, you know, I'm older than you. So that's fantastic. I'm like, Yeah, I'm a year older than you. And so we look good girl. We look. I'm just saying and part of it is that We want to make sure that we're evolving. This is what you're saying is, what's my next thing? So that I want to know, like, when you have a vision for yourself, what's interesting to you right now? What are you fascinated with? That you can tell us about? Deena Pierott 20:16 Well, you know, I think that for me, because I'm so people centered, I really want to do something if it is my own, like digital online magazine for women over 50, you know, women of color over 50, particularly, because that's an audience that's overlooked a lot of times, I'm kind of a, like a lifestyle brand type of thing that I want to do I want to get into podcasting, you know, like you. So that's what I feel that the next layer is for me. Yep, thing that's really cool and fun. I Urban Teen will always be at my heart. But you know, I'm building up the infrastructure now where I have now managing director for Portland and southwest Washington. Patti Dobrowolski 20:57 Well, I see you have your infrastructure in there and the people that can do it. And Deena Pierott 21:03 pretty soon it's when do I have all the gears in place where I can just kind of sit back? And just so funny, Patti Dobrowolski 21:10 because when I saw you in Portland, you talked about that, then. So what's true is you have multiple gears now, before you were just working one gear for a while Deena Pierott 21:21 working here, right? Patti Dobrowolski 21:22 Now you got four gears all going at the same time. So that's Yeah, I think will be really, really amazing to see. And you know, who is inspirational to you right now in the world who you look out and you see, and you think, Wow, that is cool. I like that. whatever they're doing, is there anybody that is a role model for you, either now or in the past that really has helped you, and helps you as you get going on ideas? Do you have like your little cadre of sisterhood that you talk to about things, do you? Deena Pierott 21:54 Well, you know, and that's interesting, because I think back on the person, that really was my inspiration, and I know, it may sound a little corny and all but it was my mother, you know, and she passed away suddenly, in 2010. I am such a rogue, that there really isn't anyone out there that I see that I want to learn from or any thing, it's sad to say, but it's sometimes when you are so much into your own. Patti Dobrowolski 22:27 Yep. It's I know, Deena Pierott 22:30 I have a lot, a lot, a lot of mentees or people women that want to consult with me on how do I do this? How do I do what you do? So but there's not a whole lot of others that I see that I can connect with, or brainstorm on. Because usually what I'm thinking about and what I'm envisioning, is so far out there that no one's been there yet. Patti Dobrowolski 22:56 Yeah, I love that. That's fantastic. And so you really what you're doing is you're tapping into your own creative genius, that flow. So you just unlock that. And so tell me, what's your daily routine that you go through? That helps you unlock your creative genius? What Deena Pierott 23:11 do you do? Well, you know, what I do is I just sit back in early morning hours when it's dead silent, and there's no noise, there's no nothing. I haven't even made coffee yet. I just sit in silence. And I just envision what I already have in place, how I can tweak it, how can I make it better? How can I do this? At the same time? How could I add in this creative edge into this? That's not been done before? You know, so I just kind of invid before I write down anything? Yeah, I first have a vision for it. Yeah. Then once the vision clicks, I'll start creating an outline for how I want to do this, then the next step is how am I going to implement this? You know, what's the impact on the students on the companies that I work for in the DEI space? Yeah. And sometimes when I'm even working with the companies like right now, I was working with a global tech company. And we did something totally different that they hadn't done before yet, right? Sometimes I'll work with them. Like, this is what I'm thinking, what how can we do this? So I'll get there. Like I tell companies, you've got to have some skin in the game, I can sit there and talk to you. I'm blue in the face around diversity and equity. But you've got to roll up your sleeves, and you got to help me make this happen. Patti Dobrowolski 24:31 That's right. Because it's not gonna happen without them. Yeah. Because otherwise you're just a consultant coming in. And same thing, if I'm drawing a picture of the vision and nobody's attached to it, then sure, nobody cares. Deena Pierott 24:44 And so if I give them the tools on how do they do this internally, where they don't even need me anymore, a lot of times you'll get diversity, people thinking or saying that they're diversity experts and consultants that intentionally want to keep that company so they can keep getting a Patti Dobrowolski 25:01 paycheck. Oh, no, that's so what is that doing? Deena Pierott 25:05 What is that mindset doing for this next level of students coming through? I haven't seen that might land at your workplace. Right? Yeah, exactly. What is that doing for my sons who are in the workforce now? Yes. What is that going to be doing for my granddaughters who had some yesterday and your workspace? I'd rather I'm this way. And that's why I don't think I'll ever be monetarily rich. I'd rather give them all the tools they can do right now. Yeah. And happen, attach it to action, create it, attach it to metrics, yep, with everything, letting them know where they need to pivot, so that they can be equitable and inclusive workspaces. Don't keep paying me for years and years to keep you sick. Yeah, Patti Dobrowolski 25:46 that's right. Well, and one of the things that I'm listening to is that so you let the ideas germinate about where you are, and you envision how you could make a better so this my friend, Dawn calls this spinning the universe, you're really spinning the universe. Now using your imagination, then you get a plan, you get it down on paper, so that you've got something so that you know, okay, this is what we're going to do. And even if it's with somebody else, you get some partnership in there, so that you can make it happen. So you're not the driver of the activity, because the thing that you can be the driver at the beginning, but you don't want to be the driver for That's right. I Deena Pierott 26:25 always say this is the hardest thing to do when you are someone like me and like you and that very creative space, is find people that share your rhythm. Yeah, right. Oh, that's right. Find people that share your rhythm. I spent so many years trying to consult with people who had no idea what I really wanted to do. Right, but I just knew that what they were saying didn't settle. Well. I'm like, yeah, yeah. And that's crazy. Oh, man. Thank you, man. Oh, thank you. So it took me a long time. And it's still really hard to try to find those people who share your rhythm, right? You're one of those people that share my rhythm. Yeah, we got to get things going girl stuff off the bat, right back and forth. In an hour sit in ideas, right? Patti Dobrowolski 27:11 That's right. But then we got to go do them. We got to get people to help us do them. Like somebody in the background putting together your peloton machine right now, is that right? So if you're listening and you hear like the sound this clanking so Dina warned me that they were going to put up her peloton now and so whoever's back there doing that, you know, keep going and just know that this is what happens in a creative space. You have got to get everything happening at the same time, because there's not enough time in the day. Deena Pierott 27:41 Yeah, the only thing Patti is I'm looking at them putting this peloton treadmill together now I'm going to have to use it. I'm like, Oh, yes, Patti Dobrowolski 27:52 you're gonna have to use well, and and you know, I would say bite off just a small piece of that, like, I just start on things like that. Well, what's true for me is that I know if I don't dive full in and set a goal, that seems like whoa, I wonder if I could do that, then I will really get motivated to do it. I may not do it the next week, but I will that initial week getting myself going. So it's the trick to keep yourself motivated. And that's how it is with change, too. Right? You see something that needs to be changed, you get super excited at the beginning. But how do you maintain your own motivation? How do you maintain it? I want to know how you maintain, Deena Pierott 28:31 you know, for me that and I gotta be honest, until they transparent, this whole self care thing sucks for me, because I don't know how to do it. I have such a workaholic. But I also learned about myself as I have to do this self care, I have to learn this piece as much energy that I'm putting into these ideas and these businesses. Yes, I have to put that in me. You know, I have been through a lot of trauma over the last 20 years. One of the coping mechanisms for trauma is to stay busy. Yes. So I stayed super busy, you know, and it wasn't until my husband that my son's father passed away of cancer in 2019 that I actually hit a wall. I hit a wall and I basically almost had a nervous breakdown. And I realized at that point, I said to myself, I'm a smart enough woman to know that I gotta walk through this trauma. Right? Yeah, trauma that I have been suppressing for over 20 years. And that was a constant it was a continued I just got busier just wrapped more up. Yeah. Then I thought about what I created under trauma. Right. The White House under trauma. I'm honored in the Lincoln Center in New York with Oprah Magic Johnson all of them because if I ever team under trauma, right, I've been all these things under trauma. And I think that's why if they all didn't really resonate with me, well, Patti Dobrowolski 29:53 they don't really sink in. You're like yeah, I did that. I know that because I was on Broadway things like this. You Her major accomplishments you just sort of brushed him off. Yeah. Don't let them soak in. Yeah, yeah. That's great. Thank you so much. And then on to the next thing, because if you slow down too much, yeah. And you have to actually feel what's going on inside of yourself. Exactly. And really takes the passing of somebody who is important to you, to wake you up. I think sometimes, for me, it did. It was when my mom died. That was when I woke up. I couldn't get out of bed. Honestly, I couldn't get out of bed. I was just like, I don't know, you know, what's the point? And then I had to deal with all the things that had happened in my life. Right? Yeah. Deena Pierott 30:37 Well, that's what I've been going through over the past couple of years, since his death is just sitting still and going through the things like, you know, the things that have happened over the years me being discriminated against in the workplace, and, and and all the pushback that I've had to deal with, and it has been a heavy lift. Yeah, me with all of my businesses here in the Pacific Northwest. Patti Dobrowolski 30:59 Oh, you know, got it got to be because if you're in LA, you'd have our alliances. Deena Pierott 31:06 Oh, yeah. Even if I was in New York, Boston, Chicago, Patti Dobrowolski 31:09 any of the big cities, Dallas to the Dallas, Deena Pierott 31:13 I just look at how well we're so embraced in Dallas and Houston. And you know, I just came back from Boston, that was in Boston in Portland, Maine. And it was a totally different vibe there. Yeah. You know, I loved it. So I feel that being a black female founder here in the Pacific Northwest, there's a lot of hurdles to go through. Yep. You know, a lot of hurdles. And it was a harder path to get here. However, I'm the total, optimistic, idealistic person, I feel that all of that struggle, all the traumas, things that I've gone through all of the hardships, helps make me the mosaic of who I am. Patti Dobrowolski 31:57 Oh, it is, and you are so beautiful. You're such a beautiful mosaic that that is what true. And what I love about what you said, is that, you know, the composite of view. And all of us really is all of the things that we've had to go through all the, you know, all the N word, in your case, all the bottles thrown at me out of somebody's car window in LA, you know, all that stuff. Those are the aggressions that happen. And what's true is you understand your essence in the universe for good. You know, you're a vehicle for good. And so you take all that and just say, This is who I am. This makes me empathetic, right? This is where my empathy comes from. And this is where my need for connection. And also, this is where my I don't know about you, but my fuel to make change in the world comes from and you're spot on. You are just so incredible. And I'm so grateful that our paths crossed, because, gosh, I mean, you've just been doing so many things. Since I saw you in Portland. You were like a little lifeline to me in that weird deli that we were eating with your cute little granddaughter. So much older now. Leila Berg. Yeah, she's Deena Pierott 33:19 nine years old. She will be 10 Pretty soon. And you know, crazy. I look at her and I see true leadership in Yeah, yeah. I was honored at Clark College a couple years ago as Iris award winner. Yeah, cool. When in the audience, my son, his wife, and the girls were the audience. And wow, when I was doing the acceptance piece, when I was accepting it, I looked over at my granddaughters, and I asked the audience, you know, can I have a moment I have a message I want to give my granddaughter Oh, my God. And they said yes. And so I asked my son, but Leila up on stage. And I said, because the other ones are way too little. And so I said, Leila, I said, I hope that one day you'll understand why your grandmother is being honored here tonight. And I also hope that you understand the pathway that I'm trying to create for you. I said, Leila, we are standing on the shoulders of our ancestors who were slaves. So it's a sponsibility in this life, to walk through it with dignity, grace, and integrity. Oh, you promise me you'll do that? And she shook her head. Yes. Oh, I blew her kiss. She blew me a kiss. The audience was crying. Oh, Patti Dobrowolski 34:30 I bet. Oh, my God. Deena Pierott 34:31 And I said, ladies and gentlemen, in 20 years, she'll be the one receiving this award. So let's give her a round of applause. Oh, I love that. Oh, it's speaking it into existence. Well, I just reader, I see such a leader in her and I see the empathy, the empathy in her there's a young boy in her classroom at school elementary school, who's autistic. And he says if the other kids fully handled Leila is the only one who's nice for him and stands up for him. Patti? I almost cried because I said, she's got it. Patti Dobrowolski 35:02 That's it. Got it. She got it. She got the gene and the kids got Deena Pierott 35:06 the gene she has a friend and the leadership, stand up for others. And be fearless with it, right? Patti Dobrowolski 35:14 Ah, love it, stand by others and be fearless. With it, that should be all of our call to action, you know, really stand up for others and be fearless with it. And so even if you can't stand up for yourself, be sure to stand up for other people, because it makes a huge, huge difference. It really Deena Pierott 35:32 is easier because sometimes they're more skeptical to stand up for themselves and advocate for themselves in the workplace. Yeah, but it's easier to advocate for someone else, you know, yeah, to see that lifeline for someone else as well, if you do it the right way. Patti Dobrowolski 35:47 Yeah. And I think we need it. I mean, I think that if you know, so many people have been a mentor or an a door opener for me, in my life. And I think for you, too, you know, we get little doors open, and then we open the door way wide. For other people. We're like, let's get okay. Now everyone knows. Deena Pierott 36:07 Let's go I want to do right. And the thing is, is that people need to like for me, I advocate for everybody. It doesn't care what color you are. What gender what anything. Yeah, I believe in fairness, I don't like to see an equity placed anywhere for anyone, you know. And so that's why I was fighting the good fight for Patti Dobrowolski 36:27 fair, do you Yeah, you're so amazing. You just hear I'm telling you, you're so amazing. Now what I want you to tell people what you're reading right now. So they know what they should be reading to? Deena Pierott 36:40 Well, right now I'm reading a book called do better. And it's all around advocating for others advocating for yourself, creating equity, where you are, I was just at the Harvard bookstore in Boston. And I saw it and I bought it. And so I just started reading it. Very good read. The other book that I just listened to on audio was cast about the cast. Oh, yes. Yeah, it's long. Listen, and you really sometimes you got to play it back. And I'll, but it's a very, very good, there is another book that I'm also kind of in between around equity in schools. So I'm always reading that kind of, Patti Dobrowolski 37:18 well, you got to you have to, and everybody should be reading that, you know, Yeah, gotta just change your mindset all the time. Keep up. That's the thing. The other piece about change is, you have to keep up, keep up with what's important for you, and try to push yourself into areas where you don't feel comfortable, so that you can walk into that room filled with white men, and you can get what you need from the audience there. Right. Oh, God. Deena Pierott 37:47 And you know, it's so funny. When I walked into that room that day, I kind of did the whole church thing on here I am so that they can pause the meeting. Yeah, I could walk straight through to the front room. And I tell some of the guys there. Can you move over? So I put a chair here, because there was chairs in the back of the room. But Patti Dobrowolski 38:05 oh, yeah, well, back. Okay. That's right, exactly. Deena Pierott 38:09 What up to the front. I had a move, but a chair there. And but what are the things that I tell women and people of color, when you're in those kinds of situations where you are one of none of other people is to be engaged? Don't be that wallflower. So as soon as it came time for questions, yes, I was the first one that raised my hand. And I asked a question that I already knew the answer to. But I did that. And I do that a lot of times in places that they can see I'm here, I'm engaged. I'm a part of this group. Patti Dobrowolski 38:38 That's right. That's right. I love it. So raise your hand, ask a question. Even if you know the answer to even if everybody knows you're in the room and make a play, make it happen. And I would say that's true, even if you're on Zoom. Because in zoom rooms, it's really important to show up. So you turn your camera on, you got to look your best. And you got your hand up and you got to put comments in the chat. That yeah, that's fantastic. I've been Deena Pierott 39:06 on something zoom things where it's a lot of people and these people are just sitting there like quiet. Are they Patti Dobrowolski 39:10 advocator Tommy, would you entertain me, please? Yeah, I need some entertainment. Yeah. Deena Pierott 39:15 And there's a way to have that engagement even on Zoom or whatever platform Yeah, data. So you know, in fact, we're having our stem a wean for the kids. We've had a couple of virtual stem conferences for the kids. That's fantastic. Fast paced, they're fun. They're this and yeah, they're they're engaging, you know, and also, I think we've pretty much mastered the engaging online presence, you know, stuff so Patti Dobrowolski 39:37 well, you were engaging before when I came in drew with your kids. I mean, that was really, that was fantastic. I love doing that. So thanks for asking me to do that. Oh, they loved it, too. It was super fun now. Okay. So give us one last tip before we let you go. What's your one tip about change that you would tell to people say to people, you know people who are wanting to make a change What do you recommend that they Deena Pierott 40:01 do? I would recommend that they learn how to embrace it. Change is inevitable. Yeah. So my biggest tip is to be comfortable with change. Be comfortable with the pivot, always be that Constant Learner. I mean, I truly embrace change, even if it's things that I have no control of. I try to understand it and all but even for myself, looking at what the peloton that's going to be changed for me because I admit, I've got to embrace look, I've got to embrace it. I'm going to look like Beyonce in about six months. Okay, that's right. But embrace you can you will like either, like kind of grandma. So. But yeah, so I can't imagine not looking forward to the future and change that happens. I think that when you are afraid of change, when you try to stop change, I think that's when you stop growing. Patti Dobrowolski 40:55 Yeah. And when you start, then you're going backwards, you know, they're Deena Pierott 40:58 going backwards, Patti Dobrowolski 41:00 you either go forwards, or you go backwards, or you go backwards, so you got to keep going. Deena Pierott 41:05 My tip is to embrace it to embrace change. Patti Dobrowolski 41:09 I love it. I love you. You're so fantastic. I love thank you so much for spending this time with us listeners, we're gonna put into the show notes how you can get a hold of Deena Pierott because you're gonna want to follow her on Instagram and Facebook, wherever all LinkedIn all the places that she is. So look in the show notes. And I just take this to heart what she said embrace change, we live in a time of flux. If we're not going to get to a new normal flux is our new normal. So get good at change. And I can't wait to see what you do. So if you liked what you heard, you know, be sure to write a review about it or send me a DM on Instagram because we'd love to have you back and loved that you tuned in today to listen to all about Deena Pierott. I love you Deena. Thanks for being here. All right for having me on. My pleasure. Thanks so much for listening today. Be sure to DM me on Instagram your feedback or takeaways from today's episode on Up Your Creative Genius. Then join me next week for more rocket fuel. Remember, you are the superstar of your universe and the world needs what you have to bring. So get busy. Get out and up your creative genius. And no matter where you are in the universe, here's some big love from yours truly Patti Dobrowolski and the Up Your Creative Genius Podcast. That's a wrap

Take Control of Your Health with Dr. Mercola
Prosecution for COVID Crimes- Discussion Between Francis A. Boyle & Dr. Mercola

Take Control of Your Health with Dr. Mercola

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 67:02


Francis Boyle is a repeat guest; I've interviewed him twice in 2020 about the likelihood of SARS-CoV-2 having been engineered in a lab. Boyle's background includes an undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago, a juris doctor (lawyer) degree from Harvard and a Ph.D. in political science. He's a professor of international law at the University of Illinois College of Law, and wrote the book, “Biowarfare and Terrorism.”

The Old Soul Movie Podcast

We are SO excited to finally present the winner of our social media poll: Rope (1948)!!! After overcoming several technical difficulties, we have finally been able to release our chat with two of our favorite Gen Zers, Isabella and Ben. We dive into this creepy tale that was inspired by a real murder: two former Harvard students murder a former classmate...and then serve a dinner to the victim's family and friends over his dead body. Their former teacher is on to their devious misdeed. Will they get caught? Will they get away with the “perfect crime?”  Grab your party invitation and join us for a chat on astrology, superhero abilities, philosophy of thinking, and true crime on this very special episode! *Note: This episode contains explicit language and discusses graphic content.Please Comment, Rate, and Share our episodes and tell us what you like and what you want to hear more of!— Be sure to check us out onOur website: https://the-old-soul-movie-podcast.simplecast.com/FacebookTwitter: @oldsoulpodInstagram: @oldsoulmoviepodcast

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
Call Me Back: Lessons for the 2020s – With Historian Niall Ferguson (#40)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


The first of our two-part conversation with Naill Ferguson is on applied history's lessons of the 1920s and the 1970s…for the 2020s. Niall is a historian and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and he previously taught at Harvard, NYU and Oxford. He's the managing director of Greenmantle, a macroeconomic and geopolitical […]

Post Corona
Lessons for the 2020s - With Historian Niall Ferguson

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 41:23


The first of our two-part conversation with Naill Ferguson is on applied history's lessons of the 1920s and the 1970s...for the 2020s. Niall is a historian and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and he previously taught at Harvard, NYU and Oxford. He's the managing director of Greenmantle, a macroeconomic and geopolitical advisory firm. Niall is also the author of 17 books including “The Square and the Tower: Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook” and “Doom: The Politics of Catastrophe”.

That's So F****d Up
Episode 74- MKUltra: The C.I.A.'s Illegal Human Experimentation Program

That's So F****d Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 82:17


This week the gals discuss the heinous government experiments known as MKUltra. More fucked up brainwashing stuff, yay! And Jeepers Creepers!Back in the 1950s, during the Cold and Korean Wars, the C.I.A. were a paranoid government agency, terrified of Communism and being the last in the global race to control the human mind. The C.I.A. went on a decades long mission to see if they could break and control the mind via LSD and other drugs, torture techniques including physical, emotional, mental and sexual abuse, and various other "brainwashing" techniques... on some knowing, and very often unknowing and unconsenting, American and Canadian citizens; often looking for those that they found "expendable". This is the first of a two-parter on MKUltra and Ted Kaczynski, the UNAbomber, because guess who had MKUltra experiments done on him as a teenager at Harvard... that's right, Kaczynski! So if you sometimes listen out of order, make sure to tune in to this episode before you listen to next week's!If you'd like to support your gals and the show, you can head over to patreon.com/TSFU and join for as little as $5 a month! That's less than a latte! And in honor of spooky season, throughout the rest of November, you get a 15% discount if you sign up for our annual membership! At our lowest level, that's only 14 cents a day for tons of swell Patreon perks!You can find links to all of our sources, our Discord, our super sweet merch store, and more at tsfuthepodcast.com!Follow us @tsfuthepodcast on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook!Audio engineering by Evette Darensbourg.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
The Root Causes And Solutions For Women's Hormonal Imbalances with Dr. Sara Gottfried

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 40:06


This episode is brought to you by BiOptimizers, Athletic Greens, and TUSHY.If you've experienced any of the symptoms of hormonal imbalance, you'd probably agree that they have a lot of power over how well we feel. But unfortunately, especially for women, the signs of hormonal imbalances are constantly being written off as “normal.” I'm here to tell you that they're not! Today, I'm talking with Dr. Sara Gottfried about why our hormones get out of whack and how to get them back in balance. Dr. Sara Gottfried is a board-certified physician who graduated from Harvard and MIT. She practices evidence-based integrative, precision, and Functional Medicine. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Integrative Medicine and Nutritional Sciences at Thomas Jefferson University, and Director of Precision Medicine at the Marcus Institute of Integrative Health. Her three New York Times bestselling books include: The Hormone Cure, The Hormone Reset Diet, and Younger. Her latest book is called Women, Food, and Hormones.Here are more of the details from our interview (audio version / Apple Subscriber version): We need to stop normalizing women's hormonal issues (4:24 / 1:58)Weight gain and hormonal issues (8:40 / 4:50) Symptoms of hormonal imbalance (9:53 /6:43) How food affects hormone balance (10:41 / 7:26)Alcohol and hormones (14:54 / 9:42) Hormone balancing foods (15:46 / 12:45)The importance of metabolic flexibility (20:26 / 15:37) Cruciferous vegetables, soy, and hormonal health (22:33 / 17:41) Is a plant-based or vegan diet helpful for hormonal health? (29:33 / 24:54) Why muscle is so important for hormonal health (32:31 / 27:45)Find out more about Dr. Gottfried at https://www.saragottfriedmd.com and learn more about becoming a patient of Dr. Gottfried's Precision Medicine practice at https://marcusinstitute.jeffersonhealth.org/.Get Dr. Gottfried's book, Women, Food, and Hormones: A 4-Week Plan to Achieve Hormonal Balance, Lose Weight, and Feel Like Yourself Again here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
RE-FUND THE POLICE

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 57:47


In this episode, Dinesh traces how the defund the police movement has now, provoked by sober reality, given way to move to re-fund the police. Dinesh reacts to Tucker Carlson's one-on-one with Kyle Rittenhouse. Dinesh explores the latest evidence of how the Biden family sold out America's interests to the Chinese. Harvard literary scholar Ruth Wisse joins Dinesh to talk about the "woke" contagion at America's leading university.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.