Podcasts about diagnosed

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Result of medical diagnostics

  • 1,515PODCASTS
  • 2,138EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Dec 6, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about diagnosed

Show all podcasts related to diagnosed

Latest podcast episodes about diagnosed

The Heal Podcast
Ep. 82 | Kevan Chandler: We Carry Kevan

The Heal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 63:44


Kevan Chandler's friends carried him through Europe. Yes, literally - in a backpack. Diagnosed with SMA when he was young, Kevan grew up in a family that empowered him to dream of a unique life with his disability. His life experiences, combined with a personal relationship with Jesus, led him to try something crazy when he left his wheelchair behind and let a bunch of his musician friends carry him on their backs for three weeks. The result: a book, lessons innumerable, a documentary, strengthened relationships with friends and God, a nonprofit, and a fresh perspective that will leave you feeling encouraged and inspired today. I love this episode so much, and I believe you will too! Kevan IG: @vanchandler We Carry Kevan IG: @wecarrykevan We Carry Kevan Website: https://www.wecarrykevan.com/ We Carry Kevan Book: https://amzn.com/dp/1683973178/ Django Reinhardt Best Hits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ceqeR49t7I4 C.S. Lewis The Space Trilogy: https://amzn.com//dp/B00ZAT776G/ Green Ember by S.D Smith Book One: https://amzn.com/dp/0986223506/ Little Pilgrims Progress: https://amzn.com//dp/0802420532/ Tera IG: @terabradham Tera Website: terabradham.com Heal Ministry Website: thehealministry.com If you liked this episode, you may also like this one about the men in “I'll Push You”: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ep-36-patrick-gray-justin-skeesuck-ill-push-you/id1503052916?i=1000504971446

Tick Boot Camp
Episode 225: Courageously Vulnerable - an interview with Crystal Hefner

Tick Boot Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 64:38


Crystal Hefner is a multi-talented 35-year-old artist, model, entrepreneur, philanthropist and travel blogger from Los Angeles, California. The foundation for Ms. Hefner's chronic Lyme disease journey was built on the footings of the iconic Playboy lifestyle. While married to Playboy founder Hugh Hefner, she resided in a mold infested mansion surrounded by emotionally unhealthy people. In 2015, Ms. Hefner fell ill and sought treatment from medical doctors. Confused by classic Lyme symptoms, her doctors settled on a “waste basket diagnosis of stress.” Unfortunately, the opportunity for an early diagnosis was missed because Ms. Hefner accepted the conventional wisdom that “there is no Lyme disease in California.” Diagnosed with Lyme, Bartonella, and Babesia by IGeneX labs, she began to treat with an elite Lyme Literate Medical Doctor (LLMD). All treatment tools were rendered ineffective until Ms. Hefner honored her “intuition” and took steps to remove all toxins from her environment. She underwent breast explant surgery, contracted a $2 million mold remediation of her home, and removed toxic people from her social circle. If you would like to learn how a multi-talented artist discovered that healing from Lyme disease begins with removing all physical, emotional, and social toxins from your environment, then tune in now!

The Dori Monson Show
Hour 2: Raspy-Voiced Biden Diagnosed With Congestion

The Dori Monson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 33:39


1PM - The Fastest 15 // Raspy-Voiced Biden Diagnosed With Congestion, ‘Frog' in Throat // Omicron variant // Seattle thieves steal phone, text owner's roommate, robs roommate // Chicago Public Schools eliminating sex-specific restrooms to 'increase gender equity' // Alec Baldwin on the set shooting // Breastfeeding a cat See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NPR's Book of the Day
NPR's Short Wave: 'An Outsider's Guide to Humans'

NPR's Book of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 15:03


Camilla Pang talks with NPR's Short Wave host Emily Kwong about her award-winning memoir, An Outsider's Guide to Humans: What Science Taught Me About What We Do And Who We Are. Diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder at age 8, the scientist and writer pairs her favorite scientific principles with human behavior and navigating daily life.

Don’t Give Up on Testicular Cancer
Be Vocal - From Testicular Cancer to Volleyball Championshps to Giving Back

Don’t Give Up on Testicular Cancer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 21:05


Owen McAndrews is a testicular cancer survivor, athlete, and experienced fundraiser for cancer. Diagnosed in high school with testicular cancer and during volleyball championships, Owen continued playing volleyball then and during college, where his team won championships in 2014 and 2015. Giving back became part of his life as an active participant in Movember and the American Cancer Society. Owen is a Solutions Engineer for Sprout Social in Seattle and leads a team to support clients and their social communication strategies. Listen to Don't Give Up on Testicular Cancer, a podcast from the Max Mallory Foundation. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/bePatron?u=60247613)

Founders Baptist Church
Murder Diagnosed By God's Standard

Founders Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 66:00


The Dirtbag Diaries
Above Ground

The Dirtbag Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 41:07


When Cam Fields returned from a deployment in Afghanistan, violent dreams filled his nights. Diagnosed with PTSD, Cam tried therapy, but still felt himself spiralling. Then, he got a phone call that would change his course in life. Front Country Foundation

The Lighthouse Podcast
Episode 55 | Chase Kelly Shares Theo's Story

The Lighthouse Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 26:08


Chris and Christy sat down to talk with Chase Kelly, mom to Theo and Anna, who shares the story of Theo's battle against an optic nerve glioma brain tumor. Diagnosed at age six, Theo's tumor was inoperable and required high doses of chemo that made him incredibly sick. Chase reminisces about the uncertainty in those early days—how unprepared they were for the treatment, and how guarded Theo's health care team was in offering a prognosis. Chase shares her creative idea for getting Theo to willingly go to chemo even though it made him so sick, and about the amazing support they had from Theo's school. She explains things she wishes she had known back when Theo was first diagnosed, and the importance of finding community.

Fight Like a Mama Podcast
Ep 97 - What I Wish I Knew About Nutrition When I Was First Diagnosed

Fight Like a Mama Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 10:57


If you're new to this whole Chronic thing, there is something you need the low down on: nutrition. Now, I am absolutely certain that everyone and their second cousin has told you - Oh, my so and so had something like that and they did (fill in the blank) and got better! Those fill in the blank things are usually gluten free, dairy free, sugar free… maybe an essential oil combination, or of course yoga!  I am not telling you at all that these things can't help. Of course they can. They help pretty much anyone who utilizes them at different levels... but when you have a chronic illness, everything is different. Here's what you need to know! Follow me on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/fightlikeamama

We Get Outdoors Podcast
Overcoming Bone Cancer and Climbing Mountains with Nikki Bradley

We Get Outdoors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 72:31


Nikki Bradley has not had what you would call, a ‘normal' life so far. Diagnosed with a rare form of bone cancer at sixteen and the receiver of a second hip replacement at the age of twenty-six, she has been on a truly unique journey. After overcoming bone cancer Nikki started taking on challenges to prove to herself and the world that cancer could not beat her. This has turned in to the pursuit of climbing progressively hard mountains! If you want hope, motivation, inspiration or just honest truth about overcoming & surviving cancer then this is for you. You can follow Nikki here... https://themotivationfactory.ie/

The Art of Being Well
Jedediah Bila: Overcoming Chronic Lyme, Long COVID + How To Ghost Your Cell Phone to Take Back Your Life

The Art of Being Well

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 61:45


Leading functional medicine expert Dr. Will Cole sits down with his friend Jedediah Bila, a two-time Emmy Award nominee, who has been a host of ABC's The View and Fox News' Fox & Friends Weekend. Diagnosed with chronic lyme disease, and later experiencing long COVID symptoms, she struggled with debilitating symptoms like brain fog, fatigue, vertigo, and an unhealthy gut all while trying to hold it together on live TV. Learn how she took back control over her health and her life in this empowering episode. Learn more: www.drwillcole.com/podcast DrinkOlipop.com/willcole or code WILLCOLE for 20% off plus free shipping Fastbar.com code WILLCOLE for 10% off Beekeepersnaturals.com/willcole or code WILLCOLE for 25% off your first order Athleticgreens.com/willcole for a free one year supply of vitamin D and to give AG1 a try Produced by Dear Media.

Sacred Steps Podcast
S2:E7: What is strength? Ability & disability on the Camino de Santiago

Sacred Steps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 30:12


Diagnosed with Becker Muscular Dystrophy at a young age, Bryan Steward has spent most of his life overcoming the effects of a crippling disease. Determined to be defined by his abilities, shares his story of walking and crawling across Spain on the Camino de Santiago with host Kevin Donahue (http://www.sacredstepsbook.com).  DISCUSSIONS FROM THIS EPISODE:Becker Muscular Dystrophy Camino de SantiagoCamino 101: Video Tips for your Camino Pilgrimage CONNECT WITH THE SHOW ONLINE:Podcast Homepage - sacredstepspodcast.comSacred Steps: A Pilgrimage JournalStream the Video Podcast on YouTube Connect on FacebookView on Instagram MEET OUR GUEST:  Bryan StewardIn 2017, Bryan set out across Spain on the Camino de Santiago, chronicling his journey in a daily blog for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. His story is in development for an upcoming book or WordPress journal at https://bryanstewardblog.wordpress.com.  MEET THE HOST:  Kevin DonahueHusband. Father. Backpacker. Pilgrim. Author.In 2019, Kevin Donahue set off from his home in the United States to begin a pilgrimage journey spanning both years and miles, walking across continents to the ancient end of the world, to kneel at the tombs of eight Apostles. Available for Easter 2023, Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage Journal is Kevin's first-hand account of the people and places found along the way to inspire questions and enlighten answers about faith, hope, and love. BOOK: Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage JournalAvailable from print and digital booksellers for Easter 2023, Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage Journal is the first-person account of a reluctant pilgrim navigating the eternal questions of faith while walking along the world's revered paths. The book follows one man's journey through Portugal and Spain on the Camino de Santiago, along the coast of the Pacific Ocean connecting California's Missions Trail, across England's ancient Pilgrims' Way, and onward towards Rome via Europe's forgotten footpaths on a journey of soulful discovery. More than a travelogue, Sacred Steps: A Pilgrimage Journal is a first-hand account of a pilgrim's journey and the people and places he finds to inspire questions and enlighten answers about faith, hope, and love. 

Adventures in Autism
Episode 165- Getting diagnosed with ASD as an adult. With Pro Golfer, Billy Mayfair.

Adventures in Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 33:24


Today I'm chatting with professional golfer, Billy Mayfair. Billy shares his journey of getting an autism diagnosis as an adult. After his wife encouraged him to be evaluated, Billy received his diagnosis of ASD in November of 2019. Billy explains how hearing that he had autism was initially very surprising to him. However after reading his doctors report, he felt it made a lot of sense and could see how all his life, autism had been a part of him. Billy talks about how he enjoyed golf as a kid because it was something he could do on his own, for and hours. Billy has had a very successful career as a pro golfer and still plays on the PGA Masters tour. Billy and his wife Tammy are now working on a foundation to help provide support and resources to individuals on the spectrum and their families. Billy was a delight to chat with and I hope you enjoy listening! Connect with Billy: Twitter: BMayfairGolf Sponsored by: Simple Spectrum Supplement https://simplespectrumsupplement.com/ Use code AIA at check out for free shipping! Connect with Megan: IG: @adventuresinautismpod FB: @Adventures In Autism Podcast Email: adventuresinautism2018@yahoo.com Enjoying the show? I would so appreciate your rating & review! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/megan-carranza/message

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan
Live Love, As a Parent or a Human Being- Dr. Foojan Zeine chats with Debbie Godfrey and Dale Walsh

Inner Voice - Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 56:47


Inner Voice – a Heartfelt Chat with Dr. Foojan on KMET 1490 AM / ABC News Radio.  In this segment- Live Love, As a Parent or a Human Being - Dr. Foojan shares the Tip of the Week about how to feel included anywhere in the world. Dr. Foojan brings you, Debbie Godfrey, a certified Parent Educator, brings over 30 years of expertise in the parenting education field. Through her business, POSITIVE PARENTING in schools and community centers around the world. She has served many organizations. Debbie conducted teacher training for 8 schools during a 30-day period in 5 states across India. Deborah conducted 8 parent education workshops in Beijing, China during a 2-week period in February 2008. She is the past director of Foster & Kinship Care Education at Ventura College. www.positiveparenting.com. Dr. Foojan answers your questions about “Am I a committed relationship material”. Then Dr. Foojan chats with Dale Walsh is a coach for the families of those diagnosed with schizophrenia. He has been coaching these families for three years and is the creator of the “LIVE LOVE” method to help his clients. He is guided by the mantra “A recovery is Always an Option.” Following a thirteen-week hospitalization after being “extracted” from Dartmouth College, he was in a private psychiatric program where he was hospitalized nine times over five years. He then moved into his own unsupervised apartment and returned to college at Fairleigh Dickinson University, from where he graduated magna cum laude in English Literature. Diagnosed 46 years ago, Dale has been episode-free for the past 29. His mental health journey has evolved from total psychosis to a miraculous recovery. He has lived independently for forty years. www. dalewalsh.com Check out my website: www.foojan.com

Help and Hope Happen Here
Cole Stabnick and Luke Reynolds will discuss an event which they started as High School seniors, to honor a classmate who was diagnosed with Non Hodgkins Lymphoma. This idea eventually became a very successful non profit called BALL 4 A CURE

Help and Hope Happen Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 50:10


After hearing that a fellow high school classmate was diagnosed with Non Hodgkins Lymphoma, High School seniors Cole Stabnick, Luke Reynolds and five others created an event to honor his cancer fight. This event became a non profit called BALL 4 A CURE. This non profit is anchored by a 3 on 3 basketball tournament along with a recently added golf tournament and has raised over $100,000, which has been donated to the Connecticut Children's Medical Center to help in the fight against Pediatric Cancer.  This non profit is only in its infancy as there are plans to expand both the number of events as well as hopefully working directly with pediatric cancer patients to help make their difficult lives easier and happier. Both Cole and Luke are vey passionate about giving back which is always a great thing to see, especially from two young men that are simultaneously trying to advance their own blossoming career paths. 

Locked On 76ers - Daily Podcast On The Philadelphia Sixers
Sixers Coach Diagnosed With Cancer | Mailbag Monday | When Will Joel Embiid Return?

Locked On 76ers - Daily Podcast On The Philadelphia Sixers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 28:08


Philadelphia 76ers assistant coach Dave Joerger has been diagnosed with cancer and is stepping away from the team. Plus, it's mailbag Monday with Serena Winters! When can we expect Joel Embiid to return? What is a realistic date for Ben Simmons to be traded? And, the Sixers drop their fourth straight after loss to Indiana. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News
We hear the story of a 9-year-old who was diagnosed with leukemia

Jeff Caplan's Afternoon News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 10:48


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Jen's New Song
I've been diagnosed with a mental disorder

Jen's New Song

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 41:34


Join Jen and Christine as they talk about what to think after a mental disorder diagnosis https://www.christinemchappell.com https://www.christinemchappell.com/podcast/ https://www.facebook.com/cleanhomemessyheart https://www.jensnewsong.com https://www.instagram.com/jensnewsong/  

Short Wave
Camilla Pang On Turning Fear Into Light

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 14:11


Camilla Pang talks with Short Wave host Emily Kwong about her award-winning memoir, "An Outsider's Guide to Humans: What Science Taught Me About What We Do And Who We Are." Diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder at age 8, the scientist and writer pairs her favorite scientific principles with human behavior and navigating daily life.

You Are Here
INSANITY! Woman Diagnosed with 'CLIMATE CHANGE' | Guests: Owen Shroyer & Austin Petersen | 11/11/21

You Are Here

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 127:37


A Canadian woman became the first patient ever clinically diagnosed with climate change. The diagnosis came after she experienced breathing problems reportedly due to poor air quality and heat waves. The patient did have asthma, but the doctor decided that was due to rising temperatures. As Biden's sweeping mandates take effect, OSHA is relying on “whistleblowers” to report workplace violations because the agency doesn't have an “army of inspectors.” Yes, they want employees to rat on their employers and fellow employees for any violations. Black Lives Matter leaders, including co-founder Hawk Newsome, threaten “riots” and “bloodshed” in the streets if Mayor-elect Eric Adams reinstates NYPD's anti-crime units. Surely the riots and bloodshed will be mostly peaceful. We're joined in-studio by Owen Shroyer, host of “The War Room,” and Austin Petersen, host of KWOS News Radio and founder of the Libertarian Republic. Austin Petersem: Twitter - @AP4Liberty Host - KWOS News Radio Owen Shroyer: Host - The War Room Banned.Video Subscribe to You Are Here YouTube: https://bit.ly/2XNLhQw Watch MORE You Are Here on BlazeTV: https://bit.ly/38WB2vw Check out Elijah Schaffer's YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/3C0yWH8 Check out Sydney Watson's YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2YIedK5 Follow Sydney Watson on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SydneyLWatson Follow Elijah Schaffer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ElijahSchaffer Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell
Being Diagnosed with ADHD Is Almost Like Finding Out You Have a Secret Identity

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 10:53


Today our guest host, René Brooks, shares a little behind-the-scenes conversation with our producer, Sarah Guertin, about how it feels to learn you have ADHD, and how she's grown and changed over the years since being diagnosed. "It's like the comparison (to neurotypicals) is an unfair one and we're really comparing to people who actually don't exist... these perfectly organized, always on time, always emotionally regulated people-- it's a fantasy. So we're setting ourselves up to meet this unmeetable standard and then we get burnt out and frustrated in the process." We want to hear from you! CLICK HERE TO TAKE OUR LISTENER SURVEY. Or write an email or record a voice memo and send it to connect@distractionpodcast.com.   Distraction is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont.  It's the college for students who learn differently! Landmark offers comprehensive supports for students with ADHD and other learning differences, both on campus and online. Learn more HERE! We are excited to share that René Brooks is continuing her guest-hosting of Distraction through November and December! René is an ADHD coach, writer and advocate who also has ADHD herself. From Black Girl, Lost Keys website: René Brooks is a late-life ADHD success story. After being diagnosed 3 times as a child (7, 11 and 25) she was finally able to get the treatment she deserved. René decided that her passion for helping others sirhould be put toward peopl with this disorder who are struggling in silence or shame. She started Black Girl, Lost Keys to empower Black women with ADHD and show them how to live well with the condition. 

Transcend in Life Podcast
Manage Stress & Increase Productivity: With guest Christopher Dedeyan

Transcend in Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 47:06


Episode #130:  How cool is it when you meet someone and know they are going to immediately impact your life positively?  That is exactly how I felt, the first time I met Christopher Dedeyan.  He is a man that is full of life, energy, wisdom, and willing to share it freely.  Christopher joined the show and threw straight "fire" for the entirety of the episode.  He covers why the last hour before bed can set you apart, what the locus of control is, and the importance of "my emotional home".  You will be inspired by his enthusiasm, knowledge, and silky smooth delivery.  If you are looking to grow, this is the show!  Bio:Christopher Dedeyan is a professional speaker and peak performance business & life coach who helps entrepreneurs, leaders and employees alike manage stress, increase productivity and have more energy. He always gets his message across in a humoristic, charming, energetic and passionate way.He developed his entrepreneurial skills and communication skills during the five years he built and ran his real estate brokerage company. During that time, Christopher noticed that he could help his colleagues with self-development by incorporating new rituals and habits in their lives that help them not only in their business but in their personal lives as well.Diagnosed with dyslexia at the age of eight, he was faced with many failures along the way. Because of his relentless attitude of never giving up, the failures taught him how to succeed. He attributes a huge part of his success as an entrepreneur to the lessons he learned growing up in the schooling system as a dyslexic.Christopher helps his coaching clients to become the best versions of themselves. He truly believes in self-development. He doesn't only talk the talk but he walks the walk with himself having eight coaches and mentors for all facets and aspects of life. These advisors help him and keep him accountable to become the best version of himself so he can ultimately serve others.Contact Christopher:Website: christopherdedeyan.comYouTube: youtube.com/christopherdedeyanInstagram: instagram.com/christopherdedeyanLinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/christopherdedeyan/

The WTF California Podcast
Should Antioch Mayor Be Diagnosed With Mythomania and Where is Gavin Newsom?

The WTF California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 49:11


On this episode of WTF California, we survive the great Xfinity outage of Monday night, Antioch Police announce arrests in connection with 25 robberies and Brentwood Union School District says no mandate likely this school year. Meanwhile, we discuss the Antioch interim city manager appointment of Cornelius Johnson and even the Antioch Herald points out he retired as a Lieutenant and not a Captain as claimed by Mayor Lamar Thorpe. Antioch is also not being transparent with his resume or background. Where in the world is California Governor Gavin Newsom? We get into Oakland Crime surge in carjackings, Kamala Harris has terrible approval ratings, plus Los Angeles vaccine mandate now in effect plus more.   Articles from the show: SFPD senior personnel clerk confirms interim Antioch city manager candidate is a retired lieutenant, not captain Widespread Xfinity Cable, Internet Outages Reported Across Bay Area Antioch Police Announce Trio Arrested in Connection With 25-Robberies Brentwood Union School District Says Vaccine Mandate Unlikely This School Year Gavin Newsom's wife, California Democrats bristle at questions about governor's continued absence Carjackings have increased 85% this year in Oakland, man shot in the latest one Monday Concord: BART station rape suspect arrested Man charged with shocking violent crime spree, including Oakland homicide, from 2017 when he was 16 years old ‘Oakland's sad reality' result of defunding police, POA union says LAPD Warn Residents Of New Crime Trend: ‘Follow Home Robberies' Kamala Harris has a comically bad approval rating, poll finds Hundreds of demonstrators gather in downtown LA to protest COVID-19 vaccine mandates ‘Don't get mad at us': Bartenders worry about unruly customers, lost tips as L.A. vaccine proof mandate goes into effect Norwalk foster mom charged after 4-year-old boy ‘beaten into a coma'; relatives demand answers Mother, boyfriend guilty of murder in Orangevale boy's death 2 mothers gave birth to each others' babies after IVF mix-up, L.A. lawsuit alleges San Joaquin County sting operation leads to more than 200 arrests How wildfires have forced California winemakers to make more roséBottom of Form A Pot Roast Can Set You Back $100 as Meatflation Hits Shoppers

Life Kit: All Guides
Suleika Jaouad On Working Through Isolation And Life's Interruptions

Life Kit: All Guides

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 20:06


Writer Suleika Jaouad has made a career out of covering folks living in the 'in between' spaces — starting with herself. Diagnosed with leukemia at 22, she embraced writing as a way to regain narrative control of her life. She shares lessons on making peace with uncertainty and transforming isolation into creative solitude.

Fibromyalgia Real Solutions With Amanda Love
Episode 92: With Guest Jessica Fauld's Story of Hope # 5 Dealing with MS .

Fibromyalgia Real Solutions With Amanda Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 39:05


This is an amazing story of never giving up!You don't have to have MS to listen to this episode! In this episode we also cover:Diagnosed with MS at the age of 15MS hits most people between 20- 40 years old.Stem Cell Treatment11 rounds of chemo in 8 days.So many diets are out there for MS. Plant-Based!!We talked about food sensitivitiesHas Had MS for 15 yearsWorks for the MS Society in CanadaDocument every day with her journey of Stem Cell Treatment Bio -  I am a 29-year-old female who was diagnosed with MS at the age of 15. Through my MS journey, I struggled with different disease-modifying drugs and treatments before having a stem cell transplant #HSCTwarrior! I am a certified holistic nutrition consultant and studied wellness and nutrition in university for 10 years! I am a proud plant-based badass boxer and runner who loves all things food! Food & fitness saved my life when it came to my MS. It made me strong enough to withstand any treatment and any setback MS threw at me. Now I spread the MS love and positivity around the world!Links: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alltherightbites/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoN6XiqEmtiHHXA5GYUF8IA?sub_confirmation=1&fbclid=IwAR2V7AObHeLaRJf3o5i5Z46P8uYAFqZgg4zHXGkpacN6JYmfpJ9j8RfjiEM Facebook: www.facebook.com/alltherightbites/ website: www.alltherightbites.caAmanda Elise LoveHave a conversation with me about your 2021 health goals -http://bit.ly/2ko8lSpInstagram - https://bit.ly/3fhjmfJFacebook personal page- https://bit.ly/2Wlwc4aFacebook business page- https://www.facebook.com/amandaeliseloveWebsite - http://www.amandaeliselove.comGot a question? Or maybe a guest suggestion? Email me at amandaeliselove@gmail.com

The Not Old - Better Show
#584 Aging with HIV: Discrimination, Treatment, Hope

The Not Old - Better Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:46


Aging with HIV: Discrimination, Treatment, Hope The Not Old Better Show, Art or Living Interview Series Welcome to The Not Old Better Show. I'm Paul Vogelzang, and today's show is brought to you by Chess.com and Faherty Brand Clothes. Please support our sponsors and check out today's show notes for special offers from Chess.com and Faherty Brand. Our guest today, Dennis Fleming, age 62, is a social work consultant based in Sacramento, California. Diagnosed with HIV in the early 1990s, Dennis has struggled to find an effective treatment regimen for decades, until Dennis learned about Rucobia – an HIV Therapy for heavily treatment experienced (HTE) adults living with HIV. Following his initial diagnosis, treatments were not yet available, and he had a hard time coping with his status. Nearly five years later, he began treatment with an antiretroviral therapy, but with limited success. The experience led him to stop treatment for a year, resulting in a severe case of toxoplasmosis. After recovering from this life-threatening experience, Dennis Fleming became determined to prioritize his health. Older HIV-infected gay men may experience multiple forms of stigma related to sexual orientation (homonegativity), HIV (HIV stigma), and age (ageism), all of which can negatively impact quality of life (QOL). We're going to be talking about what Dennis Fleming has witnessed in 30 years with aging and HIV, his unique perspective on how HIV has changed during the last four decades and Dennis Fleming will share what this milestone means for long-term survivors, including how treatments have evolved? Fewer pills, prevention? Hope. Be part of society. What are friendships and family life like? Stigma… Please join me in welcoming to The Not Old Better Show via internet phone, Dennis Fleming. Please support our sponsors: Chess.com https://fahertybrand.com and enter NotOldBetter at checkout

Eye Know - Do You?
Pursuing A Genetic Test

Eye Know - Do You?

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 14:34


Diagnosed with an IRD as a Marine in the early 2000s, Steve Walker received a medical discharge and went on to become an Ironman Triathlete. He and his wife, Kacey, walk listeners though the steps of his own experience with genetic testing, from learning about it, to getting the test, to the difference the results made for their families. A powerful reminder of how getting the right information can change many lives. Learn more about Steve and Kacey's journey at EyeWant2Know.com.

RNZ: Checkpoint
Ex-All Black Carl Hayman diagnosed with dementia at 41

RNZ: Checkpoint

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 3:53


The rugby world has been rocked by news former All Black Carl Hayman has early on set dementia at age 41. All Blacks assistant coach John Plumtree says New Zealand and World Rugby are doing all they can to minimise the risk of head injuries. Hayman - who was an All Black prop - told The Bounce sports newsletter he's been struggling with head related issues since retiring six years ago. Felicity Reid reports.

SuperFeast Podcast
#140 Epilepsy and Loving your Diagnosis with Lainie Chait

SuperFeast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 43:36


Today on the podcast, we have the performer stand-up comedian, author, and Love Your Diagnosis podcaster Lainie Chait (more famously known as Electro Girl) sharing her incredible story, wisdom, and revelations from more than 20 years living symbiotically with Epilepsy. Lainie's journey with what they call 'the invisible illness' (Epilepsy) is a testimony to intuitive holistic healing and the power of transmuting trauma into something beautiful. Diagnosed with Epilepsy at the age of 19, Lainie suddenly found herself in the depths of managing an illness that her teenage self wasn't ready to accept. What followed; An integrative journey spanning over two decades of denial, rebellion, acceptance, and the birthing of a phenomenal woman dedicated to inspiring others. Lainie has written and self-published a book, Electro Girl (2017), performed a one-woman stage show, done stand-up comedy, and now hosts a podcast dedicated to sharing the stories of people like herself, who have defied the odds of their diagnosis. There is no doubt that Lainie has taken the road less traveled with her approach to living with Epilepsy. Not willing to accept a lifetime of prescribed pharmaceutical medication, she thrust herself into the throes of trauma healing, alternative medicine, research, visceral guidance, and lots of trial and error. Almost 300 tonic clonic, grand mal seizures (aka the big ones) later, she is here with a message for anyone who's had a dire diagnosis to jump in the driver's seat, direct their journey, and believe in the power to heal; However that may look. This is a truly inspiring episode laced with comedic cure and a potent message of why we need to handle our brain, nervous system, and ourselves with care. Tune in.     "You've got a choice when you walk out of that doctor's office; Are you going to let someone else take charge of your life? Or are you going to be in the driver's seat? If you have to use the medicine, great, but I encourage people through my experience and other people's stories to be back in the driver's seat of this. And research, that's been the message so far from everyone. At the end of each podcast, I ask everyone to say a little tip for someone going through it. And it's always research, go and get second opinions and be in it. Be right in it, right in it. Don't let anyone control how you look at your health and how you heal".   - Lainie Chait     Mason and Lainie discuss:   Trauma and Epilepsy. Understanding Epilepsy. What triggers seizures? Healing through comedy. Over-prescribed pharmaceuticals. Allopathic vs holistic healing approach. Lainie's healing protocols and supplements.  Lainie's diet; What she avoids and what helps.  Taking care of the brain and nervous system.   Who is Lainie Chait?  Lainie Chait is an author, performer, podcaster, and stand-up comedian. Lainie is a big advocate for people treating themselves holistically, and exploring healing modalities outside of allopathic diagnosis/treatment. In 2017 Lainie self-published her autobiography, ‘Electro Girl', a story of her journey living a symbiotic existence with Epilepsy for 16 years. In 2021 Lainie started a podcast called Love your Diagnosis, which takes a weekly look into the lives of people who have been diagnosed with a condition/illness. The interviews find a flow and dialogue around the choices and changes people start to make in their lives when they learn that they have to live with dis-ease, partially brought about by their choices. Lainie believes a diagnosis can be seen as a gift if you look at it as a second chance to get to know and treat yourself in a more loving way. If you would like to connect or work with Lainie, please explore the links below.    CLICK HERE TO LISTEN ON APPLE PODCAST    Resources: Electro Girl Book Electro Girl website Lainie Chait Twitter Lainie Chait Linkedin Love your Diagnosis podcast   Q: How Can I Support The SuperFeast Podcast? A: Tell all your friends and family and share online! We'd also love it if you could subscribe and review this podcast on iTunes. Or  check us out on Stitcher :)! Plus  we're on Spotify!   Check Out The Transcript Here:   Mason: (00:00) Hey, Lainie.   Lainie Chait: (00:01) Hi, Mason.   Mason: (00:02) We're back.   Lainie Chait: (00:02) We are, we are.   Mason: (00:04) We tried again, but it was retrograding too hard that day.   Lainie Chait: (00:08) For both of us. My little thing that I'm going to bring out, malfunctioned, but I fixed that because of retrograde, which is good.   Mason: (00:15) I had, I think, for the first time ever not... I hit record, and then I'm going to blame the laptop and the fact that that just didn't record. All right, but good. We're off and running again.   Lainie Chait: (00:27) We are.   Mason: (00:29) You're just an interesting person. I mean, everyone's had a little bit of an intro, but do you want to just get everyone caught up on who you are and what you're working on?   Lainie Chait: (00:40) This book is part of a bigger... Well, this was actually the start of it. I wrote this book, because I was diagnosed with epilepsy at 19, and I just wasn't prepared to accept that I had it. I was just not interested in knowing that my brain was going to work against me to live a normal life. Yeah? This is like a dialogue around my journey and of basically how I came to deny it, rebel against it, accept it, and then use supplementation and even products of yours, which is why I want to... been so interested to talk to you, about how to control and manage the seizures and the brain farts with a holistic approach, not just throwing pills into my face.   Mason: (01:32) How long did you get swept up in the, this is your new normal?   Lainie Chait: (01:37) I hid it for the first four years, in my teenage years. I was too afraid to tell anyone about it. At that stage, I had the seizures that were just kind of jerking, and just like jerks, and maybe hiccups and things like that, but I hadn't had any tonic-clonic seizures, the big fall to the ground seizures. The scary ones that people are often scared about. It was only when I started drinking and dating, and introducing teenage stuff into your life that you're just not prepared for really, that the big seizures started to happen. At 19, my mum saw that going on and then it was seven years of doctors.   Mason: (02:24) What's the... Okay, because you call it, it's like the silent...   Lainie Chait: (02:27) The silent disease, I think they call it.   Mason: (02:29) Disease. Yeah. I mean, I was like is disease even there, but yeah, that's I guess, kind of appropriate based on the west.   Lainie Chait: (02:34) Oh, no. Invisible illness.   Mason: (02:35) Yeah. The invisible illness. Yeah. It's a little bit more gentle.   Lainie Chait: (02:38) Yeah, it is. Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Mason: (02:43) You were bringing it up in reading your email. I was like, "Yeah," and I know maybe a couple of people that have told me, in the past, how they dealt with their epilepsy, but just the walking around while you have a sign, that did like you, that you have a sign on telling people, any point you're going to be going into a fit. You can't do that, so how is your life get affected?   Lainie Chait: (03:05) Well, I guess for me, luckily, because there's 40 different types of epilepsy, right? Which I didn't know that at the time. I just thought there was the small ones called absence seizures, where your brain just shuts down for a second, and you have like a minute, maybe two minutes where you're just out, but you're not jerking or you don't drop or anything like that. They're called absence seizures. I did have a few of them when I was younger, but for me, it's all been about the grand mal, the tonic-clonic ones.   Lainie Chait: (03:36) I saw my first seizure in hospital when they did all the tests and I had to stay inside and get my head all... They had a big turban with EEG and I was hooked up to a machine, so I was about 19 when that happened, and I saw and heard my first seizure from someone else in hospital doing the same thing. From that moment on my ego and myself went, "Oh, there's no way, there is absolutely no way I'm going to let anyone see me like this, no way. It's too scary.   Mason: (04:07) So you just stopped heading out.   Lainie Chait: (04:09) No, I just hid it. If I felt like I was going to have one I'd fuck off and do it alone, Mm-hmm (affirmative). Or, risking death. My ego was stronger than my logic to get help or tell people, or... Yeah, and the fact that I kind of intuitively knew that it was an emotional... That I'd created it. I know that's weird to say, because it developed at 14 when my parents got divorced, it's not really in my family history, and the triggers that still align now are still about stuff to do with abandonment, stuff like that.   Lainie Chait: (04:55) If I'm in certain situations that trigger me, there's still wired in there somewhere, even though as an adult I've totally dealt with all of that logically and done cathartic everything's, but somewhere in the wiring, there's still that little faded memory of something to do with what triggers them. That I still find really hard to break. Yeah. It's really interesting.   Mason: (05:25) That still set you off?   Lainie Chait: (05:27) Yeah. But it's not everything, it's just certain things. Like flashing lights, that's not my type of epilepsy.   Mason: (05:34) Yeah, right.   Lainie Chait: (05:35) I myth bust in this as well. I do comedy about epilepsy. I know you do comedy. One of the reasons I started to do stand up was that I wanted to do a 45 minute show on making epilepsy funny, because when you're living it, that was the way that I found that I could get over it. Understand it, break through it, because otherwise it will destroy you actually. It's a pretty shit condition.   Mason: (06:07) Did you, within yourself, you made it funny or did you make it like, "If I'm going to embrace it, so it's not embarrassing. I'm going to like tell everyone, in a comedic way, that I'm dealing with this"?   Lainie Chait: (06:19) Okay. Here's a joke I made up. "Why did the epileptic chicken cross the road?"   Mason: (06:25) It's already funny, yeah. Why?   Lainie Chait: (06:27) "Because it couldn't fit on the sidewalk." I mean, it's not funny, but it's funny. Anyway, therefore I think that's it. Yeah. Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Mason: (06:40) Do other people that have the epilepsy get offended by you taking the piss out of it, or have you got a hall pass?   Lainie Chait: (06:46) I think, in this world of PC, way too PC, I've definitely got a hall pass. I got a hall pass as a comedian, to being a woman, so I can say anything I like about being a woman, epilepsy, and being Jewish.   Mason: (07:00) Are you Jewish as well?   Lainie Chait: (07:01) Yeah.   Mason: (07:02) Gosh. Yeah.   Lainie Chait: (07:02) I've got passes in comedy that...   Mason: (07:04) It's like what Lee, the dentist in Seinfeld, going for complete immunity, complete comedy immunity. Yeah. And becoming a Jew was the last one, I think, for him.   Lainie Chait: (07:18) That's right. I remember that. I remember that. Yeah. I don't know. I think the hall pass is out of respect, because I'm allowing people to understand it rather than be scared of it. The jokes that I make about it is more about looking at it from a perspective of, "Oh, I don't need to be scared of that then. Okay." All the things, that you can swallow, that there's a stigma or a myth that you can swallow your tongue, bring light to that, because it's so not... That's just impossible. To swallow a tongue. It's connected. The myth is to swallow the tongue, but actually, because it falls back into the mouth it blocks the airways and that's when the trouble can happen, so just will, as a muscle that's limp, block the airway.   Mason: (08:13) What about treatment-wise? What were you told the rest of your life was going to look like after you got diagnosed?   Lainie Chait: (08:20) Medication for ever. No late nights, no parties.   Mason: (08:27) Is this at 14?   Lainie Chait: (08:30) No, I hid it.   Mason: (08:32) You hid it from like everyone even-   Lainie Chait: (08:33) Everyone.   Mason: (08:33) Yeah, right, medical profession.   Lainie Chait: (08:35) Everyone. It was my little dirty little secret, but I didn't know what was going on. It's in the book though.   Mason: (08:43) Yeah, okay.   Lainie Chait: (08:43) Very interesting.   Mason: (08:50) Everyone listening, we've gone live on Instagram as well. The book we're referring to, I know I've already mentioned it, but it's Electro Girl, but yeah, if you hear us talking to the viewers.   Lainie Chait: (09:01) Yes. We've got two sides. Yeah. It was the doctors. It was lots of tests all the time. Yeah, it was pretty grim, and I guess being quite a stubborn personality in myself, when I was diagnosed, I just kind of went, "Oh, I'm caught, I'm caught. I've got no choice. I'll just sort of bend over for a little bit," and then the medicine, it just kept being thrown one on top of the other, because one wasn't enough and then another wasn't enough, and so there was a cocktail. That was creating all these co-morbidities of depression and I'm like, "Fuck, do I really actually want to live like this when I think that it's emotional?" So I brought that to the doctor's attention and they're like, "Nah, it's not. It's something in your brain."   Mason: (09:51) Do doctors know what emotions are?   Lainie Chait: (09:53) I don't know. Any doctors out there? Just text in.   Mason: (09:59) But, I mean, that's a common theme. I think everyone listening to this, not just on this podcast, probably everything that everyone's listening to, just realising there's that crusty institution that's so good at particular things, but then stepping outside and acknowledging, even when... I don't know whether you're an example of this, you may just say you go back to that doctor and say, "Hey, dead set, look at this. This happens, epilepsy happens, because of emotions, and then I deal with those emotions down the track, and I see symptomatology go down." I'm just kind of like putting words in your mouth, and I'll let you tell the story of what actually happened.   Mason: (10:33) Or it's the same, I've got friends with cancer all of a sudden coming back and the tumor is halved in size and they go, "Oh gosh, whatever you're doing," it's the same thing, "whatever you're doing, keep on doing it." "Do you want to know what's happening?" "No, absolutely not. You're an outlier. You're a bloody miracle, but I don't want to tell anyone about that miracle, because..." I don't know. It's one problem.   Lainie Chait: (10:56) Well, it's about trials you see, and in a world of being sued, they have got the blinkers on a little bit. I mean the involvement of CBD, maybe some doctors have gone, "Oh, okay. I'll just, maybe 45 degree my blinkers a little bit," because there is some evidence around that, but even with what you do and making claims, and I worked for the Happy Herb Company for many, many years and I mean, it's all just about claims, and what you can and can't say, and what you can and can't... Yeah. Claim that works or doesn't work, it's so individual. Yeah. My doctor still kind of says to me that whatever I'm doing, it's sort of like, he humours me. It's like "Great, great. That's really good." Yeah, exactly the same sort of thing, but he won't kind of give it a lot of merit.   Mason: (11:55) I guess, it's not his problem either. He works within an institution that's effective in some capacity and that's like all doctors. They're not revolutionaries. If you're revolutionary, you don't go into one of the most stagnant institutions that you can possibly go into.   Lainie Chait: (12:13) Yeah.   Mason: (12:13) You just hope sometimes they're not bought into the religion of it, and they're at least realise, "Yeah, this is the way we do things over here, and I hope that everyone else has the capacity to go and evolve along with us, for our collective intention of keeping humanity healthy."   Lainie Chait: (12:28) That's right. I suppose they're very, fix the symptom, and alternative medicine are, look at where the problem's coming from. That's kind of, intuitively, what I decided, that that's the approach I wanted to take. Seven years I gave it a go and I became a zombie, and started smoking a lot of gunjah to balance out the fact that I felt like a zombie and that just made me more zombie. At 28, I just woke up and went, "Oh, fuck I can't do this anymore at all," so I did that classic, stereotypical, Saturn return. Quit the job, left the boyfriend, bought a Kombi, drove up to Nimbin.   Mason: (13:09) Mm-hmm (affirmative). Nice. That's fitting.   Lainie Chait: (13:12) Yes. You've been wanting to say that, haven't you?   Mason: (13:17) Oh, that was 10 seconds ago, I was like, "All right, all right, I've got one."   Lainie Chait: (13:21) You've been dying to say it.   Mason: (13:22) Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Lainie Chait: (13:25) Yeah, I just thought there's got to be people that understand that there's another way to do this, and there was. Not long after that, I met Ray and Eliza from Happy Herbs, and it was that fate thing. Yeah. Oh, look, there's just so many incarnations of it, because I was then so committed and so obsessed with healing it. Curing it though, instead of... I went all the way over the other side. I went, "All right, fuck you medicine. I'm going to go over here and completely just immerse myself in everything, and I want to cure this. I want to be the first girl to cure her epilepsy," because I kept using that word cure. Cure, cure, and that was a big mistake.   Mason: (14:15) Was the mistake... I mean, because there is an initiation period where the way you approach it, if you come from a colonised Western medical mind set, you have to use the word cure to even get... but then I think we see it a lot in the health scene as people just hang on too long in being a patient. You're trying to work with the natural, but with the kinds of conversation of the synthetic Western model, and you hang in there too long. Is that what you mean?   Lainie Chait: (14:47) Yeah. I hung in there a bit, but I think the dialogue should have been more about how can I treat and manage this, because there is a part of my brain that has got a low seizure threshold. Yeah?   Mason: (14:58) Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Lainie Chait: (14:58) That part is the part of science, and genetics and chemistry that I'll never cure. Yeah?   Mason: (15:07) That was being off in never-never land a little too much thinking, "All that data doesn't apply to me." That's how I was with my mum when my mum had an aneurysm. It ripped me down emotionally, because I was like, "Nah, we're going to defy the odds here," and you probably did, and we did as well, but when you're that out of reality, and pie in the sky, and looking for miracles, it just doesn't help that much, does it?   Lainie Chait: (15:33) Yeah. Well, I would pay someone to heal me. That was the other thing, I'd be like, "Here, take the money that I really should be paying rent for or buying some very healthy food for. Take this because wow, I've read your thing and it said, 'you can perform miracles,'" so I would pay, just a shit tonne of healers, of every different modality. Moxa sticks. I mean, who the fuck can cure epilepsy with a moxa stick? Tell me.   Mason: (16:02) It depends on whether they've looked at the classics. The classic Chinese texts maybe have some secret little formula there.   Lainie Chait: (16:08) Well, it didn't frigging work.   Mason: (16:10) No, I imagine it wouldn't. It doesn't feel like it's in the ballpark of moxa.   Lainie Chait: (16:17) But I was a little bit obsessed to do it that way, so I went all the way over that side and things were working, but there's still the underlying problem, and the story that was in my brain, and the neural pathways that were leading to the seizures were still in place. You can't outsource that. You can't outsource how your brain is wired. That's the work you have to do yourself, and that's what I didn't realise in my twenties and early thirties, is that I actually had to go deep into the ugliness of when they started, why they started. I created a journal for about four months in my late twenties to document everything around what was happening.   Lainie Chait: (17:13) I started to go, "All right, maybe moxa sticks, won't cure it. Let's see what actually else is going on here," so I wrote down what I ate, what I drank, who I'd slept with. Did I fight with anyone? What supplements was I taking? Everything, and then got a list of actually, "Oh, there's a bit of a pattern occurring here," and then started to really appreciate what I was bringing to the table. How I was making myself an epileptic. How I had created this, and so I've been on a journey ever since to just go from total denial and rebellion to now preaching a message of personal responsibility and what you bring to your conditions. That's why I wrote that. You don't have to have epilepsy to get messages from this. It's actually quite across the board, but it does, obviously, specify my journey with epilepsy.   Mason: (18:18) That personal responsibility one, and I think that freaks people out. We just came out with a little... We're testing out having a line of apparel called Sovereign, and essentially exploring that. I think there's a lot of people looking at the common law kind of sovereignty, kind of side of things that's been hijacked over there versus the sovereignty of your greatest capacity to take on responsibility for your reality. I think people get confused, because just if you start taking on extreme personal responsibility, especially in a healing sense, does that mean you don't go and interact with particular institutions sort of thing? Not the case.   Lainie Chait: (19:00) Not the case. I think you need guidance, mentors and all that sort of stuff as well, because also again, you can over heal. You can get into that space where you're not living life anymore and you're just like going, "Oh, I shouldn't eat that because it might do this," you know?   Mason: (19:19) Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Lainie Chait: (19:19) It's this fine balance of what personal responsibility looks like to you and how you can still enjoy your life. I don't wear a halo. I know that there's stuff that I do now that potentially will bring on some electrical unrest, but I go, "Well, you know what? I've done really well to be alive." I've had nearly 300 grand mal seizures. Most of which were on my own. There is a thing called SUDEP. Have you heard of SUDEP? It's an acronym, it's sudden, unexpected death in epilepsy, and it happens around that age group where I chose to have just a lot of seizures. Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Mason: (20:04) Okay. When you're taking personal responsibility, is that in the fact that I'm inside my body, I'm going to be ultimately the one that's going to be able to put this much time and understanding what's emotionally triggering me or what environmentally was doing it?   Lainie Chait: (20:18) What foods you're eating that might be contributing to the way that your body functions.   Mason: (20:25) Do you talk about what you found the pattern to be?   Lainie Chait: (20:28) Yeah.   Mason: (20:29) Can we get a snippet of it?   Lainie Chait: (20:32) I should have got a few chapters-   Mason: (20:34) A few excerpts.   Lainie Chait: (20:34) ... a few paragraphs ready. I found that, what was diet related, yeah? Was obviously sugar and too much alcohol. The way I was thinking about relationships, because it all stemmed from when my parents got divorced, there was all this abandonment story in there about men, so I would attract that in my life. Then when I would attract men that would show kind of abandonment behaviour or things that would trigger that, that would just set me off incredibly. There's a type of epilepsy now, called catamenial epilepsy, which I used to bring to my doctor and say, "It's really weird. I just keep getting a seizure a couple of days before I get my period," and they're like, "Yeah. Okay. Well, it's probably not related." Now, it's an actual... It is a particular type of epilepsy that's related to hormones.   Mason: (21:41) Mm-hmm (affirmative). But it wasn't in the textbook at the time.   Lainie Chait: (21:50) It wasn't. It wasn't. Hormones. Yeah. I didn't know it then that you could supplement certain parts of your body to compensate for that hormone change, at the time that happens just before you...   Mason: (22:03) Supplement even particular hormonal cascades, you mean? Or...   Lainie Chait: (22:06) Yeah. There's so much around now that I don't particularly take anymore, but at the time there was like perhaps... Can't even think of the herb that I was taking just before I got my period, just to sort of balance out that oestrogen, progesterone sort of imbalance that might then set... Also, internal temperature. If you're internally hot, and that's a Chinese thing as well, if you're hot inside, then that can trigger it as well.   Mason: (22:42) Mm-hmm (affirmative). Yeah. You could almost like pinpoint what kind of symptomatology, and excess heat, and excess liver heat, and all those kinds of things.   Lainie Chait: (22:56) All that.   Mason: (22:56) Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Lainie Chait: (22:56) Unless you find the right practitioner at the right time, which I did, because when I moved here, I saw a lady called Ann-Mary. She was working in the Integrative Mullum, which doesn't exist anymore, her and her hubby, and she just was spot on. She did all the tests. She worked with me. I trusted her completely. We were doing collation and she got me starting to think about magnesium. She got me starting to think about there's too much copper in my body and all the-   Mason: (23:28) Oh, what a legend.   Lainie Chait: (23:29) Yeah. It was like this amazing epiphany to find the right practitioner, who just guided me in the right way to actually start balancing out what was going on. At the time, also, CBD wasn't even on the radar, because this is nearly 20 years ago, so I had to go looking for little backyard people to...   Mason: (23:54) Yeah. There were a few around back then.   Lainie Chait: (23:55) Back then, there was a few around. Yeah, I tell you, they lived in squalor, but it's not about their lifestyle, but the thing is-   Mason: (24:05) And look at them now. Look at them.   Lainie Chait: (24:09) Palaces. Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Mason: (24:10) Yeah.   Lainie Chait: (24:15) But the one thing about that was there was not so much information. I couldn't get the dose rate. I was experimenting, big time. It backfired for me.   Mason: (24:26) In what way? Just the non-standardisation?   Lainie Chait: (24:29) Yeah. Backfired in the fact that I was probably taking a strain of CBD that didn't... That I was taking too much. There were no dose rates. It was kind of like, "Here, take this bottle and see you." No consistency in the medicine, obviously, because it wasn't really a medicine at the time. It was just, "Here's some..." So I overdosed. Not that you can overdose, it's a really shit word.   Mason: (24:53) Saturated?   Lainie Chait: (24:53) I saturated myself to the point where it was the wrong strain for what I needed, and it made me more depressed and more anxious. Then, because of that, that was the catalyst to go back to Melbourne after being here for quite a few years. Go back, and sort some shit out, because it was too unpredictable. Yeah. Lots of amazing stories.   Mason: (25:26) It's like the wild west of treating yourself naturally back then. It's kind of on a platter. I wonder how many people though, because epilepsy doesn't... I mean, I just haven't thought about epilepsy, but is it one of those ones that at the moment where people are... One of the ones, I know that's insensitive, but are people immediately thinking, "Right. I'm going to go and get a naturopath here. I'm going to get my minerals tested, get my hormone panels." Is there any correlation there, do you think at all, in the wider population?   Lainie Chait: (25:53) Definitely not. It's fear-based, because of the stigma around it. It's, my neurologist knows better than me. There's a lot of fear, because to have a seizure takes... They say that the impact on your body of the seizures that I have, the tonic-clonic ones, is like running a 14 kilometre marathon in that two to three minutes that you're on the floor. People don't want to experience that. It's also hard for the people watching, because I've also had experiences where people watching me, there's not much they can do, and so they go internal and it becomes about them, so they get post-traumatic kind of like stress, not a disorder. Just at the time, they're just like, "Fuck, that was intense, and I couldn't do anything to help, and I don't want to see that again."   Mason: (26:48) It's like they get victimised, based on their own lack of capacity to do anything. I wouldn't say incompetence, but ...   Lainie Chait: (26:59) It's just lack of knowing, I think, and having faith in themselves, because there are people that would just be all over it, be like, "Yep. Okay. I've got this. She'll come around in a couple of minutes. It'll be fine. Start watching, fuck off." Yeah, and others are like, "Oh my God, what do I do? Ring the ambulance. Oh, I can't deal with this," and then outsource it, but you don't actually need to do that. That's part of what my work now is about. Is just to educate so that... Because I believe, Mason, seriously, through what's going on, on the planet now, and how fragile the brain is. Anyone can have a seizure. Anyone with a brain, any mammal, animal, human, warm-blooded can have a seizure in the wrong environment, and at the moment what's happening is the very wrong environment in the world. You are considered an epileptic if you have two seizures, that's it. If you have two seizures in your life, you are then claimed by the epilepsy people.   Mason: (28:04) Are there lots of different types of medication or is it just kind of like a few standards?   Lainie Chait: (28:10) There's a few standards that they rely on. There's a lot more than when I was treated 30 years ago. They're not designed specifically for epilepsy, so it's a massive guessing game. They've got their like, "Okay, you're displaying with these kinds of things, so we'll try this." Yeah? "And if not, we'll throw that on top." Yeah. I mean, I've heard about lots of people. I mean, I, myself was on 1500 milligrammes of different drugs at one stage, but that was just way too much. People are on 3000 milligrammes of drugs. I mean, that may not actually, in this conversation, mean anything, but it's a lot, it's a lot.   Mason: (29:01) Yeah. I mean, it's slightly... I mean, I have a friend at the moment, she was having... Well, she didn't know what was going on there for a few weeks and then got the diagnosis of been a brain tumour and then was told that she was having these little fits, and now she's been diagnosed as epileptic, and that's the one medication that she's on while she's trying to find her way around that whole conversation and getting on. Are you on medication at the moment? Do you mind me asking?   Lainie Chait: (29:32) I had a hip replacement this year and it was advised that I go back on, what they call a small dose, but what I call big enough. Yeah? For someone that wanted to do it without it, but actually, because it was the unknown, and because I've been fighting the medical industry for so long, and pharmaceutical industry, and going... This time, it was all just about yes, because this was all foreign to me. To be cut open and things that I hadn't experienced, so I didn't know how my brain was going to...   Mason: (30:06) Acute times like that, Western medicine comes in.   Lainie Chait: (30:08) Yeah. That's right.   Mason: (30:10) Just like a little bit of padding. That's like what I'm watching my friend go through just trying to have, cool, get that little bit of padding, get that diagnostics. Utilising it appropriately, and then for the fits are one thing and then the tumour is another, but the...   Lainie Chait: (30:26) But they all stem from the same thing, which is abnormal electrical activity. That's really all it is. That's all epilepsy is. It's abnormal electrical activity that is fueled by fuck, who knows, everyone's different. I think there's a lot of people with epilepsy that are living lives that bring them on. That are just ignoring stuff that they've been maybe just too hard trauma. There's big dialogue around trauma at the moment.   Mason: (30:59) Huge, isn't it? Yeah.   Lainie Chait: (31:00) Yeah.   Mason: (31:00) That's great.   Lainie Chait: (31:00) It's really interesting. Really interesting. Yeah, the trauma's just too deep and too dark to go into, and too painful, and so it represents in abnormal electrical activity that perhaps could be padded with dealing with some of that.   Mason: (31:17) What have you found has been effective for you? To go into the trauma into the dark places?   Lainie Chait: (31:26) Well, no one would ever let me do an Ayahuasca journey because the facilitators were too nervous, I suppose, is what has been reflected back to me. I haven't been able to journey in that way, so it's all had to be talking, experiencing, watching, observing, understanding, and kind of making peace with writing this book, I suppose. Yeah. I think I went to a hypnotist once and this past life... Depending on who you talk to, this past life stuff coming for me to fix it, and find peace. It was a test, it was a fricking good test, I tell you.   Mason: (32:28) Yeah. It's like, "Yeah, thanks for that."   Lainie Chait: (32:33) But, it's been such a gift. Such a gift, because I have a really big understanding of how you create your reality. Yeah. When I didn't, I would be on the floor convulsing, if I went against that.   Mason: (32:58) I was going to ask you about neurofeedback and that's the neurofeedback, I guess, right there for you. It's like a giant neurofeedback machine, which the brain is at all times, but whether you've been intentional about the way that you're creating your life or not, for you to go to have that much of it extremely thrown in your face.   Lainie Chait: (33:17) Well recently, what was interesting is that I was seizure free for a while, and then I had to move house. I had to move house four times within a year. Each time, of those four times, two weeks after I'd moved in, I had a seizure. When I looked and analysed, and maybe had a look into that, what was happening, it was more about coming back to that place when my home was torn apart at 14, and I didn't know, and I didn't feel safe, and I didn't have a base. That made heaps of sense to me. Why would it happen every time I moved two weeks after? It's this feeling of just instability.   Mason: (34:08) Yeah. That wouldn't be, because I think they say that moving house is in the top two most stressful things you can do, but if it was cortisol level related, that would most likely be during the move, but no.   Lainie Chait: (34:21) No. No, it was kind of when I was just feeling a little bit settled, and then I would wake up and within... Mine usually happened in the morning, so I would... Yeah, it would happen. I'd get warning, and now I know to brace myself. I used to just go, "No, I'm going to win this, not you, brain." That could be a good time to bring out... Oh, so me and my brain have a dialogue.   Mason: (34:54) [crosstalk 00:34:54].   Lainie Chait: (34:54) This is going to be hard for people listening, but ...   Mason: (34:58) It's okay. Let's get some fun voices.   Lainie Chait: (35:02) I turned this book into a stage show, and the best way that I could explain about the dialogue between me and my brain, and the relationship, was to actually get a puppet made of my brain. So if you could see it, "Hello, I'm Norah, how are you? Named after Bloody Norah, which if you're an Australian, it's very easy." We did a show together at the Melbourne Fringe Festival, and I got her in... I had different LED lights put in her. "Yeah. One's really exciting. Look at this one. Whoa, that's like..."   Mason: (35:43) I'm looking at Lainie's purple brain. The brain's got her hand up the clacker, and there's some big, bright, fantastic lipstick, and now it is lit up like a Christmas tree.   Lainie Chait: (35:55) Yep. This is the explanation of what happens in the electrical storm, during a seizure, because there's no pathways that it can relate to. Right? Then this one, you can explain that one.   Mason: (36:09) Well, it's all looking connected. We look like we got some flow electrically.   Lainie Chait: (36:15) There's a little bit of flow. This is more about trying to find, after a seizure, just trying to find the pathways back to what normal is. Yeah? What a functioning... This is just kind of going, "Oh yeah. Okay. What's that one. Where can I find out my arm moves?"   Mason: (36:36) What colour are we there again?   Lainie Chait: (36:36) This is just normal. "Normal. That's what you call yourself. Huh? Normal. I don't think so." This is just a normal brain. "Hello?" Yeah, so-   Mason: (36:51) Okay, [inaudible 00:36:51] the back.   Lainie Chait: (36:51) Okay, [inaudible 00:36:51] the back. Yeah.   Mason: (36:51) When was the fringe show? Obviously it was 2019, maybe?   Lainie Chait: (36:56) Yeah.   Mason: (36:57) Was it? Yeah.   Lainie Chait: (36:57) Certainly was.   Mason: (36:57) Thought it [inaudible 00:36:59] been on before?   Lainie Chait: (37:00) Yeah. I'll leave her, this one's the nice one. I'll leave it on that. Yeah, it was 2019, and not only made her Scottish, I don't know why, because you're a comedian so you push yourself, I suppose. Never been a puppeteer, so I was struggling with so many firsts. So many firsts. Using a puppet, being on stage and learning my lines for a one hour show with dialogue between me and her. It was amazing, amazing. Used lots of lion's mane, Mason, during that time.   Mason: (37:37) Did you? Yeah, cool.   Lainie Chait: (37:38) Got off the booze. Yeah. Used a shit tonne of lion's mane around then. Yes. It just worked incredible. Yeah.   Mason: (37:48) I mean, she is wonderful. May I say so?   Lainie Chait: (37:51) Do you want to feel her?   Mason: (37:51) Absolutely.   Lainie Chait: (37:51) Do you want to put your hand in the clacker?   Mason: (37:54) I do want to put my hand in her clacker.   Lainie Chait: (37:56) It doesn't... Oh, you did. You changed her.   Mason: (38:00) Oh, I changed her. Oh, wow. Oh whoa. Oh, now we're on.   Lainie Chait: (38:02) "Oh, he's turning me on. He's turning me on.I don't think I've ever had a man's hand in my clacker."   Mason: (38:08) Well. Oh no. I turned her off.   Lainie Chait: (38:12) Yeah.   Mason: (38:12) God, I have. Oh yeah. Oh gosh. Well, yeah, you got to be on. You need nimble fingers.   Lainie Chait: (38:24) Yeah. Just, yeah, you... She gives me a lot of shit, so I tell a story and she's like, "That's not how it actually went. You drank too much and you fucked too many guys." Anyway... Oh, sorry.   Mason: (38:39) That's okay. So she's cheeky?   Lainie Chait: (38:41) She's really cheeky. She's sassy.   Mason: (38:47) I understand, comedy for me has been healing. It's been a way for me to reclaim parts of myself, which I'd allowed to be swallowed up by my egoic pursuit to be something else, and also, getting swallowed up by my own stage persona, and comedy was my way to take the piss out of myself and come back down to earth. I can imagine for you, this on a whole nother level.   Lainie Chait: (39:10) It is.   Mason: (39:11) Do you get that stage clarity when you're up there? It's like when you're in your zone, it's like a professional tennis player, the ball slows down and all of a sudden you can be in your show, and you can be in your lines, and you can be fretting about what line's coming up, but then you go above yourself and you start doing... You've got some kind of healing and observation about what's actually... Making connections that are beyond... You couldn't have done it anywhere else, except on stage and in the middle of a show.   Lainie Chait: (39:39) Well, that's where I plan to get to. The director that did the first run with me, she was amazing. She was very lines based and I'm on stage, when I can riff a bit and I can get off that script. I work so much better like that, but with this particular first run of the show, and if anyone's a director out there I am looking for one, because I'm looking for... to bring this back to the stage. It's a fantastic show actually. Yeah. I'm looking for a way to be able to have a little bit of fun with it, but a little bit off script as well, but still knowing what I want the message to be, but having a bit more of a riff with her, because she's talking for all brains. She's sitting on her pedestal talking for all people's brains saying, "Take care of us, just take care of us. We're everything"   Mason: (40:49) Before we go, where are you at in practical terms? What are your favourite little brain healing activities and supplements, or whatever it is?   Lainie Chait: (41:01) It's a good question. I'm taking some CBD, and I am also taking lion's mane. I am taking vitamin B, B12. Very good for... and magnesium. Now, I kind of let the supplement call me. It's like, "Okay, well, you need a bit more of this, or your adrenals are a bit low, so I'll go for the Jing.   Mason: (41:30) Then you go intuitive after a while, don't you?   Lainie Chait: (41:33) You do, you just do. I mean, supplements or vitamins are a bit... The same with any kind of medicine. It's like, you don't want to rely too much on any one thing. You want your body to sort of like get a big hit of it and then see what it can do itself. In the work that I'm doing now, can I just plug my podcast? [crosstalk 00:41:55] one.   Mason: (41:55) Yeah, absolutely.   Lainie Chait: (41:56) I now do a podcast called Love your Diagnosis, and what that is celebrating, is every week that I have a person that's been diagnosed with something, that they've found the light. They've gone on the allopathic journey and gone, "Oh, this might not be everything that I need," and they've done exactly what I did, and have just gone and riffed with the rest of the world and alternative medicines, and found ways to treat and manage, not cure, but treat and manage the stuff that's going on for them, so they can live a really fun, healthy lifestyle. Yeah, if you've got a story like that, please hit me up. I'd love to have you on the podcast.   Mason: (42:38) I mean, that is fascinating, because that's a dark night of the soul sometimes. Like a lot of people, it's too scary to go into that darkness, to go off on your own. Yeah. I mean, especially if you think that it's one or the other. You just said allopathic going, "Okay, maybe that's not everything, and I need to make some other considerations," but that's you. Again, I'm watching a friend go through that at the moment, going, it's either open up your brain, they take your skull off and cut out this tumour, or go down your own route for however long. It's that moment, those crossroads, I guess. You talk about those crossroads a lot.   Lainie Chait: (43:15) Totally. Yeah, and all sorts of different diagnosis, and some really slips of gold in there for people, because I think when you get diagnosed with something like this.   Lainie Chait: (43:39) You've got a choice, when you walk out of that doctor's office, am I going to let someone else take charge of my life? Or am I going to be in the driver's seat of it? If I have to use the medicine, great, but I encourage people through other people's stories to be back in the driver's seat of this. Research, that's been the message so far from everyone at the end, because I ask everyone to say a little tip for someone going through it. Research, don't take your first... Always go and get second opinions and be in it, be right in it, right in it. Don't let anyone control how you look at your health and how you heal.   Mason: (44:27) That's where Western, I guess, comfort path of least resistance, automation. That's where it can come and bite you on the arse. If you've been living that life of just cushy Western life, and you get that first diagnosis and you go, "Cool, got no choice. This is what you do." Right? It's a shame, just how much we've given away that power. Not to say that we don't make a choice fully to go allopathic or whatever.   Lainie Chait: (44:58) Right. Yeah. But I think there are also a lot of people that are like, just give me the magic pill. I want to forget about it. I just want to get back to normal. I mean, we're seeing that today, still. It's fear-based. It just requires a lot less time to maybe take the pills, but I think at the end of the day, there's a sacrifice that you give over when you have that mentality of just throw the pills down. There is a sacrifice, whether it's stated or not, I believe there's a sacrifice your handover when you say, "Give me the pills," to your overall life on this planet and living to its fullest.   Mason: (45:46) Mm-hmm (affirmative). It is confronting. I can see why it's a very confronting thing, because if you do take responsibility and say, "I'm fully going to make this decision," you then have to acknowledge all the other decisions that you possibly could have made, and that you don't know what the outcome is going to be, so it's not just the way that it's presented now, when you go, "Look, your only choice right now is whatever, chemotherapy." That's your only choice, and so people go, "Okay, cool. It's my only choice. I do it." Then whatever the outcome is, they're like, "Oh, well, wouldn't have turned out any other way. That was the only choice." Very easy. Although it's hard going through something like chemo, it's a very easy way of approaching something, which is... and I get it. I haven't had to be... I've watched lots of people go down that route.   Mason: (46:36) It's nice, even those friends that have gone for chemo, they've gone, "I know all my other options, and I'm the one... I'm not doing this because the allopathic doctors are getting their kick back, and all they can do is say, 'This is what you need to do, and anything else is unethical.'" They're like, "I'm making that decision fully, because I know." Then also, that gives them the opportunity to go, "Well, I'm not just going to play their game. I'm actually going to be engaged with my treatment and make sure that I come out the other side of life," but it can be harrowing to take that responsibility.   Lainie Chait: (47:05) Very, and the guy that I just did a podcast with, with colorectal cancer, he has some incredible information about his journey. Yeah, I recommend it to everyone, Love your Diagnosis. This last one, he had just incredible stuff that he... He's not saying chemo's a bad thing. He's just saying, "In my case, I did this, this, this, and this, and I cured it." Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Mason: (47:33) Sounds like a legend.   Lainie Chait: (47:34) Amazing. So, yeah.   Mason: (47:39) Yeah. I wonder if your podcast will start getting featured in little doctor's Facebook groups.   Lainie Chait: (47:48) As don't listen?   Mason: (47:49) Yeah. Yeah, you're a quack. Lainie the quack. Lainie, thanks for coming along and sharing your story.   Lainie Chait: (47:57) That is my pleasure, and we're giving away a book?   Mason: (48:00) Yeah. We're giving away a book. Hopefully you guys are up to date. Hopefully you're up to date on the podcast schedule, and you're in time for you to go over to the SuperFeast Instagram and go in the draw right now. You guys, you're onto it. Look at you guys. Thank you so much for hanging around and watching the live. That's like...   Lainie Chait: (48:24) It's amazing. Thank you.   Mason: (48:25) That is amazing, and thanks for everyone for listening. What's the best place for everyone to find you?   Lainie Chait: (48:30) Well, Electro Girl Productions is on Facebook, and just lain_star on Insta, I suppose that's probably the... Then private message me if you want to be part of the podcast, or if you just want to talk epilepsy, because I know it, so if you're out there, the invisible illness, it doesn't have to be so invisible. Talk to me. Mm-hmm (affirmative).   Mason: (48:50) Thanks so much.   Lainie Chait: (48:52) Thanks.   Dive deep into the mystical realms of Tonic Herbalism in the SuperFeast Podcast!

New Books Network
Anthony Ianni, "Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams" (Red Lightning Books, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:01


"They don't know me. They don't know what I'm capable of." Diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder, a form of autism, as a toddler, Anthony Ianni wasn't expected to succeed in school or participate in sports, but he had other ideas. As a child, Ianni told anybody who would listen, including head coach Tom Izzo, that he would one day play for the Michigan State Spartans. Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams is the firsthand account of a young man's social, academic, and athletic struggles and his determination to reach his goals. In this remarkable memoir, Ianni reflects on his experiences with both basketball and the autism spectrum. Centered, an inspirational sports story in the vein of Rudy, reveals Ianni to be unflinching in his honesty, generous in his gratitude, and gracious in his compassion. Sports fans will root for the underdog. Parents, teachers, and coaches will gain insight into the experience of an autistic child. And everyone will triumph in the achievements of Centered. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sports
Anthony Ianni, "Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams" (Red Lightning Books, 2021)

New Books in Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:01


"They don't know me. They don't know what I'm capable of." Diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder, a form of autism, as a toddler, Anthony Ianni wasn't expected to succeed in school or participate in sports, but he had other ideas. As a child, Ianni told anybody who would listen, including head coach Tom Izzo, that he would one day play for the Michigan State Spartans. Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams is the firsthand account of a young man's social, academic, and athletic struggles and his determination to reach his goals. In this remarkable memoir, Ianni reflects on his experiences with both basketball and the autism spectrum. Centered, an inspirational sports story in the vein of Rudy, reveals Ianni to be unflinching in his honesty, generous in his gratitude, and gracious in his compassion. Sports fans will root for the underdog. Parents, teachers, and coaches will gain insight into the experience of an autistic child. And everyone will triumph in the achievements of Centered. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

New Books in Biography
Anthony Ianni, "Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams" (Red Lightning Books, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:01


"They don't know me. They don't know what I'm capable of." Diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder, a form of autism, as a toddler, Anthony Ianni wasn't expected to succeed in school or participate in sports, but he had other ideas. As a child, Ianni told anybody who would listen, including head coach Tom Izzo, that he would one day play for the Michigan State Spartans. Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams is the firsthand account of a young man's social, academic, and athletic struggles and his determination to reach his goals. In this remarkable memoir, Ianni reflects on his experiences with both basketball and the autism spectrum. Centered, an inspirational sports story in the vein of Rudy, reveals Ianni to be unflinching in his honesty, generous in his gratitude, and gracious in his compassion. Sports fans will root for the underdog. Parents, teachers, and coaches will gain insight into the experience of an autistic child. And everyone will triumph in the achievements of Centered. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in Psychology
Anthony Ianni, "Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams" (Red Lightning Books, 2021)

New Books in Psychology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 57:01


"They don't know me. They don't know what I'm capable of." Diagnosed with pervasive developmental disorder, a form of autism, as a toddler, Anthony Ianni wasn't expected to succeed in school or participate in sports, but he had other ideas. As a child, Ianni told anybody who would listen, including head coach Tom Izzo, that he would one day play for the Michigan State Spartans. Centered: Autism, Basketball, and One Athlete's Dreams is the firsthand account of a young man's social, academic, and athletic struggles and his determination to reach his goals. In this remarkable memoir, Ianni reflects on his experiences with both basketball and the autism spectrum. Centered, an inspirational sports story in the vein of Rudy, reveals Ianni to be unflinching in his honesty, generous in his gratitude, and gracious in his compassion. Sports fans will root for the underdog. Parents, teachers, and coaches will gain insight into the experience of an autistic child. And everyone will triumph in the achievements of Centered. Galina Limorenko is a doctoral candidate in Neuroscience with a focus on biochemistry and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases at EPFL in Switzerland. To discuss and propose the book for an interview you can reach her at galina.limorenko@epfl.ch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/psychology

Interior Integration for Catholics
Obsessions, Compulsions, OCD and Internal Family Systems

Interior Integration for Catholics

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 80:50


Join Dr. Peter to go way below the surface and find the hidden meanings of obsessions, compulsions and OCD.  Through poetry and quotes, he invites you into the painful, distressing, fearful and misunderstood world of those who suffer from OCD.  He defines obsessions and compulsions, discusses the different types of each, and evaluates two conventional treatments and one alternative treatment for OCD.  Most importantly, he discusses the deepest natural causes of OCD, which are almost always disregarded in conventional treatment, which focuses primarily on the symptoms.   Lead-in OCD is not a disease that bothers; it is a disease that tortures. - Author: J.J. Keeler   “It can look like still waters on the outside while a hurricane is swirling in your mind.” — Marcie Barber Phares  Poetry or word picture (prayer of the scrupulous)  Aditi Apr 2017  Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.  OCD.  That is what we are addressing today. Here is what OCD is like for Toni Neville -- she says:  “It's like being controlled by a puppeteer. Every time you try and just walk away he pulls you back. Are you sure the stove is off and everything is unplugged? Back up we go. Are you sure your hands are as clean as they can get? Back ya go. Are you sure the doors are securely locked? Back down we go. How many people have touched this object? Wash your hands again.”  Introduction We are together in this great adventure, this podcast, Interior Integration for Catholics, we are journeying together, and I am honored to be able to spend this time with you.   I am Dr. Peter Malinoski, clinical psychologist and passionate Catholic and together, we are taking on the tough topics that matter to you.   We bring the best of psychology and human formation and harmonize it with the perennial truths of the Catholic Faith.    Interior Integration for Catholics is part of our broader outreach, Souls and Hearts bringing the best of psychology grounded in a Catholic worldview to you and the rest of the world through our website soulsandhearts.com  Today, we are getting into obsessions and compulsions -- a really deep dive into what's really going on with these experiences.  I know many of you were expecting me to discuss scrupulosity today -- And you know what?  I was expecting I would be discussing scrupulosity well, but in order to have that discussion of scrupulosity  be well-founded, we really need to get into understanding obsessions and compulsions first.  I have to bring you up to speed on obessions and compulsions before we get into scrupulosity, and there is a lot to know The questions we will be covering about obsessions and compulsions. What are Obsession and Compulsions? Getting into definitions.   Also What are the different types of obsessions and compulsions, the different forms that obsessions and compulsions can take What is the experience of OCD like?  From those who have suffered it.   Who suffers from obsessions and compulsions -- how common are they?  Who is at risk?  Why do obsessions and compulsions start and why do they keep going?  How do we overcome obsessions and compulsions?  How do we resolve them?   What does the secular literature say are the best treatments"  -- Medication and a particular kind of therapy called Exposure and Response Prevention Alternatives   Can we find not just a descriptive diagnosis, but a proscriptive conceptualization that gives a direction for healing, resolving the obsessions and compulsions  Not just symptom management. Definitions  Obsessions  DSM-5: Obsessions are defined by (1) and (2): Recurrent and persistent thoughts, urges, or impulses that are experienced, at some time during the disturbance, as intrusive and unwanted, and that in most individuals cause marked anxiety or distress.  The individual attempts to ignore or suppress such thoughts, urges, or images, or to neutralize them with some other thought or action (i.e., by performing a compulsion).  Not pleasurable   Involuntary My compulsive thoughts aren't even thoughts, they're absolute certainties and obeying them isn't a choice. - Author: Paul Rudnick  To resist a compulsion with willpower alone is to hold back an avalanche by melting the snow with a candle. It just keeps coming and coming and coming. - Author: David Adam   Individual works to neutralize the obsession with another thought or a compulsion.   From the International OCD Foundation:  Obsessions are thoughts, images or impulses that occur over and over again and feel outside of the person's control. Individuals with OCD do not want to have these thoughts and find them disturbing. In most cases, people with OCD realize that these thoughts don't make any sense.  Obsessions are typically accompanied by intense and uncomfortable feelings such as fear, disgust, doubt, or a feeling that things have to be done in a way that is “just right.” In the context of OCD, obsessions are time consuming and get in the way of important activities the person values.  Common Obsessions  Sources What is OCD? Article by the International OCD Foundation on their website  WebMD article How Do I Know if I Have OCD? By Danny Bonvissuto February 19. 2020  Northpointrecovery.com blog What Types of OCD Are There? Get the Breakdown Here by the Northpoint Staff from May 3, 2019  Article entitled Common Types of OCD: Subtypes, Their Symptoms and the Best Treatment by Patrick Carey dated July 6, 2021 on treatmyocd.com   Contamination Body fluids --- blood, urine, saliva, feces -   I gave my baby niece a serious illness when I held her --  I'm sure I got a disease from using the public restroom.   Germs for communicable diseases -- may be afraid to shake hands, worried about catching gonorrhea  Environmental contaminants -- radiation, asbestos  Household chemicals -- cleaners, solvents  Dirt  If you put the wrong foods in your body, you are contaminated and dirty and your stomach swells. Then the voice says, Why did you do that? Don't you know better? Ugly and wicked, you are disgusting to me. - Author: Bethany Pierce   Losing Control Giving in to an impulse to harm yourself --  I could jump in front of this bus right now.   Fear of acting on an impulse to harm others -- what if I stabbed my child with this knife?  Fear of violent or horrific images in your mind  Fear of shouting out insults or obscenities --  Fear of stealing things   Harm Fear of being responsible for some terrible event (causing a fire at an office building)  Fear of harming others because of not being careful enough (leaving a stick in your yard that fell from a tree in a wind storm that may trip and hurt an neighbor child)   Relationships Doubts about romantic partner -- is she the right one for me?  Is there a better one I am supposed to find?  What if we are not meant to be together, but we wind up marrying each other?  Is my partner faithful?   Unwanted Sexual Thoughts Forbidden or perverse sexual thoughts or images  Sexual obsessions involving children  Obsessions about aggressive sexual behavior toward others   Obsessions related to perfectionism Concern about evenness or exactness   need for things to be in their place Arranging things in a particular way before leaving home   Concern with a need to know or remember  Inability to decide whether to keep or discard things  Fear of losing things  Fear of making a mistake -- may need excessive encouragement from others  Needing to make sure that your action is just right -- I need to start this email over, something is not wright with the wording.   Obsessions about your Sexual Orientation Obsessions about being embarrassed in a public situation Getting a non-communicable disease such as cancer Superstitious ideas such as unlucky numbers or certain colors Religious Obsessions (Scrupulosity) Concern with offending God  Concerns about blasphemy  Concerns about right and wrong, morality.   Compulsions  Definitions  DSM-5 Compulsions are defined by (1) and (2): Repetitive behaviors (e.g., hand washing, ordering, checking) or mental acts (e.g., praying, counting, repeating words silently) that the individual feels driven to perform in response to an obsession or according to rules that must be applied rigidly.  The behaviors or mental acts are aimed at preventing or reducing anxiety or distress, or preventing some dreaded event or situation; however, these behaviors or mental acts are not connected in a realistic way with what they are designed to neutralize or prevent, or are clearly excessive.  Most people with OCD have both obsessions and compulsions.   From the International OCD Foundation Compulsions are the second part of obsessive compulsive disorder. These are repetitive behaviors or thoughts that a person uses with the intention of neutralizing, counteracting, or making their obsessions go away. People with OCD realize this is only a temporary solution but without a better way to cope they rely on the compulsion as a temporary escape. Compulsions can also include avoiding situations that trigger obsessions. Compulsions are time consuming and get in the way of important activities the person values.   Common Compulsions in OCD  Sources What is OCD? Article by the International OCD Foundation on their website  WebMD article How Do I Know if I Have OCD? By Danny Bonvissuto February 19. 2020  Northpointrecovery.com blog What Types of OCD Are There? Get the Breakdown Here by the Northpoit Staff from May 3, 2019  Article entitled Common Types of OCD: Subtypes, Their Symptoms and the Best Treatment by Patrick Carey dated July 6, 2021   Washing and Cleaning Washing hands excessively or in a certain way  Excessive showering, bathing, toothbrushing, grooming  Cleaning items or objects excessively   Checking Checking that you did not or will not harm anyone  Checking that you did not or will not harm yourself  Checking that nothing terrible happened  Checking that you did not make a mistake  Checking specific parts of your body   Repeating Re-reading or re-writing   Repeating routine activities Going in and out of doors  Getting up and down from chairs   Repeating body movements Tapping  Touching  Blinking   Repeating activities in multiples Doing things three times, because three is a good, right or safe number   Mental Compulsions Mental review of events to prevent harm (to oneself others, to prevent terrible consequences)  Praying to prevent harm (to oneself others, to prevent terrible consequences)  Counting while performing a task to end on a “good,” “right,” or “safe” number  Cancelling” or “Undoing” (example: replacing a “bad” word with a “good” word to cancel it out)    Putting things in order or arranging things until it “feels right” or are in perfect symmetry Telling asking or confessing to get reassurance Avoiding situations that might trigger your obsessions  Obsessions and Compulsions go together  The vicious cycle of OCD -- Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) at helpguide.org Obsessive thought  --  I could stab my nephew with this knife.  Anxiety -- that would be a terrible thing to happen, I can't let that happen  Compulsion -- Locking all the knives away, checking to make sure they are all accounted for when your sibling and her family are visiting  Temporary relief -- the knives are all there.  “A physical sensation crawls up my arm as I avoid compulsions. But if I complete it, the world resets itself for a moment like everything will be just fine. But only for a moment.” —  Mardy M. Berlinger Harm Obsession     Compulsion:  Keeping all knives hidden away somewhere What if I killed my nephew and I just can't remember?  Repeatedly going back to check if you ran someone over DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Presence of obsessions, compulsions, or both:  The obsessions or compulsions are time-consuming (e.g., take more than 1 hour per day) or cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning.  The obsessive-compulsive symptoms are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a drug of abuse, a medication) or another medical condition.  The disturbance is not better explained by the symptoms of another mental disorder   Specify if: With good or fair insight: The individual recognizes that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are definitely or probably not true or that they may or may not be true.  With poor insight:  The individual thinks obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are probably true.  With absent insight/delusional beliefs: The individual is completely convinced that obsessive-compulsive disorder beliefs are true. 4%  With Tic disorder up to 30%   What is the experience of OCD Poem By Forti.no   Quotes: “You lose time. You lose entire blocks of your day to obsessive thoughts or actions. I spend so much time finishing songs in my car before I can get out or redoing my entire shower routine because I lost count of how many times I scrubbed my left arm.” — Kelly Hill  “Ever seen ‘Inside Out'? With OCD, it's like Doubt has its own control console.” — Josey Eloy Franco  “Imagine all your worst thoughts as a soundtrack running through your mind 24/7, day after day.” — Adam Walker Cleveland  “Picture standing in a room filled with flies and pouring a bottle of syrup over yourself. The flies constantly swarm about you, buzzing around your head and in your face. You swat and swat, but they keep coming. The flies are like obsessional thoughts — you can't stop them, you just have to fend them off. The swatting is like compulsions — you can't resist the urge to do it, even though you know it won't really keep the flies at bay more than for a brief moment.” — Cheryl Little Sutton  “It's like you have two brains — a rational brain and an irrational brain. And they're constantly fighting.” — Emilie Ford   Who 12 month prevalence is 1.2% with international prevalence rates from 1.1 to 1.8%  NIH Women have a higher prevalence 1.8% than men 0.5%.  Males more affected in childhood.  Lifetime prevalence 2.3%   Risk Factors:  DSM-5  Temperamental Factors Greater internalizing symptoms  Higher negative emotionality  Behavioral inhibition   Environmental Factors Childhood physical abuse  Childhood sexual abuse  Other stressful or traumatic events   Genetic Monozygotic concordance rates --.57  Dizygotic concordance rates .22   Physiological  Dysfunction in the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and striatum have been implicated.   Streptococcal infection can precede the development of OCD symptoms in children Therapy  Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) -- Developed originally in the 1970s Stanley Rachman's work a type of behavioral therapy  that exposes the person to situations that provoke their obsessions causing distress, usually anxiety which leads to  the urge to engage in the compulsion  that gives them the temporary relief.   The goal of ERP is to break the cycle of obsessions --> anxiety --> compulsion --> temporary relief.  So you are exposed to you anxiety provoking stimulus, and have the obsession, but you prevent the compulsive response, and you don't get the temporary relief.  Basic premise: As individuals confront their fears and no longer engage in their escape response, they will eventually reduce their anxiety. The goal is to habituate, or get used to the feelings of the obsessions, without having to engage in the compulsive behavior.  This increases the capacity to handle discomfort and anxiety.  Then one is no longer reinforced by the temporary anxiety relief that the compulsion provides.   Patrick Carey writes that: Any behavior that engages with the obsession– e.g. asking for reassurance, avoidance, rumination– reinforces it. By preventing these behaviors, ERP teaches people that they can tolerate their distress without turning to compulsions. It thereby drains obsessions of their power.  Division 12 of the APA   Essence of therapy: Individuals with OCD repeatedly confront the thoughts, images, objects, and situations that make them anxious and/or start their obsessions in a systematic fashion, without performing compulsive behaviors that typically serve to reduce anxiety. Through this process, the individual learns that there is nothing to fear and the obsessions no longer cause distress. From the IOCDF :  With ERP, the difference is that when you make the choice to confront your anxiety and obsessions you must also make a commitment to not give in and engage in the compulsive behavior. When you don't do the compulsive behaviors, over time you will actually feel a drop in your anxiety level. This natural drop in anxiety that happens when you stay “exposed” and “prevent” the compulsive “response” is called habituation. Instead, a person is forced to confront their obsessive thoughts relentlessly. The goal is to make the sufferer so accustomed to their obsessions that they no longer feel tempted to engage in soothing compulsions. Types of Exposure -- GoodTherapy.org article Imaginal Exposure: In this type of exposure, a person in therapy is asked to mentally confront the fear or situation by picturing it in one's mind. For example, a person with agoraphobia, a fear of crowded places, might imagine standing in a crowded mall.  In Vivo Exposure: When using this type of exposure, a person is exposed to real-life objects and scenarios. For example, a person with a fear of flying might go to the airport and watch a plane take off.  Virtual Reality Exposure: This type of exposure combines elements of both imaginal and in vivo exposure so that a person is placed in situations that appear real but are actually fabricated. For example, someone who has a fear of heights—acrophobia—might participate in a virtual simulation of climbing down a fire escape.   Steven Pence, and colleagues in a 2010 article in the American Journal of Psychotherapy:  "When exposures go wrong: Troubleshooting guidelines for managing difficult scenarios that arise in Exposure-based treatment for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder The present article reviews five issues that occur in therapy but have been minimally discussed in the OCD treatment literature:  1) when clients fail to habituate to their anxiety -- they don't calm down2) when clients misjudge how much anxiety an exposure will actually cause3) when incidental exposures happen in session -- other fears in the fear hierarchy intrude.  4) when mental or covert rituals interfere with treatment -- covert compulsive behaviors5) when clients demonstrate exceptionally high anxiety sensitivity.  Stacey Smith Counseling at stacysmithcounseling.com -- ERP failures Utilizing safety behaviors  Not sitting with the anxiety until it dissipates -- distracting yourself  Not working through all the irrational, unhelpful thoughts  Not practicing often enough.   ERP criticisms  Can be really unpleasant for clients -- repeated exposures to terrifying stimuli -- can there be a better way? Concerns about safety and security   Concerns about flooding with anxiety  Ben Blum: Inside the Revolutionary Treatment That Could Change Psychotherapy Forever  elemental.medium.com July 21, 2020 Robert Fox is haunted by a memory of a germophobic woman with OCD whom he met once while she was hospitalized. As part of her ERP therapy, the therapists took her into the bathroom and had her wipe her hands over the toilet and sink and then rub them through her hair. She wasn't permitted to shower until the next morning.   Concerns about dropout rates.   Dropout rate of 18.7% across 21 ERP studies with 1400 participants Clarissa Ong and colleagues in 2016 article in the Journal of Anxiety Disorders Dropout rate of 10% among youth for ERP in a 2019 meta-analysis by Carly Johnco and her colleagues in the Journal "Depression and Anxiety" 11 randomized trials I'm concerned that it doesn't go deep enough  Not getting to root causes -- staying at the symptom level -- seeing symptoms as nonsensical One thing which I can't stress enough is that OCD is completely nonsensical and will not listen to reason. This is one of the most frightening things about having it. I knew that to anyone I told, there are Salvador Dali paintings that make more sense. - Author: Joe Wells   What is the fear really about.  Let's not just ignore it.  Fear is a response to something. Tracing back layers, going back through grief and anger, all the way to shame.  Shame episodes 37-49.   Doesn't get to any spiritual issues Medication  International OCD Foundation Drugs and dosages High doses are often needed for these drugs to work in most people.   Research suggests that the following doses may be needed:  fluvoxamine (Luvox®) – up to 300 mg/day  fluoxetine (Prozac®) – 40-80 mg/day  sertraline (Zoloft®) – up to 200 mg/day   paroxetine (Paxil®) – 40-60 mg/day   citalopram (Celexa®) – up to 40 mg/day*   clomipramine (Anafranil®) – up to 250 mg/day  escitalopram (Lexapro®) – up to 40 mg/day   venlafaxine (Effexor®) – up to 375 mg/day   How Do These Medications Work?  From the International OCD Foundation.  It remains unclear as to how these particular drugs help OCD. The good news is that after decades of research, we know how to treat patients, even though we do not know exactly why our treatments work. We do know that each of these medications affect a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Serotonin is used by the brain as a messenger. If your brain does not have enough serotonin, then the nerves in your brain might not be communicating right. Adding these medications to your body can help boost your serotonin and get your brain back on track.   Discussion of conventional approaches  Medication  I am not a physician -- I'm a psychologist and I don't have prescription privileges I don't give advice on medication choices or on dosages or anything like that.  If you think your medication is helping your OCD, I'm not going to argue with you about that --  I don't want to try to dissuade anyone from taking medication for psychological issues if they think it's helping them.   Here's the thing, though.  So much of your thinking about medication depends on what you see as the cause of the problem It makes sense to take medication if you think the obsessions and compulsions pop up because of chemical imbalances.   You take the medication to restore the chemical balance and reduce the symptoms.  So many of treatments for OCD treat the obsessions and compulsions as meaningless, as irrational, as just the random epiphenomena of consciousness, or just as nonsensical expressions of miswiring in the brain or just the effects of poorly balanced neurochemical in the brain.     And so these approaches, like ERP that and medication that target the obsessions and compulsions for eradication, that seek to vanquish them result in multiple problems  I think that is a major, major mistake.   And here is what I want to emphasize.  Obsessions and Compulsions are symptoms.  They are symptoms.  Obsessions and compulsions, as painful and as debilitating as they are for many people, those obsessions and compulsions are not the primary problem.  They are the effects of the primary problem.  Obsessions and compulsions happen late in the causal chain.  I see meaning in every obsession and in every compulsion.  I see a message in every obsession and compulsion.  A cry for help, a signal of deeper distress.   There are cases in which a psychological problem can be purely or primarily organic -- due to a medical condition -- for example due to head trauma that causes brain damage.  Or a brain tumor on the pituitary gland that disrupts your whole endocrine system, resulting in mood swings. But, Most of the time, though, psychological symptoms have psychological causes.   As a Catholic psychologist, I want to move much further back in the causal chain.  I want to address and resolve the underlying issues that give rise to the obsessions in the first place.   Self Help  Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) at helpguide.org  Identify your triggers Can help you anticipate your urges  Create a solid mental picture and then make a mental note. Tell yourself, “The window is now closed,” or “I can see that the oven is turned off.”  When the urge to check arises later, you will find it easier to re-label it as “just an obsessive thought.”   Learn to resist OCD compulsions by repeatedly exposing yourself to your OCD triggers, you can learn to resist the urge to complete your compulsive rituals --  exposure and response prevention (ERP)  Build your fear ladder -- working your way up to more and more frightening things.   Resist the urge to do your compulsive behavior The anxiety will fade You're not going to lose control or have a breakdown Practice Challenge Obsessive thoughts Thoughts are just thoughts   Write down obsessive thoughts and compulsions Writing it all down will help you see just how repetitive your obsessions are.  Writing down the same phrase or urge hundreds of times will help it lose its power.  Writing thoughts down is much harder work than simply thinking them, so your obsessive thoughts are likely to disappear sooner.   Challenge your obsessive thoughts. Use your worry period to challenge negative or intrusive thoughts by asking yourself What's the evidence that the thought is true? That it's not true? Have I confused a thought with a fact?   Is there a more positive, realistic way of looking at the situation?  What's the probability that what I'm scared of will actually happen? If the probability is low, what are some more likely outcomes?   Is the thought helpful? How will obsessing about it help me and how will it hurt me?   What would I say to a friend who had this thought?   Create an OCD worry period. Rather than trying to suppress obsessions or compulsions, develop the habit of rescheduling them. Choose one or two 10-minute “worry periods” each day, time you can devote to obsessing.  During your worry period, focus only on negative thoughts or urges. Don't try to correct them. At the end of the worry period, take a few calming breaths, let the obsessive thoughts go, and return to your normal activities. The rest of the day, however, is to be designated free of obsessions.  When thoughts come into your head during the day, write them down and “postpone” them to your worry period.   Create a tape of your OCD obsessions or intrusive thoughts. Focus on one specific thought or obsession and record it to a tape recorder or smartphone.  Recount the obsessive phrase, sentence, or story exactly as it comes into your mind.  Play the tape back to yourself, over and over for a 45-minute period each day, until listening to the obsession no longer causes you to feel highly distressed.   By continuously confronting your worry or obsession you will gradually become less anxious. You can then repeat the exercise for a different obsession.   Reach our for support Stay connected to family and friends.  Join an OCD support group.  Manage Stress Quickly self-soothe and relieve anxiety symptoms by making use of one or more of your physical senses—sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste—or movement. You might try listening to a favorite piece of music, looking at a treasured photo, savoring a cup of tea, or stroking a pet.   Practice relaxation techniques. Mindful meditation, yoga, deep breathing, and other relaxation techniques can help lower your overall stress and tension levels and help you manage your urges. For best results, try practicing a relaxation technique regularly. Lifestyle changes Exercise regularly  Get enough sleep  Avoid alcohol and nicotine   Not sure this is going to work.  Doesn't get to root causes.   IFS as an alternative From Verywellmind.com  What is Internal Family Systems?  By Theodora Blanchfield, August 22, 2021    What Is Internal Family Systems (IFS) Therapy? Internal family systems, or IFS, is a type of therapy that believes we are all made up of several parts or sub-personalities. It draws from structural, strategic, narrative, and Bowenian types of family therapy. The founder, Dr. Richard Schwartz, thought of the mind as an inner family and began applying techniques to individuals that he usually used with families.  The underlying concept of this theory is that we all have several parts living within us that fulfill both healthy and unhealthy roles. Life events or trauma, however, can force us out of those healthy roles into extreme roles. The good news is that these internal roles are not static and can change with time and work. The goal of IFS therapy is to achieve balance within the internal system and to differentiate and elevate the self so it can be an effective leader in the system.   Parts:  Separate, independently operating personalities within us, each with own unique prominent needs, roles in our lives, emotions, body sensations, guiding beliefs and assumptions, typical thoughts, intentions, desires, attitudes, impulses, interpersonal style, and world view.  Each part also has an image of God and also its own approach to sexuality.  Robert Falconer calls them insiders.  Robert Fox and Alessio Rizzo  have done the most work with IFS to work with obsessions and compulsions.    Sources IFS and Hope with OCD with Alessio Rizzo and Robert Fox -- Episode 102 of Tammy Sollenberger's podcast The One Inside -- September 17, 2021  Podcast IFS Talks:  Hosts Aníbal Henriques & Tisha Shull  A Talk with Robert Fox on OCD-types -- Robert Fox   February 20, 2021   Robert Fox, IFS therapist with OCD  Ben Blum: Inside the Revolutionary Treatment That Could Change Psychotherapy Forever  elemental.medium.com July 21, 2020 https://elemental.medium.com/inside-the-revolutionary-treatment-that-could-change-psychotherapy-forever-8be035d54770   Robert Fox, a therapist in Woburn, Massachusetts, also wishes more people knew about IFS. Diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder at age 21 after a lifetime of unusual compulsions, he spent 23 years receiving the standard care: cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure response prevention (ERP). Neither had much effect, especially ERP, which involved repeatedly exposing himself to things he was anxious about in the hopes of gradually habituating to them. “When you think about it, it's a very painful method of therapy,” he says. Fox discovered IFS in 2008. Before, he had always been encouraged to think of his compulsions as meaningless pathologies. Now, for the first time, they began making sense to him as the behavior of protectors who were trying to manage the underlying shame and fear of exiles. After two particularly powerful unburdenings, his symptoms abated by 95% and stayed that way. “[OCD] used to be almost like kryptonite around my neck when I would have serious flare-ups,” he says. “I feel a lot of freedom and peace and I really owe it to Dick [Schwartz] and the model.” Concerns about ERP  ERP doesn't bring the curiosity -- why did this happen?   Obsessions are not irrational and Compulsions are not meaningless Alessio Rizzo Conventional OCD diagnosis and treatment ERP and medication -- nothing points back to underlying causes. Alessio Rizzo:  Evidence-based approaches for OCD that work -- they work by drawing a manager part into a role of suppressing OCD symptoms  Needing to continue ERP.   Causes:  Fox Repressed anger. -- not a parent who could witness   Intense shame that is dissociated Shame from childhood -- exiled  Shame from the OCD itself.  -- sarcasm from others, especially from his older brother.   “OCD is like having a bully stuck inside your head and nobody else can see it.” — Krissy McDermott   We hide what we are ashamed of -- not easy to treat.   Fox on his treatment:  Right. I didn't see it myself until one day I was out for a walk with my dog Gizmo around my block, walking around the block with him and I had been to all these lectures about shame and I was walking one day and all of a sudden it was like, it just came to me “Holy, Holy, Holy shit. I carry that shame.” And it was like a dark cloud that was overhead and just kind of followed me wherever I went. And it was actually not an awful thing to realize. That's what had been basically walking around on my back for so long. It was this deep shame. In agreement with how central I think shame is to OCD Obsessions and compulsions develop gradually and experiment with different ways of drawing attention away from the intensity of underlying experience.  All happens in silence in the inner world.   An obsession or compulsion distracts us from the pain of an exile.  If I'm worrying about the gas in the lawnmower overflowing and blowing up the house -- takes me away from the shame of feeling inadequate at work.   Needs to be powerful enough to hijack my mind So many layers of protectors  -- takes time Alessio Rizzo Post dated March 3, 2021 entitled "IFS and OCD -- A Comparison Between CBT and IFS for OCD.  https://www.therapywithalessio.com/articles/ifs-and-ocd-how-does-the-ifs-method-work-for-ocd In IFS, we use the language of parts to describe how we function. As a consequence, the OCD is considered a part of the person. This means that, even if the OCD seems quite a strong presence in the client's life, there is much more to a person than OCD.  At this stage CBT and IFS might look similar because CBT also encourages clients to label the anxieties and the intrusive thoughts that form the OCD and not engage with them.  The main difference between CBT and IFS is in how we relate to the OCD part.  One of the foundational elements of IFS is that all parts are welcome, and, therefore, the OCD part is not dismissed or ignored, but it is respected. Respect does not mean that the client will believe the content of intrusive thoughts or that they will follow up on whatever behaviour the OCD wants. IFS gives us a way to make sure that there is enough safety and calm before offering respect to the OCD part. This might take a different amount of attempts depending on the severity of the OCD, and on the strength of the relationship between therapist and client.  Healing OCD with IFS  The main difference between CBT and IFS is in the definition of “cure” of OCD.  CBT therapy has the ultimate goal of empowering the client to overcome OCD thoughts and anxieties by never engaging with them or by using exposure therapy to demonstrate that the OCD fears and obsessions have got no evidence to exist.  IFS believes that healing is the result of the re-organisation of parts so that extreme behaviour is substituted by more functional ways of thinking and acting, and, above all, IFS aims at healing the traumatic events that have led to the development of OCD symptoms.    The result of healing the trauma that fuels OCD is a spontaneous decrease of OCD anxieties and intrusive thoughts and, in my opinion, this form of healing is preferable to the one described by CBT. Using IFS language, the CBT approach aims at creating a new part in the system that is tasked with managing the OCD, while there is no attention paid to discovery and healing of the trauma that is fueling the OCD.Choosing the method that best suits you There is no way of saying what method works best for a person.  Therapy outcomes depend on many factors and not only on the method used. Sometimes the quality of the therapeutic relationship is the biggest healing factor, and it is ultimately up to the client to find the best combination of therapist and method that can best suit them. Colleen West, LMFT LMFT  December 20 post on her website colleenwest.com  Treating OCD with Internal Family Systems Parts Work Just a word about treating OCD with IFS versus Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP). Treating obsessive and compulsive parts with IFS is diametrically opposed to treating it in the Exposure and Response Prevention, the most commonly recommended approach. IFS treats OCD parts as what they are--managers and fire fighters, they have jobs to do. If you can help the exiles underneath these protectors, there will be less need for the OCD behaviors. (This might be complicated if there are still constant stressors in the client's life, for which they need the protection.)   IFS does work, and I have successfully treated people with full blown OCD who now have about 5% of their original symptoms only during moments of high stress, and they do not consider themselves OCD anymore. These clients have been helped by taking SSRIs as well, which I will say more about below.ERP works to suppress those same protectors that IFS seeks to understand/care for. It does "work", as people get a strategy for the thoughts that are driving them nuts, but the folks I know who have gone through this treatment find they have to do their 'homework' forever or the OCD comes back, and they always feel it threatening. In short, it is stressful, and the fight is never over.For anyone doing ERP, they have to commit fully to that approach, the homework is hours a day, and one cannot be halfhearted about it or it won't work. The good thing about ERP is that it gives people some control, which they strongly desire, because they feel so powerless. Next episode Episode 87, will come out on December 6, 2022 Scrupulosity --  I have such a different take -- Scrupulosity is what happens with perfectionism and OCD get religion.   Spiritual and Psychological elements.   In the last episode we really got into understanding perfectionism.  In this episode, we worked on really getting to know about obsessions and compulsions.  Next episode, we get much more into scrupulosity.  My own battle with scrupulosity.   Remember, you as a listener can call me on my cell any Tuesday or Thursday from 4:30 PM to 5:30 PM.  I've set that time aside for you.  317.567.9594.  (repeat) or email me at crisis@soulsandhearts.com.  Resilient Catholics Community.  Talked a lot about it in episode 84, two episodes ago.  We now have 106 on the waiting list.  Reopening the community on December 1 for those on the waiting list first.  Can learn a lot more about the RCC and you can sign up at soulsandhearts.com/rcc.  We have had heavy demand.  We may have to limit how many we bring in.  I am working to clear time in my calendar to review the Initial Measures Kits and help new members through the onboarding process -- all the individual attention takes time.  I'm also hiring more staff to help.   Pray for me.  Humility.  Childlike trust   Invocations        

The Fire You Carry
061: Eric Eastlund, Firefighter Diagnosed With Cancer & The Fight That Followed

The Fire You Carry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 81:20


This episode will give you some great perspectives on facing adversity in your life or supporting others that are struggling, with cancer or anything else life throws at you. Make sure you share this episode with someone you think would benefit from it! Eric Eastlund is the new Engineer on our shift. He has been a fireman with our department for over ten years now. He and Kevin went through the tower together. Eric was diagnosed with cancer after about 6 years on the job and this episode focuses on the process of fighting it. Cancer is a scary diagnosis, and for firefighters, it is all too common. Eric's mindset, his willingness to fight on multiple fronts, and the strength he carries from his heritage as a member of the Chumash tribe, along with the support of those around him all added up to defeating cancer. Thank you to Facedown Records and My Epic for the use of their song "Hail"!https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dz2RZThURTU&ab_channel=FacedownRecordsFirefighter Cancer Support Network.https://firefightercancersupport.org/Join our Discord group and talk to us!https://discord.gg/aq3qpFATQNFollow us on Instagram!https://www.instagram.com/thefireyoucarry/?hl=enBuy us a coffee to support the podcast!https://www.instagram.com/thefireyoucarry/?hl=enBuy shirts and hoodies here!https://thefireyoucarry.threadless.com/Buy some great coffee and support the podcast by using our discount code at checkout! code: thefireyoucarryhttps://www.firedeptcoffee.com/Get yourself some blue light-blocking glasses from our good friend Sean!https://thekatalyst.co/

The I Love Success Podcast
266. Christopher Dedeyan - Dyslexia is a Superpower

The I Love Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 56:28


Diagnosed with dyslexia at the age of eight Christopher Dedeyan was faced with many failures along the way. Because of his relentless attitude of never giving up, the failures taught him how to succeed. He attributes a huge part of his success as an entrepreneur to the lessons he learned growing up in the schooling system as a dyslexic. Now Christopher Dedeyan is a professional speaker and peak performance expert who helps entrepreneurs, leaders and employees alike manage stress, increase productivity and have more energy.  The host is Peter Jumrukovski a Real Estate Agent, World medalist and Author with the mission to help at least 10 million people in 10 years to accomplish their dreams. For more information visit: http://www.ilovesuccess.co Sponsor: CallCast - Turn phone calls into podcasts: https://callcast.co Music and Production: Tobi Fanoiki Advisor: Malick Jarboh

SAEM Podcasts
Most ED patients meeting sepsis criteria are not diagnosed with sepsis at discharge

SAEM Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 27:09


Most ED patients meeting sepsis criteria are not diagnosed with sepsis at discharge by SAEM

Everybody Pulls The Tarp
Danielle Walker: Overcoming Personal Challenges

Everybody Pulls The Tarp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 24:44


Danielle Walker is a 3x New York Times bestselling author, health advocate, and a self-trained chef. Diagnosed with a severe case of an incurable autoimmune disease at 22 years old, Danielle set out on a personal mission to find ways to manage her symptoms through lifestyle and diet. From her own kitchen, she tested and perfected thousands of recipes that she now shares with millions around the world. Danielle's story is one of resilience, hope, and will give you the courage you need to tackle challenges head on.  Show highlights:1:31 - Danielle's diagnosis with severe case of autoimmune disease at age 223:12 - Doing her own research to find solutions3:58 - Finding new approaches that work for you4:50 - Starting a blog and building an audience6:18 - Staying driven and motivated even with a steep learning curve8:55 - Focusing on positives, keeping a positive outlook9:42 - Transitioning a blog into a business9:50 - Learning new skills on the fly11:00 - Process of writing first book14:50 - Entrepreneurial spirit and experience as a kid selling things18:06 - Using the blog as market research to shape content for book19:50 - Turning vulnerability and hardship into something positive21:21 - Process of writing a personal memoir and power of personal reflection22:13 - Power of going through old notes and conversations22:55 - Being mindful of diet and what you put in your bodyTo learn more about Danielle and shop her store:https://daniellewalker.com Be sure to subscribe & leave a review for the show in your favorite podcast app.Please tell your friends about Everybody Pulls The Tarp on social media and be sure to tag Andrew in your posts @andrewmoses123 (Instagram) and @andrewHmoses (Twitter).Follow Andrew on IG: @AndrewMoses123 and Twitter:@andrewhmosesSign up for e-mails to keep up with the podcast at everybodypullsthetarp.com/newsletter!

Wednesdays with Watson
Surviving Breast Cancer & The Power Of Community, Tammy Williamson

Wednesdays with Watson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 43:25


Amy Watson sits down with breast cancer survivor, Tammy Williamson. We believe there is power and Hope in story and we are so pleased to bring you this warrior's story of hope, healing, and community! Tammy's perspective is a good one, and is a testament to the power of the human spirit.  We are SO grateful that Tammy's fight, while not easy, is one that is hopeful and helps us remember there are good people in this world. It is your job to be one of those people and to find those people. There is power in community and connection!Contact AmyClearwater Christian college alumna meet on the Wednesdays With Watson podcast to discuss Tammy's journey with breast cancer.  Diagnosed at just 40, this mom of six speaks candidly about her journey, what scared her the. most, and some of the traditions she has kept in the years since her battle with breast cancer. Tammy is open and honest about how she experienced a life threatening disease like breast cancer. She also shares stories of community and even gives us the perspective of some of her children. Early detection is KEY to survival, and it is the hope that this podcast will serve as a reminder to women and men everywhere. Enjoy this bonus episode of the Wednesdays With Watson podcast, and remember the power of community!

Reede Scholars Live
Let's Talk Health Equity, Breast Cancer Survivorship and Advocacy

Reede Scholars Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 26:41


On this episode we are joined by Marsha McDougal, food & lifestyle blogger and breast cancer survivor who resides in Nashville, TN. Diagnosed with breast cancer after her second pregnancy, Mrs. McDougal shares her journey publicly on YouTube. As a part of our breast cancer awareness series, we discuss diagnosis and treatment before the age of screening. As a wife, mother and advocate she hopes to let others know they are not alone and find comfort in her story. Blogger: MarshaEileen.com YouTuber @MarshaEileen #breastcancer #breastcancerawareness #marshaeileen #breastcancersurvivor #breastfeeding --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/reede-scholars/support

Because We Are Strong
INTERVIEW: Leeya Alperin & GLA

Because We Are Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 29:10


Hey Peeps! Welcome back to another weekly episode of Because We are Strong!  This week we are talking with Leeya, who was only 15 years old when she started down this rare journey. In her sophomore year, she was diagnosed56 with GLA which changed her and her family's lives forever. Now at just 20 years old, Leeya has found a passion for advocacy. I am always in awe of the young advocates in this rare space and I am so confident in the work they will do to bring the invisible visible. ____________________________________________________Meet Leeya:I am an honest person who at 20 years old has been through a lot in 4 1/2 years. At 15 years old, I went down the path to find out what was wrong. A lot of friends did not understand what I was going through and sometimes still do not.Mental struggles are true and I also deal with neuropathic pain on top of the condition.Diagnosed with Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA) at 15 years old during the first semester of sophomore year of high school. Since then, my family and I have been on a crazy but rewarding journey. Rewarding in the fact that we all love advocating and I have found a deep passion in wanting to pursue a career in hospital administration.Learned and have gone through many things which have led to some “friends” coming and going. That's also a learning experience of who you want in your life.____________________________________________________Connect with Leeya:Instagram - @leeyas.storyGo to www.lgdalliance.org for further information about patients like me with these complex lymphatic anomalies.__________________________________________________This episode is sponsored by : That's why the BC Schizophrenia Society has launched a brand new podcast, called Look Again, Mental Illness Re-examined. Host Faydra Aldridge talks to doctors, families, and people with lived experience about how to recognize mental illness, and the specific treatments that can help. Check it out. They'll really challenge you to“look again” at what you think you know about mental illness. Support the show (https://www.patron.com/findyourrare)

Fibromyalgia Real Solutions With Amanda Love
Episode 90 - Jay Shifman Stigmata Around Mental Health Story of Hope #5

Fibromyalgia Real Solutions With Amanda Love

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 27:49


Diagnosed with AHD back in the 1990s.  This is an amazing story!  In this episode we also cover:Struggle with mental healthLate teen's on 5 to 6 medications3 Months in Long term Facility5 Year's into Recovery - He got told to tell his storyChose You're Struggle PodcastWhy is there a stigma around mental health?  3 Mindfulness tips The big message for those who are struggling with mental healthJay Shifman is an open book. A vulnerable storyteller and stigma-destroying speaker, and a podcast and event host, Jay's story of struggle are familiar to the millions of people the world over who also struggle with issues of mental health, substance misuse, and addiction. Now in long-term recovery, it is Jay's mission to encourage difficult conversations and honest education concerning these and similar struggles.The founder of Choose Your Struggle and the host of the podcast that shares its name as well as the narrative series Rock Bottom Storytellers and A Day in the Life, Jay is a fervent believer in radical honesty and the simple fact that neither struggle nor recovery should be treated as a one-size-fits-all experience, Jay uses his voice, and his platforms to educate, entertain, and empower.Holding a BA in Psychology from Northern Kentucky University and with over a decade of lived and professional experience in the field, Jay has put in numerous hours of independent learning acquiring certifications in mental health, substance misuse and addiction, and drug policy. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife, Lauren, and their dog, Nell.For more information, visit: www.jayshifman.com or find him on your favorite social media platform. dog barking at 22 markAmanda Elise LoveHave a conversation with me about your 2021 health goals -http://bit.ly/2ko8lSpInstagram - https://bit.ly/3fhjmfJFacebook personal page- https://bit.ly/2Wlwc4aFacebook business page- https://www.facebook.com/amandaeliseloveWebsite - http://www.amandaeliselove.comGot a question? Or maybe a guest suggestion? Email me at amandaeliselove@gmail.com

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell
Ableism, Labelism, and What Happens After Being Diagnosed with ADHD

Distraction with Dr. Ned Hallowell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 32:35


René Brooks, our guest host of Distraction for ADHD Awareness month, is joined by John Hazelwood, an ADHD advocate and mentor for men's health. The pair share a ton of insights about what they've learned since being diagnosed with ADHD including how to surround yourself with people who respect you, the importance of self-reflection, recognizing your strengths and the positives that exist within you, and why now is the time to share your story with others.  John on Twitter: @j0n_j0n John on Instagram: @adhd_j0nj0n John's ADHD Mens Support Group on Instagram We want to hear from you! CLICK HERE TO TAKE OUR LISTENER SURVEY. Or write an email or record a voice memo and send it to connect@distractionpodcast.com.   Distraction is sponsored by Landmark College in Putney, Vermont.  It's the college for students who learn differently! Landmark offers comprehensive supports for students with ADHD and other learning differences, both on campus and online. Learn more HERE! Distraction welcomes Black Girl, Lost Keys blog creator, René Brooks, as our guest host for ADHD Awareness Month! René is an ADHD coach, writer and advocate who also has ADHD herself. From Black Girl, Lost Keys website: René Brooks is a late-life ADHD success story. After being diagnosed 3 times as a child (7, 11 and 25) she was finally able to get the treatment she deserved. René decided that her passion for helping others should be put toward people with this disorder who are struggling in silence or shame. She started Black Girl, Lost Keys to empower Black women with ADHD and show them how to live well with the condition. 

Beyond Risk and Back
Bio-Hacking Struggling Teens...Essential Oils and the Woo Woo episode

Beyond Risk and Back

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 54:56


No, I'm not joking. Before you roll your eyes, you need to know that I am a believer in essential oils and use them a lot.    After I heard about my guest, I had to ask her: Do they work with families that struggle? What is Bio-Hacking and can we use oils to hack our teen's brains? Is it actually a real thing? Like... with science? ...and every left hook question I could think of to understand this...woo-woo stuff. Melody Watts thinks so and I brought her on the air to talk about ANOTHER tool we could use. Nine years ago Melody Watts began her journey of self-discovery and healing following a perfect storm of malady, tragedy, and bad luck. Diagnosed with a debilitating form of Lyme disease while struggling through a tumultuous divorce, she simultaneously lost her mother in a tragic car accident. To exacerbate matters she was imprisoned on a baseless technicality and spent 7-months behind penitentiary bars. Upon release, Melody was introduced to doTERRA essential oils, through a close friend while seeking alternative advice for her son's recurrent cough. Miraculously, the essential oils worked and Melody's perspective of holistic healthcare was altered forever. Shortly thereafter, she officially joined doTERRA in 2013 and by 2015 was top 1% in sales in all of doTERRA. By 2019 Melody sold over $22-million per year and helped thousands of business owners accomplish financial freedom.  Melody lives in Meridian, Idaho with her husband Walter and her four children and two horses.   THANK YOU for listening, liking, subscribing, sharing, and leaving a review for Beyond Risk and Back!

Dying of Laughter
Pt 2: The Pursuit of Breast Health Equity with Jasmine Souers & Marissa Thomas of "For the Breast Of Us"

Dying of Laughter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 50:40


Today we discuss how For The Breast Of Us is empowering women of color affected by breast cancer through education, advocacy and community. This is Part 2! Check out last week's episode for Jasmine and Marissa's personal stories. @forthebreastofus Jasmine Souers, a breast cancer survivor from Jacksonville, FL, was diagnosed with stage I breast cancer at the age of 26. Diagnosed just two days before the new year in 2016, Jasmine thought the results of her biopsy would determine the trajectory of the upcoming year, but that couldn't have been further from the truth. In 2017, with the support of her family and close friends, Jasmine underwent a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction and 25 rounds of proton therapy radiation. Marissa Thomas is a four-year breast cancer survivor from Tacoma, WA. Diagnosed in November 2015 at the age of 35, with Stage II High-Grade Invasive Ductal Carcinoma In-Situ (DCIS) 35% ER positive, just shy 3 months of her 36th birthday. Her active treatment in 2016 consisted of lumpectomy, Chemotherapy, Radiation and two reconstruction surgeries. While in treatment, Marissa turned to social media as a way to connect with other women and find stories similar to hers in hopes of making the journey easier. Living With Stage IV Breast Cancer with Susan Cymrot (My Mom) Say hi! @dyingoflaughter_podcast / DyingOfLaughterPodcast@gmail.com Do you like this show? Leaving a review on Apple Podcasts is extremely appreciated...I read & cherish every single one! @_ChelsWhoElse_ | www.ChelsWhoElse.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Endo Babe Podcast: Endometriosis w/ Chelsea Bri
109. What I Wish I Had Done Differently When I Was First Diagnosed With Endometriosis

The Endo Babe Podcast: Endometriosis w/ Chelsea Bri

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 28:18


In this episode of the Endo Babe Podcast, I answer the question of, How would I change the actions I took when I was first diagnosed? What are the things I wish I had done more of and less of? The other podcast episodes I referenced in this ep: With Dr. Cook (click here!) With Katie from Heal Endo (click here!) On Seed Cycling (click here!) ************* Follow Chelsea on IG here! Get your TICKETS to the Endo Babe Bash here!! Click here to join the Endo Babe email list Check out other freebies + the Endo Babe blog here! Join my FREE Endo Babe Support Group on FB --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/endobabepodcast/support

I Know I'm Crazy with NAJA HALL
Diagnosed with Narcissistic Personality Disorder! NOW WHAT!? with Guest Coach Ralph Toulon

I Know I'm Crazy with NAJA HALL

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:21


Today Naja chats with Coach Ralph about overcoming narcissistic abuse, how she personally recovered from narcissistic abuse, and her mission to help others! Ralphiel Toulon is a badass wife, mother, and bonus mom who turned her darkest time dealing with the effects of being in a narcissistic relationship, into a mission to help women struggling in their relationships. Ralphiel got focused and did the work on herself first, and shortly after became certified as a professional coach. While serving her clients, Ralphiel went back to become a mastered certified professional coach to continue to help women put a name to what they're experiencing, survive, heal and have healthier relationships they deserve. Visit Coach Ralph online! www.ralphieltulon.com Instagram @RalphTheCoach

Prickly and Blooming
Texas Women: Kenna

Prickly and Blooming

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021


In this episode of Prickly and Blooming, Kenna speaks with host Jessie Browning about going through two life-changing moments: the end of her first marriage and getting diagnosed with (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) ADHD. She talks about the events that led to her divorce, what she did to move on and how she met her now-husband. She shares what she's learned through her ADHD diagnosis and how eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy has led her to process her trauma. Episode Timeline: [00:01] Intro [06:37] What does a fox say? [08:44] Meet Kenna [10:36] The end of her first marriage [24:29] Nothing left and the aftermath [32:04] Moving on and dating [41:02] A fight with Mom [43:26] Back to the workforce [51:49] Diagnosed with ADHD [1:01:54] EMDR therapy [1:08:22] The craft beer industry and #MeToo [1:19:17] Jessie's rapid fire questions [1:26:25] Contacting Kenna Resources Mentioned: Canon IVY Mini Photo Printer Cool Hand Luke - Shaking The Bush, Boss Don't Tell Mom the Babysitter's Dead - I'm Right On Top Of That, Rose Ylvis - The Fox (what does the fox say?) Mercer Black on Prickly and Blooming Big Bend Brewing Company

Uneducated
Diagnosed with ADHD at 30 with Cammie Scott

Uneducated

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 46:58


In honor of World Mental Health Day, Cammie discusses her recent journey being diagnosed with ADHD and how that has impacted her life and overall mental health. ADHD often goes undiagnosed in women becuase of the different ways it presents itself and our ability to mask. By having open conversations and sharing our stories, we can shed light and help educate others who may be struggling in order to get the proper help they need. Join the group chat: https://links.geneva.com/invite/4eae66bb-3547-427d-b7cb-95dbd1e596bd Follow the podcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/uneducated_podcast/ Follow the podcast TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@uneducatedpodcast?lang=en Follow the podcast on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3MA_rAlUfQ5qD45XJU0Fbg --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/uneducatedpod/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uneducatedpod/support

All Things
Episode 72: Help! I've Been Diagnosed with a Mental Disorder with Christine Chappell

All Things

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:00


Have you or a loved one ever been diagnosed with a mental disorder? A diagnosis might not only feel chaotic and unsettling, but also final and paralyzing. In the church we wonder if the issue is spiritual or physical, if friends can offer support or if we need to call in the professionals, if all we need is the Bible or if we need to draw on other resources. It can feel like we have more questions than answers. On this episode of All Things we hear from Christine Chappell who just published a new mini-book resource entitled, Help! I've Been Diagnosed with a Mental Disorder (Shepherd Press). The book aims to give comfort and counsel to those who have been labeled with a psychiatric disorder of some kind. Christine cautions against a “fix it” mentality and says, “As someone who has personally navigated such a journey, I pray that the stabilizing biblical truths shared in this resource will minister to others in the same way that they ministered to me.” Listen in to hear Christine show how the Scriptures provide truths about our personhood, purpose, and potential for making God-glorifying progress during the challenging post-diagnosis journey.Resources: Christine Chappell Website Help! I've Been Diagnosed with a Mental Disorder