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  • 38PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about arts commission

Latest podcast episodes about arts commission

Eric Chase
TMA‘s Rhonda Sewell

Eric Chase

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 49:35


I wanted to track someone down from TMA to talk about HOW they secured John Legend for a performance in the Great Gallery. I'd been wanting to visit with Rhonda because we have so many community friends in common.  This episode is 100 out of 10. PLEASE enjoy, and PLEASE consider helping Rhonda, as President elect of the Arts Commission, hit her fundraising goal. 

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

It's the month of October and we are checking in to see how local organizations are handling another year of holiday programming in a pandemic, featuring the Toledo Lucas County Public Library and The Arts Commission.

Mississippi Stories with Marshall Ramsey
S1E33 Sarah Story: Executive Director of the Mississippi Arts Commission

Mississippi Stories with Marshall Ramsey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 48:40


In this episode of Mississippi Stories, Mississippi Today Editor-At-Large Marshall Ramsey sits down with Mississippi Arts Commission Executive Director Sarah Story. Story became executive director of Mississippi Arts Commission in November 2020 and leads the state agency in its mission to be a catalyst for the arts and creativity in Mississippi. In this fun interview, Story talks about all the ways the MAC helps on one of Mississippi's greatest natural resources – it's creatives.  Story previously served as the executive director of the UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum in Austin, Texas, which exhibits the work of Charles Umlauf, his influences, and other contemporary artists and as deputy director and project coordinator of the Ogden Museum in New Orleans.  She received a BFA in painting from the University of Mississippi and a Master's in Arts Administration from the University of New Orleans.

City Of Lawrence, KS
08/18/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Special Meeting

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 27:59


08/18/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Special Meeting by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
07/21/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Special Meeting

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 32:56


07/21/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Special Meeting by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
08/11/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 105:06


08/11/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
07/14/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2021 149:10


07/14/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
05/12/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 74:49


05/12/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
06/09/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 121:29


06/09/21 Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission by City of Lawrence

That's How We Role
Just Be Your Authentic Self with Jill Dalton

That's How We Role

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2021 34:59


Jill Dalton is a actor and writer.  Jill's memoir, My Life in the Trenches ofShow Business: Escape to New York - Act 1  onAmazon.com.  It has a five star rating and was #1 in Acting andAuditioning for several days. Her essays have been published in AuntieBellum Magazine, Delmarva Review, Evening Street Review, TheMacGuffin, Pine Hills Review, and Progressive Activists Voice.Her plays, Collateral Damage (2014) and Whistle-blower (2015)were both semi-finalist in the Eugene O'Neill National PlaywrightsConference. Her solo play, Lizzie Borden Live! was commissioned bythe East Lynne Theater Company in Cape May, NJ, where it had itsworld premiere (August 2007), and a successful and critically acclaimedsix-week run. Tony and 4 time Emmy winning Orchestrator andComposer, Larry Hochman, did original music for the piece, and Ms.Dalton won the 2007 Jacoby Award for her portrayal of Lizzie.Jill has also written and performed two other solo plays: MyLife in the Trenches and Calling on God. These works wereperformed at: Surf Reality, Dixon Place, Womenkind Festival, SoloArts, Hudson Guild, The Field, New York Fringe Festival,Ensemble Studio Theatre, the Int'l, l Midtown Festival (best of thefest), 78th Street Theater Lab, the Kitchen Theatre (Ithaca, NY).Her acting credits include: FBI, Things Heard & Seen, The LoomingTower, Succession, Braid, Too Big to Fail, Law & Order, All MyChildren, As the World Turns, Another World, One Life to Live,Saturday Night Live, Veronika Decides to Die, Rachel GettingMarried, and Oliver Stone's Wall Street.She consulted with William Hurt on his portrayal of Hank Paulson in theHBO film, Too Big to Fail and he was nominated for an Emmy.She spent 4 1⁄2 years honing her skills as a stand-up comic, and is therecipient of the Mary Jo Comedy Show Award for most promisingnewcomer in NYC.In 2019, Jill was selected to be a part of the PERFORMING ARTSLEGACY PROJECT (PAL) developed at the Actors Fund. PAL is anonline platform to document and represent performers' careers and saveour national legacy.https://performingartslegacy.org/daltonPrior to coming to New York she was an Artist-in-Residence with theMetropolitan Arts Council in S.C. Her mime troupe, HOMEMADEMIME, toured the southeast and Puerto with grants from the NationalEndowment for the Arts and the S.C. Arts Commission.Jill is a member of SAG/AFTRA, AEA, and the Dramatist Guildof America.https://jilldalton.nychttps://www.jilldaltonwriter.comhttps://performingartslegacy.org/dalton/My Life in the Trenches of Show Business: Escape to New York - Act 1You'd Be Great At What I DoI Was a Cheerleader in Hitler's Stadium (Will appear in a year in Evening Street Review)No Business Like Show Business  (Will appear in Vol. 14 - November '21 of The DelMara Review)What's Your Porno Name?  (Will appear in Vol. 37.3. of The MacGuffin)The Performing Arts Legacy ProjectSupport the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/ThatsHowWeRole)

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Special Meeting 04/28/21

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2021 33:09


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Special Meeting 04/28/21 by City of Lawrence

Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast with Paul Casey
72. Tri Cities Influencer Podcast featuring Justin Raffa

Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast with Paul Casey

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2021 40:50


Paul Casey: So a goal is like pulling the rope when you cannot clearly see what is on the other end. You know the treasure is there, but you can only see a shadowy outline. With each pole, the treasure becomes more and more clear until there it is right in front of you. Speaker 2: Raising the water level of leadership in the Tri-Cities of Eastern Washington, it's the Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast. Welcome to the TCI Podcast where local leadership and self-leadership expert Paul Casey interviews local CEOs, entrepreneurs, and non-profit executives to hear how they lead themselves and their teams, so we can all benefit from their wisdom and experience. Here's your host, Paul Casey of Growing Forward Service, coaching and equipping individuals and teams to spark breakthrough success. Paul Casey: It's a great day to grow forward. Thanks for joining me for today's episode with Justin Raffa. He is the artistic director of the Mid-Columbia Mastersingers. And a fun fact about Justin he said his little whistling thing, Justin talk about that. Justin Raffa: It might be easier if I just do a little demonstration Paul. Should we just- Paul Casey: Please do. Justin Raffa: ... and then I'll explain later? Paul Casey: Okay. Justin Raffa: [inaudible 00:01:16] So there's a little taste of this annoying whistling approach that I learned as a kid. I use my teeth and I look really goofy if you were just watching me. [inaudible 00:01:35] this funny embouchure but I can do things like that. That's the piccolo solo from Stars and Stripes Forever- Paul Casey: Yes, it is. Justin Raffa: ... and I've learned how to do the little trills and yeah. Paul Casey: Yes, and it was funny because we laughed about this because I used to have a gap or a chip tooth right in the front for like 20 years. And I was able to also whistle through that gap, so that's pretty funny. Well, we're going to dive in after checking with our Tri-City Influencer sponsor. Paul Casey: It's easy to delay answering uncomfortable questions like, "What happens to my assets and my loved ones when I die?" So it's no surprise that nearly 50% of Americans don't have a will, and even fewer have an estate plan. Many disabled clients worry that they don't have enough assets to set up an estate plan. But there are important options available to ensure that you have a voice in your medical and financial decision-making, even if your health takes a turn for the worst. Estate planning gives you a voice when your health deteriorates or after you're gone. Marin Miller Bam, attorney at law, is currently providing free consultations. To find out more about estate planning or to book an appointment, call Marin at (206) 485-4066 or visit Salus that's S-A-L-U-S -law.com today. Paul Casey: Thank you for your support of leadership development in the Tri-Cities. Well, welcome, Justin. I was privileged to meet you many years ago when I was working at a church and you came alongside the music director there and was helping with oratorios and then the Messiah, and it's like, "There's this young guy coming in here with all this musical talent." I remember that. And then through leadership at Tri-Cities, we've had a chance to work together, volunteer together through that to promote leadership development in the Tri-City. So, great that I get to interview today. Justin Raffa: Thank you so much for this opportunity, Paul. I'm a big fan of the work that you do on this leadership front for our community. I've had the pleasure of working with you as a facilitator with one of my groups. And I don't know that I'm a Tri-City influencer. My friends like to call me a pusher and an instigator. They use those terms a lot, but I'm delighted to have a chance to talk with you today. Thank you for the invitation. Paul Casey: We could change this podcast because it's still an eye, Tri-Cities Instigator, right? I think that would be really creative. Well, help our Tri-City Influencers get to know you. Take us through a couple of your career highlights that led you to where you are now. Justin Raffa: I'm a South Jersey native. I grew up outside of Philadelphia in the part of New Jersey where it gets its nickname, the Garden State. I was heavily involved in music for years. I loved singing in church choirs as a kid, and then in all of my different levels of school, I was always involved in music. And it was about my junior year of high school where I thought, "Maybe I could do this for a living." And my high school choir director, who was my favorite teacher of my favorite class, gave me an opportunity that year. And she asked me, "Hey, would you like to teach the class? Would you like to run a couple of rehearsals on this piece and conduct it in the concert?" And I couldn't believe that she would give me that opportunity as a student. She sat in the back of the room and I was down there running the show and I really got hooked. So I'm grateful for those opportunities that I had in high school. Justin Raffa: I went off to my undergraduate degree. I had a lot of opportunities to intern with volunteer community choirs, learning more about the nonprofit side of my industry, which is my bread and butter now, which is what I love the most. Being an intern for a variety of choirs in the Princeton area in Central Jersey, I went to Westminster Choir College in Princeton, not part of Princeton University, but the university was just a 10-minute walk from my campus, so I did spend a lot of time there. But I just took every opportunity I could, which a lot of performing artists do early in the career. You never say no. Whatever chance you have to get in front of people to get on the podium conducting a group, I just ate up, eat, slept and breathed music for so long. Justin Raffa: My first teaching job was in Bisbee, Arizona, a little town on the border of Mexico. It was 2,500 miles away from everyone and everything I ever knew. I'm an only child, so when I finished my undergrad, I was just ready to get out of Jersey, to get out of the east coast. I was just ready for an adventure. And as a young teacher, you want to go out there and change the world. So I thought, "Let's take this job." Justin Raffa: I didn't speak a lick of Spanish. Most of my students there were bilingual. I am as pasty gringo complexion, I had to stay calm. My father's family is Sicilian and my mother's kind of generic UK, but I had a really wonderful time. I was 22 years old and I was out there by myself and had a chance to run the choir and drama departments of the Bisbee High School. And I was also quickly promoted as the lead conductor, the artistic director of the Bisbee community course. So here I am now 22 also in front of adults and getting to pick music and program concerts and things that if I had stayed on the east coast, I probably would have still had to be the intern for the another decade of my life. Justin Raffa: It's just very saturated. My industry back on the east coast, there's a lot of us looking for work, so at the border of Mexico, I had a lot of opportunities and I'm grateful for that. I got to test things out. I made a lot of mistakes in my first couple of years of teaching and working with adult choirs. I also was on the city of Bisbee's Arts Commission, which is where I first stepped into the government sector of advocating for arts. Justin Raffa: I did my master's degree a couple of years after, 27 years old, I needed a job, and I found this interesting little community called the Tri-Cities in Washington State. I'd never spent any time in the Pacific Northwest. I was interested. I was ready to move to another corner of the country ready for that next adventure. I came up for an interview, they liked me, I liked them, and 13 years later, here I am. Justin Raffa: And again, I was 27 years old when Mid-Columbia Mastersingers hired me to be its lead conductor, the artistic director. That's a big responsibility for someone that's still fairly early in their career. The board took a chance on me and I'm grateful for that. And that original team and I worked very close together to really build and start to rebrand the organization. Paul Casey: Yeah, it sounds like say yes to opportunities, I heard in that story. I heard about mentorship in that story. I heard take a chance on somebody that's showing promise, so a lot of good leadership lessons. Justin Raffa: But the salary that the Mastersingers offered me that first year, by the way, which I am happy to share. I don't mind talking about money. I know some people get weird about money. It was basically a $4,000 stipend for the year. And my parents back in Jersey were like, "You're doing what?" Paul Casey: For the year. Justin Raffa: "You're doing what? You're moving to another corner of the country to take on a job that pays you four grands." I was like, "Mom, dad, you got to start somewhere in this industry. It's a small-sized nonprofit performing arts organization. I think I can invest in this and build it, and it's going to give me the opportunities that I want to work in my field." Justin Raffa: I'm glad that we've been able to build the organization and my salary along with it in these past 13 years. But yeah, taking chances and recognizing that, for a lot of us who are artists money is definitely secondary. And we hope that it comes, but it takes a lot of time to build up your experience where you're at a level where you're being compensated for what you think you're worth. But I was happy to do it when I was 27, or I actually I would do it again now. Paul Casey: Well, that's a real love for it. So being in your strength zone can multiply your influence, so how do you add the most value to your organization? Justin Raffa: I have talked a lot over the years about getting the right people on the bus. Paul Casey: Yes, the bus. Justin Raffa: And for me, when the Mastersingers hired me, the organization was a 30ish thousand-dollar annual budget, pretty small, seven or eight members of the board of directors, most of which were singers or singer spouses. So very much the early stages of what nonprofits look like. So I was very intentional and strategic from day one about who do we want on the board? What other staff positions do we want to create? And who are the best people to fill those jobs? Justin Raffa: The board and I, we are very protective of who we bring into that inner circle, because we know that one bad apple can really- Paul Casey: So true. Justin Raffa: ... poison the water. So we've been very diligent about who we invite to come on our board. And as we've grown staff positions, I am fastidious about who we're hiring. I'm on all the selection panels. And that's part of my role as artistic director, when we're bringing additional artistic roles, just, you got to get the right people on the bus. Justin Raffa: And in choir, it's all about team. I could be the greatest, most intelligent musical mind that this country has ever seen, but at the end of the day, it doesn't matter because the work I do is so contingent on groups of people. So yeah, getting the right people on the bus I think has been a really important step for me in growing my organization. Paul Casey: And then on the flip side, you have to be self-aware of your weaknesses. So is there a favorite way you sabotage yourself? Justin Raffa: Yeah, and I've just recently started addressing this. But when you work for a nonprofit organization, when you work for a nonprofit arts organization in communities like Tri-Cities, sometimes it's hard to set work boundaries. We do have a physical office space, but I do not have set office hours. I do not have a nine-to-five job where I need to report to this physical location. Justin Raffa: I can go into the office, but mostly my colleague, Wendy, who is our managing director, she's the front face of the office, so I almost never go in. Which means that at times I find myself answering emails on Friday night at 11 o'clock at night. Because I feel that there's this urgency to get it done. And not having those clear boundaries about showing up to a physical space to work and following a 40-hour work week nine to five, working in the nonprofit sector can be really consuming. And you feel like you're just on, 365 days a year you're just on call 24/7. And so I've had to be really intentional about balancing my time and setting up those limits and said, "I'm not going to answer emails after nine o'clock at night. Let's try that." Paul Casey: Right. Justin Raffa: And it's hard because things might come in and I see it, especially now that we all have phones where we get little dings when anything else comes like, "Oh, it'll just take me a second to answer." No, it can wait. Or, "It's the weekend, I'll get it on Monday morning." So it's been really hard for me because I love my work so much. And I often do have the time. I could take a couple minutes right now and answer that despite the fact that it's 11 o'clock at night. Justin Raffa: So just having to solidify those boundaries and those time restraints so that I don't feel that I'm constantly living my job. Paul Casey: Yeah, and that is hard when you love your job. I totally can relate to that as well, but it will drain you. And it also sets an expectation sometimes of the recipient of the email that, "Oh, I got to respond at 10 o'clock or 11 o'clock as well." Justin Raffa: Right. I don't want to condition people to think that, "Oh, well, Justin's going to answer my email within 30 minutes because he always does." That also sets up unhealthy habits. Paul Casey: It does. Justin Raffa: And end up, because you could see what time this email was sent, what time the response was sent, all of that is tracked. And I'm trying to help my staff colleagues as well. We've all been culprits of this. Like, "Folks, let's just take it easy. This is not so urgent. If something's urgent, pick up the phone and call me. But have a nice weekend, see you Monday morning." Paul Casey: Good stuff. Well, rarely, by the way, only children unite just saying that if any of those- Justin Raffa: Yeah, it's a thing. Paul Casey: ... actually influencers out there that are only children will have to start a meetup. But rarely do we achieve our highest potential by ourselves. And you said, it's all about the team in choir. Who keeps you accountable? Who keeps you energized to getting your goals accomplished? Justin Raffa: It's pretty easy for me as a conductor because it's my singers. Paul Casey: Yeah. Justin Raffa: It is the wonderful array of volunteer people that I serve in this community who look to me weekly in rehearsals or when we're doing events. Being a choir director is a very authoritarian job in many ways, it's not a democratic institution. The conductor is front and center, usually elevated standing on a podium, and is calling the shots, is dictating, "This is what we're going to do, and this is when we're going to do it, and this is how we're going to do it." Justin Raffa: So I answer to my singers. I am responsible to them. I am inspired by them. And as I mentioned a moment ago, I could be the most skilled, experienced conductor, but if my singers aren't having a good experience, if they're not happy with the nature of rehearsals or how the organization is operating under my leadership, they're all volunteers, and they don't have to show up next week. And I'm nobody without a choir. Justin Raffa: Standing up there by myself, waving my arms, it doesn't matter, right? Everything I do is based on my singers. And since we are a volunteer co-organization, that all of our singers are volunteers, most of them do not have professional musical backgrounds. They have other day jobs, and callings, and spouses, and partners, and children, and things that take their time. So they need their time to be well-spent when they are assembled with me for rehearsals and performances, or they can just opt out. Justin Raffa: And all of the professional development that I do to stay up to date on what are the newest cutting edge trends in choral music, all the professional development workshops and things I attend, is so that I can be of better service to my singers. Keep them connected, keep them engaged, keep them excited, and keep them coming back. Paul Casey: I love that, because they could vote with their feet. Justin Raffa: Absolutely. Paul Casey: Do you also have a formal feedback mechanism or are they just free to give you feedback at any time? Justin Raffa: We typically have a series of surveys that we'll share with them. And we survey a lot of our stakeholders, so following a performance, we survey our audience. Recently in this era of COVID, we've done a number of surveys with our singers to gauge initially, what do you want to do and what do you not want to do since we can't be assembled, since we can't be together in person singing? Because the staff and I didn't want to just arbitrarily create all these online offerings, whereas the majority of our singers would go, "Nah, I'm not digging that. I don't want to do that." Paul Casey: Yeah. Justin Raffa: So just trying to gauge their interests. And now, as we see a lot of businesses and industries that are transitioning back to hybrid services and in-person services, asking the singers, "Do you want to do this? Are you ready to be back together? What's the timeline? How eager?" Or, "What are the conditions that you want to see met before you would be comfortable resuming in-person rehearsals?" So that I would like to think that we've created a lot of opportunities for singers to give them feedback. Justin Raffa: Many of them have become good personal friends, they're in my social circle, so I would also hope that they would feel comfortable approaching me if there was an issue that needed to be addressed. But we also have a number of other staff and obviously a board of directors who are my bosses. If there was an issue, they are points of contact for singers to give that feedback, if they're not comfortable talking with me. Paul Casey: Yeah, you mentioned it's slow now of course, during COVID, and I feel for you because it's your passion and you can't assemble to produce these works of art. But when, before COVID, and hopefully very soon, replenishment of energy is a big deal, because you said you could be on all the time because you love what you do. So what do you do to manage stress other than the boundaries that you mentioned earlier trying to put a cap on replying to email? Justin Raffa: Paul, I am a massage junkie. Paul Casey: Are you? Justin Raffa: I try to go every two weeks if I can, if my budget allows it. Paul Casey: Nice. Justin Raffa: I also, a couple of years ago, started receiving acupuncture treatments, which I think are very complimentary, the yin to the yang of massage. If massage is the macro, acupuncture is the micro treatments. So that self-care is very important to me. I have a hot tub on my back patio that I use very frequently. Paul Casey: Oh, yeah. Justin Raffa: And it's funny because in this era of COVID, my industry was among the first to officially shut down because the nature of performing arts. We're all about big groups of people being together in the same physical space and usually in very close proximity. That's what choir is. Choir singers, we stand shoulder to shoulder often. Paul Casey: Yeah. Justin Raffa: So I have taken advantage of all of this free time I've had to really reflect on my health and stress management, because I historically have done a terrible job at it. I will just work myself to death. So I calmed myself into a daily exercise routine. I get out of the house every day. I think it's important to be outdoors, get some sunshine. I take a 30ish-minute walk. I'm very privileged, I live in Richland, close to the River Walk, so I have a built-in walk that's right out my back door. Paul Casey: Nice. Justin Raffa: And then I started a 30-minute exercise routine. I rotate arms day, legs day, core day. And if you had said to me over a year ago that this would be my future, I would say, "No way. I hate working out. I hate exercise. I'm not a gym guy." But so many of my doctors and my healthcare team, people that care about me have said, "Justin, as you approach 40, you need to take care of yourself and build muscle mass." Justin Raffa: I'm a pretty flexible person. My massage therapists have always told me that, but you need core muscles to be strong, so I don't turn into a shriveled hunchback of an old man when I'm 50. Paul Casey: Right. Justin Raffa: So I think devoting the time to take care of your physical wellbeing is something that I'd never prioritize, but that I've been able to do. I've seen a lot of benefits from that. And I've also recently been working on learning mindful meditation, something I'm interested in, but since I've had so much time by myself that I can really focus in on it. Paul Casey: Well, Tri-City influencers, a lot to put on your wellness self-care checklist that Justin just ran through. So hopefully you got some great ideas to make sure you've got in your own replenishment plan. Well, before we head to our next question on people development, a shout out to our sponsor. Paul Casey: Located in the Parkway, you'll find motivation new friends and your new coworking space at FUSE. Whether you're a student just starting out or a seasoned professional, come discover all the reasons to love coworking at FUSE. Come co-work at FUSE for free on Fridays in February. Enjoy free coffee or tea, Wi-Fi, printing, conference rooms, and more, and bring a friend. FUSE is where individuals and small teams come together in a thoughtfully designed resource-rich environment to get work done and grow their ideas. Comprised of professionals from varying disciplines and backgrounds, FUSE is built for hardworking, fun loving humans. Learn more about us at fusespc.com or stop by 723, the Parkway in Richland, Washington. Paul Casey: Justin, people development, that's what you do, it's crucial for leadership, and if you could clone the ideal person for your organization, what are you looking for? What traits would they have? Justin Raffa: Artists, and I'd say teachers and conductors in general, we are so focused on product versus process. We're working towards a performance and perfecting that performance. So we tend to put a lot of value on skill sets, on people's training. But at the end of the day, what I have discovered is, I could bring in the most talented and experienced artistic team, but if they're jerks, if they're not pleasant to work with, if they aren't good team players, the whole process is miserable. And then you could have the most beautiful high-quality aesthetic product, but it's not worth it to me anymore. Justin Raffa: So early in my career, I really looked up to these pillars. I idolized a lot of celebrities in my industry who I discovered are really nasty people. So I want to clone people who are flexible, who are pleasant to work with, that I'm going to look forward to going into the weekly staff meeting with them, and not dreading, "Oh gosh, I hope Paul doesn't go off the handle again because we didn't have enough green M&M's in his dressing room." Because a lot of that happens, a lot of artists who have wild expectations, and are very needy, and very demanding, and I don't want to play with those people. Justin Raffa: I would rather have a less-quality product, but that I have really enjoyed the process of getting there, working with people that bring me joy, that I really value the time that I spent, because we do. We spend so much time together as ensemble artists building a product. So I want to clone a team of, I don't know what that physically looks like, but flexible and reliable, that they're going to get the job done and not just do lip service. And for me as a leader, I want to a team of folks that I know if I'm going to divvy out these responsibilities, which has also been hard for me, sometimes it's like, "Well, I'll do it. I'll take care of it myself," if I divvy that out, I trust that the team is going to deliver. Paul Casey: Which is crucial for delegation, crucial for that. Yeah, and I also agree that we want to hire people, in whatever leadership position you're in, that you look forward to being with. That we don't think about going to a meeting with them and it's like, "Oh, I've got to go to a meeting with so-and-so." I heard it said that you want to hire people that you would choose to go to dinner with. That's one of the filters to look through and so, I love that. Paul Casey: Well, you have to think of your organization as the head of a nonprofit, you've got to look further out, long-term, you've got to look at the big picture, how do you do that, Justin? Justin Raffa: I have also historically been terrible at this, because I've often said, "I live in the present moment, and I'm just paying attention to what's in front of me." And as I approach turning 40 and coming into formal middle age I suppose, I feel like it's a big shift for me. Paul Casey: Yes. Justin Raffa: A lot of this, I think just comes with age that we become more experienced and it forces us to think ahead about what's next. When I was in my 20s, it didn't matter. I got a job for $4,000 a year. I'm not thinking about retirement or savings, it's like, "I'll spend it when I got it and have fun and I'll worry about tomorrow, tomorrow." But as I've worked in particular with the Mastersingers, if we have big goals, if we have big dreams about what we want our organizations to accomplish, if I don't want to keep working for the same 30ish thousand-dollar annual budget organization, we have to plan ahead. We have to set those goals because it does take a long time to get there. Justin Raffa: The choir's budget is now, just over $250,000 a year. And I'm so proud that we have built that here in the Tri-Cities. It can be done, a performing arts organization that thrived. At a time when, I was hired in the summer of 2008 in the midst of the big economic downturn that the country was facing where so many performing arts organizations were closing up shop, going bankrupt. You've got to set goals if you want to actually grow, and set your sights big, because I am. I want a big, bigger, better, bolder community. I want a bigger, better, bolder organization. And it's not something that I can do today or tomorrow, it takes the time to invest. Work with the team, set those big visions, because it's going to take a lot of time to get there, but you will, if you invest the time. Paul Casey: Well, congratulations for what has been built through you with the team, because that is phenomenal. Justin Raffa: Thank you. I'm proud of the role I've played, but it's because of the team. We got the right people on the bus when we need them. Paul Casey: That's right. And to use your macro/micro wording from earlier. So macro vision, the big goals, wanting to make this even more phenomenal than it is. What are the small acts of leadership in your role as artistic director? How do you make a positive difference in each one of your volunteers? Justin Raffa: When you and I went through LTC, we learned about five leadership traits in a particular system. And one that I had never really considered, because it's not important to me as an individual, is called encourage the heart. Paul Casey: Yep. Justin Raffa: And I think that conductors, classical music conductors are also notoriously terrible at this. We are trained to be pragmatic. We are fixing problems. And when something is correct, we just check it off the list and we move on. It's like, "What else needs to be fixed? Where else are the problems?" So I was so appreciative of my time in LTC that one of my biggest takeaways was stop and celebrate successes. And not just the big ones, once a year at the annual meeting, celebrate the little things, thank people, thank them more often than you think. Justin Raffa: And again, it's because I find that myself as an individual, that's not so important to me. I don't need a lot of lauds and thanks. I often say, "It's my job, I'm doing my job." But not everyone is like me. And of the diverse team and volunteers that I serve, it goes a long way in a rehearsal to stop and say, "Altos, that was really beautiful, thank you for that." And they look at me like, "Oh, my gosh." Because they're waiting for, "Altos, you're still singing the wrong note and I just don't know why." So this idea of encourage the heart, celebrate successes not just the big ones, and thank people often. Paul Casey: Thank people more than you think, I like that. Well, if one of our Tri-City influencer listeners asked you what are some leadership resources they must go to, it could be books, it could be podcasts, it could be other ways to grow their leadership skills, where would you point them? Justin Raffa: I used to be such an avid reader for pleasure, but now as a conductor, most of my "reading time" is spent studying music scores. But there are a couple of resources that I've enjoyed over the years as a leader. One of which I just mentioned, the leadership challenge, I believe is the formal concept that you and I studied in Leadership Tri-Cities and there's a book that came out with that. I very much enjoyed that book. It really changed my perspective on identifying those five key roles because two of them were very obvious to me. It's like, "I know I already do this pretty well, but the other three it's like, oh, I never really thought of that." So I certainly encourage people to read that. Justin Raffa: And the rest of my response, probably I would take this in a different direction than some of your other guests say, I think it's important for us here as leaders in the Tri-Cities to read the Tri-City Herald. I am a subscriber online, but we need to know what's happening in our community locally. And despite all the changes that the Herald has had in terms of staffing or the parent company that's in charge, they remain the best authority of local news. And I think it's important for us to know what's happening in our community on all these various fronts of business sectors and politics, because ultimately it is going to affect me and my organization. Justin Raffa: I think good leaders need to be aware of the big picture of what's happening in their community. Not just that I know all the latest arts and culture news, but that I'm aware of what's happening at PNNL and Hanford and on the tourism front, all those things come together. And support your local paper, right? We need good media. So be a subscriber to the Herald. It is a great resource. Justin Raffa: And then out for my daily walks, I usually listen to the New York Times, puts out a podcast called The Daily. It's about 30ish minutes, so it is the length of my walk. And that is focusing on different national issues, little 30ish-minute clips of what's going on nationally or even internationally what's happening in the world. And I have a lot of respect for The New York Times. I think it's a great publication. It's got a good team of people that are doing that investigative journalism that is not always guaranteed with a lot of our news and media sources these days. Justin Raffa: So those are things that I consume on a daily basis, in addition to reading lots of meeting minutes of city councils and other jurisdiction meetings, I try to keep myself up to speed on what local governments are doing. And since I can't attend every single meeting of every jurisdiction, I go back and read a lot of meeting minutes, which can be a little stale, but again, good to know what's going on? And what are our local elected officials? What are the decisions that they've been making for our community? Paul Casey: Great to stay aware. Good reminder. Well, finally, Justin, what advice would you give to new leaders or anyone who wants to keep growing and gaining more influence? Justin Raffa: Be present in the community, get out there and be visible, meet people. I continue to spend a lot of my work putting in time, getting out of the choir rehearsal, going to networking events and the chamber of commerce luncheons, any kind of communal gathering. I think it's important that I'm advocating for my organization, that I let people know that we exist. Justin Raffa: That was one of the biggest challenges when I moved here in the summer of 2008, as I was house hunting and people would say, "What brings you to Tri-Cities, you work in a Patel?" "No." "Are you hired by one of the Hanford contractors?" "No. I am the new artistic director of adult community choir called Mid-Columbia Mastersingers." And inevitably people said, "Who? Never heard of them." So I've had to build the profile of my organization. And a lot of that is just being present, getting out there. Justin Raffa: And getting out outside of your industry. We tend to cluster with people we know. All the arts and culture folks in town are good friends, they're in my social circle, I meet them at local watering holes, but sometimes we just become too insulated, right? All the doctors hang out with the doctors and all the lawyers hang out with the lawyers. We need to intersect those paths. Leadership Tri-Cities was a big help for me on that front. Some of my closest friends in my class were the most different from me and worked in sectors that are farthest removed from what I do as a musician. Justin Raffa: So get out there and meet people, meet people outside of your industry, and build your reputation that people know you to be a kind, compassionate and reliable person. Not just that, "Oh yeah, Justin is the quiet guy." Everybody knows that. They know I'm a music person, but I also hope that they know me to be kind and caring and reliable, that if I'm involved in a project or I've joined a board that I will deliver, I will show up when I'm given a task, I have a reputation for seeing it through. Build that community profile that people just don't think of you as, "Oh yeah, well, he's the CEO of this company." What beyond our titles do people know you for? I think that's so important, building those relationships, positive relationships with people. Paul Casey: Great reminders, to weave yourself into the fabric of your community and be that go-to dependable person. Well, Justin, how can our listeners best connect with you? Justin Raffa: Well, Paul as you and many know I did throw my hat in a political arena this past year. Paul Casey: Yes. Justin Raffa: I stood as a candidate for local office. If people are interested in engaging on those issues and just a lot of local community awareness, I do maintain a Facebook page called Elect Justin Raffa. I am not running for anything, I have not made any declarations, but I wanted to keep that page alive to just continue to talk about local community issues that I think are important. I also have a Twitter presence as well. You can follow me there, electjustinraffa. You can email me directly, it's info@justinraffa.com. My first and last name, R-A-F-F, as in Frank, A, is how I heard my mother pronounce my name for years over the phone, because inevitably the letter F might sound like a letter S. Paul Casey: And Justin, you probably also would love them to support the arts fundraisers in town as well, right? Justin Raffa: Yeah. In fact Mid-Columbia Arts Fundraiser is the name of an organization that supports not just my own, but some of our partners Mid-Columbia Ballet, Mid-Columbia Musical Theater, Mid-Columbia Symphony. There is such great art being made here in the Tri-City. Sometimes we're not so visible because we don't have a brick and mortar. We haven't built that performing arts center just yet. Maybe we'll talk about that next time. That's the long-term goal of mine that I will see through before I leave this community. We are going to get it done. Paul Casey: Yes, keep being a champion. Well, thanks for all you do to make the Tri-Cities a great place and keep leading well. Let me wrap up our podcast today with a leadership resource to recommend. He was one of the stalwarts in the personal development world, passed away several years ago, a guy by the name of Jim Rohm, jimrohn.com, J-I-M-R-O-H-N.com, and he lives on through his blog through The Success Academy, their resources, a team that just wants to keep getting his stuff out there. He was one of the personal development gurus of the 20th century. Stuff on goal setting, communication and leadership, all of my passions, you might want to hit up jimrohn.com to learn more. Paul Casey: Again, this is Paul Casey. I want to thank my guest, Justin Raffa from the Mid-Columbia Mastersingers for being here today on the Tri-Cities Influencer Podcast. And we want to thank our TCI sponsor and invite you to support them. We appreciate you making this possible so we can collaborate to inspire leaders in our community. Paul Casey: Finally, one more, a leadership tidbit for the road to help you make a difference in your circle of influence. Zig Ziglar said, "Outstanding people have one thing in common, an absolute sense of mission." And so next time KGF, keep growing forward. Speaker 2: Thank you to our listeners for tuning in to today's show. Paul Casey is on a mission to add value to leaders by providing practical tools and strategies that reduce stress in their lives and on their teams, so that they can enjoy life and leadership and experience their key desired results. If you'd like more help from Paul in your leadership development, connect with him at growingforward@paulcasey.org, for a consultation that can help you move past your current challenges and create a strategy for growing your life or your team forward. Speaker 2: Paul would also like to help you restore your sanity to your crazy schedule and getting your priorities done every day by offering you his free Control My Calendar Checklist, go to www.takebackmycalendar.com for that productivity tool, or open a text message 72000 and type the word 'growing'. Paul Casey: Tri-Cities Influencer podcast was recorded at Fuse SPC by Bill Wagner of Safe Strategies.

Ali & Callie Artcast
Jennifer Drake, CDA Arts Commission Chair & Pub Owner

Ali & Callie Artcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021 46:48


Enjoy a new Artcast with the Chair of the CDA Arts Commission, Jennifer Drake as we talk about the process of choosing public art, where the money comes from, and how our public art collection vitalizes our community. And we spend a minute talking about Jenn and Ben's English Pub, The Crown and Thistle, and what is a tatty egg... and should you eat mushy peas. For more information about the CDA Arts Commission and to access the public art collection, visit https://cdaid.org/190/committees/arts/public-art-collection  

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 04/14/21

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 29:38


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 04/14/21 by City of Lawrence

City of Sunnyvale, CA: current live view (IN USE) Audio Podcast

Watch Download File

City of Sunnyvale, CA: current live view (IN USE) Video Podcast

Watch Download File

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 03/10/21

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2021 149:12


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 03/10/21 by City of Lawrence

Life at Anchor Podcast
Episode 08. Life at Anchor - Chatting about Art and Crafting with Heather Conklin

Life at Anchor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 32:22


Life at Anchor - Episode 8 Today, I am chatting with Heather Conklin. Artist, crafter, wife, mother, teacher, Arts Commissioner and lover of all things Tacoma, coffee and God. We discuss her role as an Arts Commission, her journey to becoming an art teacher, and her extensive work as a design team member for a number of companies in the paper crafting industry! Where you can find Heather: creative IG @goldiecar_creates goldiecar.blogspot.com Nespresso - Pixie. Bridgerton on Netflix. Stonewall Kitchen Sea Salt Espresso Martini Mixer. Procreate. Bardot Brush by @lisabardot Making Art Everyday Challenge. Good Notes App for iPad. December Daily. Chat Books. Tacoma Arts Commission. Authentique Paper. Diamond Press. City of Tacoma Public Art Tour. Wayz Goose Printmaking Festival. Monkey Shines. Creative Memories. Basic Gray. Xyron. Beth Kingston. HSN Crafts (24 Hour Craft Day). DreamBox. Paige Evans. You can follow me, Van Nguyen, at: www.lifeatanchor.com. https://www.facebook.com/madebyvan/ https://www.instagram.com/madebyvan/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lifeatanchor/support

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Retreat 01/10/21

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2021 181:54


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission Retreat 01/10/21 by City of Lawrence

Mississippi Arts Hour
The Mississippi Arts Hour | Mississippi Folklife

Mississippi Arts Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2021 46:13


Larry Morrisey and his Arts Commission colleague Maria Zeringue discuss the online publication Mississippi Folklife; a MAC project documenting the state’s present-day cultural heritage. Three Mississippi Folklife contributors are featured. Vish Shenoy, a sitar player based in Clinton, MS; Addie Citchens, the author of two essays about Clarksdale and Oxford-based artist, Lee Harper, creator of a diorama project called History Bones. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 12/09/20

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 63:57


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 12/09/20 by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 10/14/20

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2020 76:48


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 10/14/20 by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 09/09/20

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2020 98:16


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 09/09/20 by City of Lawrence

Mark Fraley Podcast
Dr Bradley Hanson, Tennessee Arts Commission Folklore Program

Mark Fraley Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2020 34:52


Tennessee is blessed with rich traditions of music, crafts, food and lore that often have been passed from one generation to the next.  Charged with tending to that “folk culture” is our guest Dr Bradley Hanson,  the Tennessee State Folklorist.  This important  office is part of the Tennessee Arts Commission. They make grants to non profit … Continue reading "Dr Bradley Hanson, Tennessee Arts Commission Folklore Program" The post Dr Bradley Hanson, Tennessee Arts Commission Folklore Program appeared first on Mark Fraley Podcast.

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor
Glass, Fiber, Video, and Tufted Textiles

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2020


It's probably not surprising that our last interview, with an Arts Commission employee, recommended artists for our next interview. So this week we're talking to Loraine Lynn, a local artist from Toledo, Ohio interested in working with materials such as glass, fiber, video, writing, and installation, but is currently focusing on textiles in the form of tufted work. Hear all about it on this week's episode of The RDD.

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 08/ 12/20

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2020 91:50


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 08/ 12/20 by City of Lawrence

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

Theater, concerts, arts festivals all seem like a distant memory with the ongoing pandemic of 2020. That means Crystal Phelps, of Toledo's Arts Commission, had to get creative this year in planning and executing Momentum, a three-day festival of music and art in downtown Toledo, Ohio, centered on our revitalizing waterfront along the Maumee River. Listen in to hear how the arts festival is shifting gears to continue to bring one of the last festivals of the summer to Toledoens. 

City Of Lawrence, KS
Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 07/20/20

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2020 47:14


Lawrence Cultural Arts Commission 07/20/20 by City of Lawrence

City Of Lawrence, KS
Cultural Arts Commission 07/08/20

City Of Lawrence, KS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2020 118:50


Cultural Arts Commission 07/08/20 by City of Lawrence

The Kuhner Report
Did the Boston Arts Commission make the right decision removing the Lincoln statue? pt. 3

The Kuhner Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2020 41:54


The Kuhner Report
Did the Boston Arts Commission make the right decision removing the Lincoln statue? pt. 2

The Kuhner Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2020 41:32


The Kuhner Report
Did the Boston Arts Commission make the right decision removing the Lincoln statue? pt. 1

The Kuhner Report

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2020 40:28


Mississippi Arts Hour
The Mississippi Arts Hour | Libby Rae Watson

Mississippi Arts Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2020 38:06


Larry Morrisey visits with acoustic blues musician Libby Rae Watson from Pascagoula. Watson is a native of the Gulf Coast and got to know several legendary Mississippi bluesmen when she was first starting out. She is a member of the Arts Commission’s Artist Roster. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

We Are The Church with Sherry Jones
The Church & The Arts (Dance)

We Are The Church with Sherry Jones

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2020 40:56


Dance ministry has become an integral part of worship in many churches, but are we using it to its full capacity? How can dance ministry be used for evangelism? Our guest, Gail A. Glover answers these questions and more as we discuss The Church & The Arts (Dance). Gail A. Glover is an author, minister of dance, choreographer, dance educator, life and executive coach and resident dance artist for the S. C. Arts Commission. She founded the non-profit Columbia Community Arts Centre, aka Columbia Community Arts Collective, and the online liturgical dance training program, “Order My Steps!.” Min. Gail continues to teach dance nationally and internationally. She desires to continue to share her love of the arts, specifically dance, with all ages. Interview Highlights * Gail defines liturgical/praise dance and shares different ways it can be utilized. * Gail prefers the term dance ministry instead of praise dance. Dance ministry encompasses the different ways dance can be used. Praise dance is limiting. * We use dance to give a visual of what's going on inside of us. Whatever way you can speak, can be translated into movement and the ministry of dance. * Gail explains how Salome's dance in Mark 6: 21-29 has been misinterpreted. * Zephaniah 3:17 states God rejoiced over us. That translates to movement and dance. * "Where the spoken Word can not go, the arts can infiltrate." - Gail A. Glover * Gail shares the story of how a dancer's use of cartwheels draws a man to Christ. * Dance ministries must study the Word of God to learn how to minister through dance. * Technique is important. Dance ministries must study technique and practice to deliver their message properly. * "Out of the abundance of the heart, the feet speak." - Gail A. Glover * Jealousy hinders dance ministry. * Knowing the mandate of the ministry will help your dance ministry understand how you are called to serve. Relevant Resources/Links * Follow We Are The Church on Twitter. * Click here to learn more about Praise Dance Today Academy. * Click here to view and subscribe to Gail's YouTube channel. * Follow Gail: Facebook & Twitter * Click here to check out Gail's books. * Contact Gail at 803-269-2438 or lyben1@bellsouth.net. * Learn more about your host, Sherry Jones, at Sherry Speaks Life. * Follow Sherry: Facebook & Instagram. * Click here to check out Sherry's books. * Contact Sherry at contact@sherryspeakslife.com. Take care, be blessed, be safe, and remember, the church is not a building. We are the church! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Off Stage and On The Air

Listen to the Show Right Click to Save GuestsJesus Panel - City of Austin Cultural Arts DeptJaime Castillo - City of Austin; Arts CommissionJohn Riedie -- Austin Creative Alliance What We Talked AboutSondheim Review No B’way in Como’s Task force If you build it will they come? Do You Hear the People Sing in Japanese - Video What do we need to talk about -- Apples Thank you to Dean Johanesen, lead singer of "The Human Condition" who gave us permission to use "Step Right Up" as our theme song, so please visit their website.. they're good! (that's an order)

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The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

For the month of April, The Rough Draft Diaries is going to bring you a short series of phone interviews detailing how the community has been affected by COVID-19 and the continuing quarantine. This week we're talking about the arts. We're talking about the symphony, Toledo's Arts Commission, and local artist under quarantine on the week's episode of The Rough Draft Diaries.

BG Ideas
Iker Gil, Rick Valicenti, and Jenn Stucker: Collaborative Design

BG Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2020 38:30


Rick Valicenti (founder and design director of Thirst, a communication design practice for clients in the architectural, performing arts and education communities), Iker Gil (architect, director of MAS Studio, editor in chief of the quarterly design journal, MAS Context), and Jenn Stucker (associate professor and division chair of graphic design at BGSU, founding board member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts, AIGA Toledo) discuss community-based collaborative design.    Transcript: Introduction: From Bowling Green State University and the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society, this is BG Ideas. Intro Song Lyrics: I'm going to show you this with a wonderful experiment. Jolie Sheffer: Welcome to the BG Ideas podcast, a collaboration between the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society and the School of Media and Communication at Bowling Green State University. I'm Jolie Sheffer, associate professor of English and american culture studies and the director of ICS. Today we're joined by three guests working in collaborative design fields. First is Rick Valicenti, the founder and design director of Thirst, a communication design practice for clients in the architectural, performing arts and education communities. His work has been exhibited in the Museum of Modern Art and resides in the permanent collections of the Yale University Library, Denver Art Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago. In 2011, he was honored by the White House with the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award for communication design. Jolie Sheffer: We're also joined by Iker Gil, an architect, the director of MAS Studio, editor in chief of the quarterly design journal, MAS Context, and the editor of the book, Shanghai Transforming. He curated the exhibition, Bold: Alternative Scenarios for Chicago, included in the inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial. Iker is the associate curator of the US Pavilion at the 16th Annual Venice Architecture Biennale. In 2010, he received the Emerging Visions Award from the Chicago Architectural Club. Jolie Sheffer: Finally, I'd like to welcome Jenn Stucker an associate professor and division chair of graphic design at BGSU. Her work has been published in several books on design and she's received various awards including two international design awards from How Magazine for her community based works in Toledo. She's also a founding board member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts, AIGA Toledo. And she previously co-chaired two national AIGA design education conferences. Jolie Sheffer: The three of them are here to talk to me as part of the Edwin H. Simmons Creative Minds series. Thank you and welcome to BGSU. I'm thrilled to discuss more of your work on creativity and collaboration. I like to start by having you each give a little background on your current work and how you came into the kind of design work that you're doing. So Rick, how did your career change from your time as a student at BGSU to your work now? What are some of those major u-turns or forks in the road for you? Rick Valicenti: Well, thank you. That's a good question. That's a really good question. Okay, so let me fast backwards to 1973 when I graduated from Bowling Green. I went back to Pittsburgh, spent some time in a steel mill for two years, went to graduate school at the University of Iowa. Came to Chicago afterwards with two graduate degrees in photography and discovered that I was not interested in photographing hotdogs, cornflakes and beer. So with that I thought I would leverage a time in the writer's workshop doing a little bit of letter press work as well as my time at Bowling Green studying design. And I thought I'll be a designer. It wasn't that easy. But it has been a journey for now almost four decades since then to get to a place where I feel there's relevance in what I do. And that has been the challenge, and it continues to be the challenge. Design, as you know, is a practice that has at its core, or patronage, somebody else. Rick Valicenti: In fact, it's been said you have to be given permission to practice graphic design. Not necessarily the case, you can do self-initiated projects. And it was in leveraging what I learned in graduate school, which was how to make up a project, how to provide for myself a thesis and then create work in response to that. That has allowed me to both do that on my own as well as in collaboration with other people. And then to encourage younger designers under some guidance to do the same. And of late, the more interesting work has been work that has been related to an issue, not unlike the work that Jenn practices in her classwork. But to me that's the most fulfilling and it was unfortunately not the work that I showed because it was work I was prepared to end the evening with. But I chose because we had been blabbing for so long last night to just stop early. But it's okay. Jolie Sheffer: Tell me what led you to start your own firm? Rick Valicenti: I was one of those lucky designers who, while it was difficult to crack the Chicago design scene, two years of doing what I would refer to as thankless design work, design work where I was asked to do something prescriptive. Like do this by Friday. Yes, I could do that. I was quite good at it. I lucked out by having the opportunity to be the dark room guy for a very reputable Chicago designer, who was at that time 63 years old. And so in his last three and a half years of practice I had moved from the new guy in the studio to the last employee he had. And it was a fantastic experience to be in the company of real design practice. Design practice that understood the history, it understood the present, and it was looking out to the future. This guy was connected to the other thought leaders in the Chicago design community and I had access to them even though it was vicarious. Jolie Sheffer: Great. Thank you. Iker, tell us about your journey into Chicago architecture and the current kinds of collaboration you do. How has your approach to design changed over time and what were some of those key junctures for you? Iker: So I'm originally from Bilbao, which is a city in the North of Spain in the Basque country. And I think a lot of the changes in design and a lot of the ways that I've been thinking had been motivated also by the change of place or how the people that I've encounter or any other aspects that really change as I move from other places. So from Bilbao I went to Barcelona to study architecture. I had the chance there to not only have the professors that were faculty there, but also other visiting professors, like David Chipperfield and Kazuyo Sejima. So that was a way of beginning to connect with other experiences that maybe were not the local ones. And I was very interested in expanding that. And I've had the luck to get a scholarship from IIT in Chicago to go there for a year. Iker: So it was a little bit coincidentally in a way that I ended up in Chicago. And I was there for a year as an exchange student, I still had to do my thesis so I went back to Spain. But there was something about Chicago, a apart from my girlfriend that now is my wife, who is from Chicago. But there was something very intriguing about the city, a lot of potential, very different from being in Barcelona. But there was something always in Barcelona that was interesting for me about the cultural aspect of architecture. There was the aspects of people building a significant building or just a civic building that there was always a publication and an exhibition, a way of coming together to talk about why those things were important. Iker: So when I went to Chicago, when I moved back and I did my master's, I worked for an office. I was always interested in the ADL, the community, the design community, the architecture community. How do you strengthen that and how do you create the platforms to do that beyond what you can design? So I decided at some point that I really wanted to make sure that I did both of those things. And I went on my own about 11 years ago just to make sure that I could create the designs within my office, but create other platforms for others to have that conversation. And more recently I've been able to create the structures to support or organize design competitions and really began being interested in not only the final product, but how do you structure the conditions for those things to happen. Jolie Sheffer: So you're talking about not just designing buildings, but designing communities and relationships. Iker: Yep. And I think that's a role of, in my case, an architect or designers. Like the work that you do, but also the work in the city that you do. And how are you part of the community, and also how are you proactive shaping that community? Not something that you want to benefit from someone else's effort to structure something. What is what you can do and why you can give to the community back? Jolie Sheffer: Great. Jenn, talk to us about your path into graphic design and how your approach has shifted over time. Jenn Stucker: So I was at graduate here at BGSU. Very proud of the training and the experience that I had from Ron Giacomini, a chair that Rick also had the opportunity to study under. And when I graduated I went right out into the field, I got a job in graphic design. And I think was pretty good at my craft and pretty good at making. And also at the same time pursuing this educational path. I am originally a transplant from Colorado, I guess you could say. And one of the things about the Toledo area is there's this "neh" mentality. It's the rust belt. I- Jolie Sheffer: Better days are behind us. Jenn Stucker: Yeah. [crosstalk 00:09:16]. Yes. It's definitely like, why did you move from Colorado to Toledo? Is usually the question that I get asked. And I'm always like, wow, there's so many great things here. You're four hours from Chicago, you're this far from Toronto, you're this far from here. In Colorado you're four hours from the border of Wyoming, at least where I live. Right? And you're looking at the same topography and you're not getting any cultural change. And so for me, my family was here. My husband and his family. And so I was here for the long haul. Jenn Stucker: So the idea really just became, I need to bloom where I'm planted. I need to make this space and place better, and contribute to it and work towards that. Changing the attitude, how do we create positivity in this community? And so I started getting involved in creating projects that really illuminated Toledo in a positive way. And so then I reflected back on the fact that I wasn't necessarily armed with that as a student, with that understanding of the fact that I had agency and power that I could do something. I didn't necessarily have training with, how do you collaborate and get a, you know, writing a grant to get the funding for this? And who do I need to talk to and who needs to bring this to the table? And all of those things. Jenn Stucker: So part of that I think now is coming to what I do as an educator, is to show those students. I tell them, I have no idea what I'm doing. I'm completely fumbling through this. I don't know what I'm doing. This dots project in Toledo that I'm literally the one that's going to be photographing all the dots around Toledo, or trying to find spaces in January and it's cold. And then actually putting them down on the ground and actually taking them off the ground and doing these sort of things. I don't know that when I'm creating the idea. But I know it has to get done and I'm going to do that. And the fact that I'm just Jenn is what I tell them. I'm just one person, I'm not any different than you. And so I try to give them a lot of power that they can do that thing that they want to make change for. Jolie Sheffer: You're all talking about very place-based design practices, or in different ways your work is all very much about locating yourself, right? And building in relationship to that community, and creating community. Could you give an example, Rick, of one of your projects that had a very Chicago-centric, and how that place shaped the process and the collaborations that you developed? Rick Valicenti: With pleasure. In 2016, I was the artist in residence at Loyola University. And there we devoted an entire year to prototyping empathetic ways of grieving for those who were left behind by gun violence. That was a very Chicago-centric theme. And it was something that I was curious about beyond the candle vigil, right? Or the protest march. Are there other ways we can come together both as community led by design in order to acknowledge and honor the life lost? And of course help the healing process for the families left behind. That was a very place specific design assignment. The difference was we were doing it on the North side, and a lot of the activity, gun violent activity was happening on the South side. Not all of it because in the building that we were located, in the alley right next door one of the students had been shot. Rick Valicenti: Down the street the young photographer had been shot and killed on that street. So as they call it, the franchising of gun violence had migrated North to the Rogers Park and Edgewater area, which is where Loyola is located. It made it more real and more tangible, but the prototyping of these empathetic gestures was, I think, healing for all of us. And I've been rewarded by that project ever since. And I really want to see now if something like that can migrate to other cities. And I've been talking to a few people like, wouldn't El Paso benefit from this kind of intervention? Dayton, Ohio, would they not benefit from it? Jolie Sheffer: And could you talk through what that project actually ended up looking like? Rick Valicenti: I'll give you an example. There were 20 students in the class, half of them were from the fine arts area, half of them were from design related fields. And so they all had different approaches to it. And every class began with somebody from the outside. Rick Valicenti: Okay? And I thought this was important. And Iker knows this model of practice that I use, I call it moving design is what I have named the umbrella. But I'll give you an example of three kinds of people who came to the class. One person we arranged for a car to pick up the head of the emergency room at Stroger, which is the hospital, Cook County hospital. And this guy was picked up in a car, came to our class in his [Ohar 00:14:07] blacks with his red tennis shoes. And it was the day after a very violent weekend. This guy showed up shell shocked. You could just see the trauma in his face. He never made eye contact with the students. He was a young guy, maybe 38 or something, had his head down as he spoke. And that was a moving moment. More for me, I think, than anybody else. Rick Valicenti: But it was like, oh my God, here's a first responder who's there and he told us of some of the things that he had seen that have kept him from sleeping. We also had Emory Douglas, who was the communication director, minister of the Black Panthers. So Emory talked about the use of graphic design to move an agenda. And how an unskilled, unfunded initiative of communication design could migrate into the public through the printed ephemera. And he was there to really rally these students. That was fantastic. And then another woman, her name was Cecelia Williams. Cecelia Williams was 28 years old. She is an activist. She's a mother. And in her 28 years she has lost 29 family and friends to gun violence. The first one was her second grade teacher. She came to the class, again, with her version of PTSD. Moved the students and begged the students to do something. Rick Valicenti: Just something. It was in the form of just write the mothers of one of these victims a sympathy card after you hear the headline. Right? That's a simple thing. Or, gather all your cards and one person just take it to the funeral home and leave it in the basket. Simple moment. If you'd like I could share you an example of one of the projects, how we manifested our work at the end. We had lots of installations and interventions around the area, but one in particular was a community based exercise. I showed them an image of logging in Wisconsin. Tree logging. And those images that we're all familiar with are the felled trees in the shallow water, and the guys are standing on the tree trunks. And I said, it wasn't too much earlier before that picture was taken that those were living organisms, but now they're felled to the ground. And let's just imagine that we use the tree trunk as a symbol of those who are fallen. Rick Valicenti: And we've returned them to their vertical position. So that was the form of it. And then we started to talk about, well what could we put on those and what is the form? Are we going to be having tree trunks, that seems wrong. So we ordered lots of very long and very huge custom mailing tubes from a firm in Chicago called Chicago Mailing Tubes. And they made 24 inch, 18 inch and 12 inch mailing tubes of varying lengths. We had them wrapped in white paper and then the students took the grid of Chicago and wrapped each of those trees with black tape to suggest, not replicate, the grid of the city. And then we invited the community to come. And we had the list of the 760 some victims from the previous year to write their first names in whatever black calligraphy we could, whether it was with a Sharpie or whether it was with a brush pen. Rick Valicenti: And to see the community members come together with the students, honoring everybody with the names. And so, okay, that's one facet of it. And we have all these tubes now, and we put end caps on the tubes and the students started to talk about things that they would like to say. If you had to say something to a mother, to a community, to just reduce the pain of gun violence, what might it sound like? Everyone is a hero. I miss you, I miss you, I miss you. Whatever those messages were. And they typeset them in a black and white type, in all caps in a Gothic typeface on an orange disk. That orange disk had a hole cut in the middle and there was an orange piece of a cord, nylon cord, that we knotted. And that provided now these tree trunk-like forms to be carried. Rick Valicenti: And so there was a procession around town into the quad of the campus until they... Oh, I'm sorry. When the morning started all of the trunks were there in the center of the quad. That's right. Like the felled tree trunks. And then the procession started. And there were prayers read, and some music played, and some dancers from the music school came and they did a performative dance. A kind of celebration and resurrection, if you will. And then we were all invited to grab the chords and walk the trunks back to the alley where this student had been shot in the back, and return them to their vertical position. And there, I don't know, there we just reflected on it. But it was all quite moving. And we had it filmed and photographed and there was the record of it that could carry on. Rick Valicenti: We thought that could live in other places. The alderman, I'm sorry if I'm going on so long, I'm taking up this whole hour. But the alderman, his name is Harry Osterman, he was also invited to come. And he said, you know what, I would like that to be re-installed in my local park. And sure enough we installed it in his park and complete with all of the rides that a kid would have, the seesaw on the slide. A couple weeks later we get a call from alderman Osterman's office saying, it seems that there has been some violence in the park and your display has been vandalized. In fact, it has been destroyed. It has been cut up. It has been sawed. It has been smashed. Rick Valicenti: And I thought immediately, oh my God, the last thing we need is for Loyola to be a headline. And this good intention to be diminished. So we quickly scrambled and we went and we cleaned up the site and we got a chainsaw, we rented a chainsaw and we cut the things up so that we could transport it. And here what had happened was the other gang from the other side of the street was upset that, right, there had been some franchise in some retaliation of a recent shooting and this was the way that they could mark their territory. So there's lots healing that needs to be done, but design was certainly there to put a mirror to it. To make a good intention. And to certainly reveal the scab or the wound. Jolie Sheffer: Iker, can you give us an example of some of your place specific work? Maybe one particular project. You talked last night about the Marina Towers. I don't know if you want to talk about that or feel free to take that in a different direction. Iker: Yeah. Maybe one thing that I think is more important is structurally I think being in Chicago is what has saved my practice. I think a lot of the opportunities of doing self-initiated projects or projects that I was particularly interested are allowed to happen in Chicago because maybe there is not the pressure that there is in New York or any other places. And I think the idea of having space as a designer and an architect to think about things was something that I found very important and very unique to Chicago. Iker: So I think in a way, the way I was trained and the way I practice right now is different because of being in Chicago. And particularly that project of Marina City, I think it's one that it's very specific to the idea of Chicago about how it reflects how I work and how the projects evolve. And taking one icon of the city and really using that for me as a personal interest in understanding not only the building but understanding the architect, the ambitions of the architect. Why that building was so forward thinking when it opened in the early 60s. And then beginning to understand, how do you capture that value? Iker: How do you tell that story to people who are not architects? What are the tools that you have? And in that case I worked with Andreas Larsson, a photographer, to really begin to capture the diversity of the community. And it was a way of saying, you don't have to read plans in sections and elevations or use models to communicate the value of a building. There are other ways that maybe you can engage. And then through that you can learn some of the other things. Iker: And then that was exhibited, and then it has continued in doing then renovations in the building with Ellipsis Architecture. So always in collaboration with someone else. And the idea there is that, how do you celebrate the spacial qualities of the marina architect, but at the same time making it modern so new people can be living there. So it's an interesting project that has been ongoing for 10 years. And it just summarizes my interest in Bertrand Goldberg. And then as you work with other people, as you evolve or you have other skills, you can really begin to communicate that in different ways. And I can see that he's probably not going to be the last renovation or not the last project in some shape or form that I'm going to do about that building and that architect, which I think it's fantastic. Jolie Sheffer: Well there's something really interesting. You said something about this at your talk about how a project never really ends, it just sort of evolves into some new shape. Right? And clearly that work is an example of that notion that you never really have an end point. And your example too, Rick, went that way. That it takes on a new form and it may be not what you intended or what you imagined, but you have to let that life go on. Iker: I think in the end they are like your own personal obsessions. They are your interest, but it's sometimes it's an interest and sometimes it's an obsession. And they are in the back of your mind and then there is something that happens that it comes forward again, you have the opportunity to do it and then he goes back. But there are things that obviously you have a certain attachment. And then you realize that there are a lot of buildings, in this case, that share some of the ambitions because they were built in the same period. And then you can make a comparison or connect it to other experiences in other cities. So something that is very local and particular you can engage in a conversation with something that is happening in other cities. So I find it very particular, I never let go of those interests. It's just they transform and the outcome is very different. Jolie Sheffer: And Jenn, you mentioned the dots project. Could you talk about what that was and how that was very much play specific to Toledo? Jenn Stucker: Absolutely. So the genesis of that project came from the Arts Commission. I'd previously had done a banner project for them collaboratively with my colleague Amy Fiddler. And at the time I was president of AIG Toledo. And they came to us to say, oh we're having the GAS conference, the Glass Art Society is going to be coming. It's an international conference and maybe you could do some banners again. And I thought about that and really wanted to do something different. And one of the things about banners is the passivity that it has. And you have to be looking up, kind of encountering those. And so I've always been fascinated with maps and the "you are here" dot specifically. When I go to museums, when I go to zoos, wherever I'm going, I look for that and it gives me a sense of place. And the idea of sense of place seemed very important here at this time. Jenn Stucker: They were going to have people coming from all over the world. What is our sense of place? What is Toledo? And knowing that I wanted people to discover the city, and hopefully through walking. And how could I branch out into various places? So thinking about this dot of "you are here" and wanting people to discover the city, came up with this idea of three foot circular dots that had artwork on them created by a hundred different artists in Toledo that were site specific to that place. So working with the Arts Commission, what are the signature places in Toledo? The Toledo public library, the San Marcos Taqueria. It could be anywhere within the Toledo area, Point Place. So they helped curate that list. We talked about signature points, reached out to all of those establishments to say, more or less, congratulations, you're going to be part of this project. So that they would know that there was going to be a dot in front of their place. Jenn Stucker: And then having artists participate in creating those dots. And then on the dots was a QR code, and this was 2012, so it was still kind of cool then. And the idea was that you would scan the dot and you could then get the background information about the place in which you were standing. So you would learn about St. Patrick's Cathedral and get more information. And then to also give honor to the artist that they too would have their artist statement and what inspired the artwork that they created. And so one of the things about public art is that oftentimes if it's a sculpture, it's a very place specific, and only if you go to that place. And it's typically usually one artist. And so what I really liked about this project was that it was a hundred different artists that were participating in this. Jenn Stucker: And it was originally developed for outsiders to discover Toledo. The things that happened secondarily to that were amazing, where I was getting emails from people that had read about it in the newspaper. And one couple in particular said, we've read about this, we went out to start looking for these dots. They collected 25 of them and ended up at San Marcos Taqueria, said they had the best tacos they've ever had, had no idea it was even there. And they said they were looking forward to discovering more of their city. And I was like, that's a mic drop kind of moment. It couldn't have been any better than having people really realize the great things that we have in the community. So the byproduct of that was just, like I said, people seeing the great things that were here. Jenn Stucker: I wish I'd partnered with a cell phone company at the time because we had people that are actually buying cell phones. Because really, the iPhone had only come out, what, 2007 or something. So we're not too far to not everybody having a smartphone. There were people that were going out to buy a smart phone so that they could participate in this project. And there was a scavenger hunt component too, so we had an app for it. And the first hundred people to digitally collect 25 dots got a custom silkscreened edition poster. And so people are posting on Facebook and finding this dot and taking their children out. And I don't know, couldn't ask for a better project. Jolie Sheffer: We're going to take a short break. Thank you for listening to the BG Ideas podcast. Speaker 1: If you are passionate about big ideas, consider sponsoring this program. To have your name or organization mentioned here, please contact us at ics@bgsu.edu. Jolie Sheffer: Welcome back. Today I'm talking with Rick Valicenti, Iker Gil, and Jenn Stucker about the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in creative fields. One of the things that you both talked about during your visit was the idea that the form of a given project will change, right? And I think Iker, you put it as something like, what's the story I want to tell and what's going to be the best form to tell that story? So how do you go about, what is part of your process and figuring out that answer to that question of the relationship between form and story? Iker: Yeah, I think that came out about the work and the way we structure MAS Context. And then really the first thing is just framing what the topic that we want to do, and then who should be the voices that need to be part of that issue. And sometimes you realize that you need something that sets the ground and it might be more academic. It might be an essay that really gives the shape to that. And then there are many other elements that can compliment, that can contra, that could take another direction that comes in the form of a short essay. And you need to be very aware. I think that a lot of the work that I do is actually paying attention to what other people are doing in their work. So whenever there is an issue that is coming together, I know I already have in my head what's the work that everybody's doing so I can make those connections. Iker: So it's really understanding how they work, what they are trying to say, what's the shape that it can be. And we've had, in the issues, we have long essays, short essays, photo essays, diagrams, poems. But also the people who write, they don't come from all the academic world. And some of the most interesting articles have come from people who are just residents in a building. And they can tell a story much better than an academic that has talk about housing. And one of the examples is we've done this for 10 years, and then the most read article is about Cabrini–Green, about our resident who grew up there and live there. And we walk with him, with Andreas Larsson actually. And we told him just let's walk around the neighborhood and tell us the stories of what are the meaningful places for you here that you grew up here and your families. Iker: And we just took photographs of that and we made captions of that. And it really was a way for us to understand what it means to leave there. Yes, there are some negative things, but there are many other positive things about Cabrini–Green that they all mask under headlines and other things from other people who have no relationship. So yes, there are many people who write about public housing, about Cabrini–Green, but his point of view and the way to talk about it in a very clear, succinct, and just experiential way of there. It was remarkable and it obviously resonated with the rest of the people because it's still the most read article. And it was in issue three, 10 years ago. Rick Valicenti: We should also keep in mind that Cabrini–Green, if we're talking about form, no longer exists. That building complex has been raised and it's gone. Now it's a Target. Is it not? Iker: Yep. It is. So it's like, when you demolish buildings you just don't demolish the actual building, you demolish the structures, the society, the relationship, everything that is built around that. So the void that it's in the city with the destruction of public housing is not just the building, it's all the fabric, the social fabric that got destroyed. And it's very complicated to regain. And unfortunately nothing really... It's happening at the level that it should be done. Rick Valicenti: And at the time you had an idea that it was going to be demolished or did you not know it was going to be demolished at that time? Iker: I did know that it was going to get demolished. Rick Valicenti: Oh, you did. Okay. But in either case you have left behind through the medium of design and this documentation a real important record of what it was like there at that moment. Iker: Yeah. Because in a way, these stories are not just headlines that once the headline leaves the story leaves. These are people who this is the place where they grew up. Where they live. Where they have their family. And then once the buildings are remove, they have to keep going with their life. They have to do other things. So it is really unfair to just live through headline after headline. The city is a much more complex thing. And I think one of the goals that we tried to do with the journal is really, yes, talk about issues that are important. But that there is a legacy that those things are looked in depth, that someone can go back 40 years later and finding that it's still relevant because there's another situation that contextualizes in a new way. Iker: So this is just a series of thinking that evolves and it grows and builds from each other. But I think there needs to be some, like paying attention to all these issues and build from those rather than be surprised by the latest thing that happens. And then once it goes, it just, oh, it's all sold. Jolie Sheffer: Could you talk, Rick, about your own forays into book work, as you describe it, and why that form made sense for some of those projects? Rick Valicenti: The book format I particularly love, I love its linearity but I also love its ability to be opened at any page. I also love its form, its tactile nature, its ability to change voices and change perceptions as you change the tactile experience when your hand touches a page. Change the paper, change the size of it. All of those things are available tools to find engagement in that which is being communicated and that which is being received. So you know, perhaps as a writer, you're able to capture your thinking in your typing. Jolie Sheffer: Absolutely. I don't know what I'm thinking until I'm typing it. Rick Valicenti: That's right. Until after maybe you've read it and say, oh my God, that's really special. But the designer takes that source material, if you will, and either amplifies it or adds harmony to it in a harmonic sound, or adds depth to it, or adds another perspective. And so I'm keenly aware when I'm making a book that it's not a typesetting assignment, that it really is a duet at the most basic level with the content. Whether it's with the author, whether it's with a photographer, whether it's with both. And how can you bring something to life in a way that under different hands or different perspectives or different budgets or whatever, it would sound different. Rick Valicenti: And just like you can do that when you're reading a poem, or a kid reading a kid's book, you know it sounds different than the parent. It happens when people perform songs, other than the person who wrote the song. So I like the book form, but I really like its linearity. And I must admit, when non-linearity was all the rage with interactive media, I was like, what's that about here? What's happening? I'm getting used to it, but that doesn't mean I need to like it. Jolie Sheffer: What about you Jenn? You've published work in book form. What for you is your particular process in thinking about that as a medium? Jenn Stucker: Well most of the publications, I guess probably been a little bit similar, it's been mostly for documentation that this happening happened has been a big part of that. The other part is most of the work has been with recent alums or with students, and so there's something about creating the object that adds that secondary level of, I guess, accomplishment, right? Or achievement, or that this thing... I guess the same thing is it happened. And so if we have evidence of that. I taught at SACI in Florence, Italy, through our program here at BGSU, last summer and we self published a book out of that called the FLRX times 14. Or 14 of us and putting material together to sort of, what was our experience here in Florence? All being American citizens coming into this place and space. And I don't see those students again. Right? They were from University of Michigan, Penn State, Parsons, couple from BGSU, Marshall. And it was a nice moment to capture and make a capsule, I guess, of that experience. Jolie Sheffer: Well, I want to thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me. It has been a real delight. Our producers for this podcast are Chris Covera and Marco Mendoza with help from Aaron Dufala, Hannah Santiago and Kaleah Ivory. Research assistants for this podcast was provided by ICS undergraduate intern Tay Sauer. This conversation was recorded in the Stanton audio recording studio in the Michael and Sara Kuhlin Center at Bowling Green State University.  

Summer School
Lesson 11: Art and Community w/ Rachel Glago

Summer School

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2020 90:00


In this episode, local artist and organizer Rachel Glago discusses her role as Grants Chair for the Bloomington Arts Commission, House Party Project, as well as what it's like to be a double Capricorn!You can check out more of Rachel's work here!You can get involved in the Arts Commission by going to their website!Thanks to MCPL Level Up Studios!

Journey Daily with a Compelling Poem

The beauty of horses is captured in this poem Lee Robinson is a fiction writer and poet who practiced law for over 20 years in Charleston, South Carolina. Her poems have been featured on Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s Almanac. Her novel, Lawyer for the Dog was chosen by the San Antonio Express-News as one of the 25 best books of 2015 and the sequel Lawyer for the Cat is now available. Lee is a three-time winner of the S.C. Arts Commission’s Fiction Prize for short stories and she lives on a ranch in the Texas hill country.

Neighbors Of Raleigh
E32: Shelley Winters

Neighbors Of Raleigh

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2019 59:17


Shelley Winters loves Raleigh. As a matter of fact, her ancestors called Raleigh home as far back as the 1790s. 6 generations ago! We hear about her family's commitment to public service, leadership, and empowerment. Shelley reflects on her time at NC A&T, leading Citizen Advisory Councils, sitting on the Arts Commission, and how to honor the past, respect the present, and prepare for the future. 

The Bay
San Francisco Debates How to Honor Women With Monuments in the Era of Toppling Statues

The Bay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2019 15:29


San Francisco's Arts Commission wants a public monument honoring poet Maya Angelou. It's part of an effort to fix the fact that just 2 percent of public sculptures in the city honor women. But the commission and the local arts community can't agree on how Maya Angelou should be represented. The debate has highlighted a rift between people who want to see women represented in the same way men are -- through statues -- and others who say there's gotta be a better way to honor women. Guest: Chloe Veltman, Arts & Culture Reporter for KQED

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
Maine Arts Alive 11/26/19: Update on the Maine Arts Commission and the State of the Arts in Maine

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2019 0:01


Producer/Host: Guest host Matt Murphy Studio Engineer: John Greenman Julie Richard is the Executive Director of the Maine Arts Commission, a government agency charged with supporting and encouraging the arts through educational programs, advocacy, cultural planning, grants, and conferences. She visits WERU to give listeners an update on what’s happening with both MAC and the state of the arts in Maine in general. Key Discussion Points: MAC grants MAC professional development for artists and arts organizations MAC survey of arts education in schools

Barley & Me
Episode 113: John Prather of Porchlight Brewing & Maya Wallace, Vice Chair of the Sacramento Arts Commission

Barley & Me

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2019


Host Ben Rice travels to Sacramento, CA, to sit down with Porchlight Brewing's brewer John Prather, plus the Vice Chair of the Sacramento Arts Commission, Maya Wallace. We discuss everyone's history with Sacramento, plus their observations on the city's growth economically, socially, artistically, and beer-centrically, and how all of those intertwine. Plus! The housing crisis! The hidden morality of beer regulations! Bill Buckner and the 1986 Red Sox! And how the internet has changed our ability to measure popularity. We also break down Belgian vs German brewing methods, fix the broken beer festival model, and solve palate fatigue. All this and more, on episode 113 of Barley & Me. Enjoy! Follow Porchlight Brewing @porchlightbrewingco Find out more about all of Maya Wallace's projects and interests by following her on Instagram @sactomaya Follow Barley & Me across social media @barleyandmepod and check out the brand-new still-in-progress website www.barleyandmepod.com You can buy Barley & Me t-shirts at www.zen-threads.com Don't forget to check out that sweet, sweet beer dinner at Sac City Brews on November 16 and, if you're interested, there are currently positions open at the Sacramento Arts Commission! This episode is brought to you by: -The Art of Beer, taking place at the McClellan Conference Center in Sacramento on January 24, 2020. Tickets are available at www.artofbeerinvitational.com. Use the promo code "Barley5" to get $5 off tickets! -"Drink Better Beer" by Joshua Bernstein, available now on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Indiebound, and www.joshuambernstein.com. Makes a great gift for any beer lover this holiday season! -And by Comedy Night at Crooked Lane, returning Thursday, November 21, 2019, to Crooked Lane Brewing in Auburn, CA and continuing every 3rd Thursday through March 2020. Enjoy performances from AmazonPrime, Netflix, Disney, late night talk shows, and more, for just $10. Tickets are limited, so get them soon! Available on EventBrite.com or at the brewery (536 Grass Valley Hwy, Auburn, CA) or by phone at (530) 878-5232. Intro Music: "JamRoc" by Breez (@breeztheartist) Logo by Jessica DiMesio (@alivingclicheart)

Leaders and Legends in Government
Fine Arts Commission secretary commits to protecting DC’s design integrity

Leaders and Legends in Government

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2019 43:27


On this week’s episode of Leaders and Legends in Government, host Aileen Black welcomed Thomas Luebke, the secretary of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts in Washington, D.C. Luebke was also the editor of the photo and history book, "Palace of the State: The Eisenhower Executive Office Building," published in August 2018.

The Scott Sands Show
Malena Caruso of the Arts Commission discusses the Momentum Arts Festival

The Scott Sands Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2019 10:01


In A Mississippi Minute with Steve Azar
Malcolm White of the Mississippi Arts Commission

In A Mississippi Minute with Steve Azar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2019 41:20


Malcolm White, the executive director of the Mississippi Arts Commission.

Arts Friendly Conversations
Katie Murray, Orange County Arts Commission (HIllsborough, NC)

Arts Friendly Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2019 17:26


Enjoy our conversation with Katie Murray.  Katie is the Director of the Orange County Arts Commission which is based in Hillsborough, North Carolina and includes the Towns of Chapel Hill and Carrboro. Orange County Arts Commission: artsorange.org   =============== Discover Certified Arts Friendly Communities: artsfriendly.com/communities Subscribe to our free newsletter at: artsfriendly.com/subscribe  

Songwriter Sanctuary
Episode 12 - Larry Meyer

Songwriter Sanctuary

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2019 52:56


Larry Meyer is an attorney and board member of The Arts Commission in Toledo, Ohio who loves to nerd out on aspects of the music business. In this episode we discuss copyright and how it can be used to protect your creative works. Joel Trzcinski also joins the conversation and touches on Spotify and streaming topics.

San Marcos Scoop
The Mural Arts Program Committee no longer exists

San Marcos Scoop

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2019 34:28


Murals have become an essential component of the culture in San Marcos, banding together artists, residents and university students alike for the appreciation of art. But could the future of our murals be at stake? On June 4, the San Marcos City Council quietly disbanded the Mural Arts Program Committee, subsequently transferring the responsibility of the committee to the Arts Commission. The decision has not sat well with those who helped form the Mural Arts Program Committee, a key body of members responsible for establishing the nearly 30 murals around San Marcos. Former Mayor and founding member of the Mural Arts Program Committee John Thomaides sat down with Exsar to discuss the decision by the council. For Thomaides, the decision could have dire implications for future murals. Support the show: Patreon.com/SanMarcosScoop

Washington City Podcast
Proposed Changes to D.C.'s Arts Commission Have Artists on Edge

Washington City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2019 13:58


On this week's episode of Washington City Podcast, arts editor Matt Cohen talks about his cover story looking at proposed changes to the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and the last year of turmoil at that agency. He wrote it with Kriston Capps. Host Will Warren also looks at the week's news, which includes a story about D.C.'s parole system and the movements galvanizing the go-go community. Stories in this episode: Local D.C. Courts Acquitted Him, But He Still Went to Prison The Success of Moechella and #DontMuteDC Is Galvanizing Go-Go Mayor Muriel Bowser Wants Big Changes for the City's Arts Commission Music for this episode was by Lee Rosevere and Jahzzar used under the Creative Commons license. 

Berkeley Talks
Cal Performances announces its 2019-20 season

Berkeley Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2019 29:18


On Thursday, April 18, 2019, Cal Performances’ board of trustees co-chairs Helen Meyer and Susan Graham, and executive and artistic director Jeremy Geffen, announced the organization’s 2019-20 season, programmed by associate director Rob Bailis. Hear Bailis in conversation about the season with Cy Musiker, a KQED radio news reporter, anchor and recently retired host of KQED's weekly arts showThe Do List. Musiker is an alumnus of UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism.Cal Performances' 2019-20 season showcases an exhilarating and expansive breadth of dance productions, from grand to intimate in scale, featuring a broad range of international performance traditions and starring renowned companies from the US and abroad in Zellerbach Hall, widely considered the finest concert dance venue on the west coast; virtuoso soloists and conductors making their Cal Performances debuts; and immersion in key bodies of work by Beethoven, Bartók and Liszt.An interdisciplinary set of projects explores the artistic accomplishments of UC Berkeley faculty and alumni and Berkeley natives — with composers, scholars, writers, filmmakers and performers bringing new and recent work to campus. Dance and contemporary music ensembles perform Cal Performances co-commissioned work and the season concludes with a Hewlett 50 Arts Commission project staged in collaboration with lead commissioner Stanford Live. Artists and ensembles with meaningful, decades-long relationships with Cal Performances and Bay Area audiences return, and master performers from across the globe travel to Zellerbach Hall for presentations that revive and refresh traditional and contemporary music and dance practices.Read a transcript and see photos on Berkeley News.(Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater photo by Andrew Eccles) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fred LeFebvre and the Morning News
Fan of art? Momentum at Promenade Park

Fred LeFebvre and the Morning News

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2018 6:48


Marc Folk, The Arts Commission talks momentumtoledo.orgMOMENTUM IS A THREE-DAY FESTIVAL OF MUSIC AND ART ALONG THE RIVERFRONT IN DOWNTOWN TOLEDO. ALL EVENTS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

Messiah Community Radio Talk Show
Anthony Abeson: Acting 2.0 – Doing work that gets work in a high-tech world

Messiah Community Radio Talk Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2018 54:10


Our special guest is famed NYC acting coach Anthony Abeson who has worked with Jennifer Aniston and countless other well known stars. Anthony's high school summers were always spent in summer stock, acting and directing along with all the other jobs summer theatre required: stage managing, set construction, lighting design, etc. Even teaching surfaced then; his earliest memory is of writing the name "Konstantin S. Stanislavski" on a blackboard in front of bewildered children's theatre apprentices. During his college years at Columbia University he made his off-Broadway debut as an actor and assistant director at the Sheridan Square Playhouse in a repertory theatre whose director first introduced him to Lee Strasberg and the Actors Studio. He was unable to attend his graduation having been appointed by the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council to serve as a resident actor and director of the Canterbury Theatre Company, in Christchurch, New Zealand, that country's first international, professional theatre, where he worked with actors from all over the UK. As a 22-year-old American it was a challenge to direct actors whose previous director had been Laurence Olivier. Anthony's teaching continued in New Zealand where he also served as director of the Experimental Theatre Laboratory of the Christchurch Academy of Dramatic Arts, the country's first training academy. In the late '60's he began his long collaboration with Jerzy Grotowski, first as an actor at the Centre Dramatique National du Sud-Est in Aix-en-Provence, France, and later, in the early '70's as a participant/assistant in Grotowski's first "Special Project" in a forest outside of Philadelphia. Further collaboration occurred under the auspices of the Instityut Aktora in Wroclaw and Brzezinka, Poland. In 1972 he accepted an invitation to join Peter Brook (former director of the Royal Shakespeare Company) at his Centre International de Recherche Theatrale in Paris, where he participated as an actor in the Centre's exploration of the effect of non-linear language on the process of the actor. The research was facilitated by the deliberate inclusion of actors from Japan, Africa, France,etc. with hardly any common language between them. Instead, during Anthony's stay, the verbal impulse was channeled into ancient Greek and /or bird calls. Texts were supplied by Ted Hughes, Sylvia Plath's husband, a distinguished poet who went on to become the Poet Laureate of England. During the late '60's and early '70's, Anthony started a theatre company, the Ensemble Theatre Laboratory, one of whose earliest members was the wonderful actor/monologist Spalding Gray, whose richly entertaining version of their tour to Missouri of their production of "The Tower of Babel" can be found in his "A Personal History of the American Theatre." During this time, Anthony continued to be exposed to Lee Strasberg and the Actors Studio, becoming one of the youngest people ever to address a special session with Lee. In 1973 Anthony started another theatre company, this time in Washington, D. C. : The Washington Theatre Laboratory with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the D. C. Arts Commission. Their training program marked the start of many careers including that of actresses Caroline Aaron and Karen Allen. Selected as a seminal archetype of the experimental theatre movement in America, its archival materials are housed in the permanent collection of The Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee Theatre Research Institute at Ohio State University. Returning to New York, Anthony studied with Stella Adler at her conservatory and joined the faculty of the Drama Department of the High School for the Performing Arts (the "Fame" school) where he first worked with Esai Morales and Jennifer Aniston, among many talented others. Jennifer, who went on to study in Anthony's adult classes before leaving for LA, wrote of one of her experiences with him in Marlo Thomas's book: "The Right Wo...

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

This week on The Rough Draft Diaries we're talking to Marc Folk, the executive director of Toledo's Arts Commission, a nonprofit organization founded
 in 1959 to foster Toledo's heritage in the arts. Get to know Marc and the commission on this episode of The Rough Draft Diaries.

Mississippi Arts Hour
The Mississippi Arts Hour | Marita Gootee

Mississippi Arts Hour

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2018


Larry Morrisey travels to Starkville to talk with photographer and Mississippi State professor Marita Gootee. Her photography focuses on examining the concept of memory, which she has pursued through different processes and techniques, creating a varied and distinctive body of work. Gootee has received two artist fellowships from the Arts Commission and has been featured in the Mississippi Museum of Art’s biennial shows five times. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mississippi Edition
Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Mississippi Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2017


On today's show: An education funding bill squeaks past a key deadline. Find out why a key education group has concerns. Then, a controversial bill to dissolve the Arts Commission appears dead for now. Find out what the agency's director says that means for his organization. And hear the surprise of a longtime lotto proponent after an unexpected lottery bill survives the comm

Mississippi Edition
Monday, January 30th, 2017

Mississippi Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2017


On today's show: As the education funding debate continues in the legislature, we'll hear from one of the youngest public education advocates. Plus, tornado-ravaged William Carey University is poised for recovery. Find out how the campus is faring now, and what the public can do to help. Then after Everyday Tech, arts advocates across the state fight for the Arts Commission.

Mississippi Edition
Thursday, January 26th, 2017

Mississippi Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2017


On today's show: Legislators are considering a bill that would abolish the state Arts Commission. We'll talk to the Commission's executive director. Plus, find out why one education policy researcher says a new funding proposal could benefit some 80 percent of school districts. And in this week's Book Club: a new look at the classic documentary, Eyes on the Prize.

Toledo Matters Podcast
Episode 28 - Ken Leslie

Toledo Matters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2016 32:28


Episode 28 of the Toledo Matters Podcast – Ken Leslie, Founder of 1matters.org, Veterans Matter, and Tent City ——————————————————— With Bob Tucker, Danny Woodcock, & Nathan Lewis ——————————————————— What's happening in the 419: Tonight - Thursday - 9/29 Startup Toledo September, Buchanan + Nipper
Join us this month as patent attorney and history buff, J. Matthew Buchanan shares stories from Toledo's Golden Age of Innovation. This Weekend is homecoming at BG, enjoy your weekend Falcons! Next weekend, you’re getting crushed by the rockets ;) Next Thursday - 10/6 
Toledo Symphony and Arts Commission, Murder Set in Glass - Murder Mystery at the Toledo Club set in 1905. When the family’s favorite son returns home from war, all hell breaks loose and the father of the family ends up dead. ——————————————————— Today’s Guests: ***Ken Leslie*** - Former Standup Comedian - Founder, 1matters.org - Founder and Event Organizer, Tent City - Founder, Veterans Matter Favorite Toledo Hidden Gem - Black Swamp Blues Society Links: www.1matters.org www.1matters.org/tentcity/ www.blackswampbluessociety.org/ **Royalty music provided by Bensound

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor
The RDD Meets YAAW (Part Two)

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2016


Continue the story on YAAW, Young Artists at Work from the The Arts Commission of Greater Toledo. In part one we heard from Michelle Carlson, Programs Coordinator. Part Two looks at the program from the perspective of a student.

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor
The RDD Meets YAAW (Part One)

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2016


Young Artists at Work is a six-week summer employment opportunity from the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo. Hear from Michelle Carlson, Programs Coordinator. 

The Rough Draft Diaries with Haley Taylor

Our previous interview, with the band Heavy Color, asked The Rough Draft Diaries to take a trip to the Toledo Museum of Art. Not to look at any particular exhibit, but to talk to the TMA's Program Manager, Scott Boberg. Enjoy this behind-the-scenes look at the internationally known art museum located in Toledo, Ohio. Scott's connections for our next episode include: children's book author, Jan Wahl and Ryan Bunch, Coordinator to the Arts Commission. Tune in next time to hear who we pick!

Creative Memphis Podcast
Episode #032: Lauren Kennedy | Urban Arts Commission

Creative Memphis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2015 51:32


Lauren Kennedy is executive director of Urban Arts Commission, a local non-profit responsible for helping the city manage public art projects. They enhance the cultural vibrancy of communities through the development of public art. They also celebrate diversity in everything they do. Urban Arts CommissionFacebookTwitter

District Reports Podcast
District Reports: Madison Arts Commission

District Reports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2015 29:30


Arts Program Administrator, Karin Wolf, and Alder and Madison Arts Commission member, Sheri Carter, discuss public art in the City.

Glasscaster: Hot Glass Talk in a High-Tech World
Glasscaster Celebrates Edith Franklin

Glasscaster: Hot Glass Talk in a High-Tech World

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2014 27:45


Edith Franklin was one of the lucky few to participate in the   legendary 1962 glass workshop with Harvey Littleton. This momentous occassion heralded the beginning of the Studio Glass Movement.  In this interview Franklin shares her memories of Littleton, Nick Labino and the humble beginnings of studio glass. A potter by trade, she was one of Littleton's ceramics students. He had a profound influence on her career; she continued in clay and eventually co-founded the Toledo Potters Guild. Known as the Grand Dame of the Arts  Franklin was one of the earliest board members of the Arts Commission in Toledo. She was an ardent activist for arts-based programming for inner city youth. Edith Franklin passed on just a few weeks after this interview. Her intellect, enthusiasm, and fiery spirit will be sorely missed.

Mississippi Moments Podcast
MSMo 329 Dollye Robinson - The Importance of Arts and Humanities

Mississippi Moments Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2012 4:28


Dr. Dollye Robinson has had a distinguished career as a Professor of Music Education at Jackson State.  So it was only natural that she would join the Mississippi Arts Commission.   Robinson details the efforts of the Arts Commission to find funding for various programs statewide and presents an eloquent defense for the continued support of the Arts and Humanities in our schools.