Podcasts about British

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Best podcasts about British

Show all podcasts related to british

Latest podcast episodes about British

World News This Week
Full Episode: Friday, October 15, 2021

World News This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 25:46


In this week's episode, tackling the nation's supply chain problems, workers go on strike, a Navy engineer faces espionage-related charges, a long-serving British lawmaker is stabbed to death, and an update on some Aspirin recommendations.

Léargas: A Podcast by Gerry Adams
Michael Davitt GAC | The Future of Moore Street | Tony McMahon

Léargas: A Podcast by Gerry Adams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 15:07


Michael Davitt GACIn October 2006 and again in August 2021 I was asked to give a talk on Michael Davitt to the members of Davitts GAC on the Falls Road as part of the Davitts Culture, Sport and History Weekend. I enjoyed the craic. My thanks to Chairperson Tommy Shaw, Terry Park and others for a good evening.  The Future of Moore StreetLast Thursday the relatives of the Signatories of the 1916  Proclamation of the Republic and the Moore Street Preservation Trust launched their detailed plan for the protection of the 1916 Moore Street Battlefield site and for its development as a historic cultural quarter. They were joined at the launched by many of those, including … and Mary Lou McDonald TD and others who have campaigned against the developer led proposal for the area that has been produced by British company Hammerson.Tony McMahonThe great Tony McMahon has died. A musician and broadcaster Tony was one of the giants of traditional music. His music on the button accordion was passionate, deeply Irish, poignant, uplifting and spiritual.

Worst Idea Of All Time Podcast
42: Carry On, Guy and Tim

Worst Idea Of All Time Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 51:29


Your beloved Frosty Fellaz may be finished watching pornography now, and what a journey it's been. Monty has not had a fun time with this 1978 British send up, Carry On, Emanuelle. In fact, he's named it potentially the worst movie he's ever seen. Timbo didn't fare quite so badly, enjoying the flick for its position as a cultural artifact and has a theory that Guy's comic sensibilities are to blame for his terrible time. Whatever the verdict, your boiz reminisce on this season in relation to Real Life™ and what may remain to truly end this run of the podcast.JOIN US ON FACEBOOK: (facebook.com/WorstIdeaOfAllTime)VISIT THE LITTLE EMPIRE PODCAST NETWORK: (littleempirepodcasts.com)MUSIC CREDIT: Tender Moonlight (facebook.com/TenderMoonlight)ART CREDIT: Tomas Cottle (sick-days.com) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
October 16, 2021 - PBS NewsHour Weekend full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 26:36


On this edition for Saturday, October 16th, the murder of a British lawmaker is now being called a terror attack, infrastructure funding is stalled in Congress but a giant project is creeping forward in the northeast transit corridor, and in our signature segment, some Native American tribes are joining in a growing movement to buy back their ancestral lands. Hari Sreenivasan anchors from New York. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

World News with BK
Podcast#271: UK MP stabbing death, Norway bow and arrow massacre, India rectal air compressor death

World News with BK

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 152:26


Started this week with a British member of parliament getting stabbed to death in what is described as a terrorist incident. Then it was on to the local violence in Lebanon and how it all came about, the Norway mass bow and arrow killings, Joe Rogan vs. CNN, Iraq national election results, FBI arrests couple trying to pass of submarine secrets, and there has been yet another rectal air compressor death in India. Music: Jane's Addiction/"Stop!"

Newshour
Russian Covid daily deaths pass 1,000

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 49:00


Russia has passed 1,000 daily Covid-related deaths for the first time since the pandemic began. The Kremlin has blamed the number on people not taking up the vaccination. Only about a third of the nation has had the vaccine. Also in the programme: British politicians reflect on the murder of their colleague David Amess, and anti-government protesters take to the streets in Sudan. (Picture: Health workers escort a Covid-19 patient to a hospital in Moscow. CREDIT: EPA/MAXIM SHIPENKOV)

PreAccident Investigation Podcast
PAPod 361 - Spirit Airline Flight 3044

PreAccident Investigation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 27:18


It is 2021! Get Caught Trying to Make the World Better! Best Safety Podcast, Safety Program, Safety Storytelling, Investigations, Human Performance, Safety Differently, Operational Excellence, Resilience Engineering, Safety and Resilience Incentives... Give this a listen. Thanks for listening and tell your friends.  See you on Audible...all my books are up on there.  One of them is read by a British dude - it is like a Harry Potter book!  Have a great day as well. 

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys
Joy Keys chats with Filmmaker Gregory S. Cooke about Black women in WWII

Saturday Mornings with Joy Keys

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 30:00


Gregory S. Cooke is a career educator, documentary filmmaker, and World War II historian, dedicated to helping "relocate African Americans from the margins to the main pages of American and global history.” He is the Founder and President of the Basil and Becky Educational Foundation, a recipient of the Congressional Black Caucus, Veterans Braintrust Award (2019). Gregory is the creator of Invisible Warriors: African American Women in World War II, a critically acclaimed feature-length documentary that explores the wartime experiences of 600,000 “Rosie the Riveters”- “hidden figures” - pioneers who courageously triumph over racism and sexism to create job opportunities in industry and government for themselves and future generations of African American women. Invisible Warriors is an inaugural recipient of the Better Angels/Lavine/Ken Burns Fellowship (2020), and also received the Congressional Black Caucus, Veterans Braintrust Award (2019). Gregory is also the driving force behind the historical documentary, Choc'late Soldiers from the USA (CSUSA), the untold story of 140,000 African American men and women who cross a racial divide and form an unexpected bond with British civilians during World War II.

We Watched A Thing
BONUS - Spooktober Special III: Dracula (1958)

We Watched A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 43:27


Spooktober marches on and as it does I continue to make Newski (who hates horror) watch a classic horror movie EVERY SATURDAY THIS MONTH! We'll be hitting all the big ones - Aliens, Ghosts, Vampires, Werewolves and Zombies. So sit back, pour yourself a Bloody Mary and join us on this journey! This week we're avoiding the sun, drinking some blood, tea, coffee, or wine and hunting down a tall, sexy vampire, all while discussing 1958's classic Hammer horror film ‘Dracula' from 1958. Dracula is a 1958 British gothic horror film directed by Terence Fisher and written by Jimmy Sangster based on Bram Stoker's 1897 novel of the same title. The first in the series of Hammer Horror films starring Christopher Lee as Count Dracula, the film also features Peter Cushing as Doctor Van Helsing, along with Michael Gough, Melissa Stribling, Carol Marsh, and John Van Eyssen. In the United States, the film was retitled Horror of Dracula to avoid confusion with the U.S. original by Universal Pictures, 1931's Dracula. We Watched A Thing is supported by Dendy Cinemas Canberra. The best Australian cinema chain showing everything from blockbusters to arthouse and indie films. Find them at https://www.dendy.com.au/ If you like this podcast, or hate it and us and want to tell us so - You can reach us at wewatchedathing@gmail.com Or, Twitter - @WeWatchedAThing Facebook - @WeWatchedAThing Instagram - @WeWatchedAThing and on iTunes and Youtube If you really like us and think we're worth at least a dollar, why not check out our patreon at http://patreon.com/wewatchedathing. Every little bit helps, and you can get access to bonus episodes, early releases, and even tell us what movies to watch.

Saturday Live
Tom Daley

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 83:47


Tom Daley joins Richard Coles and Nikki Bedi. Tom fulfilled his Olympic dream this year, becoming the most decorated British diver of all time. He talks about the challenges he's faced, the lessons learnt, passion for knitting and his proudest achievement so far. Listener Alexis Roxburgh shares his paragliding stories. Anne-Marie is a West End child star turned multi-platinum-selling artist and The Voice coach, who also found time to be a karate World Champion. But despite success, the singer struggled until recently to find true happiness and confidence. Bobby Gillespie shares his Inheritance Tracks: The Band Played Waltzing Matilda by June Tabor, and Joe Hill by The Dubliners. Ann Shaw talks about spending over 4 years in the Craig-Y-Nos TB sanatorium in Wales as a child, and connecting with fellow survivors as an adult. Coming Up for Air by Tom Daley is out now. You Deserve Better  by Anne-Marie is out now. Tenement Kid by Bobby Gillespie is out now. The Children of Craig-Y-Nos by Ann Shaw is out now. Producer: Claire Bartleet Editor: Eleanor Garland

Up First
Saturday, October 16, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 14:56


A U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel recommends booster shots for those who got the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The killing of a British lawmaker is called an act of terrorism, and is prompting a review of security protocols. Ethiopia's civil war is entering a new phase, with civilians not only in the path of violence but also facing famine.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Disillusion in Iraq

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 28:43


When western troops overthrew Saddam Hussein, the argument was that this would turn Iraq from a dictatorship into a democracy. And they have indeed held elections there; the latest vote for a new Iraqi parliament took place last Sunday. Yet when it comes to actually voting, tribal and religious affiliation appear to have trumped any ideological leanings, and with a heavy dose of apathy and disillusionment thrown in, says Lizzie Porter. As with Iraq, Japan also faces much disillusionment with democratic politics. The last election saw only a little over half the voting population turn out, and it's not hard to see why: in almost every single contest, the same party has won. Now, the Liberal Democrat Party has chosen a new leader, and he automatically became interim prime minister, pending a general election later this month. It is an election nobody expects him to lose, but was the country's new leader welcomed with great excitement and fanfare? Hardly, says Rupert Wingfield-Hayes: According to mythology, Rome was founded by a pair of twins who had been raised by wolves. But Romulus and Remus might have been surprised to know that in the early Twenty First Century, the “eternal city” would have wild wolves spotted near its airport. Meanwhile wild boars and other animals have been stalking the streets, feasting on the rubbish that sits uncollected. It's all just one sign of the extent to which Rome has not been particularly well run in recent years, maladministration and the mafia making easy bedfellows. Tomorrow, Romans will have the chance to choose a new mayor, hoping they save the city from this plight. Italian politics is, of course, often rather colourful, and the two remaining candidates in this contest are a radio star with links to the far right, and a former Economics Minister, who has attempted to seduce voters by serenading them with a bit of bosa nova guitar. Watching this spectacle is long-term Rome resident, Joanna Robertson. Someone once said that when it came to British politics, there had only been three issues in recent elections: Brexit, Brexit and Brexit. This was not a subject that other countries necessarily wanted to focus on, most governments having enough challenges of their own to think about. Yet, for the Republic of Ireland, the UK's rows over Europe were always going to make their mark; the country has so much trade with Britain, as well as an open border with Northern Ireland. Emma Vardy says that the latest developments in the Brexit saga, have left Irish people exasperated, and also rather sad. It was the writer William Faulkner who famously said “The past is never dead. It's not even past.” That's something which another writer, Colin Freeman, discovered, when he visited Ukraine this month. He was there to hear about a new memorial and museum for the “Babi Yar” massacre, an atrocity which took place in 1941. German Nazi occupiers shot dead more than thirty thousand Jews there, and later, would use the same site to kill gay people, prisoners of war, and the mentally ill - some of the worst mass shootings in human history. Plans for a new museum about the massacres have been underway for some time, but it's a development, which Colin Freeman say,s tells us much about present day Ukraine, as well as about the moment in history being commemorated.

Gossip With Celebitchy
105: Duchess Meghan and Prince Harry partner with Ethic, British press fixates on Lili's christening, Angelina Jolie's love life

Gossip With Celebitchy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 32:45


Introduction: Minutes 0 to 4:30 We will be off next week and will be back on October 30th. We've had a lot of technical problems with the site and think it's due to Mercury retrograde. Chandra and I got haircuts. We both like our long hair and just got trims. Royals: Minutes 4:30 to 20:00 There's been a lot of drama over whether the Sussexes will christen Lilibet Diana in the UK. We heard a couple of weeks ago that Prince William blocked William and Meghan's plans to christen Lilibet Diana in Windsor. Chandra thinks Harry wanted to introduce Lili to the Queen and christen her in Windsor. There were so many reports about Lili's christening that The Sussexes issued a simple statement. They say the plans for Lili's christening are still being finalized and any other reporting was “mere speculation.” While the press was freaking out about Lili's christening plans, Harry and Meghan announced a partnership with an investing firm called Ethic. It's a natural fit for the Sussexes and is sure to be wildly successful. We just heard that BetterUp's valuation more than doubled since Prince Harry joined so Ethic is about to take off. The press response was weak. They called Ethic a hippie firm and complained that they had holdings in Google, Facebook and Twitter even though Harry and Meghan have talked about the perils of social media and the Internet. These arguments make no sense. There was also an attempt by sources close to William to show that he wants to shut out his uncle Andrew, but his reasoning for that is questionable. William is said to see Andrew as a “threat” to the royal family and a “risk” but not because he's a rapist, but because he's “ungracious and ungrateful” for the advantages he gets as a royal. It's possible William is also making a point about Harry. I play a segment from Zoom where we talk about the royals. We wonder whether Meghan would want to share photos of her children if things were different. Angelina Jolie: Minutes 20:00 to 28 Angelina Jolie has been seeing The Weeknd since at least July, when they were spotted on a dinner date. They were also at a private concert in LA, have been seen out together a few times since and were even together at his house. It's thought to be romantic and that he's trying to win her over. Angelina has also been seen out with her first husband, Jonny Lee Miller. In June she visited Jonny's New York City apartment a few times, with the cover story being that she brought Pax and then Knox with her to visit Jonny's son, Buster. This week Angelina and Jonny were photographed out at dinner in Beverly Hills. We're praying to the gossip gods that this happens. I play a segment from Zoom where we talk about this. Comments of the Week: Minutes 28:00 to end Chandra's comment of the week is from Eurydice on the post about the “Generation Earthshot” event. My comments of the week are from Miss Margo and rawiya on the post about Blac Chyna's rant at the airport in Miami telling people to get vaccinated. Thanks for listening bitches!

Something You Should Know
SYSK Choice: How to Figure Out Anything & The Art of Statistics

Something You Should Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 48:50


It is called the “psychology of requests.” That is, if you want someone to do something for you, it is all about how you phrase it. This episode begins with a discussion on the best ways to ask people, so they respond the way you want and do things you want them to. http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/09/persuasive-techniques-that-actually-work.html Every day you are presented with problems. According to my guest Marie Forleo, all those problems can be solved with the right attitude and the right approach. Marie Forleo is a wildly popular entrepreneur, writer, philanthropist, optimist and author of the book, Everything is Figureoutable (https://amzn.to/32NIeVw). Listen as she offers a fresh way to look at and solve the problems of life. Marie's website is www.MarieForleo.com  Of course, you know that it's not polite to stare. Still, people stare. So, if you do, how long can you stare before you creep people out? Listen as I reveal the exact number of seconds – down to a tenth of a second so you will now know proper staring etiquette. http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/3/7/160086 Statistics are funny. It seems you can make them say whatever you want – in fact you can just make them up out of thin air and likely never get caught. Unless of course you are talking with my guest, David Spiegelhalter. He is a British statistician and Winton Professor of the Public Understanding of Risk in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. He is also author of the book The Art of Statistics (https://amzn.to/30amC8T). David joins me to reveal how best to use statistics to bolster your own argument and how to question other people when they use statistics to make sure they are real and relevant. PLEASE SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS! We really like The Jordan Harbinger Show! Check out https://jordanharbinger.com/start OR search for it on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.  You can grow thicker, healthier hair AND get $15 off at https://nutrafol.com Promo code: SOMETHING Download the GetUpside App and use promo code SOMETHING to get up to 50¢/gallon cash back on your first tank! Discover matches all the cash back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically and is accepted at 99% of places in the U.S. that take credit cards! Learn more at https://discover.com/yes Listen to Build For Tomorrow with Jason Feifer, our favorite new podcast, right here! https://apple.co/3rPM8La or visit https://www.jasonfeifer.com/build-for-tomorrow/ JUSTWORKS makes it easier for you to start, run and grow a business. Learn more: https://justworks.com Omaha Steaks is the best! Get awesome pricing at https://OmahaSteaks.com/BMT T-Mobile for Business the leader in 5G, #1 in customer satisfaction, and a partner who includes benefits like 5G in every plan. Visit https://T-Mobile.com/business Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FIVE MINUTE NEWS
British politician stabbed to death in terrorist attack.

FIVE MINUTE NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 6:37


British politician stabbed to death in terrorist attack. US to lift travel ban on November 8 for vaccinated foreign travelers. Climate crisis activists resume their weeklong protest at US Capitol. You can subscribe to Five Minute News with Anthony Davis on YouTube, with your preferred podcast app, ask your smart speaker, or enable Five Minute News as your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing skill.  Subscribe, rate and review at www.fiveminute.news  Five Minute News is an Evergreen Podcast, covering politics, inequality, health and climate - delivering independent, unbiased and essential world news, daily. 

How To Love Lit Podcast
Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Sonnets Of The Portuguese - Plus A Great Love Story!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 50:03


Elizabeth Barrett Browning - Sonnets Of The Portuguese - Plus A Great Love Story!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver, and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver, and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This is our second week in a two part series discussing one of English Language literature's most romantic couples- the poets Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Last week, we introduced Robert Browning and his notable dramatic monologue My Last Duchess which gives voice to a twisted psychopath.  We talked a little bit about Robert Browning's life, but not too much.  This week we'll return to his story as well as introduce his remarkable wife and her poetry, Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  Christy, am I correct when I say that during their lifetimes, she was famous and he was the Mr. Elizabeth Barrett Browning, so to speak?  Also, am I also correct that the man who wrote about the most twisted love relationship in British poetry also arguably had one of the most famous personal love stories!      You are correct on both accounts- although, in his defense, in regard to the second fiddle Robert played to Elizabeth during her life, history has elevated him over the years.      And been less kind to her, am I right about that?      For a while-you're right- the world turned on  Elizabeth, or EBB, as she signed her things.      Wait= stop there- EBB for Elizabeth Barrett Browning?  She went by that?      Well, she had a family nickname BA, but in her professional life-Yes- she signed everything EBB but there is a story.  When she was single she was Elizabeth Barrett Barrett- so, she started that before she got married.  When she got married, she kept up the EBB- it avoided all the normal name confusion women deal with when they marry later in life and have the hassle of changing identities.  In her case, sticking with thethe initials  just made it easy.    That worked out.      I agree- Anyway- back to your point that history was RUDE to her.  There was a period of about 100 years where people really criticized put her down.  Virginia Wolfe, specifically, wrote what to me is a cruel essay about EBB's most accomplished piece of poetry, a long epic novel in poem form called Aurora Leigh.  Wolfe is very condescending for many reasons, but from my perspective, Wolfe just didn't like poetry very much, and Aurora leigh is an epic poem.   So, EBB, for about a 100 years drifted along on the coat tails of her husband, ironically, whose reputation gained ground over that same period of time.  It was this giant reversal after death.      Huh- I guess it's a good thing they were both gone- that could have brought some marital complications!      So true, but maybe they would have laughed.  When they were alive, Robert Browning once said that the only way he could get a publisher to look at his work was if he promised he'd get Elizabeth to print something with them.   Today, though, over two hundred years later, we can all be relieved to know, history has decided to let them rest together in peace. They are both viewed in high regard in their own rights.  The Wolfe crowd has settled down, and we can see EBB with a more balanced perspective, especially her work Aurora Leigh- something notable but more than we can really handle in one episode-  I did want to mention because it was EBB's masterpiece- and something that is quite original- if you like her stuff or if you like epic poetry, you should check it out.  No one has really done an epic poem about a female hero like her either before or since, at least that I know anything about. When it came out It was extremely popular, as well as quite scandalous. It's a plot driven story, and Marian Erle, a heroine in the stories, gets raped, has a child, refuses to hide the fact that it was a product of rape and does not take a proposal in marriage that would redeem her reputation as a fallen woman, so to speak.  It has been said that women read it secretly under their sheets so as not to be discovered, and EBB loved that.      Let me just tell you, that might scandalize readers even todayOh my, I'd say that's a very different hero than Odysseus or Gilgamesh, and I can see why Aurora Leigh was so popular so quickly not just in Britain but in America- in fact,. I read it hadsomewhere that they printed over 20 editions before the end of the 19th century.  But, let's back up and get a little of the back story on this scandalous Victorian celebrity.      Okay- boring stuff first.  EBB was born on March 6, 1806, the eldest of TWELVE children to very prominent people.  Her father's family, the Barrett's owned thousands of acres of sugar plantation in Jamaica plus all the slaves that went with that.  The Barrett's had gobs of money.  Her early years were happy, and for a while she lived in a fairy land.  Her father built this incredibly lavish estate, and she had free reign to roam at will, and that's exactly what she did.  In one sense, her family was progressive.  They encouraged and even supported her studying, and she did and loved it.  She had an excellent private tutor and she worked hard- even though at the time for a woman there wasn't much point in it.  She received a very good classical education becoming proficient in both Greek and Latin.  She read all of the time and anything she could get her hands on- which was a lot.  She also got into poetry writing pretty early on. She wrote for everyone and all the time.  Her father called her the Poet Laureate of Hope End (that was the name of their estate).  He even sponsored the publication of her first epic poem she was only 13.      Can you imagine a proud father publishing his teenage daughter's epic poem- that's definitely a rich kid thing to do.    Well, it certainly was and an indication that her life was all just dreamy…until it wasn't.  First, The Barrett's, as in the extended family, had some sort of squabble about the sugar plantation money and somehow, I'm not sure how, Elizabeth's dad, lost a big chunk of it.  They lost the big fancy estate and had to move into some sort of temporary housing.     Then, and this is even worse although, it seems what I'm about to describe happened to a lot of women during this time period, at age 15, she started getting really sick with no commensurate explanation.  To this day, her illness is undiagnosed, but she had all kinds of symptoms that left her weak to the point of literally being physically disabled.      What did they say it was at the time?  And as historians have looked back through the record is there an idea today about what made her sick?    Two good questions.  Well, of course, her family tried everything, including moving to live by the seaside- which we've seen in a lot of British literature- that came up even in Emma.  But in her case her health never really improved. By the time she was 25, her family was living in London,but that place wasn't really known at the time for its fresh air- think the chimney sweeper or Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.  What happened to poor Elizabeth is that she ended up spending all of her time confined in a bedroom in that famous address associated with her today- 50 Wimpole Street.       Well, I'm not sure about 50 Wimpole street, but isn't 57 Wimpole street the famous home of Paul McCartney- the place where he and John Lennon wrote “I want to Hold your Hand” and then later “Yesterday”.      Yes- that's a little bit after EBB's time there, though.  HA.  But actually, they did make a fairly famous movie called The Barretts at Wimpole Street about Elizabeth Barrett Browning.  So, there's that too.    Anyway, back to EBB's health-  Victorian London, in general,  was dirty and smoggy, and so Elizabeth ended up basically being locked up in her room theoretically for her own good.  There is a school of thought that suggests that Some of her problems were connected to an issue with her spine from an injury she got from falling off a horse.  We also know for a fact she  had a lot of trouble with her lungs.  I think the most trustworthy sources say she probably had spinal tuberculosis. Honestly, I really don't really know what was wrong with her except to say that by the time she was twenty-five, it seems she was pretty much disabled.  And, if that wasn't enough, she has another issue- again fairly common for the time period.   Her doctors- proscribed to her meds- and you can probably guess where I'm going with this- that were addictive- and like so many back then as well as today- she became an opium addict, of course, all under her doctor's care.  This seems a little horrifying to me, partly because we just finished watching the Netflix series The Pharmacist which was an expose on the opium problem in the United States connected to Oxycotin and the ensuing 400,000 overdoses directedly related to that drug.  But Garry, clearly, opium addiction is not a 21st century phenomenon, we talked about it a little bit with Frankenstein because it surfaced a little in that book, and even though this is a little tangential, it's interesting to me, so tell us about what opium addiction looked like in the 19th century and why would a little doted on homeschool girl wind up addicted to it?     Sure, wellFirst let's establish what it was she was taking.  It was a common drug called laudanum is what Elizabeth Barrett Browning was addicted to..  She wasn't popping pills or shooting up. anything.   Laudanum was an alcoholic herbal preparation thatand was 10% opium.  It was prescribed pretty much for everything: it was used as a pain reliever, a cough suppressant, it was used to control depression, heart palpitations.  It was given as a sleeping pill, menstrual cramps were treated with laudanum.  Just likeEven worse than oxycotin in the early days of the opioid epidemic today, itlaudanum was an entirely uncontrolled substance. Almost no one took the side effects of the drug seriously- and there were a lot of them- But another point to understand, and again this is just like opioids today- there was that associated euphoria people experienced from taking the drug that encouraged it's people to use it.  Why not, right?  It's not hurting anything, and it makes me feel good.       .  However, as we all know, thatdrug euphoria comes at a cost and the cost was depression, the slurred speech, the restlessness, poor concentration, and of course, theif you ever wanted to get off, terrible withdrawal symptoms.  Here's one crazy fun fact that might blow your mind- Itlaudanum was even spoon fed to infants, if you can believe that.      No way!    But before we judge too quickly with the arrogance of the present, we have to remember, that it wasn't until 1899 that aspirin was invented.  These were days when there were no antibiotics,  no mild tranquiliers;  not much of anything and people needed help- not just pain relief, but with all kinds of things, and this is what they had.      Do you think Barrett's prolonged disabilities could be connected with her drug use?    I'm sure it's possible, but I really don't know.  Laudanum has no curative properties. After they got married, Robert Browning did help her reduce her drug use significantly,  and in fact, she reduced her dosage to where she was finally able to get pregnant after two miscarriages related to laudanum.  After marrying him, her entire health condition improved actually.  She even got to where she could walk again, but I'm not sure what all the factors were that contributed to her general improved health.  She was definitely in a better climate and presumably happy.   I do want to be clear, there was no stigma at that time in using laudanum, so we don't need to see her as dark or even unconventional because she was a laudanum user.  Lots and lots of people used it for all kinds of things and lots were addicted- including names we recognize like Charles Dickens.      Okay-moving on to the love story- so Elizabeth was pretty much locked up in her room, disabled but otherwise living a fairly engaging intellectual life.  She was writing poetry, writing letters and basically building a literary career out of that bedroom, even in her disabled state.  In 1838, she published a book of poetry called The Seraphim and Other Poems and that one was met with a lot of critical success- oh and let me note- Elizabeth Barrett Browning published her work under her own name!!!  That wasn't what a lot of women writers were doing.  But, because her work was well received and NOT anonymous, this led to her corresponding via the mail and making friends with important literary figures of her day- some we've even heard of today- famous people like William Wordsworth and Edgar Allan Poe.  In 1844, she published another book of poetry, and it met even more success- and it was the publication of this book that changed her personal life completely.  In one of the poems in this collection,  the poem's name, btw, was  “Lady Geraldine's Courtship”, If you're interested, but in this poem she references the poetry of another  fairly obscure British poet,  a man by the name of Robert Browning.  Well, this obscure poet, Robert, was highly flattered to be noticed by someone who was now quite famous, and wrote her a letter thanking her for the shout out.  However, this was not your run of the mill thank you note.  In his thank you letter he very forwardly and now famously said this, “I love your verses with all my heart, Miss Barrett”…”, I do, as I say, love these books with all my heart- and I love you too.”      Ha!  That is forward.  Robert Browning was very much a very bold suitor- no doubt.  He pursued Elizabeth and all throughvia the mail. I was amazed to read there are over 573 letters between these two, and these letters pretty much document the story of two people falling in love.  Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan's email drama has nothing on these two!!  They wrote each other every day and seemingly pretty much about everything  in the world.  These were not check in texts.  These were not Joey Tribiani lines like “what's up!”- they were full on epistles.     So true, and these letters have been popular reading material ever since- for those of us who want to take stalking to the next level and stalk the love lives of the dead.  You really get an intimate look at two people falling in love.  Elizabeth said they were “talking upon paper”.   When you read the letters, you literally feel like you are injecting yourself into their private world.      Mostly because you are.      I guess that's true, but it is sweet.  Here's a clip for you to see what I mean.  “You've come to me as a dream comes, as the best of dreams comes.”  That's Elizabeth to Robert. And Robert Browning responds in the same sorts of ways, “I have loved you all my Life unawares- that is the idea of you.”         It's a very special back and forth that has been preserved, and they were clearly falling in love now before the eyes of the world and posterity- but we also see that Elizabeth was not totally sure marriage was the path for her.       No, she had a couple of serious hesitations.  Not the least of these was her father.  He absolutely did not believe in allowing his children to get married- especially Elizabeth, and by that I mean not ever.  They were a close family, and that put her in a terrible position.  To marry Robert would be to cut off her father.  Her relationship with her father otherwise was good- if you take out the tyrannical controlling thing- I know that kind of fails the say out loud test.       And of course we see in the letters that Robert, obviously was totally against this kind control over her.        That was one big problem, but she was also concerned about her disability and her age.  She was six years older.  Would this really work? By the time, they got married she was 40- today 40 is the new 20, but she didn't feel that way.   She felt past her prime.  These are some of the insecurities, we will see her write about in her love sonnets.  But, at the end of the day, Robert did love her.  He wanted the relationship to work.  And despite her father's objections, he visited her home 91 times unrelenting in wanting a relationship with Elizabeth.  Garry, do you have a theory as to what Mr. Barrett had against Robert or marriage in general?    Well, for one thing, he thought Robert might be trying to use Elizabeth's fame for his own career- and that would be understandable, I guess, although for a 40 year old, today that seems her problem not his.  But the bigger problem was sex in general.  From everything I've read he was a good father and loved his daughter.  Elizabeth, who they calledhis Ba- in many ways she his pride and joy.  He struggled with his daughter having her own sexual identity- he had idealized her.  It seems that as he got older, the sex piece was just more than he could handle.  This sort of thing happens even today.    Well, the locking the daughter up in the room plan failed.      I will say those plans usually do.    Robert and Elizabeth were in love, and on September 12 1846, with the help of her maid, Elizabeth sneaks out of the house and marries Robert.  One oddity is that after they get married, she had to sneak back into her father's house and live there secretly married for another week before they could work out their train tickets to Italy.  But they did ran away together and eventually settled in Florence and where they lived for the rest of Elizabeth's life.     One unfortunate fall out is that her father never got over the elopement.  He disowned her; cut her off financially and never spoke to her again.  He would die never to see his daughter again.  That's sad.     I suspect she knew that was a possibility, and the reason for her hesitation.  I'm also sure that really hurt, but she didn't seem to regret her decision.  Italy was her choice.  She'd loved it from her classical studies.  The doctors insisted it would significantly improve her health- which it did.   She also wanted Robert and a life with Robert, so Italy was the plan.  After three miscarriages, they had a son, she began walking again; she got involved with European politics, supported the the Unification of Italy, took stands on women's rights issues.  She was fully engaged in a life there.  In 1850, she would publish another collection of poetry- this one contained what she is most famous for- her “Sonnets from the Portuguese”.  Selections from this work is what we're going to read.  These were poems she had written to Robert during those days when she was living locked up in that room on Wimpole street.  She wrote 44 love sonnets to Robert,  but she didn't give them to Robert until after they were married.      What's the connection with the Portuguese?      Well, when they were dating, Elizabeth wrote a poem about a Portuguese girl named Catarina who was beloved.  Robert loved it and always connected Elizabeth to this fictional girl Catarina from the poem.  When Elizabeth published these love sonnets it was kind of an inside joke- the speaker is the Portuguese (her) and the poems are all love poems to her husband.  Sonnets from the Portuguese.    Also, you may remember from Robert's life- he had kind of a bad experience with writing personal confessional poems, so when it came to publishing truly personal poems, he wanted her to create some distance between the speaker of the poem.  So, they basically pretended she translated the sonnets. I like the idea- although, I will say, it's not super-well disguised.      So, why are these love sonnets so popular?    For one, there's just the idea that they are so so sweet.  And since their love life is so well documented with their letters, the personal story makes the sentiments in the sonnets charming.   Elizabeth was 39 years old.  She considers herself past her prime when they met.  She was disabled.  She expresses what to me seems like a disbelief someone she found to be as amazing as this man she admired really truly loved her.  On his part, it's kind of a female fantasy- it's sweet- against a lot of big obstacles,he made her believe he loved her because he did.  He really did.  He was equally enamoured with her.  He admired her.  He wondered how could a woman as brilliant as this woman love me?     And there we have something special- a mutual admiration- it is this mutual admiration that led to a real intellectual exchange.  In these letters we watch this intellectual exchange develop into a reciprocity of respect and from this respect we see trust and then intimacy. All of this, of course, is exactly the kind of thing Ibsen advocates for in A Doll's House.  The Browning's relationship is the exact opposite of the Helmer marriage.  The BrownsingsThe Brownings started  as intellectual equals but then emotionally connect.  After many months of back and forth, after many doubts, we finally land on those famous lines most of us recognize from grocery store valentine cards that young boys glue boxes of chocolates or put in the arms of teddy bears. “How do I love thee, let me count the ways?”      I really like Elizabeth; but I also like Robert.  He loved her for who she was.  He was bold; he took risks.  This is something young men aren't often encouraged to do. For whatever reason, Robert demonstrated leadership, and Elizabeth absolutely reciprocated this strength back to him.  Sonnets from the Portuguese take us on her journey. And because we know the true story of their real-life romance- the sonnets just seem sweet, romantic and precious.    You seem smitten, Christy, should I be concerned?  Or should I write sonnets?    Oh, you should definitely write sonnets, But let me say, there is more to appreciate about these love sonnets than just the love confession.  EBB was a rhetorician- and you know I love rhetoric- persuasion.  These poems don't just express emotion.  They are making an articulate argument- she's making a statement one I find interesting and relevant. Because Elizabeth was a product of the Victorian era, she had a very specific understanding of the view of the ideal woman of her day.  However, she was an intellectual, her father had done her the disservice of introducing her to Greek and Latin philosophy.  She was enamored with the female poet Sapphos- so as she sat in the confining room on Wimpole street, receiving letters from Robert- she found herself thinking- what does something like romantic love mean for someone like me?  I don't need a man for money?  I don't need a man for a career?  I don't even need a man for love- my father loves me.  What is romance?  What is love?  What is a relationship between a man and a roman?  She sat around her room a thought about those sort of things and she draws conclusions.     For one thing, she  defines female love in a different way- it doesn't have to be the same thing as masculine love- but it also doesn't have to be this frail Victorian helpless type she found typical of the age- she defines feminine love in a stronger way.  For EBB love comes from confidence and fills the lover with confidence. In the beginning we see a woman who was confident in her intelligence; confident in her work, confidenr in her family,  but not necessarily confident in any romantic sense.  And how many of us can relate to that?  This was exactly me as a high school and college student- if I'm being honest.       One thing that stands out to me is this idea the frail female.  This WAS the ideal female for a lot of men at this time period.  Of course, most men, even today, want to be strong for a significant lover or the love of women in general,  but this dramatic idea of the sickly and frail woman is very typical of the Victorian period.   I can see that a woman expressing powerful confidence was not something people expected from a female in a romantic relationship and certainly not in a female romantic figure.      Exactly, and EBB, who ironically was sickly, didn't want that to be the reason someone loved her.  She ran from that.  In fact, she even ran from being appreciated for being a woman in general.  When Wordsworth died, England needed a new poet Laureate, Elizabeth's name was recommended to succeed him.  The argument was that there should be a woman poet Laureate for the nation because there was a woman monarch.  Barrett took issue with this- she made the statement that she was not a poetess but a poet and she thought poetry should be judged by its merits not by the sex of its writers.    HA!!  19th century cross-sectional politics.    I know, right, but here's why I bring it up.  When it came to her poetry, she didn't want to be looked at as a woman-as in a hyphenated sub-group.  She saw this kind of thing as patronizing like how I heard boys talk about girl athletes when I was a kid- phrases like, “she's pretty fast- for a girl.” That was not Elizabeth's thing.  It's why didn't use a pseudonym like George Eliot or Emily Bronte who went by Ellis Bell.  Hiding your gender professionally  was totally acceptable.  But it seems to me that for EBB she wanted to say- I am a woman- know that-, I have the feelings and desires define me as a woman.   I will write about women and what women care about.  I will show how I as a woman see the world and I will stand confidently this.  This is an important thing to do.   Don't patronize me by qualifying me by gender; I define my femininity for myself.    But all of that only applies to outside relationships. n    So, how does it apply to personal relationships?     It seems crazy, and unljikely but somehow, she and Robert were on the same page in their understanding of how men and women should relate.  He was not intimated by her professional success at all, and he really should have been.  She was very well known; he was not.  Their personal relationship was all theirs.  She was a woman who wanted to be desired, to be cherished, to be loved and adored- and he wanted very much to do all those things for her.  That is a very traditional relationship, and maybe Victorian in nature- but I have to be honest, I love all those very same things.     As we read these poems, I see a powerful writer but also a dreamy love-struck woman.   “As the prisoners think of liberty, as the dying think of heaven so I think of you.”  That is another quote from one of her letters to Robert- but in this line we see a brave but smitten female voice.      So, you're saying, she's not writing as someone trying to be coy or silently waiting to be seduced.       Exactly, she does want to be seduced; she's just dropping the silent part.  Sonnets from the Portuguese are in sequence; they take us through her evolution of thinking and her emotions on this experience of falling in love.  In sonnets 1-2 we see the woman speaker as object of man- she is not the creator of her own poetic voice yet.  And this of course is what we think of when we think of traditional love poetry- man loves woman- man speaks- woman stays silent- just think about the convention of the sonnets in particular- especially Petrarchan sonnets.  That's what they were all about.    Now, we don't need to rehash our entire episode on Petrarch- although he's worth listening to if you haven't listened to that podcast- or at least not in a while- but, by way of reminder, Petrarch wrote sonnets to a woman named Laura who did not return his affection- the entire genre of the Petrarchan sonnet is about objectifying women.    In fact, I'm pretty sure Petrarch never really even refers to Laura as a whole human being- it's always her hair, or her breasts, her voice, her smile- even the name Laura- some people think just stands in for the word Laurel.      You're right.  Laura is distant- impersonal- an ideal.  The sonnets are mostly about Petrarch- the man- not the woman at all. Elizabeth is to not just going to reverse this- she's going to redefine the sonnet genre entirely.  She's going to say, I'm the object- yes- I want to be the object, but I'm also the speaker- I am not silent.  I am a recipient of a love that empowers, but I am also the giver of a love that emboldens.  The poetic relationship in these sonnets is reciprocal- His love calls for her poems- SHE writes them.  In a sense, he is a magic prince who kisses and restores her- she sees him like this- but she is not weak, she is not powerless- even in her physical fraility- even in her age- and she did see herself as kind of past her prime maybe physically but definitely not creatively or professionally.    SHE is the creator of the art here- she is creating this new idea that I can be a the muse for love and the creator of its art.      I also want to point out that their relationship, although it is intellectual,  it is not platonic.  It's very romantic and there is a lot that is physical here… and some of this is erotic to be honest… He was bold towards her, but now she reciprocates with boldness of her own….    Well, that could get interesting.      I think so, but we'll let you read those on your own, though.     Okay- so, we're going to read three of her sonnets?     Yes, I want to.   I think it's nice to try to see a little bit of the progression we've been talking about- how they kind of show her evolving into her own understanding of her relationship.  We won't overdo the analysis thing because there are three of them- and we'll just try to enjoy them more holistically.  We'll start with 14, move to 22 and then finish with the famous 43- the one most people know.        Sonnet 14    If thou must love me, let it be for nought  Except for love's sake only. Do not say,  "I love her for her smile—her look—her way  Of speaking gently,—for a trick of thought  That falls in well with mine, and certes brought  A sense of pleasant ease on such a day"—  For these things in themselves, Belovèd, may  Be changed, or change for thee—and love, so wrought,  May be unwrought so. Neither love me for  Thine own dear pity's wiping my cheeks dry:  A creature might forget to weep, who bore  Thy comfort long, and lose thy love thereby!  But love me for love's sake, that evermore  Thou mayst love on, through love's eternity.      It seems very straightforward and easy to understand for me.      It really is.  Just to give a little introduction to the form, notice that it is in iambic pentamenter, that means there are five strong beats in every line- just like in most every other sonnet in the world. Also, just like Petrarch, there is a rhyme scheme abba abba cdcdcd. But, that's as far as she will follow Petrarch's model.  In fact, she's almost responding to Petrarch- don't love me like Petrarch loved Laura.   He loved her for stuff- for her smile, her look, her way… all that garbage… don't even love me for any cute thing I say, or even what you do for me and how it makes you feel to do stuff for me, like wipe tears from my cheeks- nonsense like that…I'm just not interested.  If we're going to do this love thing, we need to get past all that and figure out something much deeper …the smile and tears stuff isn't enough.    “Love me for love's sake, that evermore though mayst love, on, through love's eternity.”      Well, it's a very ornate style- and it's understandable in light of what we know about her own personal underconfidences that she would talk like this, but like I said before, I really enjoy seeing a mature woman experience a deep and intimate love- she's allowing herself to enjoy all the emotions of love like most people associate with you, but it's not immature love, it establishs reciprocal terms.       Another point I want to make before we read the next one, and this may be one of the reasons her poetry was so ill-received in the 20th century, EBB has no trouble exploring her doubts and underconfidences in her romantic relationship.  And we see that a little here, although the earlier ones had more of it.  She seems slightly concerned that if the love relies too much on the physical, it might be a bust.  Feminist critics of the 20th century didn't like that.  They said things like, she's lowering herself in the relationship when she should be promoting herself.  And there is a real sense that that is true- she clearly submits to Robert in these sonnets- on purpose- but here is the difference that I think has since redeemed her- it's a reciprocated submission- it's not something that Robert himself was not doing.  Today, as we read her poems, we aren't really offended by her vulnerability.  In fact, the honesty has been reinterpreted as confidence.  It takes quite a bit of sincerity and confidence to be openly underconfident and dependent- as paradoxical as it sounds.      Well, of course, I agree with that.  And I have to think, from a psychological point of view, that being in love and writing about how it makes you feel at age 39 as opposed to 19 is probably why she can be vulnerable about her self-doubts without coming across as weak and pitiful.  She's already been through the adolescent stuff as a totally separate issue, so as she tries to understand what about love is overwhelming her and making her feel so differently- she can separate what is unique about this particular love relationship from regular developmental issues of underconfidence or even the loving relationships she's already experienced from her family- which we have to remember- she'd been adored her entire life.      Let's read 22- we can see the tone has shifted.  There's been a progression from love me for love's sake to now WHEN we stand erect…the posture is very different.  Let's read it.        When our two souls stand up erect and strong,    Face to face, silent, drawing nigh and nigher,    Until the lengthening wings break into fire    At either curvèd point,—what bitter wrong    Can the earth do to us, that we should not long   Be here contented? Think. In mounting higher,    The angels would press on us and aspire    To drop some golden orb of perfect song    Into our deep, dear silence. Let us stay    Rather on earth, Belovèd,—where the unfit   Contrarious moods of men recoil away    And isolate pure spirits, and permit    A place to stand and love in for a day,    With darkness and the death-hour rounding it.    Again, we have the same iambic pentameter- five strong beats in every line.  We have the rhyme scheme Abba Abba cdcdcd.  But what we notice more than the rhyme change is the tone change.  Traditionally in the Petrarchean sonnet the first eight lines set up a question and then the second six lines answer it.  There's a turn.  In this one, the first eight lines or the octave are going to define the status of their love as it is now.  The last six will argue- quite untraditionally that they need to stop time and just stay in the present moment.      HA!!  Wouldn't that be nice to be able to do.      Yeah- but I guess it's a nice sentiment even if a bit unrealistic.  I guess that's why she can enjoy it.  I want to point out how much religious imagery she throws in here.  It's not two bodies- it's two souls- they are not constrained by physical restraints anymore- something she was all too familiar with.   I also want to point at how equal the two people in this poem are.  They are two souls- erect and strong- face to face- with wings breaking into fire- that's pretty cool imagery.- kind of like some mythical phoenix full of power and energy.    And yet, as cool as they would be, I would prefer to just stay here in this moment with you.  It's sweet.  Okay, ready for the last one…the famous sonnet 43, the second to last poem in the series- in many ways the concluding one.  In this one, she is going to summarize some of the arguments she's made throughout the other sonnets.  She is going to catalogue the eight ways of loving that she's been making for the last 42.  Let's read it and then we'll see how this famous love story ends.      How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.  I love thee to the depth and breadth and height  My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight  For the ends of being and ideal grace.  I love thee to the level of every day's  Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.  I love thee freely, as men strive for right.  I love thee purely, as they turn from praise.  I love thee with the passion put to use  In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith.  I love thee with a love I seemed to lose  With my lost saints. I love thee with the breath,  Smiles, tears, of all my life; and, if God choose,  I shall but love thee better after death.    By the end of EBB's sonnet sequence she has reshaped her understanding of love.  She has allowed herself to express her initial insecurities, walked us through her doubts and developed before us a full and complete discovery of what her romantic relationship means.   Again, she is using the same iambic pentameter- and the same abba abba cdcdcd.  It's simple.  It's obvious.  It's confident. Where in the first one we read, there was a lot of insecurity, the second a very confident equality, here she is asserting her own leadership.  I think she's ready to elope!!!    HA!!  I guess she is.  Again there is a lot of religious and Christian imagery- it even alludes to the Bible.  The languages borrows from St. Paul in his letter to the Ephesians where he describes Christ's love for humanity.      Exactly, she's expressing a completeness here- in every line she's showing us this cycle.  There's spiritual love, every day love, free and society love, virtuous love, passionate love, permanent love and finally eternal love- after death.    Well, how does their story end.      It's nice.  First of all, I forgot to tell you, they nicknamed their son, Pen.  That's cute.  After the elopement and the move to Italy, they had 15 years before Elizabeth's health finally gave out.  The story goes that on the day Elizabeth died, Robert lifted her up towards him and she kissed him repeatedly, even kissing the air after he put her back on her bed.  Robert was heard saying, “Beautiful, beautiful.”  After she breathed her last breath, he looked at her and said, “How she looks now, how perfectly beautiful.”  This was on June 29, 1861.  That autumn, Robert and Pen left Florence never to return.  He prepared and published her last works that he titled, “Last Poems”.  He was unselfishly pleased that even after her death, sales of her work exceeded his.      Browning stayed in England, gradually establishing a place in London society.  He did propose again to a woman named Louisa, Lady Ashburton, a rich and attractive widow in 1869.  However, he blew the proposal so badly that she turned him down.     You know bad proposals are some of the things America's Funniest Home Videos really taught us all to enjoy.  But how was his so bad.  I mean, he was a poet.  You'd think he could turn a line.       Oh, he turned a line for sure, but this stands out- even in a long list of bad proposals.   He literally told her that his heart lay buried with his wife in Florence and he really just wanted to marry her for the advantages it would give Pen.      Well, at least he was honest.      Yes, he was that- just honest and single.  He continued to write and to publish all the way until his death.  And he died in the same country as his wife.  He and his sister were vacationing in Venice, Italy.  He had bought a house there for Pen.  While in Venice, he caught a cold and died on December 12, 1878 there.  Today, EBB is buried in Florence, but ironically they did not ship Robert Brownings down to Florence to be buried with her.  He actually got a very prestigious placement.  Today Robert Browning's body rests in Westminster Abbey.    Wow, that's impressive and an interesting ending to this very famous romance.    Unless  it doesn't end the romance…according to Elizabeth, she was going to love him better after death.    Ha!!!  Well, there you go, perhaps she's set those wings on fire!!    Oh my, we've read way too many sonnets this week.  Next week, we are changing gears entirely.  If you're listening to this in real time, it's October 2021, Halloween season and we are starting The Haunting of Hill House by the American Shirley Jackson.  It's not my favorite sub-genre, but here we go…into the scary stuff!!!    Thanks for listening, please know we appreciate you spending time with us each week.  We hope you are enjoying exploring the classics with us.  If so, please help us by tweeting an episode, posting a link on Facebook or LinkedIn or simply texting an episode to a friend.  And if you're a teacher, Visit our website for teaching support.    Peace Out.     

Business Matters
British member of Parliament dies after stabbing

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 53:17


The British Conservative MP Sir David Amess has died after being stabbed multiple times at his constituency surgery in Essex, England. We get an update on the tragedy from Rob Watson, the World Service's political correspondent. Also in the programme, Italy has made it mandatory to prove Covid vaccination, or a negative test, to go to work. Thousands of workers at Trieste port have gone on strike over the mandate, and we get reaction to the new policy from Alessandro Borghese, who is a chef with two restaurants in Milan, and another opening soon in Venice. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis heads to the TED Countdown climate summit in Edinburgh, to find out about innovative approaches to tackling climate change. And Lucy Burton talks to Katherine O'Brien of the British Pregnancy Advisory Service about why women are deciding that it's not a good idea to have a baby in these uncertan times. Plus, we have a report from Arunoday Mukharji in India as the country's festival season gets under way. He hears that whilst there seems to be more enthusiasm on the streets compared to last year, it does not necessarily mean more business. Additionally, a report from Kai Ryssdal from our partner programme Marketplace; Kai has been speaking to the CEO of a flower deivery company to see how she's been affected by the last year. Lucy Burton is joined throughout the programme by Sinead Mangan of the ABC in Perth, Western Australia. (Picture: Conservative MP Sir David Amess. Credit: UK PARLIAMENT)

Global News Podcast
British anti-terror police investigate fatal stabbing of MP Sir David Amess

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 31:49


Police say a 25 year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after the attack in Leigh-on-Sea. Also: dozens killed in Afghan mosque suicide bombing, and US to lift travel ban on 8 November.

Leland Live
10/15 Leland Live Hour 3: Stabbing of English Parliament, Buttigieg, Dessert Talk, and More!

Leland Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:55


Leland Whaley talks about a British member of Parliament stabbed to death at a meeting of constituents, Pete Buttigieg's bad handling of the supply-chain crisis, where to find great desserts, and more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Lead with Jake Tapper
Biden pitches spending plans as negotiations intensify; Key FDA panel unanimously recommends J&J booster shot; Biden admin plans to revive controversial Trump-era border policy;

The Lead with Jake Tapper

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 36:31


Manchin & Sinema detail key disagreements over Biden agenda; One-on-one with White House press secretary Jen Psaki; CNN Poll: only 25% of Americans see economic bills helping them; Klain retweets economist saying inflation is a “high class” problem; Psaki's mention of VA governor's race raises objections; FDA panel recommends J&J booster 2 months after first shot; CDC: unvaccinated adults have 11x higher risk of dying, 6x higher chance of testing positive; CDC: more than 90% of people who got J&J may be eligible for booster; NIH study: mixing & matching boosters seems effective; Migrant surge complicating VP Harris's border assignment; DHS watchdog report criticizes ICE's use of solitary confinement; Bill Clinton in hospital aster infection spread to bloodstream; Bill Clinton hospitalized for infection but “on the mend”; Source: Biden called Clinton, talked politics & VA gov race; British lawmaker stabbed to death at meeting with voters; British counter-terrorism police to lead investigation into stabbing death of member of British parliament; To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review
Sir Michael Caine, Halloween Kills, Venom, Ron's Gone Wrong, The Last Duel and The Velvet Underground

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 135:33


Sir Michael Caine talks about his new movie Best Sellers, about a cranky, retired author who reluctantly embarks on a final book tour to help out a young publisher. Plus we have reviews of Halloween Kills, starring Jamie Lee Curtis in the continuing saga of Michael Myers and Laurie Strode; The Last Duel, Sir Ridley Scott's film about King Charles VI declaring that Knight Jean de Carrouges settle his dispute with his squire by challenging him to a duel, written by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck and starring Jodie Comer; Venom: Let There Be Carnage, Andy Serkis's sequel starring Tom Hardy, Woody Harrelson and Michelle Williams; The Velvet Underground, Todd Hayne's documentary about the seminal sixties band; Ron's Gone Wrong, the story of Barney, an awkward middle-schooler and Ron, his new walking, talking, digitally-connected device; and Ear for Eye, Debbie Tucker Green's film following British and American Black characters of different generations navigating their way through today's society, offering a critical perspective on the state of the nation. Mark and Simon also talk you through the best and worst films on subscription-free TV next week, and recommend a home entertainment purchase in DVD of the Week. We welcome your contributions: Email: mayo@bbc.co.uk Twitter: @wittertainment

LET IT OUT
Cooking, Style, Entrepreneurship, and the Importance of Communication with Kerrilynn Palmer of CAP Beauty

LET IT OUT

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 85:37


Show notes: - CAP Beauty on the Web | Instagram- the WRITE kit (50% off!)- Check out Katie's one-on-one Creative Clinic- You can book a free consultation with Katie here, and if you don't see a time that works for you please email her at katie@letitouttt.com- Subscribe to our newsletter to get show notes sent straight to your inbox- Follow @letitouttt on Instagram Sponsors: Olive & June: get 20% off your first mani system when you go to oliveandjune.com/letitout and use promo code letitout at checkout.Acorn TV is the largest commercial-free British streaming service. Get 30 days free by going to acorn.tv and entering the promo code letitout (all lowercase) at checkout.Ana Luisa: chic, sustainable, and fairly-priced jewelry. Go to shop.analuisa.com/letitout and enter code LETITOUT at checkout for 10% off your order.

The New Yorker Radio Hour
Daniel Craig Takes Off the Tux

The New Yorker Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:38


Daniel Craig made his career as an actor in the theatre and in British indie films. When he showed up in Hollywood, it was usually in smaller roles, often as a villain. So, in 2005, when Craig was cast as the original superspy, James Bond, he seemed as surprised as anyone. In “No Time to Die,” Craig gives his final performance as Bond—a role, he tells David Remnick, that sometimes grated on him. Craig hasn't lost his love of theatre, and is set to play Macbeth on Broadway. “I try not to differentiate” between Shakespeare's work and Ian Fleming's, he tells David Remnick. “You're trying to aim for some truth, to ground things in reality,” and “both require the same muscles.” Though he admits that “there's a lot more chat” in a Shakespeare script. Plus, the beloved comic character actor Carol Kane discusses her Oscar-nominated turn in 1975's “Hester Street,” which is being re-released.

Charisma News
British Politician Stabbed at a Meet and Greet

Charisma News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 2:41


Sir David Amess, a conservative member of Parliament was stabbed at a meet and greet with his constituents at the Belfairs Methodist Church in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex. Listen to hear the full story from host John Matarazzo and how you can be praying.

Understand Suicide
Ep. 77 - Finding answers within the self | John Siddique

Understand Suicide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:14


John Siddique is a British author and poet who found answers to existential questions in spirituality. For quite some time, he struggled with self-doubt, negativity, and unhealthy relationships, but he would constantly hit a wall. John wanted to understand himself: “I didn't know how to love or how to live this life,” he told me. “I was living through certain objects (work, relationships). We try to move into those things to find meaning and not one of them has sufficient meaning in them.” Then, his path was lit by spiritual awareness, a journey within himself, or “back home,” as he says. In this interview, John tells us about his discoveries, including his lived experiences with suicide. One of the topics we explored was the different meanings of suicide, which was quite enlightening to me. Find John Siddique: https://www.authenticliving.life/ His book: https://amzn.to/3aGfMuy Watch this interview on my YouTube channel "Understand Suicide:” https://bit.ly/3AKqVVV Enroll in my course "How to help suicidal people." https://bit.ly/3klNZ7n Visit my page www.understandsuicide.com Find my book "Understanding suicide: living with loss, paths to prevention:” https://amzn.to/2ANczuR Read my blog on Psychology Today: https://bit.ly/2Y9WdID Exchange experiences on my Facebook page: https://bit.ly/3h8sIet If you need to talk, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline on their website or phone: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org Phone: 800-273-8255 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/paula-fontenelle/message

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show
October 15th, 2021 7am Alice News Network

Sarah and Vinnie Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 19:27


Americans have drunk and smoked more with less exercise during the pandemic, British people think about killing people all the time, and a man went to the Cheesecake Factory to order all 35 of their flavors so he can rake them!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Hardcore Self Help Podcast with Duff the Psych
Episode 274: Can't Talk About Feelings & Feeling Like a Bad Person

The Hardcore Self Help Podcast with Duff the Psych

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 46:29


Hello, all! I hope that you are having a great week. I got a great episode for you here with the following questions: How can I get help for my depression when I can't talk about my feelings? How do I stop feeling like such a bad person all the time? As always, you can send me your questions to duffthepsych@gmail.com and find the show notes at duffthepsych.com/episode274 --- Felix Gray manufacture the Blue Light glasses that started it all. Get yourself a pair of glasses made for the 21st century and designed for modern, hardworking eyes.  Go to felixgrayglasses.com/duff for the best Blue Light glasses on the market and receive Free Shipping, Free Returns, and Free Exchanges. Acorn TV is a commercial-free streaming service that's rooted in British television. Escape to Britain and beyond without leaving your seat and try Acorn TV free for 30 days, by going to acorn.tv and using the promo code duff when you sign up!

Reason Being
Joe Rogan Exposes CNN'S Corruption | Dave Chappelle Faces Backlash | Ep. 36

Reason Being

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 22:06


Joe Rogan and Dave Chapelle VS the World. Our Site:https://www.reasonbeingofficial.com/Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/reasonbeingo...Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/reasonbeing...TikTok:https://www.tiktok.com/@reasonbeingof...Apple Podcast:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast...Spotify Podcast:https://open.spotify.com/show/37No9vc...Use PROMO code "RAM" to receive BIG discounts at mypillow.com or call 1-800-867-0416.FAIR USE NOTICEFair use is a doctrine in United States law that permits limited use of copyrighted material without having to first acquire permission from the copyright holder. Fair use is one of the limitations to copyright intended to balance the interests of copyright holders with the public interest in the wider distribution and use of creative works by allowing as a defense to copyright infringement claims certain limited uses that might otherwise be considered infringement. Unlike "fair dealing" rights that exist in most countries with a British legal history, the fair use right is a general exception that applies to all different kinds of uses with all types of works and turns on a flexible proportionality test that examines the purpose of the use, the amount used, and the impact on the market of the original work.

Security Stories
38: Would I lie to you? Security Stories versus Beers with Talos

Security Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 55:00


Welcome to a very special edition of Security Stories, as we go head to head with the Beers with Talos podcast team. Using a live game show format based on the British show 'Would I lie to you?' we present "facts" about significant moments in our security careers—but can the teams work out who is telling the truth, and who is bluffing?This episode features Mitch Neff, Joel Esler and Matt Olney on the BWT team. Joining Hazel on the Security Stories team are Dennis Fisher of Decipher, and Pam Lindemoen, CISO Advisor for Cisco Secure.To learn if we can sort fact from fiction, don't miss this special edition: "Would I lie to you? Security Stories versus Beers with Talos."To learn more about Talos careers, head to https://talosintelligence.com/careers

Luke's ENGLISH Podcast - Learn British English with Luke Thompson
747. Social Awkwardness / Very British Problems (with Michael Lavers from Level Up English)

Luke's ENGLISH Podcast - Learn British English with Luke Thompson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 82:47


747. Social Awkwardness / Very British Problems (with Michael Lavers from Level Up English) Talking to Michael Lavers from the Level Up English Podcast about learning Japanese, embarrassing moments in language learning, social awkwardness and some "very British problems". Are you as socially awkward as a British person? Let's see how you and Michael would respond to some quiz questions that will test your British awkwardness to the max. Video version available. Episode page https://wp.me/p4IuUx-pxs  LEP Premium https://www.teacherluke.co.uk/premiuminfo  LEP Merch https://www.teacherluke.co.uk/merch 

Post Corona
The Merits of Merit - with Adrian Wooldridge of The Economist

Post Corona

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:02


During the pandemic, standardized tests were suspended in an entire range of educational institutions. Will these changes be temporary or permanent? More than 600 of these institutions switched from a mandatory to optional test for the 2020-21 application season, and many just flat out refused to accept a test at all in their application process. According to the editor in chief of the Princeton Review, “That is a tectonic change for many schools.” According to Smithsonian Magazine, “The pandemic sped up changes that were already afoot; even before Covid, more than 1,000 colleges had made the tests optional. Many had been turned off by the way the tests perpetuated socioeconomic disparities, limiting their ability to recruit a diverse freshman class.” Concerns about disparities in outcomes, at the core of this massive shift, have been behind Mayor Bill DeBlasio's agenda in New York City, including his past efforts to eliminate the entrance exam for the City's seven specialized high schools. While that effort has experienced a setback in the State Legislature, the fight will likely carry on by other political leaders. And more recently, the Mayor announced a plan to make sweeping changes to the gifted program in the City's elementary schools. There are similar efforts in other cities across the country. Joining today's conversation is Adrian Wooldridge, a longtime journalist at The Economist, where he is political editor and writes a column on British life and politics, and before that he penned the Schumpeter column on business, finance and management. He was previously the Washington bureau chief for The Economist, where he also wrote the Lexington column. Prior to his role in Washington, he was The Economist‘s West Coast correspondent, management correspondent and Britain correspondent. Adrian has written a number of books. His most recent books include “Capitalism in America: A History”, which he co-authored with Alan Greenspan, “The Wake-Up Call: Why the Pandemic Has Exposed the Weakness of the West, and How to Fix It”, which he co-wrote with John Micklethwait of Bloomberg News, and just out this year: “The Aristocracy of Talent: How Meritocracy Made the Modern World”. Adrian's most recent book has been shortlisted for The Financial Times and McKinsey Book of the Year Award. Feel free to drop us a line with questions, feedback and ideas for the new podcast at Dan@unlocked.fm

Richard Herring: Ally and Herring's Twitch of Fun
Episode 47 - Dragon Boneman Versus Fluffy Rabbit

Richard Herring: Ally and Herring's Twitch of Fun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 64:00


A surprise guest leads to an impromptu promo for Twitch Of Fun and I think you will all be able to tell who the funny one is in the family. It's a very weary Twitch Of Fun tonight, that nearly didn't happen, but Richard couldn't bear to think of all those excited grown adults celebrating their birthdays not getting their donkey kicks. We're asked to imagine a lot in this episode which is insensitive given everyone involved suffers from aphantasia, but there's some questions asked by Prince Andrew that we should all be asking and a question asked that isn'e even a question. Plus deadly sprinkles, not panicking, overthrow of the political system and what the Queen wants to eat with every meal. Sit on it, you malodorous ragamuffins.

Sister Bliss In Session
Sister Bliss In Session - 15/10/21

Sister Bliss In Session

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 60:06


Sister Bliss is one of the true pioneers of modern dance music and the musical force behind multi-million selling ionic British band Faithless. Each week Sister Bliss In Session showcases the worlds best new upfront electronic music, spinning world exclusives from her label Junkdog Records, a live DJ mix, A List artists and DJs on the phone, and a run down of the taste-making Cool Cuts Chart. Fans of authentic, exciting electronic music press the subscribe button now! Oden & Fatso - Lauren Mind Enterprises - La Vita De Mare Rufus Du Sol - On My Knees ( Oliver Shories Remix ) Gorgon City X Aura James - Oxygen ( Franky Wah Remix ) Jungle - All Of The Rtime ( Dj Streaks Remix ) Maceo Plex X Liberty City - You Know What I Got Prospa - Voyage Disclosure - Observer Effect Ewan Mcvicar - Tell Me Something Good Fred Falke X Zen Freeman - Beach Club Mella Dee Ft Eddie - Ethereal Chugger * Blissed Out Sosa - Its Time To Move * Cool Cuts Fred Again -Billie ( Loving Arms ) * Cool Cuts No1Preston Zane & Mc Flipside - Late Nite Disco ( K Mack Remix ) Elijan & Grundy - VogueDomshe -Feeling ( Ron Costa Remix ) Not Going Home From Chris Listener

New Books Network
Elizabeth Carolyn Miller, "Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:47


The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion worked its way into narrative form. Britain was the first nation to transition to industry based on fossil fuels, which put its novelists and writers in the remarkable position of mediating the emergence of extraction-based life. Miller looks at works like Hard Times, The Mill on the Floss, and Sons and Lovers, showing how the provincial realist novel's longstanding reliance on marriage and inheritance plots transforms against the backdrop of exhaustion to withhold the promise of reproductive futurity. She explores how adventure stories like Treasure Island and Heart of Darkness reorient fictional space toward the resource frontier. And she shows how utopian and fantasy works like "Sultana's Dream," The Time Machine, and The Hobbit offer imaginative ways of envisioning energy beyond extractivism. Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion (Princeton UP, 2021) reveals how an era marked by violent mineral resource rushes gave rise to literary forms and genres that extend extractivism as a mode of environmental understanding. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literary Studies
Elizabeth Carolyn Miller, "Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion" (Princeton UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:47


The 1830s to the 1930s saw the rise of large-scale industrial mining in the British imperial world. Elizabeth Carolyn Miller examines how literature of this era reckoned with a new vision of civilization where humans are dependent on finite, nonrenewable stores of earthly resources, and traces how the threatening horizon of resource exhaustion worked its way into narrative form. Britain was the first nation to transition to industry based on fossil fuels, which put its novelists and writers in the remarkable position of mediating the emergence of extraction-based life. Miller looks at works like Hard Times, The Mill on the Floss, and Sons and Lovers, showing how the provincial realist novel's longstanding reliance on marriage and inheritance plots transforms against the backdrop of exhaustion to withhold the promise of reproductive futurity. She explores how adventure stories like Treasure Island and Heart of Darkness reorient fictional space toward the resource frontier. And she shows how utopian and fantasy works like "Sultana's Dream," The Time Machine, and The Hobbit offer imaginative ways of envisioning energy beyond extractivism. Extraction Ecologies and the Literature of the Long Exhaustion (Princeton UP, 2021) reveals how an era marked by violent mineral resource rushes gave rise to literary forms and genres that extend extractivism as a mode of environmental understanding. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

Curiosity Daily
Overfeeding Dogs, Suffrajitsu, and Does Wind Affect Sound?

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 16:15


Learn how to avoid overfeeding your dog; whether wind affects sound; and how Suffrajitsu helped women win the right to vote. Please vote for Curiosity Daily in the 2021 Discover Pods Awards! We're a finalist for Best Technology & Science Podcast. Voting closes today, and it only takes a few seconds. Thank you! https://awards.discoverpods.com/vote/ More from Rodney Habib and Dr. Karen Shaw Becker: Pick up "The Forever Dog: Surprising New Science to Help Your Canine Companion Live Younger, Healthier, and Longer": https://foreverdog.com/about/ Dr. Karen Becker on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/doctor.karen.becker  Rodney Habib on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rodneyhabib  Follow @drkarenbecker on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drkarenbecker/  Follow @RODNEYHABIB on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/RODNEYHABIB/  Follow @drkarenbecker on Twitter: https://twitter.com/drkarenbecker  Follow @rodneyhabib on Twitter: https://twitter.com/rodneyhabib  Rodney Habib on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXVR-WWoQ6J4kZNmPwdZkNQ/videos  Is sound affected by wind? by Ashley Hamer (Listener question from Oliver in Glen Ellyn, Illinois) Effect of Wind on Sound Transmission. (2018). Sciencing. https://sciencing.com/effect-wind-sound-transmission-23531.html  ‌softdb. (2019, May 14). The Effect of Wind and Temperature Gradients on Sound Waves | Soft dB. Soft DB. https://www.softdb.com/effect-of-wind-and-temperature-gradients-on-sound-waves/ More from this author. (2020, April 22). How Does The Speed Of Wind Affect Sound Waves Travelling Through It? Science ABC. https://www.scienceabc.com/pure-sciences/does-the-speed-of-wind-affect-how-fast-sound-waves-travel-through-it.html  ‌Why Is It So Loud Today? Understanding How Weather Affects Traffic Noise Levels in Your Community. (2015). https://wisconsindot.gov/Documents/doing-bus/eng-consultants/cnslt-rsrces/environment/trafficnoiseweather.pdf Wisconsin Department of Transportation. British women like Edith Garrud and Emmeline Pankhurst won the right to vote in part by using martial arts by Steffie Drucker women's suffrage | Definition, History, Causes, Effects, Leaders, & Facts | Britannica. (2021). In Encyclopædia Britannica. https://www.britannica.com/topic/woman-suffrage  ‌Ruz, C. (2015, October 5). “Suffrajitsu”: How the suffragettes fought back using martial arts. BBC News; BBC News. https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-34425615  ‌Keegan, H. (2018, February 6). Everything you need to know about the awesome art of Suffrajitsu. Stylist; The Stylist Group. https://www.stylist.co.uk/visible-women/suffragettes-votes-for-women-suffrajitsu-fighting-ju-jitsu/188142  ‌Tao Tao Holmes. (2015, November 3). The Suffragettes Who Learned Martial Arts to Fight for Votes. Atlas Obscura; Atlas Obscura. https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/suffrajitsu ‌ Did You Know? Suffragist vs Suffragette (U.S. National Park Service). (2020). Nps.gov. https://www.nps.gov/articles/suffragistvssuffragette.htm  ‌ How Mary Poppins Softened the Image of the Suffragette - JSTOR Daily. (2015, October 28). JSTOR Daily. https://daily.jstor.org/mary-poppins-softened-image-suffragette/  ‌Stevenson, A. (2018, December 11). Will the new Mary Poppins film acknowledge the suffragettes' success? The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/will-the-new-mary-poppins-film-acknowledge-the-suffragettes-success-106771  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Wake Up to Money
Pigs, Planes and Pumpkins

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 51:32


Most fully vaccinated travellers will be able to take cheaper lateral flow tests on returning to England from holiday, rather than the more expensive PCR tests. What does it mean for the travel industry? Plus more foreign workers will be allowed in to do the jobs in abbatoirs that British workers are not filling right now. And have you been spending more on the kids this halloween? Felicity asks if, after such a rough 18 months, we're just wanting to spend more on the things we missed out on. #WakeUpToMoney With Felicity Hannah

q: The Podcast from CBC Radio
[Full episode] Nick Lowe, Dahlia Belle and Syrus Marcus Ware, Imbolo Mbue

q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:35


British singer-songwriter Nick Lowe reflects on his career and his remarkable longevity as an artist. Comedian Dahlia Belle and Black Lives Matter Canada co-founder Syrus Marcus Ware break down why Dave Chappelle's latest Netflix special, The Closer, has reignited debates around artistic freedom, cancel culture and the historic fight for trans folk to feel valued. Bestselling author Imbolo Mbue reads from her latest novel, How Beautiful We Were, and tells us why the story took her almost two decades to write and release.

Legion of Skanks Podcast
Episode #584 - Louie Soprano - Shane Gillis

Legion of Skanks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 96:27


Comedian Shane Gillis joins Big Jay Oakerson, Luis J Gomez, & Dave Smith to discuss a British woman who walked out on Luis' set, accusations on Twitter against Dave Chappelle, and ongoing porn related drama between Jay and his dad. All This and More, ONLY on The Most Offensive Podcast on Earth, the LEGION OF SKANKS!!! Air Date: 10/11/21Support our sponsors! Go to BlueChew.com and use promo code LEGION of receive your first order for FREE with just $5 shipping! Fans over the age of 21, visit YoKratom.com – home of the $60 kilo! Fans over the age of 21, go to YoDelta.com and use promo code GAS for 25% off your order! NEW Legion of Skanks merchandise is available at PodcastMerch.com/LOS!You can watch Legion of Skanks LIVE for FREE every Monday & Friday at 8:00pm EST at GaSDigitalNetwork.com/live.Once you're there, sign up to GaSDigitalNetwork.com with promo code LOS to receive a 7 day FREE TRIAL with access to our entire catalog of archived episodes! Including over 350 video episodes and over 500 audio episodes that have ever been recorded! On top of that, you'll also have the same access to ALL the other shows that GaS Digital Network has to offer!FOLLOW THE WHOLE SHOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA!Shane Gillis (GUEST)Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shanemgillis/Twitter: https://twitter.com/shanemgillisLegion of SkanksInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/legionofskanks/Twitter: https://twitter.com/LegionOfSkanksBig Jay OakersonInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/bigjayoakerson/Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigjayoakersonLuis J. GomezInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gomezcomedy/Twitter: https://twitter.com/luisjgomezDave SmithInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/theproblemdavesmith/Twitter: https://twitter.com/comicdavesmithGaS Digital NetworkInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gasdigitalTwitter: https://twitter.com/gasdigitalSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Spill
Jonah Hill Made A Heartfelt Request To The World, One Celeb Pushed Back

The Spill

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 19:29


On the show today… Ever since his first break-out role in Superbad, Jonah Hill's body has been mocked in headlines, interviews, and even at the Oscars. This week he issued a heartfelt plea via his social media channels for that to stop. A slew of celebrities showed their support, except for one questionable response. And Britney Spears has had a good run of news lately with the announcement of her engagement and her conservatorship breaking down. But this week she's making headlines for a different, much more petty reason. It's all to do with a public throw down with her sister, Jamie Lynn Spears, a tell-all book, and some very pointed messages. Plus, it's Weekend Watch time! This week we are recommending a new British thriller series and a new slasher series based on an iconic movie. LINKS Angela Black- Stan I Know What You Did Last Summer- Amazon Prime Video CREDITS Hosts: Laura Brodnik & Kee Reece Producers: Laura Brodnik & Madeline Joannou Audio Producer: Leah Porges WANT MORE? Join us in our Facebook group to discuss everything pop culture... https://www.facebook.com/groups/2524018781153963/ Read all the latest entertainment news on Mamamia... https://mamamia.com.au/entertainment/ Follow us on Instagram @mamamiaentertainment https://www.instagram.com/mamamiaentertainment/  Subscribe to The Spill Newsletter...  https://mamamia.com.au/newsletter Join our Facebook page... https://www.facebook.com/mamamiaentertainment/ GET IN TOUCH Call us on the pod phone 02 8999 9386. Email us at thespill@mamamia.com.au Want to hear more Mamamia podcasts? You'll find them here... https://mamamia.com.au/podcasts Mamamia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the Land we have recorded this podcast on, the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Support the show: https://www.mamamia.com.au/mplus/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Strange Brew - artist stories behind the greatest music ever recorded

The British Psychedelic Scene 1966-68 is explored by David Wells, with tracks by Traffic, Kaleidoscope, Nirvana, The Zombies, The Action and more. Think I'm Going Weird: Original Artefacts From The British Psychedelic Scene 1966-68 is available from Grapefruit/Cherry Red. The post The British Psychedelic Scene 1966-1968 appeared first on The Strange Brew.

American Conservative University
SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: What Really Happened in Wuhan

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:45


SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: What Really Happened in Wuhan https://youtu.be/oh2Sj_QpZOA 3,228,588 views Premiered Sep 27, 2021 Sky News Australia 2.08M subscribers This Sky News Australia special investigation into the origins of COVID-19 reveals what really happened in Wuhan in the early days of the pandemic. Award-winning journalist Sharri Markson spent more than a year investigating the potential leak of the virus from a top-secret laboratory in Wuhan. Ms Markson uncovered evidence of a widespread cover-up and unpacks the new theory that “patient zero” worked in the Wuhan lab. Sky News Australia anchor and Investigations Writer at The Australian, Sharri has been at the forefront of investigating the origins of COVID-19 since early in 2020 when the virus spread globally. Since that time, the precise genesis of COVID-19 has been hotly contested, with scientists, government officials, the World Health Organization, and the Chinese authorities releasing conflicting reports. In a coup for Australian television, Sharri secures the first sit-down interview for an Australian broadcast media outlet with Donald Trump since he was elected president in 2016. Sharri also speaks with a range of Chinese whistle-blowers, scientists, and high-ranking intelligence officials to bring us closer to discovering the truth of what happened in Wuhan. These include John Ratcliffe, the U.S. Director of National Intelligence from 2020 to 2021, and former head of British intelligence service, Mi6, Sir Richard Dearlove. HELP ACU SPREAD THE WORD!  Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks. Forward this show to friends. Ways to subscribe to the American Conservative University Podcast Click here to subscribe via Apple Podcasts Click here to subscribe via RSS You can also subscribe via Stitcher FM Player Podcast Addict Tune-in Podcasts Pandora Look us up on Amazon Prime …And Many Other Podcast Aggregators and sites   Please help ACU by submitting your Show ideas. Email us at americanconservativeuniversity@americanconservativeuniversity.com Please go to Apple Podcasts and give ACU a 5 star rating. Apple canceled us and now we are clawing our way back to the top. Don't let the Leftist win. Do it now! Thanks.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 6/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:55


Photo:  First page of Paine's The American Crisis              "The morale of the Patriot forces was boosted on December 19 when a new pamphlet titled The American Crisis written by Thomas Paine, the author of Common Sense, was published. "These are the times that try men's souls; the summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph."Within a day of its publication in Philadelphia, General Washington ordered it to be read to all of his troops. It encouraged the soldiers and improved the tolerance of their difficult conditions." CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 6/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 8/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 8:50


Photo:   Colonel John Glover directs the evacuation of the American army from Brooklyn, on the night of August 29-30, 1776. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 8/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 5/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:04


Photo:  View of the Attack on Bunker's Hill with the Burning of Charlestown, by Lodge CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 5/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1763: 7/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 10:20


Photo:  George Washington praying at Valley Forge Dr Bond inoculated Washington's troops: "Finding the Small pox to be spreading much and fearing that no precaution can prevent it from running through the whole of our Army, I have determined that the troops shall be inoculated. This Expedient may be attended with some inconveniences and some disadvantages, but yet I trust in its consequences will have the most happy effects. Necessity not only authorizes but seems to require the measure, for should the disorder infect the Army in the natural way and rage with its usual virulence we should have more to dread from it than from the Sword of the Enemy. Under these circumstances I have directed Doctr Bond to prepare immediately for inoculating in this Quarter,1 keeping the matter as secret as possible, and request that you will without delay inoculate All the Continental Troops that are in philadelphia and those that shall come in as fast as they arrive."*             CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 7/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution. ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  *  The Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond had a problem. During the Battle of Lexington and Concord, in obedience to his Hippocratic Oath, he had treated British soldiers. For performing his duty as a doctor, he was falsely accused of being a Loyalist and had his life threatened by an angry mob.     "Doctor Nathaniel Bond, of Marblehead, having been charged before this Committee with having acted an unfriendly part to this Colony, the said Committee appointed Joseph Warren, Esq., Colonel Thos. Gardner, and Lieut. Colonel Joseph Palmer, as a Court of Inquiry, to examine witnesses in the case, and hear and determine the same; and upon full enquiry into the case, they are clearly of the opinion that said Bond's general behaviour has been friendly to American liberty; and though he may have discovered an imprudent degree of warmth in some instances, yet we do not find any proof of an inimical temper or disposition to this Country, and therefore recommend him to the esteem and friendship of his Country, that (as the errour which occasioned his being brought before this Committee appears to have been altogether involuntary, and was such as several of our most firm friends were led into, by false rumours spread, of the transactions of the nineteenth instant) no impressions to the Doctor's disadvantage may remain on the minds of any person whatsoever.             [signed] Joseph Warren, Chairman.”  April 26, 1775. .

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 3/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:35


Photo:  Gen. Sir William Howe CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 3/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 1/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:20


Photo:    A portion of Howes Map (1776) showing "The Heights" [of Guan, which is a variant of Gowanus], north of the village of Flatbush. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1761: 2/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:00


Photo:  Brooklyn Heights in 1854. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 2/8  The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.

The John Batchelor Show
1762: 4/8 Patrick O'Donnell, #UNBOUND: The Indispensables. The complete, 80-minute interview, June 26 & October, 2021

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 11:25


Photo:  John Glover (November 5, 1732 – January 30, 1797) was an American fisherman, merchant, and military leader from Marblehead, Massachusetts, who served as a brigadier general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. CBS Eye on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow 4/8 The Indispensables: The Diverse Soldier-Mariners Who Shaped the Country, Formed the Navy, and Rowed Washington Across the Delaware, by Patrick K. O'Donnell  From the bestselling author of Washington's Immortals and The Unknowns, an important new chronicle of the American Revolution heralding the heroism of the men from Marblehead, Massachusetts On the stormy night of August 29, 1776, the Continental Army faced capture or annihilation after losing the Battle of Brooklyn. The British had trapped George Washington's forces against the East River, and the fate of the Revolution rested upon the shoulders of the soldier-mariners from Marblehead, Massachusetts. Serving side by side in one of the country's first diverse units, they pulled off an “American Dunkirk” and saved the army by transporting it across the treacherous waters of the river to Manhattan. In the annals of the American Revolution, no group played a more consequential role than the Marbleheaders. At the right time in the right place, they repeatedly altered the course of events, and their story shines new light on our understanding of the Revolution. As the acclaimed historian Patrick K. O'Donnell dramatically recounts, beginning nearly a decade before the war started, and in the midst of a raging virus that divided the town politically, Marbleheaders such as Elbridge Gerry and Azor Orne spearheaded the break with Britain and shaped the nascent United States by playing a crucial role governing, building alliances, seizing British ships, forging critical supply lines, and establishing the origins of the US Navy. The Marblehead Regiment, led by John Glover, became truly indispensable. Marbleheaders battled at Lexington and on Bunker Hill and formed the elite Guard that protected George Washington. Then, at the most crucial time in the war, the special operations–like regiment, against all odds, conveyed 2,400 of Washington's men across the ice-filled Delaware River on Christmas night 1776, delivering a momentum-shifting surprise attack on Trenton. Later, the Marblehead doctor Nathaniel Bond inoculated the Continental Army against a deadly virus, which changed the course of history. White, Black, Hispanic, and Native American, this uniquely diverse group of soldiers set an inclusive standard of unity the US Army would not reach again for more than 170 years. The Marbleheaders' chronicle, never fully told before now, makes The Indispensables a vital addition to the literature of the American Revolution.