Podcasts about Jimi Hendrix

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American guitarist, singer and songwriter

  • 2,555PODCASTS
  • 4,599EPISODES
  • 55mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Jimi Hendrix

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Latest podcast episodes about Jimi Hendrix

Your Last Meal with Rachel Belle
Shabazz Palaces' Ishmael Butler: Slow Roasted Chicken Dinner

Your Last Meal with Rachel Belle

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:17 Very Popular


There must have been a magical elixir flowing from the drinking fountains at Seattle's Garfield High School. Alumni include Jimi Hendrix, Quincy Jones, Macklemore and our very special guest Ishmael Butler, rapper and founding member of Shabazz Palaces and Grammy Award winning hip-hop group Digable Planets.Host Rachel Belle first met Ish eight years ago, when she interviewed him at his house for a column called Show Us Your Fridge. So, it felt right to indulge in another round of culinary voyeurism and take a peek into the healthy home cook's refrigerator.Ish and Rachel discuss the Shabazz Palace song Chocolate Soufflé, so Seattle pastry chef Brittany Bardeleben joins the show to walk us through how to make the fussy French dessert, and opines on why you rarely see it on menus these days.Follow along on Instagram!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Gen X, This is Why.
Time Capsule: Trainwreck: Woodstock '99

Gen X, This is Why.

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 64:25


Jennie and Amye, sisters and Gen Xers, sit down and discuss the 2022 Netflix Docuseries, Trainwreck: Woodstock '99.In the summer of 1999, while Jennie and Amye were off being poor and lame, 250,000 kids attended what promoters hoped would be an historic once-in-a-generation concert: Woodstock 99. This three-part docuseries exposes poor planning, willful ignorance, and an amazing amount of hubris on the part of (mostly) two men: Michael Lang and John Scher, aka Darth Vader. This was the perfect display of a generational clash between Gen X and Boomers. In the end, a hologram of Jimi Hendrix played as Rome burned.For MORE content, become a Premium Patreon Subscriber! For as little as 5$ a month, you get TWO bonus episodes per month and access to our back catalog! Click here to join today! https://open.acast.com/public/patreon/fanSubscribe/5506301Join our Facebook Group, The Me-Me B's for extra content, giveaways, and some fun Gen X introspection: facebook.com/groups/genxthisiswhy/Follow us!Facebook: facebook.com/genxthisiswhy/Instagram at: @genxthisiswhyAmye: @amyearcherwriterYou can find Jennie, but good luck with that.Questions? Comments? Email us at info@genxthisiswhy.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Full Cast And Crew
130. 'Over The Edge' (1979)

Full Cast And Crew

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 63:32


Thrilled to revisit 1979's seminal teen-angst/school destruction fantasy 'Over The Edge'...a teen film to rule them all, a movie that more accurately captures the bonds of youthful friendship and the bounds of self-discovery than all the John Hughes films combined.  Using a mix of first-time, inexperienced, and non-professional locals as actors, the Colorado-shot film has an authenticity and veracity to it that's rarely been equalled. Plus it has an absolute kick-ass soundtrack loaded with Cheap Trick, Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix, The Cars, and Ramones. It launched the career of Matt Dillon, who was discovered loitering in a Long Island High School hallway during class time.  "What's your Mother do?" the casting director asked. "She don't do shit" was Dillon's attitudinal reply and he has the job because of and not in spite of his rawness and rough edges.  Joined by frequent FCAC guest star Richard Brown, we talk all about the origin story, making of, and critical and fan reception to this excellent and enduring film.

The Talking Friendship with Mike D Podcast
Season 3 - Episode 7 - Chris Allan

The Talking Friendship with Mike D Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 103:25


In Episode 7 of Season 3 Mike welcomes his former high school (and still current) broham Chris Allan onto the podcast where they discuss their mutual love of illegal roller blade hockey, high school hoops, the State on MTV and hip hop, with a particular focus on the Wu-Tang Clan.Follow the podcast on Twitter: @friendsofmikedEmail the podcast at talkingfriendship@gmail.comKey moments from the pod: 0:30: Mike welcomes listeners to S3E7 featuring Mike's longstanding buddy Chris Allan.1:50: Mike then gives an update on the plan for the rest of Season 3 of the podcast.2:20: Mike moves onto corrections from past episodes, where he comes clean about two monumental mistakes from past episodes (one from S3E4.5 related to Jimi Hendrix and one related to S3E6 (the Lance Havelka Episode)).4:20: Mike then gives listeners an update on what's been going on with him and it revolves around an emotional fever he caught from Season 4 of the much ballyhooed TV program Virgin River.  Mike then breaks down his top 5 MVPs from Season 4 of the show. 15:15: Mike welcomes Chris Allan into the virtual podcast studio.16:00: Chris then gives the listeners his ENTIRE life story and it's amazing (including why he is known as the “straw that stirs the drink” at his place of employment).18:55: Chris gives an update on what's been going on with his family this summer, which involves a HUGE trip to the POINTE (Cedar Pointe).  Chris then tells the story of Mean Streak Henry.22:30: Want to know who Chris' longest standing friend is?  Listen to this segment.24:30: The guys talk about the last time they hung out in person, which was going to a Pistons game at Little Caesar's Arena and buying tickets in the “Drinking Row”.26:05: The fellas then trace the origins of their friendship which involves catholic school, hoops, roller blade hockey, hip hop and the TV Show Webster.31:00: Basketball is a shared love for Mike and Chris and they talk about their true athletic glory days of playing hoops at Cabrini High School on some of the best teams in the history of Michigan High School basketball, which never lost to St. Alphonsus.  The guys talk about playing over the summer at Team Camp at Olivet College (where Chris would bring satin sheets like he was a member of royalty) as well as dominating local park courts all over the Detroit area like Kemeny Park and Basketball City.40:40: The guys talk about how they used to love just “driving around” (usually in Dodge Neons) as an activity in high school.44:10: Next up: the guys discuss their shared passion for the MTV Sketch Show from the 90s “The State” and the impact it had on their humor.48:30: The fellas then break down their love of hip hop overall and specifically hip hop group the Wu-Tang Clan and their favorite tracks from that legendary group.1:30:30: Chris then talks about his keys to a good friendship at this point in life.1:32:20: Mike takes Chris through the Rapid Fire Segment where they discuss Chris' favorite place to eat during senior year of high school open campus lunch, the favorite spots Chris has ever traveled to with his family, Chris' favorite member of the Bad Boys Pistons, and Chris' prediction for when the Pistons will win their next NBA Title.

The Tone Mob Podcast
Is It OK To Smash Guitars? w/ Kai West

The Tone Mob Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 76:27 Very Popular


What do Wendy O. Williams, Jimi Hendrix, Kurt Cobain, Pete Townshend, Mike McCready, and Blake Wyland have in common? We have all SMASHED GUITARS as part of a public performance. This polarizing practice is so deeply integrated into music culture, and yet it is so frowned upon by a large swath of the music community. Is it ok? Is it terrible? Is it wasteful? Is it excessive? I had Kai West on to dissect this issue a little bit further. Kai is a Musicologist and PhD candidate at the University of Michigan. He has extensively researched and studied electric guitar culture which of course includes the history of guitar smashing. This is a very interesting conversation about a fairly divisive topic. I hope you enjoy the show! Check Kai's Instagram HERE The Tone Mob Discord is HERE TEXT ME (503) 751-8577 You can also help out with your gear buying habits by purchasing stuff from Tonemob.com/reverb Tonemob.com/sweetwater or grabbing your guitar/bass strings from Tonemob.com/stringjoy Release your music via DistroKid and save 7% by going to Tonemob.com/distrokid Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll
The Jimi Hendrix Experience: "Are You Experienced?"

The Imbalanced History of Rock and Roll

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 38:22 Very Popular


The focus here, after a classic two-part episode about Hendrix in the Fall of 2019, is the game-changing album, "Are You Experienced?" The Experience's debut set fire to all conventions except the use of instruments and electricity to create sound!!! Jimi's brilliance is underlined by the perfect sonic bed by Noel & Mitch for the exercising of the passions exhibited in those grooves!The social conditions of the times are discussed as are their impact on the final contents of both the U.S. and U.K. versions of the album.Please check out our sponsors:Boldfoot Socks   https://boldfoot.comCrooked Eye Brewery   https://crookedeyebrewery.com/Don't forget that you can find all of our episodes, on-demand, for free right here on our web site: https://imbalancedhistory.com/And check our blog about exciting premier events for Danny Garcia's new film, "Nightclubbing!"     

It's Only Rock And Roll Podcast
Ep. 43 - Dave Mason (Traffic)

It's Only Rock And Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 47:09


On this episode of The It's Only Rock And Roll Podcast, singer, songwriter, guitarist, and founding member of the legendary band Traffic, DAVE MASON talks about his sometimes-tumultuous tenure with the band, and how moving from England to the United States over fifty years ago introduced him to a slew of like-minded musicians from Gram Parsons to Cass Elliot. Mason also discusses his session work with Jimi Hendrix, Paul McCartney & Wings, George Harrison, and The Rolling Stones, as well as his songs “Feelin Alright”, “Only You Know And I Know” and “We Just Disagree”. Additionally, Dave talks about his latest tour (including one particularly scary on-stage moment from a few years back), the state of radio in an online world, working with the King of Pop, and even a bit of politics gets thrown in the mix. ------------------------------------------------ ֎ For more on Dave Mason (including TOUR DATES): https://www.davemasonmusic.com/ ֎ Pre-Order Dave Mason's autobiography “Only You Know and I Know” (Due 2023) - https://www.amazon.com/dp/1947026828 Visit the 'It's Only Rock And Roll PODCAST' online at: ● Homepage – www.ItsOnlyRockAndRollPodcast.com ● Facebook – facebook.com/ItsOnlyRockAndRollPodcast/ ● YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCFB7uJ3dg4IKSxsNny9Jiw/videos ● Audea.io - https://audea.io/ ● Instagram - @itsonlyrockandrollpodcast Be sure to check out our all-new OFFICIAL IORR PODCAST STORE! https://www.cafepress.com/iorrpodcast © 2022 Howlaround Productions. All rights reserved.

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
Episode 75 | Greg Prato ["Iconic Guitar Gear"]

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 87:14


Renowned guitarists (or experts) discussing “tools of the trade” in their own words serves as the basis of “Iconic Guitar Gear”. Jimi Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen, Randy Rhoads, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Brian May, Tony Iommi, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Kurt Cobain, The Edge, Alex Lifeson, Steve Vai, Dimebag Darrell, Zakk Wylde,…the list goes on/won't let you down!If you've ever pondered what some of rock's top guitarists and bassists favor gear-wise (instruments, amps, and/or effects), then “Iconic Guitar Gear” is most certainly the book for you.Greg Prato is a writer and journalist from Long Island, New York, whose writing has appeared in such renowned publications as Rolling Stone, Classic Rock, and Vintage Guitar. He is also the author of several popular books, including “Grunge Is Dead: The Oral History Of Seattle Rock Music”, “MTV Ruled the World: The Early Years of Music Video”, and “A Devil on One Shoulder and an Angel on the Other: The Story of Shannon Hoon and Blind Melon”, among other titles. He's made appearances on several TV, radio and podcast appearances, including The Howard Stern Wrap-Up Show and Eddie Trunk Live.Purchase a copy of "Iconic Guitar Gear" through Amazon: www.amazon.com/Iconic-Guitar-Gear-Greg-Prato/dp/B0B4C4QP46/refFor more on author Greg Prato, including his latest books, articles and links to social media pages go here: https://linktr.ee/gregpratowriterListen to a playlist of the music discussed in this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/4DpM32YepiJj0ZX53Yb1qI?si=9ec6b046a5ed498aThe Booked On Rock Website: www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcast/?hl=enSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (www.crowander.com)

Pedrock Press
Ep86- Jimi Hendrix- Quando ele surgiu, os guitarristas perderam seus empregos!

Pedrock Press

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 94:34


Fala Horda! Em agora um programa mensal, Mário Bortolotto e Pedro Pellegrino resolveram nesse episódio falar sobre o Deus da guitarra, o gênio de Seattle, Jimi Hendrix. Teremos uma baita entrevista com o escritor Kleber Felix, e como sempre, o Dicas Muiraquitã. Nos apoie! Até o próximo mês!  

ThatFKingShow
Abbie Stabby and the Monsters of Rock

ThatFKingShow

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:10


It's summertime and we're having ourselves a music festival. Join  Abbie Stabby as she attempts to win over the Monsters of Rock. It's sure to beat watching Jimi Hendrix at the Hull Working Men's club with Eddie Chedder as the support act.Will she win over the Creates and get Her Majesties Tiddy up and running in pursuit of her most precious booty?Abbies adventure Part 1  - The Chip Spice extends lifeAbbies adventure Part 2 - Carry on ApocalypseAbbies adventure Part 3 - Throat Goat and the Kennedy boysAbbies adventures Part 4 - Dr Greenthumb vs Dr. FriendbeastWebsite - TotalCultZone.ComElectronic mail - FKingHello@gmail.comAbbie StabbyTwitchInstagramFacebookDoom Generation trailerLinktree for the DGMusicArmageddon vacation introСукины Сыны / Sons Of Bitches (RU) - Мальчики/Девочки / Boys/GirlsAd breakLobo Loco - Helges Friend woke upAvailable on the Free Music archiveEnd trackFuel - Avril Lavigne (MTV Icons live) cover

The Toby Gribben Show

Denis' career encompasses almost every aspect of show business from singing and performing to recording and composing. His musical career began at the age of six as a banjolele-playing singer at children's matinees. By the 1950s and early 60s, he was a member of Britain's first ever boy band The King Brothers, one of the most successful pop groups of that era and the youngest Variety act to play the London Palladium. From pop star to award-winning TV composer (including the Black Beauty theme and Lovejoy), to award-winning theatre composer (Privates On Parade) and songwriter, and collaborating along the way with such legends as Alan Ayckbourn, Sammy Cahn and Don Black, the artists with whom Denis has worked (and played) read like a who's who of British and American stage and screen--Tony Bennett, Nina Simone, Peter Sellers, Howard Keel, Sophie Tucker, Lena Horne, Alma Cogan, Albert Finney, Dame Edna Everage, Maureen Lipman, Elaine Stritch, Dudley Moore, Bruce Forsyth, Ronnie Corbett, Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra and even Jimi Hendrix. His highly acclaimed and entertaining memoir KEY CHANGES revised and updated 2020 edition can be purchased from our SHOP.​For more career information and a full archive see deniskingmusiclibrary.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Icon Fetch
398 - Jocko of Sha Na Na - New DVD, Sha Na Na's Woodstock: 20 Years After

Icon Fetch

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 27:08


At the very peak of the Hippie movement, here comes Sha Na Na to remind everyone that “Rock n' Roll is Here to Stay.” They were the second to last performers at Woodstock, opening for their friend (and fan of the band) Jimi Hendrix. After that prime slot, the band went on to high-profile gigs at the Fillmore, best-selling albums, and even a hit TV show in the mid-Seventies. Sha Na Na ushered in a rock revival that continued with the films American Graffiti, Grease (which they were featured in), and the long-running TV show Happy Days. 20 years after their Woodstock performance, Sha Na Na, along with other performers of the original festival, gathered in California for a reunion concert. For the first time, that historic event has been put on DVD as Sha Na Na's Woodstock: 20 Years After from Liberation Hall. It's also available on CD and download.We talk with founding member, drummer & vocalist, Jocko, from the the band. He walks us through the crazy path Sha Na Na took from college vocal group to the Woodstock stage in just a few short months. He also gives his memories of that crazy festival, and the reunion concert that followed.

Rig Doctor Podcast: Tone Tips, Pedalboard Tricks, & Easy DIY Hacks

Chairmen of the Boards | Episode 18 Rating Your Pedalboard HOSTS: Grant Klassen (Goodwood Audio) - grant@goodwoodaudio.com Brian Omilion (Omilion Audio) - omilion@theguitarsanctuary.com Mason Marangella (Vertex Effects) - mason@vertexeffects.com WATCH ON YOUTUBE: 

Music Fun Facts
Jimi Hendrix

Music Fun Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 0:31


Download the Volley.FM app for more short daily shows!

Hacking The Afterlife podcast
Hacking the Afterlife with Jennifer Shaffer, James Caan and Luana Anders

Hacking The Afterlife podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 34:56 Very Popular


Another one of those mind bending sessions. We open with a discussion about an unusual recent event, where my old friend Melinda Germann came through to give a climate warning to my friend Patrice.  Patrice and Melinda were best pals and went to Santa Cruz together. I met Melinda at the Loyola Rome Center and she was the light of everyone's eye - funny, sweet and just a delight to be around.  However she died in a plane crash a few years later - and since then, has visited Patrice a number of times, and myself as well (in dreams.)  A few days ago, Patrice texted me about some visuals that Melinda was sending her - that for some would be a "warning" of impending disaster.  Like forest fires, tsunamis - etc.   Living on the West Coast one lives with those possibilities, so I wanted to know if this was an immediate threat or something in general. (As if that made a difference!)  Yes, we are in an immediate threat of losing our beloved planet - due to human behavior. Yes, she wants people to pay attention to climate change and do everything one can to save the planet.  But no, it's not happening next week. I admit I forgot about James Caan passing only two weeks ago - so many beloved folks checking off the planet. And because Luana Anders, our moderator on the flipside has a connection with James via the Godfather (Luana's pal directed it, and her voice appears in it), it was thrilling to see Jennifer say that he'd shown up to chat. The "Jimi Hendrix talk show" reference is more fully explored with the podcast with Charles Grodin - a veteran of decades of talk shows, I was with him often backstage in the green room - and he went into an elaborate description of what it was like to cross over and find oneself doing a "life review" in front of an audience, and Jimi Hendrix being the talk show host!  It's mind bending, but we've talked about this before. We've asked Jimi about it - and he has repeated the concept that he likes to help participate, everyone recognizes him instantly, so he provides a "soft landing."  All I can say is that everything James says here is repeated in the hypnotherapy or meditation research, in "Tuning into the Afterlife." It was thrilling to hear him stop by.

27 Club
Ron “Pigpen” McKernan Episode 8: Turning off the Love Light, Long-Awaited Redemption, and a Deadly Diagnosis

27 Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 32:27 Very Popular


A dark cloud of death hung over the Grateful Dead as they went into the studio to make what is arguably their masterpiece, American Beauty. Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones…they were all gone. All dead at the age of 27. But time didn't stop. Time marched on. The cold hands of death could close in on any of them. But who? When would they go? And how would they go? For more info on the 27 CLUB and other great shows, visit the Double Elvis website and follow Double Elvis on Twitter and Instagram.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Who Are These Podcasts?
Ep330 - Jacked Up Review Show (Rejacked)

Who Are These Podcasts?

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 99:11


It's time to get jacked up and then immediately calm the f*ck down because Cameron and his pal Benny are going to make the subject of Jimi Hendrix unlistenable. When a show starts with "I listened to the radio so I know everything there is to know about rock music from the 70s and 80s" you know you're going to learn a lot! Producer Chris's twin brother, Cohost Chris, joins the show to discuss Sully's inability to complete a sentence. Then Vito Gesualdi says something that's shocking even for him and we close it out with some new StutJo song parodies and John bragging about how "handy" he has been at his apartment. http://bit.ly/watp-patreon https://watp.supercast.tech/ Tickets for the roast: http://creepoffroast.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 104: July 24, 2022 part two

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 70:16


Be sure to take the 2-part trivia contest show out for a spin. Answers are posted at www.Facebook.com/PSBlues (and below)19. Bob Malone / Bad Moon a Risin'20. Duke Robillard / Who'll Stop the Rain 21. Tim Koehn / 100 Degrees in the Shade 22. Rex Granit Band / The Man in Chapter 23. Mississippi Heat / Silent Too Long24. Bernard Allison (feat Colin James) / My Way or the Highway 25. Joanne Shaw Taylor / I Don't Know What You Got 26. Samantha Fish / Kill or Be Kind27. Tedeschi Trucks Band / Have You Ever Loved a Woman 28. Larkin Poe / Easy Street29. Kenny Blues Boss Wayne / They Call Me the Breeze (JJ Cale) 30. Professor Longhair / Rockin' Pneumonia31. Tommy Castro / I Caught a Break 32. Johnny Winter / She Likes to Boogie Real Low 33. Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top) / My Lucky Card34. Dana Fuchs / Last to Know Pacific Street Blues & Americana2nd Yearly Music Trivia Contest The Answers (don't look yet...)There is still plenty of time to catch the show on Podcast and complete the challenge. Remember, it's for fun. Have fun! SCORING: 36 or higher = Music Trivia Jedi Knight 30 to 35 = Baby, You're A Smart (Wo) man25 to 29 = You Know Your Stuff24 to 16 = Pretty Dadgum good52 to 55 = Move over Rover, Let Jimi Take Over...Let's Form a Trivia Team and Hit the Bars on Trivia Night56 = A Prince(ss) Among FrogsThe Answers1. This track is not included in the contest2. This track is not included in the contest3. Lynyrd Skynyrd (1)4. Eric Clapton (1)            BONUS: Michelob Beer (1) 5. Cream (1) 6. Paul Simon (1)7. The Eagles (1)           BONUS: Jackson Browne (1) 8. George Thorogood (1) 9. Bill Withers (1) 10. Norman Greenbaum (1) 11. The Biblical Book of Ecclesiastics (1)           BONUS: The Byrds (1) 12. The Doobie Brothers (1) 13. Elvis Presley (1) 14. The Supremes (1) 15. Bob Segar (1) 16. The Traveling Wilburys (1)           BONUS 1: Jeff Lynne (1)           BONUS 2: Bob Dylan (1)           BONUS 3: George Harrison (1)           BONUS 4: Tom Petty (1)           BONUS 5: Roy Orbison (1)           SUPER BONUS: Bob Dylan, Jeff Lynne (2) 17. Booker T & the MGs (1) 18. The Temptations (1)           BONUS: The Rolling Stones (1) 19. Pink Floyd (1)           BONUS: Syd Barrett (1) 20. Al Green (1)           BONUS: The Talking Heads (1) 21. The Rolling Stones (1) 22. Meatloaf (Bat Out of Hell) (1) 23, Jimi Hendrix (1) 24, Gerry Rafferty (1) 25. Booker T Jones (Booker T & the MGs) (1) 26. Robin Trower (1) 27. Creedence Clearwater Revival (1) 28. Steve Miller (1)           BONUS: Boz Scaggs (1) 29. Neil Young (1) 30. Van Morrison (1) 31. Jackson Five (1) 32. Beatles (1)           BONUS: The White Album (1)           SUPER BONUS: Charles Manson (2) 33. Bob Dylan (1) 34. Dr. John, a/k/a The Night Tripper,  a/k/a Mac Rebbanack (1) 35. Santana (1) 36. Johnny Winter (1)

Mark Hummel's Harmonica Party
Special Guest: Country Joe McDonald

Mark Hummel's Harmonica Party

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 49:42


Country Joe and the Fish formed in Berkeley, California, in 1965. The band was among the influential groups in the San Francisco music scene during the mid- to late 1960s. The Woodstock festival's most memorable moment was McDonald's unexpected solo performance of "The Fuck Cheer". The audience  responded by chanting along with McDonald. McDonald's rendition of propelled the song into the mainstream  and was featured on the Woodstock film.   The performance of the song was cause for The Ed Sullivan Show to ban Country Joe from ever booking the show. Joe discusses his early years and the forming of Country Joe and The Fish.  The legendary stories become true as Joe tells timeless stories about friends, Bob Dylan Janis Joplin, Grace Slick, Barry Melton, Jimi Hendrix and others in a career that has spanned 60 plus years. "The guitar neck turned into a snake and I had no idea what was playing."Joe tells the story of the band taking LSD and trying to perform at the legendary Matrix club in San Francisco. Please SUBSCRIBE to Mark Hummel's Harmonica Party YouTube Channel. Mark Hummel  Accidental Productions

About A Girl
Linda Keith & Jimi Hendrix

About A Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 39:07 Very Popular


Linda Keith was so determined to make Jimi Hendrix a star that she dumped Keith Richards. She got Hendrix a manager and a record deal, but then felt compelled to let him go, even if he was never able to really let go of her. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

I wanna jump like Dee Dee
S8 E3: Steve Hillage

I wanna jump like Dee Dee

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 39:57


Steve Hillage is one of music's greats - a great musician, a great innovator, a great free thinker and great experimenter whose achievements and career is just one whole wall of inspiration for doing the things that excite you and on your own terms.It's a terrific conversation, talking about how family circumstances dictated that he spend a lot of his early childhood in his own company, the inspiration that he got from Jimi Hendrix and Syd Barrett, how Kraftwerk changed his focus towards dance music and the eventual emergence of System 7, bridging age gaps and how he's been able to operate without unwanted interference.I Wanna Jump Like Dee Dee is a music podcast that does music interviews differently. I'm Giles Sibbald and I'm talking to extraordinary musicians, DJ's and producers about how they use an experimental mindset in their lives to amplify their own creativity, pursue new challenges, overcome fears and bounce back from mistakes.- brought to you by Hey Sunday, the mothership of the experimental mindset™.- podcast logo and art by Tide Adesanya, Coppie and Paste.

Growin' Up Rock
Hollywood's Wild Hair (Match Game Edition)

Growin' Up Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 67:35 Very Popular


Hollywood's Wild Hair took time out before the 2021 Kiss Kruise to host a rocked out version of Match Game with special guests, fellow podcasters, and hosts of Shout It Out Loudcast, Tom & Zeus.  We also have Hollywood's brother, Danny, join in on the fun. WE NEED YOUR HELP!! It's quick, easy, and free – Please consider doing one or all of the following to help grow our audience: Connect with us  Email us growinuprock@gmail.com Contact Form  Like and Follow Us on FaceBook Follow Us on Twitter Leave Us A Review On Podchaser Join The Growin' Up Rock Loud Minority Facebook Group Do You Spotify? Then Follow us and Give Our Playlist a listen. We update it regularly with kick ass rock n roll  Spotify Playlist Buy and Support Music From The Artist We Discuss On This Episode Growin' Up Rock Amazon Store Music in this Episode Provided by the Following: Bon Jovi, Restrayned, Jimi Hendrix, Bad Company, Poison, Beastie Boys, Extreme, Phil Lewis, The Monkees, Voodoo Circle, Richie Kotzen Crank It Up New Music Spotlight – Richie Kotzen – “When God Made You” If you dig what you are hearing, go pick up the album or some merch., and support these artists. A Special THANK YOU to Restrayned for the Killer Show Intro and transition music!! Restrayned Website

The James McMahon Music Podcast
Episode 59: Kathryn Williams

The James McMahon Music Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 31:19


Been a long time coming this episode. I've meant to speak to Kathryn Williams – whose music I've loved since I was a bruised hearted teenager in the North East of England, a region that neither of us were born in, but came to call home – for ages now. Life happened. But with Kath's excellent new, 14th studio album, Night Drives out and about, I thought I needed to make it happen... and fast! Kath is on a writing retreat, so I was grateful to her for making the time to speak to me. She's also on her phone when we connect, so it means the audio is a bit scratchy in places. But hey, if you sat through a lot of the early episodes of The James McMahon Music Podcast, you've heard worse. And I think what follows is an interesting, sometimes very funny conversation - about recording on a budget, singing when no-one is listening, The Flumps, the brilliance of Ed Harcourt, robot Jimi Hendrix and more - with one of Britain's most consistent songwriters… The James McMahon Music Podcast is a Spoook media production. Spoook is loads of things - visit the Substack to learn more! 

Salty Dog Blues N Roots Podcast
DELTA RELOAD Blues N Roots - Salty Dog (July 2022)

Salty Dog Blues N Roots Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 124:06


Salty Dog's DELTA RELOAD Podcast, July 2022 Visit: www.salty.com.au The Dawg RELOADS the most listened to show from 2021 - DELTA. Too much great music tone hounds. The delta, the swamp, the virus, the tracks. Cuts from GA-20, Cisco Casear, James Harman, Alejandro Escovedo, Genevieve Chadwick, Artur Menezes, Bai Kamara, New Moon Jelly Roll Freedom Rockers, Shemekia Copeland, T.K.Reeve, Taya Chani, Barr Brothers, Malcolm Holcombe, Jeffery Foucault, James McMurtry, Benny N Flybyniters, Chick Willis, Charlie Bedford, Diesel, Chuck Prophet, Henrik Freischlader, Jimi Hendrix, Nigel Wearne, Peter Parcek. ----------- ARTIST / TRACK / ALBUM ** Australia 1. GA-20/ Siting At Home Alone / Try It You Might LIke It 2. ** Cisco Caesar / Mean To Me / Cisco Caesar 3. James Harman / Three Way Party / Blues Harpo Summit 4. Alejandro Escovedo / Break This Time / Hits of Alternative Country 5. ** Genevieve Chadwick / Weigh Me Down / Playing For Change Presents 6. Artur Menezes / Should Have Never Left / Keep Pushing 7. Bai Kamara Jr / I Ain't Lying / Salone 8. New Moon Jelly Roll Freedom Rockers / Searchlight / New Moon Jelly Roll Freedom Rockers Vol 2 9. Shemekia Copeland, Kenny Wayne Shepherd / Hit Em Back / Hit Em Back 10. ** T.K.Reeve / Don't Want Nobody New / First Recordings 11. ** Taya Chani / Dynamite / Restless Heart 12. The Barr Brothers / Give The Devil Back His Heart / The Barr Brothers 13. Malcolm Holcombe / Doncha Miss That Water / The RCA Sessions 14. Jeffery Foucault / Geese Fly By / Cold Satellite 15. James McMurtry / If It Don't Bleed / The Horses and the Hounds 16. ** Benny N The Flybyniters / Take Off Mama / Watch Yourself 17. Chick Willis / Four Wives Blues / Things I Used To Do 18. ** Charlie Bedford / Just A Little Longer / Good To Go 19. ** Diesel / Lost and Lookin' / Alone With Blues 20. Chuck Prophet / American man / A Beginners Guide To American Roots Music 21. Henrik Freischlader Band / Walking In The Shadow of the Spotlight / Missing Pieces 22. Jimi Hendrix Experience / Up From The Skies / Axis Bold As Love 23. Nigel Wearne / Josephine / Drawing Circles 24. Peter Parcek / Everybody Oughta Make A Change / Mississippi Suitcase

Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 102: Music Trivia show (part two) 2022

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 90:09


17. The sound of pop music in the 1960s was largely driven by four relatively unknown house bands. For example, Los Angles had the Wrecking Crew, which included Glenn Campbell, Dr. John, and Leon Russell; Muscle Shoals had The Swampers, and Motown had The Funk Brothers. What was the name of the legendary backing band for many of the acts on Stax Records?18. Speaking of Motown, this version of Ain't Too Proud to Beg features, Ben Harper. Which motor city band had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: While considered by some to be "just a blues cover band" which British Band also covered this song?19. Performed by soul singer Betty LaVette, which Brit-rock psychedelia band, named in part after blues artist Pink Anderson, wrote this post-card-themed song?        BONUS: This song was written for the former member and leader of this band, who was this song written for?20. Heard here by Syl Johnson, which Hi Recording artist, now Reverend, referenced from the podium by then-President Obama, had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: Which art-rock, CBGB Punk-era band, fronted by a Scottish ex-patriot, later covered this song, creating awareness among a whole new audience? The Talking Heads21. Known as the Soul Queen of New Orleans, Irma Thomas struck gold with this hit, Time Is On My Side. Which British blues-rock band had an early hit with this soulful song?22. Originally signed to Motown Records with Omaha-born singer Shaun 'Stoney' Murphy, which Hades-based night flyer had the original hit with this song?23. Heard here by The Leaves, which Seattle-based Native American blues-rock guitarist, featured at Woodstock, would later cover this song?24. Played here by the late Canadian guitarist Jeff Healy, the song was composed by a member of Steeler's Wheel, and later a successful solo artist, who had the original hit with this song?25. Blues artist Albert King recorded for the Memphis-based Stax Records. Which Memphis Groover wrote and backed up King on this recording? (Born Under a Bad Sign)26. Often accused of being a Jimi Hendrix clone, which former member of the British band Procol Harem, originally recorded and performed this song? He was a trowering figure in the mid-1970s.27. Heard here by Mike Zito and Sonny Landreth, which band, from the Bay Area, originally known as the Polly Wogs, wrote and recorded the original version of this song, Fortunate Son?28. Written and performed by Paul Pena, Which Dallas-born native son had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: Which former member of this band, also from Dallas, went on to have a soulful hit-driven career?29. Performed here by Tanya Donnelly, while Freda Payne was singing about a Band of Gold, which Canadian singer-songwriter had a hit with the original version of his song, Heart of Gold?30. Performed here by Little Milton, which noted Irish soul singer wrote and recorded this song originally?31. For this next song, we're going back to the days when you actually boy bands. Which band, from the steel mill area of Gary, Indiana, had the original hit with this song?32. Performed here by Warren Haynes and Gov't Mule, which fab band featured this song late in their career?        BONUS: Although not the official name of the album, what is the generally accepted colorless name of the band's album that featured this song?        SUPER BONUS: Name the convicted murderer that recorded with the Beach Boys and knew Neil Young, who referenced this song for his dastardly deeds? (Two points for a correct answer here).33. Heard here by blues artist Larry McCray, who was the iron-belt Minnesotan minstrel who wrote this song?        BONUS: The only gold the original writer got was when this noted bi-racial guitarist covered his song: who was the artist that built Electric Lady studios with the silver and the gold he earned from his cover of All Along the Watchtower?34. Performed here by the recently reformed Screaming Cheetah Wheelies, featuring Grammy Award-winning vocalist Mike Ferris, who ordained voodoo priest, who was referenced early in this show, wrote this song?35. Originally written and performed by Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac Blues Band, which band, who debuted nationally at Woodstock, hit the Billboard charts with this song, Black Magic Woman?36. Heard here by Blaster Dave Alvin, this song, Highway 61 was written by Bob Dylan and references this highway that cuts through the deltas of northwestern Mississippi. Which smokin' blues slide player, born in Leland, Mississippi but raised in Beaumont, Texas arguably recorded the best rendition of this song?Total Earnable Points: 56 Points.CONTEST QUESTION Answers (One Point Each)(^) These are out of order. Some acts appear more than once in our contest.1. Song One - Not a part of the contest2. Song Two - Not a part of the contest3. Bill Withers4. Elvis Presley5. The Temptations6. The Traveling Wilburys7. The Rolling Stones8. Paul Simon (Simon & Garfunkel)9. Al Green10. The Book of Ecclesiastes11. Steve Miller12. George Thorogood13. Meatloaf14. The Supremes15. Neil Young16. Cream17. Bob Segar18. Van Morrison19. Bob Dylan20. The Doobie Brothers21. Gerry Rafferty22. Eric Clapton23. Santana24. The Beatles24. Creedence Clearwater Revival25. The Eagles26. Dr. John27. Norman Greenbaum28. Jimi Hendrix29. Robin Trower30. Lynyrd Skynyrd31. Johnny Winter32. Booker T & the MGs33. The Jackson 534. Pink FloydBONUS Question Answers (1 Point Each)SUPER BONUS Answers (2 Points Each)George HarrisonThe White AlbumThe ByrdsJimi HendrixBob DylanJackson BrowneThe Talking HeadsTom PettyMichelob BeerCharles MansonThe Rolling StonesRoy OrbisonJeff LynneBoz ScaggsThe Actual Playlist1. Tommy Castro / A Bluesman Came to Town2. Hector Anchondo / I'm Going to Missouri3. JJ Cale / They Call Me the Breeze4. JJ Cale / After Midnight5. Robert Johnson / Cross Roads Blues 6. Dixie Hummingbirds / Loves Me Like a Rock7. Travis Tritt / Take It Easy 8. Hank Williams / Move It On Over9. Keb Mo / Lean on Me10. The Blind Boys of Alabama / Spirit in the Sky11. Nina Simone / Turn, Turn, Turn12. Robert Randolph & the Family Band / Jesus is Just Alright13. Kris Kristopherson / All Shook Up14. Jonell Mosser / Stop, In the Name of Love 15. Lyle Lovett and Keb Mo / Till It Shines16. Bonnie Raitt / You Got It17. Booker T & the MGs / Green Onion18. Ben Harper / Ain't Too Proud to Beg19. Betty LaVette / Wish You Were Here20. Syl Johnson / Take Me to the River21. Irma Thomas / Time Is On My Side22. Jamey Johnson / Two Out of Three Ain't Bad23. The Leaves / Hey Joe 24. Jeff Healey / Stuck in the Middle With You 25. Albert King / Born Under a Bad Sign 26. Drivin' & Cryin' / Too Rolling Stoned27. Mike Zito & Sonny Landreth / Fortunate Son28. Paul Pena / JetAirliner29. Tonya Donnelly / Heart of Stone30. Little Milton / Tupelo Honey 31. Graham Parker & the Rumor / I Want You Back 32. Gov't Mule / Helter Skelter33. Larry McCray / All Along the Watchtower34. Screaming Cheetah Wheelies / Right Place, Wrong Time35. Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac Blues Band / Black Magic Woman36. Dave Alvin / Highway 61 Revisited 

Guru Viking Podcast
Ep159: Meeting of Ngakpas - Lama Glenn Mullin & Dr Nida Chenagtsang

Guru Viking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 112:24


In this episode I host a dialogue between Tibetologist and Tantric Buddhist Lama Glenn Mullin and doctor of Tibetan Medicine and Yuthok Nyingthig spiritual teacher Dr Nida Chenagtsang. Lama Glenn and Dr Nida discuss impact of three key revolutionary figures in Tibetan Buddhism from historical and doctrinal perspectives: Padmasambhava, Atisha, and Tsongkhapa. The discussion extends to include the history and evolution of the famous 6 Yogas of Naropa. Both Lama Glenn and Dr Nida are known to teach these hitherto secretive practices relatively openly, and they discuss the issues that have influenced them to do so, including prophecy, the true meaning of secrecy, and the importance of including the body in religious practice. Lama Glenn and Dr Nida also discuss subjects such as the geomancy of Samye and the surrounding areas, the pros and cons of the multiplicity of religious sects in Tibet, similarities between Buddhist lineages and Western psychological schools, and more. …

 Video version: www.guruviking.com/podcast/ep159-meeting-of-ngakpas-lama-glenn-mullin-dr-nida-chenagtsang 
Also available on Youtube, iTunes, & Spotify – search ‘Guru Viking Podcast'. … Topics include:
 00:00 - Intro 01:10 - Jimi Hendrix and Je Tsongkhapa 03:29 - 3 revolutionaries: Padmasambhava, Atisha, Tsongkhapa 09:38 - Tsongkhapa's 5 stages of the Dzogrim vs 6 Yogas of Naropa 14:13 - Padmasambhava's big breakthrough 18:07 - Civil war, religious persecution, and Muslim invasion 20:08 - Why was Atisha special? 21:09 - Sect consciousness 21:41 - Tsongkhapa and the Sarma Renaissance 23:27 - Importance of historical perspective in understanding Tibetan Buddhism 26:16 - Samye College & the 5 Perfections 29:27 - Similarities with psychology schools 31:07 - Milarepa and experiential learning 35:38 - Core of all the schools 37:24 - Pros and cons of many schools 41:16 - The geomancy of Samye and Tibet 48:26 - Geomancy and dream yoga 51:36 - Historical evolution of the 6 Yogas of Naropa 56:34 - Why secrecy? 59:06 - Experiential vs academic learning 01:04:07 - Completion stage secrecy doesn't make sense 01:08:08 - Body liberation is essential in tantra 01:12:47 - Physical activity is important 01:15:07 - Subtle body yogas of vajrayana 01:23:29 - Glenn's closing remarks on the pros and cons of recent spread of Buddhism 01:33:19 - Nida's closing remarks on social awareness and finding balance in Buddhist teaching 01:41:14 - The need for female teachers 01:43:32 - BONUS: Lama Glenn & Dr Nida's first meeting (in Tibetan) … Previous episodes with Lama Glenn Mullin: - https://www.guruviking.com/search?q=glenn%20mullin Previous episodes with Dr Nida Chenagtsang: - https://www.guruviking.com/search?q=chenagtsang … 
To find out more about Lama Glenn Mullin, visit: - http://www.glennmullin.com/ - https://www.facebook.com/Maitripa.Glenn To find out more about Dr Nida Chenagtsang, visit: - https://www.facebook.com/DoctorNida/ - http://www.skypressbooks.com/ … For more interviews, videos, and more visit: - www.guruviking.com Music ‘Deva Dasi' by Steve James

Finding Your Summit
EP 255 Matt Warren: Singer / Songwriter with multiple hits had to go through rehab to find his greatness.

Finding Your Summit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 38:08


Matt Warren: Singer / Songwriter with multiple hits had to go through rehab to find his greatness. Everybody's Mark Pattison, I'm back again with another great episode of finding your summit, all about people overcoming adversity and finding their way. Can't wait to jump into today's guest, who certainly fits that bill. But before we do, I want to direct your attention to my website, www dot mark pattison nfl dot com, and I've got my film Emmy Award Winning Best Picture searching for the summit. You can check it out there. It directs you over to NFL three sixty. So fortunate that they film my amazing journey up and down Mount Everest and back Um and and what a beautiful story at the end of the day. And if you haven't seen it, check it out again. Best Picture Emmy. I've got the hardware comments, so I'm excited about that. Number two is I've done over two and fifty episodes, uh, going on out two or three years, and I've got so many amazing people doing incredible things and it always inspires me to talk to these people, like we're gonna talk to today, just what they're doing, how they've gone about life and their success and we all need that. I'm not the or you're not the only one I need it to to Jack me up and keep me going up and down these mountains. And finally, we continue to raise money for a millions everest all proceeds go to higher ground. It's all about empowering others and that's what we aim to do. Um, we we show the film, we've done these campaigns with Amelia, so on, so forth. Uh. And I think we have something coming either to the south down of Mississippi, which I hope Matt would be included with. That's coming on just a minute. Uh, and in southern California with Um, some pretty cool people. So tune into that, um all, if you do go on to that length. Philanthropy, millions Everest of all proceeds go directly to higher ground. It doesn't come to me in anyway. So on that note, let's get into today's awesome guest. His Name Matt Warren. Matt, I've met you two years ago down in the Great State of Mississippi, the little town of Greenville, at a wonderful common mutual friends, Steve Azar. He's another Delta Blues Singer, in your case singer Songwriter. I hope I got that right, Matt. Welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having me. Brother. I'm I'm excited to be on here and it's a real honor. Thanks for asking. Well, listen, you know, let's let's just rewind this, because we're gonna talk about your life. We're gonna talk about dreams, we're gonna talk about failures. You know, we talked about the name of the show is finding your summit. There's peaks, the valleys. Um, you've been in valleys. You've been in peaks. I've been in a whole probably more valleys than you've been, and I've been on a couple of peaks and it's fun when you're standing on the top. But you know, to develop that character over time you have to go through some stuff. Right. That builds that character, that broils that grit, that builds those other things that you ultimately are made up. But I want to go back just two years now and and I want to tell you my experience, Um, for the audience. So there's a there's a common friend of of Matt and mind. His name is Steve Azar. He's a Delta Country Blues he's had a number of hits. He's a singer, he's a songwriter, just like our guest today. Um. But he he throws a a Gulf event, a fundraiser, and then we're fortunate, the people that come down to be able to listen to these these amazing voices that Steve. He calls friends up on stage on a Friday night and I was sitting back with my girl dares, and I was I was this Guy, man Warren, was introduced. He came up and belt it up and we're looking each other like, oh my God, this guy sings like a flippant angel, I mean so talented. And afterwards I said something, you know, and we didn't really talk too much after that. And this last year, a couple of months ago, we got to talk a lot more. And again you got up and you sang a beautiful song and and so, I mean again, where did this love? When did you figure out that when you opened your mouth, you have this magic that could actually come out and it's I mean, I'd sounded pretty sweet. Gosh, that's an interesting question. Um, I've kind of got a funny story, uh, about that because, Um, I wasn't really sure, Um, that I had a beautiful voice, and the reason being, Um, you know, as a kid I was a product of what my parents listened to. I can remember being, you know, sitting in front of a record player, flipping records, you know, from one side to the next, while my mom was in the kitchen or doing whatever she was doing. And that was kind of my babysitter, was the record player. Um. And so from a very young age I loved music and I would lock myself in my room as I got older, and I had a whiffleball bat and I'd stand in there and, you know, Air Guitar and I'd sing it. I always thought that I had, well, I don't know if I thought I had a good voice, but I enjoyed singing. I thought that I could sing pretty much to anything. And Uh, and then in the what not? Okay, glad you're gonna say that. The seventh in the seventh grade, I tried out for the church choir and I was the only kid that didn't make it. So I was devastated, you know, because well, a you know, everybody should make the church choir. I mean, you know, we're all just, you know, praise in Jesus. But when they you know, I was I thought to myself, maybe maybe I'm not a good singer. You know, if I'm the only kid that didn't make the choir. So, Um, I was a little confused because I knew that I enjoyed singing and I thought that I was a pretty good singer. Um. And then it wasn't until the tenth grade that I had the courage to try out again for a for chorus in high school, and it was basically because my but these all my buddies I played football with. You had to have an elective and the reasoning for uh doing chorus was on my on. My budd said, they're all the cute girls were in there and it was a lot of fun. So I got the courage I have to to try out and I think I tried out with George all in my mind, by Ray Charles and my chorus teacher, Mr James Story. He uh, he just he said, where have you been? And so that was at that point that I thought, okay, well, maybe I was right, maybe I can't sing, and then he gave me a solo. Um, that Christmas we had a Christmas show at my high school, at Gallas in high school, and he let me Sing Jingle Bell Rock and that was the first time I'd ever sing in front of a group of people and I actually didn't even tell my mom and dad that I was going to be singing until the night before and I remember telling my dad I said, I think you guys should come to the Christmas program tomorrow and I I've got a solo and uh, my dad just looked at me and solo at what, you know, and I'm single Bell Rock. And so that was the first time that was it wasn't until then really that that I thought that I had a decent voice and I guess the approval of the crowd after the cheers. You know, that that kind of was what hooked me. You know, I was like you. I was, um, an athlete, a four spoor athlete my whole life, you know, a team, team player, and it went until I stood up on that stage by myself and sang a song that I was I was hooked. Yeah, I can tell you that really quickly that in high school, my senior year, after football season, UM, myself and some other football guys tried out for as a cast for the musical Ballyga doone and I was going to be in the village and I just singing, just dish. I had to sing in front of a hundred people and I was terrified. I knew that was not my place, but that was that was my story. So I want to mix this in. So now now, you you're, you're, you're, you're, you're, you get up on stage, you're singing jingle bow rock, you know, you know, you finally like Hey, maybe I can do this. You know, as you're you've got a little confidence boost, you know, going and and then and then. I know we're kind of fast foreign forwarding at the clock a bit, but over the arc of time, you know, you find your place and you start writing songs. So where does the connection come from? You're, you're okay, I got a voice. Now I actually, rather than singing jingle bow rock and all these other, you know, songs that that you get up it's like Karaoke night, but you're actually you're gonna screate your own like, where the where did that inspiration come from? Um, so, I knew that I wanted to be my ultimate dream is to be the lead singer in a band. I mean that. That has never changed. Um. And so I had a band. I had a cover band, and we were basically signed to play like frat houses and bars in the SEC at Alabama or L S U or Tennessee. and Um, the band broke up and a couple of the guys wanted to go do a thing where they were playing original music. And I realized pretty fast that if I wanted to continue chasing my dream of being a lead singer in a band, I was gonna have to have some songs of my own, because I think my thought process back then was, and it's still this way. Um, no great musician is wanna gonna want to just play covers, so you're gonna have to have your own songs, Um, and that I started writing songs out of necessity because I needed a band, Um, and that's really what put me on the path to writing songs. And and at the time, you know, I still don't know how to read or write music. I just I know what chords I'm playing and I can hear them. I was just imitating Van Morrison and and and Willie Nelson, you know, generally speaking, because I would listen to some of their records and I how I started writing songs was I would just copy the chord structure from like Willie Nelson Song or a van Morrison Song, something pretty simple. You know, Tom Petty Song. I would copy those chords and the structure and the rhythm and then I would learn how to put my own words and my own Melly over top of those chords and that chord structure and that rhythm, and then I would change the rhythm up a little bit. And so I would, you know, create my own my own my own songs, and I realized that it was okay to do that because they had copied, you know, petty and and Willie Nelson and and you know, Van Morrison. They were just copying people that they loved. I mean there's only x amount of chords so and there's only, you know, x amount of subjects to to sing about and to to write about, and so I thought, well, if they can do it, so can i. and that's really how I started writing songs. Was Just Um, copying Um, the artist that I was I was into. Yeah, it's really interesting. Just sidebar to them and we're gonna give jump right back onto it. Um, I was. I was been been intrigued about some of these lawsuits are going out of saying trying to there's a lawyer that's out there in particular trying to I can't remember who the artist is, but saying that the so and so stole songs right, and if you listen to it, I guess you could like draw some comparisons in there by the end of the day. I don't know how you exactly do that, just because you said there's an infinite which is x amount of chords and those chords have to follow some structure and and there's eighty million trillion songs that are out there and so trying to create a new songs. So I mean you could potentially make an argument every single time somebody writes a song that they're infringing on somebody. Absolutely. I mean it's it's like it's not exactly like this, but to compare it to something that you are very familiar with, you know, each receiver has his own way of running a route, but it's still rout at the end of the day. You know what I mean? Like I mean we're still you're still talking about three chords. In the truth, you're still Um, there's only so many instruments you can use, there's only so many you know, Um, like I said before, only so many subjects. So it is getting strange and I think that the reason we're seeing more lawsuits, or one of the reasons, Um, is because the money streams and the revenue is drying up because of streaming. Um. It's not like it was in the nineties or or even the early two thousand's or previous to when, if you you know, when you and I were growing up, if you wanted to listen to music, you either had to turn on the radio or the only way you could get it was to purchase, you know, a single or a tape or a cassette or or an LP or a eight track. Eight track for you guys, Hey, I'm lone enough to I had an eight track tape player in my nineteen eight Grand Marquis. That was my own. But I think that. I think that because the money revenues are starting to dry up, people are starting to get suit happy and I actually heard the other day that, you know, a lot of songwriters and artists are selling their catalog I know that Bob Dylan just sold his for three plus million Um. But I heard that some of these companies that are buying catalogs are actually hiring lawyers to go through the catalogs and see which songs sound like other songs and find out who wrote them first and go get those guys. Get those guys and that that's pretty scary, I know well. And listen, I don't want to go down that path. I want to jump back onto you, but it's just like when you said that. Okay, so, okay. So you're in high school jingle bow rock. You're young here. Now you start a band, you realize that the PA of going forward is write your own songs. So you can figure that out. You start to put a few things down and now you go on and you've had a number of hits. Now I don't think you've had hits in terms of you seeing those songs. One of the models which I've I've been told, is like, like, you want to be the writer of the song. It doesn't matter really who's singing. If you sing it, it's great. Um, it'd be great for your career, but you just want to, you know, write songs and have Tim mcgrawan and these other guys pick them up and that's where you can make some serious down. And that has happened to you. Now, how many times? Um, I have only had three singles. Um, I had one single that was by a guy named Robert Randolph in the family band and Darius Rutgers sang it. That record was up for Um for a grammy Um in the Blues Category. We did not win. Still in honor to have a song that was the nomination Um. The other two singles that I've had have been with Gary Allen. The first one was called learning how to bend. It went to number ten and then the second one was called every storm runs out of rain and that went to number one and it was up for a C M for Song of the year. It was. It's it's by far my biggest song I've ever had. Um definitely the one that paid the most. I've had a couple other you know, now the format is Um. People are releasing songs Um and not even making records. So I actually have a song that just came out last week by a guy named Jake who who won the voice. He was the season seventeen winner, and the song is called had it to lose, and I wrote that with Jake and my friend Matt Nolan. But those you know. I've the the other three really the Gary Allen stuff is the biggest payouts that I've had because he's a major label, within the within the country, within the Yes, yeah, well, you're a tendency boy, right. Oh, yeah, yeah, so you know. Look, you know how many hits I've had. Zero Um and so do you know? You have to be at the plate to be in the game, right. We always say this, and that's what so much when you start talking about fear of jumping into that of like my fear of getting over the stated scene in front of people to mean massive. And so that was not my path. You know, that has been your path, and I think at the end of the day, you have to be committed to the end goal, because your next great song could be tomorrow, it could be today. Yes, right, you just don't know when that thing is gonna come. But if you don't get up the bad the plate, you keep swinging, you'll never know unless you try absolutely and I mean, dude, I'm scared every day. I mean I you know, I get nervous every time I perform. I figured that if I the day and I'm not nervous, that I don't care anymore. Uh, I get you know, if I if I wanted to succumb to the worries of of what ifs in life, I mean sometimes I think I'm never gonna write another song. You know. Sometimes I think that, Um, that I might have already written my greatest song and it may never get cut. I mean, who knows, but you have to show up and actually I'm in this phase right now. Um. I A big part of my path that that you know about is I went to Rehab three and a half years ago and got sober. And so this is my twentieth year, Um, in the business writing on a publishing you know, writing professionally. And so for seventeen or sixteen and a half of those years, Um, I was, you know, I was a user, you know, pot, alcohol, prescription drugs, recreational drugs, and there were many writing appointments. Are Many Times that I sat down to write in the past in those sixteen and a half years where I wasn't on some substance. So does that? Can I can? I can I ask you this question. Does that? Because you know, you go back to like Jimi Hendrix and you know when he's lighting his guitar on fire, when he's on LSD and does it? Does it make you, or the Beatles, when they're in their creative did you feel like like where you're at now, with full clarity, versus where you were in some altered state? I don't know what what it was, but do you feel like that in some way gives you more creativity when you're like your your mind is altered like that? or or what's your opinion? Um, you know, I I think for each person it's going to be different. I do think that there is Um, you know, you are in some altered state of mind, there is a window. You know, for me, I think the reason I liked to smoke pot when I would write was there is like this window, a ten minute window of what I thought was brilliance or whatever. But you had, I had to have a a recorder with me because I'd forget it, you know. But Um, I also think that that potentially is just a big lie. I mean, you know, for years I was addicted um two different substances and I I used to think that, well, these helped me to create, these helped me to focus and help me to write. And you know, my my, the drug that that I had the biggest issue with was adderall, and it's a it's doctor prescribed and they do give it to patients, you know, for Um, attention attention deficit disorder and Um, you know, that drug does help you to concentrate on whatever it is you're doing, but if what you're doing is folding socks, then you'll be concentrating on that. So you know, for me, I started to do other things and I I wasn't focused on writing music. But back to answer your question, I I think that for some people there is this fairytale world or this super creative place that they are able to go when they get high. But you can go there sober and you can go um too, other new places, other places that you can't go to when you are high. Now, if I'm being honest, I'm still figuring out who this guy is as a sober artist and a sober writer, because when I was is an addiction, I was such a mess that I wrote from that place and so I was always struggling, I was always emotionally, uh m, just broken, and it was very easy for me to write from that perspective. Now that I'm healthy and I'm leaning into my higher power and leaning on God and Jesus, you know that I can't really talk about my path without mentioning my spirituality in my relationship with the Lord. So now that I'm healthy and I have that that I'm that I'm leaning into and that I'm I'm following, I'm happy and I'm healthy, and so I'm still learning how to write from that perspective. Um, I think you know. You know, you know. The whole thing with that matter is us. My opinion is that and this is, you know, like I wanted to start off by let's talk about your peaks. Right, we'll get back to your peak, but I wanted to start about your peaks. You know, you start to find success and singing and people like teams, you know what was coming out of your mouth and started to saying. So you get a bunch of peak and then you fell into this common path, I wouldn't say of just artists, but certainly you're kind of in that space. You're playing laden bars and everybody's drinking, having a good time, and so you're in you're doing all that and then, like many Um you know, you fall into a valley. So now you're coming back and and to me, when I've been, I've even been in my valleys have not been related to drugs or alcohol or anything. But just you know, we all go through and struggle, whatever that might be. And like if you're focused on what your intention is going to be, if you're focused on you know, there's blue sky ahead, even though you don't even know what that blue sky ahead, if you're if you're if you're focused on whatever you do. I've had a couple of wins Um in my life doing different things, but that's just that's over, right. What's ahead? What? What? What? What am I gonna do next? You know, how can I like propel myself in that direction? And that gives me hope about other things. And I would like to think, like what I'm hearing from you is kind of the same thing, where you finally found peace within yourself. You know, you don't have to, you know, be self combustible to be great, right, and and and that's your blue sky, you know, whatever that might be, of trying to find the next best song. You know, I think you and I should write a song called the summit song, right, but it's, you know, like the people that you meet and the influences that you have. But again we goes back to that first thing about, you know, stepping up the plate and swine in the Bat. You gotta be at the plate. Yes, that's so. That's what I was I was saying all that to get to this. Even though, even though I don't feel as creative as I it was and it doesn't have anything to do with the drugs and alcohol. It also has a lot to do with I've been doing this for twenty years and you know, you're only as good as the subject that you have to sing about or right about. And so if you are a paid professional songwriter and you go Monday through Friday and you write, you know, for a publishing company, I mean you can get I mean, burnout is a real thing. I mean, you know, and so you know that. And so I also think that I'm just going through this this period right now where, Um, I'm just living, I'm enjoying who I am today in my sobriety and even though here, here's here's the point, even though I don't feel like showing up some days because I just I want to do something else, I'm still showing up and I'm still working and I'm very fortunate that I have friends and Co writers I've been working with for a long time who know what I'm going through and they're more than happy to still get together and and a lot of times I'm getting songs that I would have never guessed that I you know, that we'd beginning because they weren't my you know, the title or the the idea wasn't mine, but I'm showing up. That's that's that's the point I wanted to make. And you're right. You can't be in the game without stepping up to the plate, and that's what I had this conversation, I think it was yesterday, with my my buddy Jim Moore, who is now the head coach at the University of Connecticut. Has Been a long time in the NFL head coach, and you know, what we were talking about is, and this is related only in to my own situation, but you know that. And there's no cameras, there's no film crew, there's no you know, people with money wait now like every single day, every single morning. You know the difference, I'm just telling you, between some of the things I've done others. It is consistency with daily discipline, consistency with daily discipline, consistency with and it does seem anonymous, but I know that puts me in the best position to win. Yes, I sold lately, since March I have gotten back into the gym and I started running and you know, like I said, I was a fourth sport athlete in high school. I also used to teach health and wellness and K through twelve P um and I love sports. I'm an athlete and that that part of my life has been gone for years. And so in March I started working out and running and there were days I did not want to do it and I just started showing up. I ran my first five K on Memorial Day. I never thought I would ever be the kind of guy that could, that could run five K and I end up finishing eight in my age group and I finished one eleven out of four hundred and eighty three runners and was really I I was really proud of myself because I could have quit working out or I could have stopped running. When I thought that, Hey, I feel I'm looking in the mirror, I see improvement. I'm just gonna take today off. It's the mundane. It's the consistency, like you just spoke of, Um and the discipline that has helped me to get to where I'm at now with my exercise skulls, and that will also bleed over into other aspects of my life. The discipline, Um, in the consistency. Yeah, one of the things you're gonna find too, is is, uh, you know, not only is the mental health, because you're out doing something positive right, it's activating all the endorphins in your body, but there's also a lot of creativity that go through. So when you're one of those those that we that five kids that you're talking about, that's going to three miles and as you're running those miles, you're not just thinking about Oh my feeedom floor, you know you're you're you're also other things come in relationships and maybe music ideas or I should have called this guy, or what's going on with DVS are you know? There's there's a million and one things that go on in your brand that helped activate that, that retap into that creativity. Absolutely so. So, listen, Um, what I love to do and you pick it, Um, but you you've got a beautiful song that went to number one. Every storm runs out of rain. By the way, I'm from Seattle, so I know all about rain, or or this this new song that you just cranked out recently that you're really proud of. You pick, just give us a little sampler. Well, I uh, I'll play you a song that. Um, it's not that new song, but it's it's on my new record that's coming out and it's also on the Gary Allen record that just came out. We're not sure if it's going to be a single or not. We'll see, but it's called the hard way. Well, I was looking for my actually on the interstate Si I'm but the wind winning. We Dance. I took a wrong right turn about a half of my back. My directions all spun around through the sideways. Ray and the love and the shame. I watched the sunlight disappeared in the sun so black. He said you're never gonna make it back. Do you do some hard time? I'm out here. Well, God gave me the ring. Do you watch anyway, my pain and to learn from bad mistakes. Love me the horrid way. I love that man. That's beautiful. That was beauty. What what is that song about? Uh, that song. It's about sometimes in life, Um, the best lessons are learned through hardship and adversity, the hard way. Um, at least. You know, at least for me, that's been when I've learned the most just when I didn't want to. Um, you know I have. I've had a lot of people on the show again finding your summing. Everybody find it's going through adversity and finally way out right and and Um. And this one lady I had about a hundred episode. It's said this correctly, and this is after her son had been who twenty, was like three at the time. I've been stoned to death down in Somalia. Okay, so I think of the pain of a mother going through something like that. And she said there's no way around it. You have to go through it and in it. And I've been in the same spot. I've been in the spot many times and and you want that to go and you like doing everything Canada like shove that rock out of the way and get it. But sometimes it takes ten years, sometimes it takes five years. You know there was no but you look back on those times and you're saying that was the best thing that I could have ever happened to me, even though it sucked. Right, but I learned so many great lessons and I was humbled and people, you know, this person and that person came to my rescue and we're there and maybe that, like like the Beautiful Song You just sang, gave me inspiration to put me in a place for him today. Absolutely. I mean, my it a really long story, but the things that led me to the point to where I knew I needed to go to Rehab, that whole process was just completely life shattering to me and my and my and my view and my eyes. Um, and had I not gone, you know, gone through that, Um, I'd still probably be out using, you know, and just as lost as I could possibly be. But Um, I really had to go through the fire to get to where I'm at now and I would not ever take that back. I mean I would. I would never go back to my old self and I'm so grateful for the hardships that I had to endure and overcome. Well, you become a stand up guy, you become a man of integrity. You see what you do, when you do what you say, and and you know other people around you. They noticed that and then they noticed that shift and that's a big deal. It's a to me, it's a big deal and and and hopefully to you it's a big deal. I think it is a big deal. And you know your your life's journey. You know, every single day it's just a new thing. I mean, you know, I mean I we talked about the very, very beginning. I talked about, you know, this emmy that I just went for the best picture. You know, I've never started off climbing mountain. I climbed a mountain because I was in pain and suffering and I just had to go through my journey and it's just like that's that's what, that's. That was my Rehab Center, right to get up. And then these big gas mountains and you know, like ten years later I'm standing on the stage in front of pop costs and all these other people winning. You know, like where would that? I mean, it's so impossible that, like, I mean I don't know to say about it's so impositive, like there was no intention for that ever to happen. I didn't do it, you know, I just was there. You know the reasons for it. And so again, I think if you're authentic to your off on what you're trying to get through and where you're trying to go in the hill, and we're all on that path, we're constantly all healing in some different way. There can be magical things on the other side, and I think you're experiencing that right now and I'm just grateful and thankful that that you're willing to accept my friendship and and to beat on this podcast and and any time. What you should do right now is after you can need to strap on those tennis shoes and we're only four and a half hours awhile you're down in Salt Lake City, four and a half hours by car. But I think you start running, you could be here by like next Thursday. Oh Man, I'd have to hide right for that. Well, you can bring a couple of camelbacks. But listen, where can people find your your you and your beautiful music. So, uh, I've got a record. Um. It's under Matt Warren. The name of the record is self titled Um. But you if you wherever you listen to your music, whether it's on itunes or spotify or apple or however you listen to it, you can find my record on their at Warren, self titled. And also I have a band, my new band called good foot, and that record Um is about to come out. It's called the park city sessions and I'm really proud of this record Um, and it's it's me and four of my best buddies in the world. We came up here to park city, actually, to where I'm staying at right now and my friend Ben Anderson and Paige Anderson's house, and they have a studio here. We made a record and that record is all about, Um, my process from where I was in addiction to to where I am now and Um, and that record is gonna be available for people to download and to stream and listen, Um, hopefully by the end of the summer. That that it's it's done being mixed and the artwork is done. We're just in the process of getting it out there. So, Matt Warren Self titled and Um, Good Foot the Ark city sessions and also, uh, my very, very first record that I ever made. Um, they got me signed to my first publishing deal. Um, and muscle shows is uh, that band is called Papa Joe and the name of the record is called storybook ending and it's also on all your streaming platforms and download platforms. There he is, man, he's on his way, he's been on his way and he's got great things ahead of him. So listen, Matt. Totally appreciate you coming on. Look forward to seeing you next year in in Mississippi and getting caught up and seeing where you know your career has gone to in this record and I look forward to hearing these songs and uh again. It's very grateful for you accepting to come on and being very authentic who you are. Dude. Thank you so much, Mark. I appreciate you. Brother. You're you're a real blessing to me and to all who know you. God bless you, my friend. All right, buddy, there he is the one, the only Matt warrant. Thank you so much. https://www.youtube.com/c/FindingYourSummitWithMarkPattison https://www.markpattisonnfl.com/finding-your-summit/ https://twitter.com/MarkPattisonNFL https://www.facebook.com/NFL2SevenSummits

Drum Channel Podcast
S2 E15 - Alvin Taylor

Drum Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 69:08


This week's Drum Chanel Podcast with host Billy Amendola features session and touring drummer Alvin Taylor. Taylor started his professional career at the young age of fourteen, touring with Little Richard, where he played drums for Richard, and featured Jimi Hendrix on guitar and keyboardist Billy Preston, who Alvin would have a lifetime experience both musically as well as a mentor. Years later Preston invited George Harrison to the studio when he was working with the Burke brothers from The Five Stairsteps featuring Taylor on drums. That led to Alvin being invited to play on the Harrison debut solo album 33 and a 1/3 for his Dark Horse label debut. Always one to stay in the background and do his job, and do it very well, Taylor recorded and or toured with The Eric Burdon Band, Billy Thorpe, Elton John, Bob Welch, Sly Stone, Leo Sayer, Billy Preston, Little Richard, George Harrison and more. Let's listen as Alvin shares his words of wisdom, tips, and advice on a lifetime of making it in the music business. Enjoy!

The Dave Chang Show
The Most Memorable Meals Dave Has Ever Had, the Power of Not Knowing, and the Lure of the List

The Dave Chang Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 63:08 Very Popular


How the heck are we supposed to figure out where to eat in 2022 anyway? On the heels of an unforeseen but absurdly good Peking duck dinner, Dave and Chris consider the ever-expanding restaurant-recommendation complex, and the risks and rewards of going off the grid. Plus: mummy innards, not watching the trailer, crispy shrimp, the penicillin principle, Ben Wallace, eating turbot at Elkano, an L.A. restaurant trinity, Dave in Japan, Kappabashi yakitori, Oriental Garden, on-set lunch, overlooking the good-to-great, and the culinary version of Jimi Hendrix. Hosts: Dave Chang and Chris Ying Producer: Sasha Ashall Additional Production: Jordan Bass and Lala Rasor Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Random Soundchecks
"The Wind Cries Mary" 2022-07-21 Random Soundcheck

Random Soundchecks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 4:19


Jimi Hendrix, Chas Chandler, and wisdom.

Dan Caplis
Ryan's Riffs, 7/20: The Go-Go's, Blue October, Madonna, Jimi Hendrix, Weezer, INXS

Dan Caplis

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 23:28


Vacation - The Go-Go's, Into the Ocean - Blue October, Pray for Spanish Eyes - Madonna, Hey Joe - Jimi Hendrix, Africa - Weezer, New Sensation - INXS

RADAR 97.8fm podcasts
ÁLBUM DE FAMÍLIA - JIMI HENDRIX - ARE YOU EXPERIENCED

RADAR 97.8fm podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 65:14


Jimmi Hendrix - Are You Experienced (1967)   Com Marta Cardoso

Abandoned Albums
Abandoned Albums - Gary Myrick - Season 2 Episode 13

Abandoned Albums

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 43:32


Singer/Songwriter, Troubadour, and Texas Guitar Slinger Gary Myrick drops by Thunderlove Studio to chat with Keith and Rob about the self-titled debut album by Havana 3am from 1991. Havana 3am took shape when singer Nigel Dixon (of rockabilly band Whirlwind), guitarist Gary Myrick and bassist Paul Simonon (of The Clash) went out riding their motorcycles.  This self-produced album is wickedly sharp and melds surf, punk, rockabilly, traditional rock and adds a healthy Latin influence. For 1990, it was probably a little ahead of its time. Gary talks to the guys about his entire career, which includes meeting Jimi Hendrix, getting shot at while performing in Texas, and replacing Stevie Ray Vaughn. Myrick even plays a little sample of what he is currently working on… and it's amazing, naturally. LINKS: Gary Myrick Havana 3am on Spotify

The Mens Room Daily Podcast
Seg 3: Jimi the Hipster

The Mens Room Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 33:32


Emails, Your Guess is as Good as Mine Categories: Hipster Cities & Jimi Hendrix! Plus Headlines Mike is NOT working on!

Icons and Outlaws
Metallica Part 1

Icons and Outlaws

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 87:59


Drummer Lars Ulrich was born into an upper-middle-class family in Gentofte, Denmark, on December 26, 1963. The son of Lone and tennis player Torben Ulrich. In February of 1973, Lars' father obtained passes for five of his friends to check out a Deep Purple (Smoke On the Water) concert held in the same stadium in Copenhagen as one of his tennis tournaments. When one of the dad's friends couldn't go, they gave their ticket to the nine-year-old Lars, who fell in love with the band and ran out and bought their album Fireball the next day. The concert and album greatly impacted Lars, inspiring the start of his music career. He received his first drum kit, a Ludwig, from his grandmother around 12 or 13. Lars initially intended to follow in his father's footsteps and become a badass tennis player, so he moved to Newport Beach, California, in the summer of 1980. Despite being ranked in the top ten tennis players of his age group in Denmark, Lars failed to make it into the seven-man Corona del Mar High School tennis team, solidifying his decision to focus on music.    So, while living in Los Angeles in late 1981, Lars placed an ad in the L.A. newspaper, The Recycler, which read, "Drummer looking for other metal musicians to jam with. Tygers of Pan Tang, Diamond Head and Iron Maiden."    Guitarists James Hetfield and Hugh Tanner of Leather Charm answered the advertisement.    James Alan Hetfield was born on August 3, 1963, in Downey, California, the son of Cynthia Bassett, a light opera singer, and Virgil Lee Hetfield, a truck driver. James was nine years old when he first began piano lessons. He then started jamming on his half-brother David's drums, and finally, at 14, he began to play guitar with Robert Okner. He was also in a few bands as a teenager – one was "Leather Charm" with Hugh Tanner, and another was "Obsession." James said that Aerosmith was his primary musical influence as a child and that they were why he wanted to play guitar. His parents divorced in 1976 when he was 13. They were devout Christian Scientists, and following their beliefs, they strongly disapproved of medicine or any other medical treatment and remained loyal to their faith, even as James' mother, Cynthia, was dying from cancer. This lifestyle inspired many of his lyrics during his career with Metallica. For example, the songs "Dyers Eve" and "The God That Failed" from the albums "...And Justice for All" and "Metallica" touch on those topics. His mother, Cynthia, died of cancer in 1979 when Hetfield was 16 years old. After her death, James went to live with his older half-brother David.   Although he had not formed a band, Lars asked Metal Blade Records founder Brian Slagel if he could record a song for the label's upcoming compilation album, Metal Massacre. Slagel accepted, and Ulrich recruited Hetfield to sing and play rhythm guitar. Lars and James officially formed the band known as "Metallica" on October 28, 1981, five months after they first met.   A funny story; James' and Lars' first encounter was anything but promising. As Mick Wall wrote in his biography of the band "Enter Night", "neither James nor Hugh had anything good to say about [Lars]. The kid was 'weird' and 'smelled funny' [and] he couldn't even really play drums." Deeming the entire encounter something of a waste, James later recalled (in Wall's bio) that "we ate McDonald's, he ate herring. [Lars'] father was famous. He was very well off. Spoiled – that's why he's got his mouth. He know what he wants, he goes for it and he's gotten it his whole life."   When asked what Lars remembers about their first meet up, in a Blabbemouth.com interview, he said:   "I remember connecting with him," Lars responded. "I could see that, even though he was painfully shy or whatever, that there were some distinctive similarities. I spent six months talking to people about heavy metal, and they'd mention STYX, JOURNEY, KISS or whatever. I'd talk about ANGEL WITCH, DIAMOND HEAD or TYGERS OF PAN TANG. He had a connection to the music and the things I was throwing out there that seemed a little more authentic or trustworthy. Not much happened during that first meeting because he was kind of the wing man, or the plus one, for a guy named Hugh. If James was sitting here, he'd tell you that the drum kit I showed up with was in such bad shape that every time I hit the cymbal, it kept falling over — which is accurate. Hetfield and I ended up staying in touch, and when I came back from travelling in Europe a few months later, I called him up and said, 'Hey, do you want to play and see what happens?' And he was up for it."   The band name, "Metallica," came from Lars' friend Ron Quintana, who was brainstorming names for a fanzine and was considering MetalMania or Metallica. After hearing the two monikers, Lars wanted Metallica for his band, so he suggested Quintana use MetalMania instead. That magazine wound up being a U.S. monthly magazine focusing on heavy metal music, which was published between 1985 and 1991   Guitarist Dave Mustaine replied to an advertisement for a lead guitarist where Lars and James asked him to join after seeing his expensive guitar equipment. In early 1982, Metallica recorded its first original song, "Hit the Lights," for the Metal Massacre I compilation. James Hetfield played bass, and rhythm guitar and sang, while Lloyd Grant was credited with a guitar solo and Lars Ulrich played drums. Lloyd was a Jamaican guitarist who was never officially in the band. Lloyd has said:   "Me and Lars was jammin' down there in Orange County, California and we jam with a few people and we lookin' other people to jam with..." they met through The Recycler. "We were playing for a long time and he came down to my place my apartment once and he says and he keep asking me to come jam with the band, but I was really busy doing other stuff and I went down and play with them-me and him and James. That's three of us. James was playing bass, I was playing guitar and Lars was playing drums and we rehearse that "Hit The Lights" song, but way before that Lars had let me hear that song. We were hanging out watching soccer and he says "hey I met this guy blah blah blah and he's exactly what we want to jam with and he played this one song and it was great and that's how I was first was introduced to "Hit The Lights." After that I went over and jam a few times and he called me and say they gonna be in this compilation album and he brought over a tape of "Hit The Lights" recording on a four track asked me to play some solo for that and they were going to bring the four track down and they were going to bring it down and dump it on the compilation album."   Metal Massacre I was released on June 14, 1982. The early pressings listed the band incorrectly as "Mettallica," pissing the band off. However, the song "Hit The Lights," generated a buzz, and Metallica played their first live performance on March 14, 1982, at Radio City in Anaheim, California. The lineup consisted of James Hetfield, Lars Ulrich, Dave Mustaine, and newly recruited bassist Ron McGovney, who had been in James' previous band, "Leather Charm." Their first live success happened as they were chosen to open for British heavy metal band Saxon at one gig of their 1982 U.S. tour. This show was Metallica's second gig. In addition, Metallica recorded its first demo, Power Metal, whose name was inspired by Quintana's early business cards in early 1982.   In late 1982, Ulrich and Hetfield attended a show at the West Hollywood nightclub Whisky a Go Go, which featured bassist Cliff Burton in the band Trauma.  Clifford Lee Burton was born on February 10, 1962, in Castro Valley, California, to Ray and Jan Burton. Cliff's interest in music began when his father introduced him to classical music, and he began taking piano lessons. In his teenage years, he developed an interest in Rock, classical, country, and heavy metal. He began playing the bass at 13, after the death of his brother. His parents quoted him as saying, "I'm going to be the best bassist for my brother." He practiced up to six hours daily (even after joining Metallica). Besides classical and jazz, Burton's other early influences varied from Southern Rock and country to the blues. Cliff has cited Geddy Lee, Geezer Butler, Stanley Clarke, Lemmy Kilmister, and Phil Lynott as significant influences on his style of bass playing.   James and Lars were "blown away" by Cliff's use of a wah-wah pedal and asked him to join Metallica. The two leaders wanted Ron McGovney to leave because they thought he "didn't contribute anything, he just followed."  According to McGovney, his time in Metallica was reportedly tumultuous, as he often clashed with Ulrich and Mustaine. In addition, he felt that, aside from using the connections he made as an amateur photographer, his role was that of a money man and transportation provider rather than a respected band member. He ultimately quit on December 10, 1982, due to growing tensions. After leaving Metallica, McGovney became uninterested in playing music and sold most of his equipment.   Although Cliff Burton initially declined the offer to join Metallica, by the end of the year, he had accepted on the condition that the band moves to El Cerrito in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. Metallica's first live performance with Cliff was at the nightclub "The Stone" in March 1983, and the first recording to feature Burton was the Megaforce demo (1983).   Metallica was ready to record their debut album, but they began looking for other options when Metal Blade could not cover the cost. Concert promoter Jonathan "Jonny Z" Zazula, who had heard the demo No Life 'til Leather (1982), offered to broker a record deal between Metallica and New York City-based record labels. After those record labels showed no interest, Zazula borrowed enough money to cover the recording budget and signed Metallica to his label, Megaforce Records.   In May 1983, Metallica traveled to Rochester, New York, to record its debut album, Metal Up Your Ass, which Paul Curcio produced. Unfortunately, the other members of Metallica decided to eject Mustaine from the band because of his drug and alcohol abuse and violent behavior just before the recording sessions on April 11, 1983. About this time, Mustaine told Loudwire magazine:   "When you're around a lot of people that like to drink and get silly, they just want to have fun," Mustaine explains. "I would drink and have fun until someone would refute something I had said. And then that was war, baby. I'd be aggressive and confrontational because I was a violent drunk. I lost all inhibitions when I was drinking, and that didn't go over to well in the end." The end came on April 11, 1983, and it came without warning for Mustaine. Metallica had already hired Kirk Hammett as their new lead guitarist.  At around 9AM that morning, James, Lars, and Cliff woke up Mustaine, suffering from a tremendous hangover, and told him he was out of the band. "The thing that really upset me was that they never gave me a warning and I never got a second chance," Mustaine says. "It was just, 'Hey man. You're out. See ya later."   When Mustaine asked when his flight back to California was, he was told he wasn't flying. He was taking a four-day bus ride. Even worse, the bus was scheduled to leave one hour after he was fired. Mustaine scrambled to pack a travel bag, and James drove him from the Music Building in Queens to 42nd Street and Eighth Avenue in Manhattan.   During the seemingly endless bus ride, according to Livewire.com, he was rightfully pissed for a while and then decided to write some new lyrics. Since he didn't have any paper, he wrote on the back of a handbill from Senator Alan Cranston. A message on the front of the card referred to the stockpiling of nuclear weapons that read, "The arsenal of megadeath can't be rid." After considerable thought, Mustaine decided the term megadeath would make a cool name for a metal band, especially if it were misspelled as Megadeth.   Kirk Lee Hammett was born on November 18, 1962, in San Francisco, California, and raised in the town of El Sobrante. He is the son of Teofila "Chefela" and Dennis L. Hammett, a Merchant Mariner. While attending De Anza High School, he met Les Claypool of Primus, and they remain close friends. Kirk began showing an interest in music after listening to his brother Rick's extensive record collection (which included Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin, and UFO). In addition, he was a huge horror movie fan but began selling his horror magazines to buy albums. This infatuation led him to pick up the guitar at fifteen. His first guitar was (in his own words) a "wholly unglamorous" Montgomery Ward catalog special that came with a shoebox with a 4-inch speaker for an amp. After purchasing a 1978 Fender Strat copy, Kirk attempted to customize his sound with various guitar parts before eventually buying a 1974 Gibson Flying V.   Guitarist Kirk Hammett replaced Dave Mustaine the same afternoon. Metallica's first live performance with Kirk was on April 16, 1983, at a nightclub in Dover, New Jersey, called "The Showplace."    Mustaine has expressed his dislike for Kirk in interviews, saying he "stole" his job. Mustaine was "pissed off" because he believed Hammett became popular by playing guitar leads that Mustaine had written. In a 1985 interview with Metal Forces, Mustaine said, "it's real funny how Kirk Hammett ripped off every lead break I'd played on that No Life 'til Leather tape and got voted No. 1 guitarist in your magazine".    Because of conflicts with its record label and the distributors' refusal to release an album titled Metal Up Your Ass, the album was renamed "Kill' Em All." It was released on Megaforce Records in the U.S. and on Music for Nations in Europe and peaked at number 155 on the Billboard 200 in 1986. Pretty cool, considering their top ten that year was: 1. That's What Friends Are For - Dionne Warwick, Elton John, and Gladys Knight 2. Say You, Say Me - Lionel Richie 3. I Miss You - Klymaxx 4. On My Own - Patti Labelle and Michael McDonald 5. Broken Wings - Mr. Mister 6. How Will I Know - Whitney Houston 7. Party All the Time - Eddie Murphy 8. Burning Heart - Survivor 9. Kyrie - Mr. Mister 10. Addicted to Love - Robert Palmer Although the album was not initially a financial success, it earned Metallica a growing fan base in the underground metal scene. The band embarked on the "Kill' Em All for One" tour with Raven to support the release. In February 1984, Metallica supported Venom on the "Seven Dates of Hell" tour, during which the bands performed in front of 7,000 people at the Aardschok Festival in Zwolle, Netherlands.    Metallica recorded the album in only two weeks on a shoestring budget. Initially, the band printed 1,500 copies. Since its release, "Kill 'Em All" has been certified 3x platinum. Metallica then recorded their second studio album, Ride the Lightning, at Sweet Silence Studios in Copenhagen, Denmark, from February to March 1984. It was released in August 1984 and reached number 100 on the Billboard 200. Unfortunately, a French printing press mistakenly printed green covers for the album, which are now considered collectors' items. Mustaine received writing credit for "Ride the Lightning" and "The Call of Ktulu."   Elektra Records A&R director Michael Alago, and co-founder of Q-Prime Management Cliff Burnstein, attended a Metallica concert in September 1984. They were impressed with their performance and signed Metallica to Elektra. They also made them a Q-Prime Management artist. Metallica's growing success was such that the band's British label Music for Nations released "Creeping Death" as a limited-edition single, which sold 40,000 copies as an import in the U.S.  Two of the three songs on the record—cover versions of Diamond Head's "Am I Evil?" and Blitzkrieg's "Blitzkrieg"—appeared on the 1988 Elektra reissue of "Kill' Em All."  With unforgettable songs like "For Whom The Bell Tolls," "Creeping Death," and "Fade To Black", "Ride The Lightning" has sold over 5 million copies in the U.S. and has been certified 5x Platinum by the RIAA.   That bell in the beginning of "For Whom The Bell Tolls", isn't really a bell at all. As producer Flemming Rasmussen recalled: “We had an anvil in the studio, and Lars had to bang that; it could've been that or from a record of sound effects. But there was a really heavy, cast-iron anvil and a metal hammer, and we stuck them in an all-concrete room. He'd just go wang.”  If you've ever tried to play along with the studio album version of "For Whom, The Bell Tolls, " you've probably had some guitar tuning issues. That's because the song is a quarter step above standard tuning. Why? As the Metallica Wiki says, there are two theories. The first is that the band intentionally sped up the recording, pitch shifting it in the process. The second is that the guitars are tuned up a quarter step to match the pitch of the "tolling bells." I mean anvil... now that's "metal AF". Metallica embarked on its first major European tour with Tank to an average crowd of 1,300. Returning to the U.S., it embarked upon a tour co-headlining with W.A.S.P. and supported by Armored Saint, featuring John Bush on vocals, who later went on to front Anthrax. Metallica played its largest show at the Monsters of Rock fest at Donington Park, England, on August 17, 1985, with Bon Jovi and Ratt, playing to 70,000 people. Then, at the "Day on the Green" festival in Oakland, California, the band played to a crowd of 60,000. Metallica's third studio album, Master of Puppets, was recorded at Sweet Silence Studios in Denmark from September to December 1985 and was released in March 1986. The album reached number 29 on the Billboard 200 and spent 72 weeks on the chart. It was the band's first album to be certified gold on November 4, 1986 and has sold over 6 million copies.    In 2015, Master of Puppets became the first ever metal album in history to be selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Recording Registry.   Following the album's release, Metallica supported Ozzy Osbourne on a U.S. tour. During this time, James Hetfield broke his wrist while skateboarding; he continued with the tour, performing vocals, with guitar technician John Marshall playing rhythm guitar.   On the night of Sept. 26, 1986, Metallica was traveling between tour dates in Sweden when Burton and guitarist Kirk Hammett drew cards to decide who would get to choose a bunk. The bassist drew the Ace of Spades and chose the bunk Hammett had been occupying. "I said fine, take my bunk," the guitarist recalled in VH1's Behind the Music. "I'll sleep up front; it's probably better anyway." In the early morning of Sept. 27, 1986, shortly before 7 AM, the band members were awakened abruptly when the bus began to sway from side to side. The driver later told authorities that he lost control of the bus after hitting a patch of black ice. The bus left the road and flipped over on its side, and Cliff Burton – asleep in the top bunk – was thrown through the window. As the bus came down, it landed on top of him. He was only 24 years old. Reportedly, attempts were made to rescue him from underneath the bus by lifting it with a crane, but the crane slipped, and the bus crashed down on top of Burton a second time. Band members and onlookers have given different accounts of whether Burton died upon the first impact or when the bus came down again. Whichever way it happened, Cliff Burton died at the scene.   Hetfield said: "I saw the bus lying right on him. I saw his legs sticking out. I freaked. The bus driver, I recall, was trying to yank the blanket out from under him to use for other people. I just went, 'Don't fucking do that!' I already wanted to kill the bus driver. I don't know if he was drunk or if he hit some ice. All I knew was, he was driving and Cliff wasn't alive anymore."   James has said he walked up and down the road in his socks and underwear looking for black ice and found none. The band has speculated over the years if drinking or drugs could have played a role in the accident or if the driver fell asleep at the wheel. An investigation cleared the driver of any wrongdoing. Burton was cremated, and his ashes were scattered at the Maxwell Ranch in California. Metallica's "Orion" was played at the ceremony, and lyrics from "To Live Is to Die" are engraved upon his memorial stone: "Cannot the Kingdom of Salvation take me home."   In an interview with Gibson TV, Kirk Hammet, who could have been the one in that unlucky bunk said: "The last show that we played with Cliff was a spectacular show," Kirk recalls in the interview. "It was the first show after maybe six or seven weeks when James was back on guitar because he had broken his arm during the Ozzy tour. His arms was healed enough so he was able to play guitar and it was the first show where we had James back… and it was the night that Cliff died. "Everyone was just so happy James was back and to have James's guitar fuelling everything again, rather than me and John Marshall [tech and stand-in guitarist] sharing that duty. We played really, really well and felt like we were back 100%… so that last show was one of the best shows we'd played all fucking year and in retrospect I'm glad Cliff's last show was special in that regard. It really was, in all respects, one of the best shows we'd played and Cliff was very, very happy. So knowing that is a good thing." "It' didn't really, truly sink in until about three weeks or so [afterwards]," Hammett remembers. "As a tribute to Cliff's memory it was important for us to go on [but for] those first two weeks it was up and down, we had no idea what we were going to do. I was taking guitar lessons, the old standby for musicians who can't find any gigs or band. That's what I was actually thinking."

music new york california new york city europe rock master los angeles england corona hell water british san francisco french kingdom green european new jersey trauma salvation band wall stone sweden ride mcdonald ufos kiss manhattan queens monsters netherlands concerts lights nations oakland denmark whiskey venom lightning tank obsession billboard elton john metallica cliff lloyd rochester addicted af orange county burton jamaican copenhagen led zeppelin puppets drummer anaheim platinum san francisco bay area jimi hendrix go go ludwig orion leather aerosmith iron maiden bon jovi vh1 library of congress ozzy osbourne ozzy dover lone ulrich fireballs spoiled west hollywood megadeth styx anthrax downey newport beach reportedly elektra saxon spades primus livewire riaa ratt bell tolls blitzkrieg nolife james hetfield dave mustaine lars ulrich southern rock john marshall fade to black radio city lemmy kilmister zwolle power metal kirk hammett geddy lee hammett recycler diamond head stanley clarke megaforce cliff burton ride the lightning john bush les claypool armored saint phil lynott metal blade records say you geezer butler metal blade loudwire creeping death mustaine kill em all hetfield donington park el cerrito tygers castro valley christian scientists michael alago montgomery ward gentofte national recording registry deeming hit the lights metalmania for whom the bell tolls am i evil brian slagel angel witch kirk hammet fender strat enter night em all pan tang jan burton tygers of pan tang eighth avenue showplace torben ulrich flemming rasmussen party all metal massacre ron mcgovney
Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 94: Second Annual Music Trivia Show (July 17, 2022)

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 153:47


Pacific St Blues & AmericanaSecond Annual On-Air Trivia ContestJuly 17, 2022Here are the Questions1. Not a part of the contest2. Not a part of the contest3. Who covered this JJ Cale track and had an FM radio hit? 4. Who covered this JJ Cale track and had an FM radio hit?        BONUS: Which product featured this song in their commercial? 5. Robert Johnson famously went down to the crossroads, not to sell his soul but to hitch a ride? Which band, featuring a slow hand, struck gold with Johnson's song?6. Performed here by the five-part gospel-based harmonies of The Dixie Hummingbirds, who Brille Building songwriter, who performed under the name Tom & Jerry, later wrote this song?7. Performed here by Travis Tritt, which band had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: which well-known singer-songwriter collaborated with the band to compose this song?8. The little dog had to move it on over for the big dog. And in Country Music, there is perhaps no bigger dog than Hank Williams. But which denizen from Delaware created a concert stable with Williams' song, Move It On Over?9. Released on the most recent album by Keb Mo, which recently deceased, army veteran composed this song and had the original hit?10. While the song, Spirit in the Sky is well known, the original artist, um, not so much. What is the name of the artist who had a hit with this song?11. Set to music by Pete Seeger, what was the source for the lyrics to this song?        BONUS Which LA Strip Band, inspired by the Rickenbacker Sound of the Beatles, had a pop hit with their cover of this song?12. Performed here by Robert Randolph and the Family Band, which band capitalized on the Jesus Freak Movement to have a top radio hit with this song?13. Songwriter Otis Blackwell would write numerous hits for Memphis-based, Sun Records recording artists including Jerry Lee Lewis and others. Which hip-shaking Memphis Man from Tupelo had the original hit with this song?14. Recorded here for the Hope Floats motion picture soundtrack, which Motor City three-piece group had the original hit with this song?15. Speaking of the Motor City, covered here by Texan Lyle Lovett and California Keb Mo, which Michigander, a real ramblin' man, wrote and performed this song, Till It Shines?16. Featured here, Bonnie Raitt is covering a song by a band that featured five very high-profile artists. Name the band that had the hit with this song.         Bonus: Take a bonus point for each member of the original supergroup that recorded this song.         SUPER BONUS: Only two of the original five members of this band are still alive. Name the two members of this band that are still with us. (Two points for each correct answer)17. The sound of pop music in the 1960s was largely driven by four relatively unknown house bands. For example, Los Angles had the Wrecking Crew, which included Glenn Campbell, Dr. John, and Leon Russell; Muscle Shoals had The Swampers, and Motown had The Funk Brothers. What was the name of the legendary backing band for many of the acts on Stax Records?18. Speaking of Motown, this version of Ain't Too Proud to Beg features, Ben Harper. Which motor city band had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: While considered by some to be "just a blues cover band" which British Band also covered this song? 19. Performed by soul singer Betty LaVette, which Brit-rock psychedelia band, named in part after blues artist Pink Anderson, wrote this post-card-themed song?        BONUS: This song was written for the former member and leader of this band, who was this song written for? 20. Heard here by Syl Johnson, which Hi Recording artist, now Reverend, referenced from the podium by then-President Obama, had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: Which art-rock, CBGB Punk-era band, fronted by a Scottish ex-patriot, later covered this song, creating awareness among a whole new audience? The Talking Heads21. Known as the Soul Queen of New Orleans, Irma Thomas struck gold with this hit, Time Is On My Side. Which British blues-rock band had an early hit with this soulful song?22. Originally signed to Motown Records with Omaha-born singer Shaun 'Stoney' Murphy, which Hades-based night flyer had the original hit with this song?23. Heard here by The Leaves, which Seattle-based Native American blues-rock guitarist, featured at Woodstock, would later cover this song?24. Played here by the late Canadian guitarist Jeff Healy, the song was composed by a member of Steeler's Wheel, and later a successful solo artist, who had the original hit with this song?25. Blues artist Albert King recorded for the Memphis-based Stax Records. Which Memphis Groover wrote and backed up King on this recording? (Born Under a Bad Sign)26. Often accused of being a Jimi Hendrix clone, which former member of the British band Procol Harem, originally recorded and performed this song? He was a trowering figure in the mid-1970s. 27. Heard here by Mike Zito and Sonny Landreth, which band, from the Bay Area, originally known as the Polly Wogs, wrote and recorded the original version of this song, Fortunate Son?28. Written and performed by Paul Pena, Which Dallas-born native son had the original hit with this song?        BONUS: Which former member of this band, also from Dallas, went on to have a soulful hit-driven career?29. Performed here by Tanya Donnelly, while Freda Payne was singing about a Band of Gold, which Canadian singer-songwriter had a hit with the original version of his song, Heart of Gold?30. Performed here by Little Milton, which noted Irish soul singer wrote and recorded this song originally? 31. For this next song, we're going back to the days when you actually boy bands. Which band, from the steel mill area of Gary, Indiana, had the original hit with this song?32. Performed here by Warren Haynes and Gov't Mule, which fab band featured this song late in their career?        BONUS: Although not the official name of the album, what is the generally accepted colorless name of the band's album that featured this song?         SUPER BONUS: Name the convicted murderer that recorded with the Beach Boys and knew Neil Young, who referenced this song for his dastardly deeds? (Two points for a correct answer here). 33. Heard here by blues artist Larry McCray, who was the iron-belt Minnesotan minstrel who wrote this song?        BONUS: The only gold the original writer got was when this noted bi-racial guitarist covered his song: who was the artist that built Electric Lady studios with the silver and the gold he earned from his cover of All Along the Watchtower? 34. Performed here by the recently reformed Screaming Cheetah Wheelies, featuring Grammy Award-winning vocalist Mike Ferris, who ordained voodoo priest, who was referenced early in this show, wrote this song? 35. Originally written and performed by Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac Blues Band, which band, who debuted nationally at Woodstock, hit the Billboard charts with this song, Black Magic Woman?36. Heard here by Blaster Dave Alvin, this song, Highway 61 was written by Bob Dylan and references this highway that cuts through the deltas of northwestern Mississippi. Which smokin' blues slide player, born in Leland, Mississippi but raised in Beaumont, Texas arguably recorded the best rendition of this song? Total Earnable Points: 56 Points.CONTEST QUESTION Answers (One Point Each)(^) These are out of order. Some acts appear more than once in our contest. 1. Song One - Not a part of the contest2. Song Two - Not a part of the contest3. Bill Withers4. Elvis Presley 5. The Temptations6. The Traveling Wilburys7. The Rolling Stones 8. Paul Simon (Simon & Garfunkel) 9. Al Green 10. The Book of Ecclesiastes 11. Steve Miller 12. George Thorogood 13. Meatloaf 14. The Supremes 15. Neil Young 16. Cream 17. Bob Segar18. Van Morrison 19. Bob Dylan20. The Doobie Brothers21. Gerry Rafferty 22. Eric Clapton 23. Santana24. The Beatles24. Creedence Clearwater Revival 25. The Eagles26. Dr. John27. Norman Greenbaum28. Jimi Hendrix 29. Robin Trower 30. Lynyrd Skynyrd31. Johnny Winter32. Booker T & the MGs 33. The Jackson 534. Pink FloydBONUS Question Answers (1 Point Each)SUPER BONUS Answers (2 Points Each) George HarrisonThe White AlbumThe ByrdsJimi Hendrix Bob DylanJackson BrowneThe Talking HeadsTom PettyMichelob BeerCharles MansonThe Rolling Stones Roy OrbisonJeff LynneBoz ScaggsThe Actual Playlist1. Tommy Castro / A Bluesman Came to Town2. Hector Anchondo / I'm Going to Missouri3. JJ Cale / They Call Me the Breeze4. JJ Cale / After Midnight5. Robert Johnson / Cross Roads Blues 6. Dixie Hummingbirds / Loves Me Like a Rock7. Travis Tritt / Take It Easy 8. Hank Williams / Move It On Over9. Keb Mo / Lean on Me10. The Blind Boys of Alabama / Spirit in the Sky11. Nina Simone / Turn, Turn, Turn12. Robert Randolph & the Family Band / Jesus is Just Alright13. Kris Kristopherson / All Shook Up14. Jonell Mosser / Stop, In the Name of Love 15. Lyle Lovett and Keb Mo / Till It Shines16. Bonnie Raitt / You Got It17. Booker T & the MGs / Green Onion18. Ben Harper / Ain't Too Proud to Beg19. Betty LaVette / Wish You Were Here20. Syl Johnson / Take Me to the River21. Irma Thomas / Time Is On My Side22. Jamey Johnson / Two Out of Three Ain't Bad23. The Leaves / Hey Joe 24. Jeff Healey / Stuck in the Middle With You 25. Albert King / Born Under a Bad Sign 26. Drivin' & Cryin' / Too Rolling Stoned27. Mike Zito & Sonny Landreth / Fortunate Son28. Paul Pena / JetAirliner29. Tonya Donnelly / Heart of Stone30. Little Milton / Tupelo Honey 31. Graham Parker & the Rumor / I Want You Back 32. Gov't Mule / Helter Skelter33. Larry McCray / All Along the Watchtower34. Screaming Cheetah Wheelies / Right Place, Wrong Time35. Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac Blues Band / Black Magic Woman36. Dave Alvin / Highway 61 Revisited 

No es un día cualquiera
No es un día cualquiera - Lídia Pujol - Tele - Maleta XXVII - Hora 5 - 16-07-22

No es un día cualquiera

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 54:33


Conversamos con la cantante Lídia Pujol, que el próximo 23 de julio actuará en el Festival D’aquí estant veig una estrella (Desde aquí veo una estrella), que se celebra en Riudaura (Girona). En “La pantalla” de Elisenda Roca, la crítica y actualidad de la televisión y las plataformas digitales. Y despedimos el sábado disfrutando de la música que Pancho Varona nos trae en su “Maleta de canciones”. Hoy escuchamos: 'Woman from Tokyo' (Deep Purple); 'Who Knows' (Jimi Hendrix), 'You‘ve Got a Friend' (Carole King) y 'Desaparecido' (Manu Chao). Escuchar audio